Vinci Da Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Vinci Da. Here they are! All 200 of them:

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Don't say you don't have enough time. You have exactly the same number of hours per day that were given to Helen Keller, Pasteur, Michelangelo, Mother Teresa, Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Jefferson, and Albert Einstein.
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H. Jackson Brown Jr.
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Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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A painter should begin every canvas with a wash of black, because all things in nature are dark except where exposed by the light.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Men go to far greater lengths to avoid what they fear than to obtain what they desire.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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Study without desire spoils the memory, and it retains nothing that it takes in.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. They went out and happened to things.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.
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Clare Boothe Luce
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The painter has the Universe in his mind and hands.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Nothing strengthens authority so much as silence.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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You know what the fellow said โ€“ in Italy, for thirty years under the Borgias, they had warfare, terror, murder and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and the Renaissance. In Switzerland, they had brotherly love, they had five hundred years of democracy and peace โ€“ and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock.
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Graham Greene (The Third Man)
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History is always written by the winners. When two cultures clash, the loser is obliterated, and the winner writes the history books-books which glorify their own cause and disparage the conquered foe. As Napoleon once said, 'What is history, but a fable agreed upon?
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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I love those who can smile in trouble...
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Leonardo da Vinci
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One can have no smaller or greater mastery than mastery of oneself.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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I have from an early age abjured the use of meat, and the time will come when men such as I will look upon the murder of animals as they now look upon the murder of men.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Nothing can be loved or hated unless it is first understood.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The smallest feline is a masterpiece.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Art is never finished, only abandoned.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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As a well spent day brings happy sleep, so life well used brings happy death.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Everyone loves a conspiracy.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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Faith โ€• acceptance of which we imagine to be true, that which we cannot prove.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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Learning never exhausts the mind.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The knowledge of all things is possible
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The greatest deception men suffer is from their own opinions.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Principles for the Development of a Complete Mind: Study the science of art. Study the art of science. Develop your senses- especially learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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It is easier to resist at the beginning than at the end.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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If you are alone you belong entirely to yourself. If you are accompanied by even one companion you belong only half to yourself or even less in proportion to the thoughtlessness of his conduct and if you have more than one companion you will fall more deeply into the same plight.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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I love those who can smile in trouble, who can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. 'Tis the business of little minds to shrink, but they whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves their conduct, will pursue their principles unto death
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Leonardo da Vinci
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By its very nature, history is always a one-sided account.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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The function of muscle is to pull and not to push, except in the case of the genitals and the tongue.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The deeper the feeling, the greater the pain
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Leonardo da Vinci
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These books can't possibly compete with centuries of established history, especially when that history is endorsed by the ultimate bestseller of all time." Faukman's eyes went wide. "Don't tell me Harry Potter is actually about the Holy Grail." "I was referring to the Bible." Faukman cringed. "I knew that.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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Telling someone about what a symbol means is like telling someone how music should make them feel.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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As you cannot do what you want, Want what you can do
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Leonardo da Vinci
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What really matters is what you believe.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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While I thought that I was learning how to live, I have been learning how to die. -Leonardo Da Vinci
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Oliver Bowden (Assassin's Creed: Renaissance (Assassin's Creed, #1))
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I thought I was learning to live; I was only learning to die.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Life is filled with secrets. You can't learn them all at once.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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The time will come when men such as I will look upon the murder of animals as they now look on the murder of men.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The artist sees what others only catch a glimpse of.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The Bible did not arrive by fax from heaven. The Bible is the product of man, my dear. Not of God. The Bible did not fall magically from the clouds. Man created it as a historical record of tumultuous times, and it has evolved through countless translations, additions, and revisions. History has never had a definitive version of the book.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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life without love, is no life at all
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Iron rusts from disuse, stagnant water loses its purity, and in cold weather becomes frozen; even so does inaction sap the vigors of the mind.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Realize that everything connects to everything else.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Time stays long enough for those who use it.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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One has no right to love or hate anything if one has not acquired a thorough knowledge of its nature. Great love springs from great knowledge of the beloved object, and if you know it but little you will be able to love it only a little or not at all.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Make your work to be in keeping with your purpose
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Intellectual passion drives out sensuality.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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When a question has no correct answer, there is only one honest response. The gray area between yes and no. Silence.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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I have offended God and mankind because my work didn't reach the quality it should have.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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All our knowledge has its origin in our perceptions
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Forgiveness is God's greatest gift
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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Water is the driving force in nature.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Every now and then go away, have a little relaxation, for when you come back to your work your judgment will be surer. Go some distance away because then the work appears smaller and more of it can be taken in at a glance and a lack of harmony and proportion is more readily seen.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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No matter how old you are now. You are never too young or too old for success or going after what you want. Hereโ€™s a short list of people who accomplished great things at different ages 1) Helen Keller, at the age of 19 months, became deaf and blind. But that didnโ€™t stop her. She was the first deaf and blind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. 2) Mozart was already competent on keyboard and violin; he composed from the age of 5. 3) Shirley Temple was 6 when she became a movie star on โ€œBright Eyes.โ€ 4) Anne Frank was 12 when she wrote the diary of Anne Frank. 5) Magnus Carlsen became a chess Grandmaster at the age of 13. 6) Nadia Comฤƒneci was a gymnast from Romania that scored seven perfect 10.0 and won three gold medals at the Olympics at age 14. 7) Tenzin Gyatso was formally recognized as the 14th Dalai Lama in November 1950, at the age of 15. 8) Pele, a soccer superstar, was 17 years old when he won the world cup in 1958 with Brazil. 9) Elvis was a superstar by age 19. 10) John Lennon was 20 years and Paul Mcartney was 18 when the Beatles had their first concert in 1961. 11) Jesse Owens was 22 when he won 4 gold medals in Berlin 1936. 12) Beethoven was a piano virtuoso by age 23 13) Issac Newton wrote Philosophiรฆ Naturalis Principia Mathematica at age 24 14) Roger Bannister was 25 when he broke the 4 minute mile record 15) Albert Einstein was 26 when he wrote the theory of relativity 16) Lance E. Armstrong was 27 when he won the tour de France 17) Michelangelo created two of the greatest sculptures โ€œDavidโ€ and โ€œPietaโ€ by age 28 18) Alexander the Great, by age 29, had created one of the largest empires of the ancient world 19) J.K. Rowling was 30 years old when she finished the first manuscript of Harry Potter 20) Amelia Earhart was 31 years old when she became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean 21) Oprah was 32 when she started her talk show, which has become the highest-rated program of its kind 22) Edmund Hillary was 33 when he became the first man to reach Mount Everest 23) Martin Luther King Jr. was 34 when he wrote the speech โ€œI Have a Dream." 24) Marie Curie was 35 years old when she got nominated for a Nobel Prize in Physics 25) The Wright brothers, Orville (32) and Wilbur (36) invented and built the world's first successful airplane and making the first controlled, powered and sustained heavier-than-air human flight 26) Vincent Van Gogh was 37 when he died virtually unknown, yet his paintings today are worth millions. 27) Neil Armstrong was 38 when he became the first man to set foot on the moon. 28) Mark Twain was 40 when he wrote "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer", and 49 years old when he wrote "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" 29) Christopher Columbus was 41 when he discovered the Americas 30) Rosa Parks was 42 when she refused to obey the bus driverโ€™s order to give up her seat to make room for a white passenger 31) John F. Kennedy was 43 years old when he became President of the United States 32) Henry Ford Was 45 when the Ford T came out. 33) Suzanne Collins was 46 when she wrote "The Hunger Games" 34) Charles Darwin was 50 years old when his book On the Origin of Species came out. 35) Leonardo Da Vinci was 51 years old when he painted the Mona Lisa. 36) Abraham Lincoln was 52 when he became president. 37) Ray Kroc Was 53 when he bought the McDonalds Franchise and took it to unprecedented levels. 38) Dr. Seuss was 54 when he wrote "The Cat in the Hat". 40) Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger III was 57 years old when he successfully ditched US Airways Flight 1549 in the Hudson River in 2009. All of the 155 passengers aboard the aircraft survived 41) Colonel Harland Sanders was 61 when he started the KFC Franchise 42) J.R.R Tolkien was 62 when the Lord of the Ring books came out 43) Ronald Reagan was 69 when he became President of the US 44) Jack Lalane at age 70 handcuffed, shackled, towed 70 rowboats 45) Nelson Mandela was 76 when he became President
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Pablo
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An average human looks without seeing, listens without hearing, touches without feeling, eats without tasting, moves without physical awareness, inhales without awareness of odour or fragrance, and talks without thinking.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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God sells us all things at the price of labor.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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All sciences are vain and full of errors that are not born of Experience, the mother of all Knowledge.
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Leonardo da Vinci (Leonardo's Notebooks)
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You will never have a greater or lesser dominion than that over yourself...the height of a man's success is gauged by his self-mastery; the depth of his failure by his self-abandonment. ...And this law is the expression of eternal justice. He who cannot establish dominion over himself will have no dominion over others.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Nothing in Christianity is original.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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A poet knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Our life is made by the death of others.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Can you keep secrets? Can you know a thing and never say it again?
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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I awoke only to find that the rest of the world was still asleep.
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Leonardo da Vinci (Leonardo's Notebooks)
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once you have tasted the taste of sky, you will forever look up
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Leonardo da Vinci (Leonardo on Painting: An Anthology of Writings by Leonardo Da Vinci with a Selection of Documents Relating to His Career)
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Learning is the only thing the mind never exhausts, never fears, and never regrets.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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My body will not be a tomb for other creatures.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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He who thinks little errs muchโ€ฆ
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Leonardo da Vinci
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He who possesses most must be most afraid of loss.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Blinding ignorance does mislead us. O! Wretched mortals, open your eyes!
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Learning the truth has become my life's love.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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He who loves practice without theory is like the sailor who boards ship without a rudder and compass and never knows where he may cast.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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He who does not oppose evil......commands it to be done.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Obstacles cannot crush me; every obstacle yields to stern resolve.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Patience serves as a protection against wrongs as clothes do against cold. For if you put on more clothes as the cold increases, it will have no power to hurt you. So in like manner you must grow in patience when you meet with great wrongs, and they will then be powerless to vex your mind.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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In rivers, the water that you touch is the last of what has passed and the first of that which comes; so with present time.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Art is the queen of all sciences communicating knowledge to all the generations of the world.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Why does the eye see more clearly when asleep than the imagination when awake?
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Shakespeare, Leonardo da Vinci, Benjamin Franklin and Abraham Lincoln never saw a movie, heard a radio or looked at television. They had 'Loneliness' and knew what to do with it. They were not afraid of being lonely because they knew that was when the creative mood in them would work.
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Carl Sandburg
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He who wishes to be rich within a day, will be hanged within a year.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Oysters open completely when the moon is full; and when the crab sees one it throws a piece of stone or seaweed into it and the oyster cannot close again so that it serves the crab for meat. Such is the fate of him who opens his mouth too much and thereby puts himself at the mercy of the listener. Leonardo da Vinci, 1452-1519
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Robert Greene (The 48 Laws of Power)
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The time will come when men such as I will look upon the murder of animals as they now look on the murder of men.
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Dmitry Merezhkovsky (Romance of Leonard da Vinci)
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Vision without execution is hallucination. .. Skill without imagination is barren. Leonardo [da Vinci] knew how to marry observation and imagination, which made him historyโ€™s consummate innovator.
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Walter Isaacson (Leonardo da Vinci)
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Marriage is like putting your hand into a bag of snakes in the hope of pulling out an eel.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Today is today. But there are many tomorrows
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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Wisdom is the daughter of experience
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Donโ€™t say you donโ€™t have enough time or enough money to change the world. You have exactly the same number of hours per day that were given to Helen Keller, Gandhi, Michelangelo, Mother Teresa, Leonardo da Vinci and Jesus Christ.
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Shannon L. Alder
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Well, for that matter, I was also a good friend of Leonardo da Vinci, Botticelli, Francis Bacon, Albert Einstein, and John, Paul, George, and Ringo." He pauses, seeing the blank look on my face and groaning when he says, "Christ, Ever, the Beatles!" He shakes his head and laughs. "God, you make me feel old.
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Alyson Noel (Evermore (The Immortals, #1))
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Anyone who conducts an argument by appealing to authority is not using his intelligence; he is just using his memory.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Details make perfection, and perfection is not a detail.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The acquisition of knowledge is always of use to the intellect, because it may thus drive out useless things and retain the good. For nothing can be loved or hated unless it is first known.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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As every divided kingdom falls, so every mind divided between many studies confounds and saps itself.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Authors, he thought. Even the sane ones are nuts.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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The painter will produce pictures of little merit if he takes the works of others as his standard.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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My lawyers will fricassee your testicles for breakfast. And if you dare board my plane without a warrant, your spleen will follow.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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Men of lofty genius when they are doing the least work are most active.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Truth at last cannot be hidden. Dissimulation is of no avail. Dissimulation is to no purpose before so great a judge. Falsehood puts on a mask. Nothing is hidden under the sun.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Leonardo da Vinci wrote in his Notebooks: โ€œIt should not be hard for you to stop sometimes and look into the stains of walls, or ashes of a fire, or clouds, or mud or like places in whichย โ€ฆย you may find really marvelous ideas.
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C.G. Jung (Man and His Symbols)
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Da Vinci painted one Mona Lisa. Beethoven composed one Fifth Symphony. And God made one version of you.
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Max Lucado
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Many have made a trade of delusions and false miracles, deceiving the stupid multitudes.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The mind that engages in subjects of too great variety becomes confused and weakened.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Those who truly understand their faiths understand the stories are metaphorical.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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He who does not punish evil, commands it to be done.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Please stop patronizing those who are reading a book - The Da Vinci Code, maybe- because they are enjoying it. For a start, none of us know what kind of an effort this represents for the individual reader. It could be his or her first full-length adult novel; it might be the book that finally reveals the purpose and joy of reading to someone who has hitherto been mystified by the attraction books exert on others. And anyway, reading for enjoyment is what we should all be doing. I don't mean we should all be reading chick lit or thrillers (although if that's what you want to read, it's fine by me, because here's something no one else will tell you: if you don't read the classics, or the novel that won this year's Booker Prize, then nothing bad will happen to you; more importantly,nothing good will happen to you if you do); I simply mean that turning pages should not be like walking through thick mud. The whole purpose of books is that we read them, and if you find you can't, it might not be your inadequacy that's to blame. "Good" books can be pretty awful sometimes.
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Nick Hornby (Housekeeping vs. the Dirt)
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He is a poor pupil who does not go beyond his master.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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To develop a complete mind: Study the science of art; Study the art of science. Learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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He who truly knows has no occasion to shout.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The worst evil which can befall the artist is that his work should appear good in his own eyes.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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If you find from your own experience that something is a fact and it contradicts what some authority has written down, then you must abandon the authority and base your reasoning on your own findings.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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A well-spent day brings happy sleep
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Truly man is the king of beasts, for his brutality exceeds them. We live by the death of others. We are burial places.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Just as a well-filled day brings blessed sleep, so a well-employed life brings a blessed death.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Every faith in the world is based on fabrication. That is the definition of faithโ€•acceptance of that which we imagine to be true, that which we cannot prove. Every religion describes God through metaphor, allegory, and exaggeration, from the early Egyptians through modern Sunday school. Metaphors are a way to help our minds process the unprocessible. The problems arise when we begin to believe literally in our own metaphors. Should we wave a flag and tell the Buddhists that we have proof the Buddha did not come from a lotus blossom? Or that Jesus was not born of a literal virgin birth? Those who truly understand their faiths understand the stories are metaphorical.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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Man has much power of discourse which for the most part is vain and false; animals have but little, but it is useful and true, and a small truth is better than a great lie.
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Leonardo da Vinci (Leonardo's Notebooks)
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Do not start me on The Da Vinci Code ... a novel so bad that it gives bad novels a bad name." (Discussion at Woodruff Auditorium in Lawrence, KS; October 7, 2005.)
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Salman Rushdie
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While human ingenuity may devise various inventions to the same ends, it will never devise anything more beautiful, nor more simple, nor more to the purpose than nature does, because in her inventions nothing is lacking and nothing is superfluous.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Reading list (1972 edition)[edit] 1. Homer โ€“ Iliad, Odyssey 2. The Old Testament 3. Aeschylus โ€“ Tragedies 4. Sophocles โ€“ Tragedies 5. Herodotus โ€“ Histories 6. Euripides โ€“ Tragedies 7. Thucydides โ€“ History of the Peloponnesian War 8. Hippocrates โ€“ Medical Writings 9. Aristophanes โ€“ Comedies 10. Plato โ€“ Dialogues 11. Aristotle โ€“ Works 12. Epicurus โ€“ Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus 13. Euclid โ€“ Elements 14. Archimedes โ€“ Works 15. Apollonius of Perga โ€“ Conic Sections 16. Cicero โ€“ Works 17. Lucretius โ€“ On the Nature of Things 18. Virgil โ€“ Works 19. Horace โ€“ Works 20. Livy โ€“ History of Rome 21. Ovid โ€“ Works 22. Plutarch โ€“ Parallel Lives; Moralia 23. Tacitus โ€“ Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania 24. Nicomachus of Gerasa โ€“ Introduction to Arithmetic 25. Epictetus โ€“ Discourses; Encheiridion 26. Ptolemy โ€“ Almagest 27. Lucian โ€“ Works 28. Marcus Aurelius โ€“ Meditations 29. Galen โ€“ On the Natural Faculties 30. The New Testament 31. Plotinus โ€“ The Enneads 32. St. Augustine โ€“ On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine 33. The Song of Roland 34. The Nibelungenlied 35. The Saga of Burnt Njรกl 36. St. Thomas Aquinas โ€“ Summa Theologica 37. Dante Alighieri โ€“ The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy 38. Geoffrey Chaucer โ€“ Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales 39. Leonardo da Vinci โ€“ Notebooks 40. Niccolรฒ Machiavelli โ€“ The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy 41. Desiderius Erasmus โ€“ The Praise of Folly 42. Nicolaus Copernicus โ€“ On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres 43. Thomas More โ€“ Utopia 44. Martin Luther โ€“ Table Talk; Three Treatises 45. Franรงois Rabelais โ€“ Gargantua and Pantagruel 46. John Calvin โ€“ Institutes of the Christian Religion 47. Michel de Montaigne โ€“ Essays 48. William Gilbert โ€“ On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies 49. Miguel de Cervantes โ€“ Don Quixote 50. Edmund Spenser โ€“ Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene 51. Francis Bacon โ€“ Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis 52. William Shakespeare โ€“ Poetry and Plays 53. Galileo Galilei โ€“ Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences 54. Johannes Kepler โ€“ Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World 55. William Harvey โ€“ On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals 56. Thomas Hobbes โ€“ Leviathan 57. Renรฉ Descartes โ€“ Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy 58. John Milton โ€“ Works 59. Moliรจre โ€“ Comedies 60. Blaise Pascal โ€“ The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises 61. Christiaan Huygens โ€“ Treatise on Light 62. Benedict de Spinoza โ€“ Ethics 63. John Locke โ€“ Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education 64. Jean Baptiste Racine โ€“ Tragedies 65. Isaac Newton โ€“ Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics 66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz โ€“ Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology 67. Daniel Defoe โ€“ Robinson Crusoe 68. Jonathan Swift โ€“ A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal 69. William Congreve โ€“ The Way of the World 70. George Berkeley โ€“ Principles of Human Knowledge 71. Alexander Pope โ€“ Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man 72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu โ€“ Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws 73. Voltaire โ€“ Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary 74. Henry Fielding โ€“ Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones 75. Samuel Johnson โ€“ The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
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Mortimer J. Adler (How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading)
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Those who, in debate, appeal to their qualifications, argue from memory, not from understanding.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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He who can copy can do.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The Pentacle - The ancients envisioned their world in two halves - masculine and feminine. Their gods and goddesses worked to keep a balance of power. Yin and Yang. When male and female were balanced, there was harmony in the world. When they were unbalanced there was chaos.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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58. โ€œLove is something so ugly that the human race would die out if lovers could see what they were doingโ€ (Leonardo da Vinci).
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Maggie Nelson (Bluets)
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Experience does not err; only your judgments err by expecting from her what is not in her power.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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We must doubt the certainty of everything which passes through the senses, but how much more ought we to doubt things contrary to the senses, such as the existence of God and the soul.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Having wandered some distance among gloomy rocks, I came to the entrance of a great cavern ... Two contrary emotions arose in me: fear and desire--fear of the threatening dark cavern, desire to see whether there were any marvelous things in it.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The eye sees a thing more clearly in dreams, than the imagination awake.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. Life is a process of becoming, a combination of states we have to go through. Where people fail is that they wish to elect a state and remain in it. This is a kind of death. Living never wore one out so much as the effort not to live. Life is truly known only to those who suffer, lose, endure adversity and stumble from defeat to defeat. Perfection is static, and I am in full progress. Abnormal pleasures kill the taste for normal ones. -Anais Nin "Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return." -Bible-Genesis 3:19 "While I thought that I was learning to live, I have been learning how to die" - Leonardo da Vinci
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Anaรฏs Nin
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Iron rusts from disuse; stagnant water loses its purity and in cold weather becomes frozen; even so does inaction sap the vigor of the mind. So we must stretch ourselves to the very limits of human possibility. Anything less is a sin against both God and man.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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It is an acknowledged fact that we perceive errors in the work of others more readily than in our own.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Maybe da Vinci didnโ€™t serve lamb in his painting of the Last Supper, but there was room for interpretation. Jesus himself was the lamb led to the slaughter.
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Monica Drake (Clown Girl)
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What is fair in men, passes away, but not so in art
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Her eyes were olive greenโ€•incisive and clear.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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It is easier to resist at the beginning than at the end. โ€”LEONARDO DA VINCI
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Robert B. Cialdini (Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (Collins Business Essentials))
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To become an artist you have to be curious.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The supreme misfortune is when theory outstrips performance
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The human bird shall take his first flight,filling the words with amazement,all writings with his fame,and bringing eternal glory to those whose nest whence he sprang.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The Last Supper is supposed to be thirteen men. Who is this woman? "Everyone misses it, our preconceived notions of this scene are so powerful that our mind blocks out the incongruity and overrides our eyes.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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Der Augenblick ist zeitlos.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Robert wondered if any of Harvard's revered Egyptologists had ever knocked on the door of a pyramid and expected an answer.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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A wave is never found alone, but is mingled with the other waves.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Men fight wars and destroy everything around them. The earth should open and swallow them up. He who does not value life does not deserve it. Never destroy another life through rage, or through malice.
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Leonardo da Vinci (Leonardo's Notebooks)
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To understand, I destroyed myself. To understand is to forget about loving. I know nothing more simultaneously false and telling than the statement by Leonardo da Vinci that we cannot love or hate something until weโ€™ve understood it.
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Fernando Pessoa (The Book of Disquiet)
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If there's no love, what then?
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Leonardo da Vinci (The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci, Volume 1)
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The organ of perception acts more readily than judgment.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The water you touch in a river is the last of that which has passed, and the first of that which is coming. Thus it is with time present. Life, if well spent, is long.
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Leonardo da Vinci (Leonardo's Notebooks)
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At this gathering [Council of Niceau in 324 AD] many aspects of Christianity were debated and voted upon โ€• the date of Easter, the role of the bishops, the administration of sacraments, and, of course, the divinity of Jesus... until that moment in history, Jesus was viewed by His followers as a mortal prophet... a great and powerful man, but a man nonetheless. A mortal.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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ุงูˆู„ุฆูƒ ุงู„ุฐูŠู† ูŠู†ุดุฏูˆู† ุงู„ุญู‚ูŠู‚ุฉู‡ู… ุงูƒุซุฑ ู…ู† ุงุตุฏู‚ุงุกุŒ ุงู†ู‡ู… ุงุฎูˆุฉ
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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It's happened many times before. Usually it results in an exceptional and gifted human. Some of the greatest figures in Earth's history were actually the product of humans and the Loric, including Buddha, Aristotle, Julius Ceasar, Alexander the Great, Genghis Khan, Leonardo da Vinci, Isaac Newton, Thomas Jefferson, and Albert Einstein... Aprodite, Apollo, Hermes, and Zeus were all real, and had one Loric parent
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Pittacus Lore (I Am Number Four (Lorien Legacies, #1))
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Be brave. Even if you're not, pretend to be. No one can tell the difference. Don't allow the phone to interrupt important moments. It's there for your convenience, not the callers. Don't be afraid to go out on a limb. That's where the fruit is. Don't burn bridges. You'll be surprised how many times you have to cross the same river. Don't forget, a person's greatest emotional need is to feel appreciated. Don't major in minor things. Don't say you don't have enough time. You have exactly the same number of hours per day that were given to Pasteur, Michaelangelo, Mother Teresa, Helen Keller, Leonardo Da Vinci, Thomas Jefferson, and Albert Einstein. Don't spread yourself too thin. Learn to say no politely and quickly. Don't use time or words carelessly. Neither can be retrieved. Don't waste time grieving over past mistakes Learn from them and move on. Every person needs to have their moment in the sun, when they raise their arms in victory, knowing that on this day, at his hour, they were at their very best. Get your priorities straight. No one ever said on his death bed, 'Gee, if I'd only spent more time at the office'. Give people a second chance, but not a third. Judge your success by the degree that you're enjoying peace, health and love. Learn to listen. Opportunity sometimes knocks very softly. Leave everything a little better than you found it. Live your life as an exclamation, not an explanation. Loosen up. Relax. Except for rare life and death matters, nothing is as important as it first seems. Never cut what can be untied. Never overestimate your power to change others. Never underestimate your power to change yourself. Remember that overnight success usually takes about fifteen years. Remember that winners do what losers don't want to do. Seek opportunity, not security. A boat in harbor is safe, but in time its bottom will rot out. Spend less time worrying who's right, more time deciding what's right. Stop blaming others. Take responsibility for every area of your life. Success is getting what you want. Happiness is liking what you get. The importance of winning is not what we get from it, but what we become because of it. When facing a difficult task, act as though it's impossible to fail.
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Jackson H. Brown Jr.
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ุฃู† ุงู„ุฑุฌุงู„ ู‚ุฏ ูŠูุนู„ูˆู† ุฃูŠ ุดูŠุก ู„ุชุฌู†ุจ ู…ุง ูŠุฎุดูˆู†ู‡ ุฃูƒุซุฑ ู…ู…ุง ู‚ุฏ ูŠุจุฐู„ูˆู†ู‡ ู„ู„ุญุตูˆู„ ุนู„ู‰ ุดูŠุก ูŠุฑุบุจูˆู† ููŠู‡
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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In time and with water, everything changes
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Leonardo da Vinci
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ุฅู† ุณูˆุก ุงู„ูู‡ู… ูŠูˆู„ู‘ุฏ ุงู„ุดูƒ
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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Coincidence was a concept he did not entirely trust. As someone who had spent his life exploring the hidden interconnectivity of disparate emblems and ideologies, Langdon viewed the world as a web of profoundly intertwined histories and events. The connections may be invisible, he often preached to his symbology classes at Harvard, but they are always there, buried just beneath the surface.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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If we want to be more like Leonardo, we have to be fearless about changing our minds based on new information.
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Walter Isaacson (Leonardo da Vinci)
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We fear what we do not understand...
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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The men of experiment are like the ant; they only collect and use. But the bee gathers its materials from the flowers of the garden and of the field, but transforms and digests it by a power of its own.
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Leonardo da Vinci (Leonardo's Notebooks)
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When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the Earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Obstacles cannot crush me. Every obstacle yields to stern resolve. He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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He taught me to be a Da Vinci and I sit here, with his portraits waiting for him to return I do not think he will Is that what it means to be human to be all powerful, to build a temple to yourself and leave only the walls to pray
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Phil Kaye (A Light Bulb Symphony)
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as a well-spent day gives, joy in sleep so a well-spent life brings, joy in dying
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Leonardo da Vinci (Thoughts on Art and Life)
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He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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I would have thought you'd import an English staff?" "Good heavens, no! I would not wish a British chef on anyone except the French tax collectors.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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PHI is one H of a lot cooler than PI!
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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ู„ูŠุณ ู‡ู†ุงูƒ ู…ุง ูŠุณู…ู‰ ุจุงู„ู…ุนุฑูุฉ ุงู„ูƒุจุฑู‰ ุฃูˆ ุงู„ู…ุนุฑูุฉ ุงู„ุตุบุฑู‰ุŒ ุจู„ ู‡ู†ุงูƒ ู†ูˆุน ูˆุงุญุฏ ู…ู† ุงู„ู…ุนุฑูุฉ ูˆู‡ูˆ ุฐู„ูƒ ุงู„ู†ูˆุน ุงู„ุฐู‰ ูŠุฃุชู‰ ุนู† ุทุฑูŠู‚ ุงู„ุชุฌุฑูŠุจ
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Leonardo da Vinci
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ุงู„ุญูŠุงุฉ ู…ู„ูŠุฆุฉ ุจุงู„ุฃุณุฑุงุฑ ูˆู„ุง ูŠู…ูƒู†ูƒ ุฃู† ุชุนุฑููŠู‡ุง ูƒู„ู‡ุง ุฏูุนุฉ ูˆุงุญุฏุฉ
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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La semplicitร  รจ la sofisticazione finale.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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But I did learn from Leonardo how a desire to marvel about the world that we encounter each day can make each moment of our lives richer.
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Walter Isaacson (Leonardo da Vinci)
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In which year did a Harvard sculler last outrow an Oxford man at Henley?" Langdon had no idea, but he could imagine only one reason the question had been asked. "Surely such a travesty has never occurred.
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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Above all, Leonardoโ€™s relentless curiosity and experimentation should remind us of the importance of instilling, in both ourselves and our children, not just received knowledge but a willingness to question itโ€”to be imaginative and, like talented misfits and rebels in any era, to think different.
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Walter Isaacson (Leonardo da Vinci)
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The greatest story ever told is, in fact, the greatest story ever sold
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Dan Brown (Connect Bible Studies: The Da Vinci Code)
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I abhor the supreme folly of those who blame the disciples of nature in defiance of those masters who were themselves her pupils
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Leonardo da Vinci (Thoughts on Art and Life)
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When you put your hand in a flowing stream, you touch the last that has gone before and the first of what is still to come
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Fix your course to a star and you can navigate through any storm
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Leonardo da Vinci
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men who desire nothing but material riches and are absolutely devoid of the desire for wisdom, which is the sustenance and truly dependable wealth of the mind.
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Walter Isaacson (Leonardo Da Vinci)
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ุงู† ุฑูŠุงุญ ุงู„ุชุบูŠูŠุฑ ู‚ุงุฏู…ุฉ ุจู„ุง ุดูƒ
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Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2))
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For nothing can be loved or hated unless it is first known.
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Leonardo da Vinci (Leonardo's Notebooks)
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If the painter wishes to see beauties that charm him, it lies in his power to create them, and if he wishes to see monstrosities that are frightful, ridiculous, or truly pitiable, he is lord and God thereof.
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Leonardo da Vinci (Leonardo's Notebooks)
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Although nature commences with reason and ends in experience it is necessary for us to do the opposite, that is to commence with experience and from this to proceed to investigate the reason.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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...the love of anything is the offspring of knowledge, love being more fervent in proportion as knowledge is more certain. And this certainty springs from a complete knowledge of all parts which united compose the whole of the thing which out to be loved.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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I'm grateful to my readers. Readers who buy and support authors, especially career authors, are the patrons who fund art, genius, innovation, and creativity. Out of all the books published, there will emerge the next Plato, Socrates, Einstein, Da Vinci, Shakespeare, Benjamin Franklin, Edison, Churchill, Tolstoy, and Tolkien. My readers help with my creative process because they help create the positive and supportive environment that allows me to keep writing the books and series my readers love. Thank You!" - Kailin Gow, Strong.
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Kailin Gow
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Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return. Learning never exhausts the mind. Art is never finished, only abandoned. Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen. The human foot is a masterpiece of engineering and a work of art. It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. They went out and happened to things. I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do. As a well-spent day brings happy sleep, so a life well spent brings happy death. Water is the driving force of all nature.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Itโ€™s just an accident that we happen to be on earth, enjoying our silly little moments, distracting ourselves as often as possible so we donโ€™t have to really face up to the fact that, you know, weโ€™re just temporary people with a very short time in a universe that will eventually be completely gone. And everything that you value, whether itโ€™s Shakespeare, Beethoven, da Vinci, or whatever, will be gone. The earth will be gone. The sun will be gone. Thereโ€™ll be nothing. The best you can do to get through life is distraction. Love works as a distraction. And work works as a distraction. You can distract yourself a billion different ways. But the key is to distract yourself.
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Woody Allen
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And you who wish to represent by words the form of man and all the aspects of his membrification, relinquish that idea. For the more minutely you describe the more you will confine the mind of the reader, and the more you will keep him from the knowledge of the thing described. And so it is necessary to draw and to describe.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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I've never believed that they're separate. Leonardo da Vinci was a great artist and a great scientist. Michelangelo knew a tremendous amount about how to cut stone at the quarry. The finest dozen computer scientists I know are all musicians. Some are better than others, but they all consider that an important part of their life. I don't believe that the best people in any of these fields see themselves as one branch of a forked tree. I just don't see that.People bring these things together a lot. Dr. Land at Polaroid said, "I want Polaroid to stand at the intersection of art and science," and I've never forgotten that. I think that that's possible, and I think a lot of people have tried.
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Steve Jobs
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All our knowledge hast its origins in our perceptions โ€ฆ In nature there is no effect without a cause โ€ฆ Experience never errs; it is only your judgments that err by promising themselves effects such as are not caused by your experiments โ€ฆ Science is the observation of things possible, whether present or past; prescience is the knowledge of things which may come to pass.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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The dilemma is this. In the modern world knowledge has been growing so fast and so enormously, in almost every field, that the probabilities are immensely against anybody, no matter how innately clever, being able to make a contribution in any one field unless he devotes all his time to it for years. If he tries to be the Rounded Universal Man, like Leonardo da Vinci, or to take all knowledge for his province, like Francis Bacon, he is most likely to become a mere dilettante and dabbler. But if he becomes too specialized, he is apt to become narrow and lopsided, ignorant on every subject but his own, and perhaps dull and sterile even on that because he lacks perspective and vision and has missed the cross-fertilization of ideas that can come from knowing something of other subjects.
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Henry Hazlitt
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Smoke was a person with a sense of history. Do you know what I mean?" ...in truth, I DID know what she meant. Da Vinci, Martin Luther King, Jr., Genghis Kahn, Abraham Lincoln, Bette Davis - if you read their definitive biographies, you learned even when they were a month old, cooing in some wobbly crib in the middle of nowhere, they already had something historic about them. The way other kids had baseball, long division, Hot Wheels, and hula hoops, these kids had History and thus tended to be prone to colds, unpopular, sometimes plagued with a physical deformity (Lord Byron's clubfoot, Maugham's severe stutter, for example), which pushed them into exile in their heads. It was there they began to dream of human anatomy, civil rights, conquering Asia, a lost speech and being (within a span of four years) a jezebel, a marked woman, a little fox and an old maid.
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Marisha Pessl (Special Topics in Calamity Physics)
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The Seven Da Vincian Principles are: Curiositร โ€”An insatiably curious approach to life and an unrelenting quest for continuous learning. Dimostrazioneโ€”A commitment to test knowledge through experience, persistence, and a willingness to learn from mistakes. Sensazioneโ€”The continual refinement of the senses, especially sight, as the means to enliven experience. Sfumato (literally โ€œGoing up in Smokeโ€)โ€”A willingness to embrace ambiguity, paradox, and uncertainty. Arte/Scienzaโ€”The development of the balance between science and art, logic and imagination. โ€œWhole-brainโ€ thinking. Corporalitร โ€”The cultivation of grace, ambidexterity, fitness, and poise. Connessioneโ€”A recognition of and appreciation for the interconnectedness of all things and phenomena. Systems thinking.
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Michael J. Gelb (How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci: Seven Steps to Genius Every Day)
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Leonardo had almost no schooling and could barely read Latin or do long division. His genius was of the type we can understand, even take lessons from. It was based on skills we can aspire to improve in ourselves, such as curiosity and intense observation. He had an imagination so excitable that it flirted with the edges of fantasy, which is also something we can try to preserve in ourselves and indulge in our children.
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Walter Isaacson (Leonardo da Vinci)
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His lack of reverence for authority and his willingness to challenge received wisdom would lead him to craft an empirical approach for understanding nature that foreshadowed the scientific method developed more than a century later by Bacon and Galileo. His method was rooted in experiment, curiosity, and the ability to marvel at phenomena that the rest of us rarely pause to ponder after weโ€™ve outgrown our wonder years.
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Walter Isaacson (Leonardo da Vinci)
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If the painter has clumsy hands, he will be apt to introduce them into his works, and so of any other part of his person, which may not happen to be so beautiful as it ought to be. He must, therefore, guard particularly against that self-love, or too good opinion of his own person, and study by every means to acquire the knowledge of what is most beautiful, and of his own defects, that he may adopt the one and avoid the other.
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Leonardo da Vinci (A Treatise on Painting)
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Experience is never at fault; it is only your judgment that is in error, in promising itself such results from experience as are not caused by our experiments. For having given a beginning, what follows from it must necessarily be a natural development of such a beginning, unless it has been subject to a contrary influence, while, if it is affected by any contrary influence, the result which ought to follow from the aforesaid beginning, will be found to partake of this contrary influence in a greater or lesser degree in proportion as the said influence is more or less powerful than the aforesaid beginning.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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They will say that I, having no literary skill, cannot properly express that which I desire to treat of, but they do not know that my subjects are to be dealt with by experience rather than by words. And [experience] has been the mistress of those who wrote well. And so, as mistress, I will cite her in all cases. Though I may not, like them, be able to quote other authors, I shall rely on that which is much greater and more worthy: on experience, the mistress of their masters.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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To me it seems that those sciences are vain and full of error which are not born of experience, mother of all certainty, first-hand experience which in its origins, or means, or end has passed through one of the five senses. And if we doubt the certainty of everything which passes through the senses, how much more ought we to doubt things contrary to these senses โ€“ ribelli ad essi sensi โ€“ such as the existence of God or of the soul or similar things over which there is always dispute and contention. And in fact it happens that whenever reason is wanting men to cry out against one another, which does not happen with certainties. For this reason we shall say that where the cry of controversy is heard, there is no true science, because the truth has one single end and when this is published, argument is destroyed for ever.
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Leonardo da Vinci (Trattato della pittura)
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Look at walls splashed with a number of stains, or stones of various mixed colours. If you have to invent some scene, you can see there resemblances to a number of landscapes, adorned with mountains, rivers, rocks, trees, great plains, valleys and hills, in various ways. Also you can see various battles, and lively postures of strange figures, expressions on faces, costumes and an infinite number of things, which you can reduce to good integrated form. This happens on such walls and varicoloured stones, (which act) like the sound of bells, in whose peeling you can find every name and word that you can imagine. Do not despise my opinion, when I remind you that it should not hard for you to stop sometimes and look into the stains of walls, or the ashes of a fire, or clouds, or mud or like places, in which, if you consider them well, you may find really marvelous ideas. The mind of the painter is stimulated to new discoveries, the composition of battles of animals and men, various compositions of landscapes and monstrous things, such as devils and similar things, which may bring you honor, because by indistinct things the mind is stimulated to new inventions.
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Leonardo da Vinci
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Reality is based on your perception of the truth. Think about that statement for a bit, it will blow your mind, and blow the lid of what you perceive to be real and what is an illusion. You are here to live YOUR life, YOUR way and on YOUR terms, not for the people you work for, not the people in the media, and not to live in the little box that society may have placed you in. You are a unique individual, with talents, with drive, with passion, with ambition, with love, with laughter, with a soul that could melt the hardest of hearts, and with a mind as creative as Da Vinci. You chose this life for a reason, and it certainly wasn't to live a reality created by others. Is this the time to stand up, and say I can live my own reality, create what I want for my own life, have the things I want in life without guilt, knowing that you deserve anything you want and are prepared to put the time and effort into getting? What ifย there was a way to bend your reality, a way to use your mind consciously to get whatย YOU want in life,ย become wealthy, feel comfortable in your own skin, meet the perfect man or woman, become more spontaneous, feel free, love, be open, be honest, be heartfelt, be grateful, be the one, love life, live, feel it, breathe it.... Welcome to Mind Alchemy Is this the time to Bend Your Reality?
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Steven Aitchison