Uther Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Uther. Here they are! All 34 of them:

She knew exactly how he was feeling, because experience had taught her that the kind of excitement she was feeling at that moment was never, ever one-sided. On the contrary, she knew that it was born of acute and mutual anticipation, and she knew, too, that it would not be denied.
Jack Whyte (Uther (Camulod Chronicles, #7))
Their sudden intimacy was like the explosive combustion that engulfs and consumes a moth that has fluttered too close to a candle flame; a completely unexpected turn of events that took both of them unawares and swept them irresistibly up and out of themselves as it hurled them into each other’s arms.
Jack Whyte (Uther (Camulod Chronicles, #7))
I suspect that much of life is like that. We seldom see what is closest to our eyes.
Jack Whyte (Uther (Camulod Chronicles, #7))
Arthur is no fit king. Uther's bastard, Merlin's pawn, he is lowborn and a fool. He is wanton and petty and cruel. A glutton and a drunkard, he lacks all civilized graces. In short, he is a sullen, ignorant brute. All these things and more men say of Arthur. Let them. When all the words are spoken and the arguements fall exhausted into silence, this single fact remains: we would follow Arthur to the very gates of Hell and beyond if he asked it. And that is the solitary truth. Show me another who can claim such loyalty.
Stephen R. Lawhead (Arthur (The Pendragon Cycle, #3))
I knew even then, the first time that I saw you, that I loved you.
Jack Whyte (Uther (Camulod Chronicles, #7))
A man is a fool to live in hopes of a better tomorrow. I have a thousand, better ways today to spend what time remains ahead of me, and I have brighter, lighter and more pleasant places in which to spend it.
Jack Whyte (Uther (Camulod Chronicles, #7))
He will toss everything aside if he must—Uther, the high kingship, Britain—before he will give up Morgan.
Joan Wolf (The Road to Avalon (Dark Ages of Britain, #1))
At last she drifted into sleep, and in the country of sleep she found herself standing in the orchard where she had spoken with Uther, where she had dried his tears with her veil.
Marion Zimmer Bradley (The Mists of Avalon (Avalon, #1))
Aarne-Thompson-Uther index
Marina Warner (Once Upon a Time: A Short History of Fairy Tale)
I think my sense of right and wrong, my feeling of noblesse oblige, and any thought I may have against the oppressor and for the oppressed came from [Le Morte d'Arthur]....It did not seem strange to me that Uther Pendragon wanted the wife of his vassal and took her by trickery. I was not frightened to find that there were evil knights, as well as noble ones. In my own town there were men who wore the clothes of virtue whom I knew to be bad....If I could not choose my way at the crossroads of love and loyalty, neither could Lancelot. I could understand the darkness of Mordred because he was in me too; and there was some Galahad in me, but perhaps not enough. The Grail feeling was there, however, deep-planted, and perhaps always will be.
John Steinbeck
Poor Uther. He believed that virtues are handed down through a man's loins! What nonsense! A child is like a calf; if the thing is born crippled you knock it smartly on the skull and serve the cow again. That's why the Gods made it such a pleasure to engender children, because so many of the little brutes have to be replaced. There's not much pleasure in the process for women, of course, but someone has to suffer and thank the Gods it's them and not us.
Bernard Cornwell (The Winter King (The Warlord Chronicles #1))
Man had gone on, through age after age, avenging wrong with wrong, slaughter with slaughter. Nobody was the better for it, since both sides always suffered, yet everybody was inextricable. The present war might be attributed to Mordred, or to himself. But also it was due to a million Thrashers, to Lancelot, Guenever, Gawaine, everybody. Those who lived by the sword were forced to die by it. It was as if everything would lead to sorrow, so long as man refused to forget the past. The wrongs of Uther and of Cain were wrongs which could have been righted only by the blessing of forgetting them.
T.H. White (The Once and Future King (The Once and Future King, #1-4))
Was it the wicked leaders who led innocent populations to slaughter, or was it wicked populations who chose leaders after their own hears? On the face of it, it seemed unlikely that one Leader could force a million Englishmen against their will. If, for instance, Mordred had been anxious to make the English wear petticoats, or stand on their heads, they would surely not have joined his party -- however clever or persuasive or deceitful or even terrible his inducements? A leader was surely forced to offer something which appealed to those he led? He might give the impetus to the falling building, but surely it had to be toppling on its own account before it fell? If this were true, then wars were not calamities into which amiable innocents were led by evil men.They were national movements, deeper, more subtle in origin. And, indeed, it did not feel to him as if he or Mordred had led their country to its misery. If it was so easy to lead one's country in various directions, as if she was a pig on a string, why had he failed to lead her into chivalry, into justice, and into peace? He had been trying. Then again -- this was the second circle -- it was like the Inferno -- if neither he nor Mordred had really set the misery in motion, who had been the cause? How did the fact of war begin in general? For any one war seemed so rooted in its antecedents. Mordred went back to Morgause, Morgause to Uther Pendragon, Uther to his ancestors. It seemed as if Cain had slain Abel, seizing his country, after which the men of Abel had sought to win their patrimony again for ever. Man had gone on, through age after age, avenging wrong with wrong, slaughter with slaughter. Nobody was the better for it, since both sides always suffered, yet everybody was inextricable. The present war might be attributed to Mordred or to himself. But also it was due to a million Thrashers, to Lancelot, Guenever, Gawaine, everybody. Those who lived by the sword were forced to die by it. It was as if everything would lead to sorrow, so long as man refused to forget the past. The wrongs of Uther and of Cain were wrongs which could have been righted only by the blessing of forgetting them.
T.H. White (The Once and Future King (The Once and Future King, #1-4))
The monster, Hitler, died like Uther, frightened, hiding, haunted by his crimes and his wholly reasonable belief that all decent human beings would turn their backs on him. Who really cares where Hitler’s bones lie, or how he died, as long as he is safely dead? Now, in the twenty-first century, Karl Marx’s grave in a London cemetery is no longer a rallying cry to the poisoned idea that the end justifies the means. We shall never know for certain where Arthur lies, or if he even lived. If he was a myth, then it was necessary for human beings to invent him. Hail, Arthur, King of the Britons! I wish another hero would take your place, now that the west has such a need of you.
M.K. Hume
That's sweet and all, but we can't hold this bastard down much longer," Wyot, one of the dragons on top of Uther, grumbled. Brand lifted his head and grinned, "Shall we kill a king, my queen?" She laughed, pure joy erupting from the blackness that had consumed her. "By all means.
Abigail Owen (The Rogue King (Inferno Rising, #1))
From that day on they lived together as equals, united by their great love for each other.
Warwick Deeping (Uther and Igraine / Love Among the Ruins / The Slanderers)
Arise, Lord King, for the enemy is come; even Ambrosius and Uther, upon whose throne thou sittest—and full twenty thousand with them—and they have sworn by a great oath, Lord, to slay thee, ere this year be done; and even now they march towards thee as the north wind of winter for bitterness and haste.
James Knowles (The Legends of King Arthur and His Knights)
It was as if everything would lead to sorrow, so long as man refused to forget the past. The wrongs of Uther and of Cain were wrongs which could have been righted only by the blessing of forgetting them.
T.H. White (The Once and Future King)
Esther Agrees to Help the Jews ESTHER 4 When Mordecai learned all that had been done, Mordecai tore his clothes  o and put on sackcloth and ashes, and went out into the midst of the city, and he cried out with a loud and bitter cry. 2He went up to the entrance of the king’s gate, for no one was allowed to enter the king’s gate clothed in sackcloth. 3And in every province, wherever the king’s command and his decree reached, there was great mourning among the Jews,  p with fasting and weeping and lamenting, and many of them  q lay in sackcloth and ashes. 4When Esther’s young women and her eunuchs came and told her, the queen was deeply distressed. She sent garments to clothe Mordecai, so that he might take off his sackcloth, but he would not accept them. 5Then Esther called for Hathach, one of the king’s eunuchs, who had been appointed to attend her, and ordered him to go to Mordecai to learn what this was and why it was. 6Hathach went out to Mordecai in the open square of the city in front of the king’s gate, 7and Mordecai told him all that had happened to him,  r and the exact sum of money that Haman had promised to pay into the king’s treasuries for the destruction of the Jews. 8Mordecai also gave him  s a copy of the written decree issued in Susa for their destruction, that he might show it to Esther and explain it to her and command her to go to the king to beg his favor and plead with him on behalf of her people. 9And Hathach went and told Esther what Mordecai had said. 10Then Esther spoke to Hathach and commanded him to go to Mordecai and say, 11“All the king’s servants and the people of the king’s provinces know that if any man or woman goes to the king inside  t the inner court without being called,  u there is but one law—to be put to death, except the one  v to whom the king holds out the golden scepter so that he may live. But as for me, I have not been called to come in to the king these thirty days.” 12And they told Mordecai what Esther had said. 13Then Mordecai told them to reply to Esther, “Do not think to yourself that in the king’s palace you will escape any more than all the other Jews. 14For if you keep silent at this time, relief and deliverance will rise for the Jews from another place, but you and your father’s house will perish. And who knows whether you have not come to the kingdom for such a time as this?” 15Then Esther told them to reply to Mordecai, 16“Go, gather all the Jews to be found in Susa, and hold a fast on my behalf, and do not eat or drink for  w three days, night or day. I and my young women will also fast as you do. Then I will go to the king, though it is against the law,  x and if I perish, I perish.” 17Mordecai then went away and did everything as Esther had ordered him.
Anonymous (The Holy Bible: English Standard Version)
In the old wild days of the world there was a king of England known as Uther Pendragon; he was a dragon in wrath as well as in power.
Peter Ackroyd (The Death of King Arthur: The Immortal Legend)
Para algo que ha salido chorreando del culo de una cabra, no eres del todo inútil ".
Bernard Cornwell
If the fucking Scar exists,” whispered the Brucolac, still without turning, “and if they get us there and by some gods-fucked miracle we survive, then they’ll still destroy us. We are not an expeditionary force; we are not on some fucking quest. This is a city, Uther. We live; we buy; we sell; we steal; we trade. We are a port. This is not about adventures.” He turned and faced Uther Doul with his eyes caustic. “You know that. That’s why you came here, dammit, Uther. Because you were sick of adventures.
China Miéville (The Scar (New Crobuzon, #2))
Of course you didn’t volunteer the information, or even damn well admit it. But shit, Uther, I came to you and confronted you with what I’d worked out, and you … Well, you’re too professional to give away anything that could come back to bite you, but if you’d wanted to mislead me or leave me thinking I was wrong you could have.
China Miéville (The Scar (New Crobuzon, #2))
the Arthurian legends. He was the son of Uther Pendragon and Igraine or Ygraine of Cornwall.
Stephen Klein (The Legend of King Arthur: The Captivating Story of King Arthur)
Don't let your sickness steal the goodness in your heart, Uther. He's still there, that noble man with good intentions. Control it.
Torie N. James (Timeless Desire (New Camelot, #2))
Alistair scooped my legs up and walked us both onto the bed with his knees. When we were near the center of the bed, he laid me down and stayed on his knees, looking at me, towering over me. But I’d worked alongside Uther for three years. Six feet was nothing when you’d been having lunch with thirteen. I
Laurell K. Hamilton (A Kiss of Shadows (Merry Gentry, #1))
Uther était jeune enfant encore, lorsque la nouvelle du sac de Rome par les Goths parvint en Bretagne. Pour certains, et même pour la plupart de ses compatriotes, la Ville n’était qu’un maître lointain, surtout pourvoyeur d’impôts et de corvées. Pour d’autres par contre, Rome représentait la présence vivante d’une grandeur touchant au cosmique, une source jaillissante de civilisation qui soudain s’était tarie.Dans les vertes campagnes de l’île, bien entendu, cela ne changea rien de prime abord à la vie quotidienne, ou si peu. Certes, les quelques légions s’en étaient allées sur le continent défendre ce qu’il restait de la cité impériale, mais l’alternance des saisons ne s’en trouvait pas perturbée pour autant, pas plus que celle des moissons. Dans les villes, les vieilles familles tentaient de grappiller le pouvoir abandonné par ceux qui gouvernaient jusqu’alors au nom des distants et faibles césars, et se livraient à d’insidieuses luttes d’influence.
Alex Nikolavitch (Trois coracles cinglaient vers le couchant)
Peut-être la civilisation était-elle destinée à crouler ? Rome comptait plus de mille années sur son calendrier et, dévorée par la sénilité, elle s’effondrait peu à peu sous son propre poids. Tenter de la sauver ne faisait, semblait-il, qu’ajouter au chaos. Tenter de la relever n’était qu’une farce bouffonne à laquelle seuls des fous comme lui se prêtaient encore sans se rendre compte de leur ridicule. Uther se vit comme un homme qui essayait de contenir le débordement d’un fleuve à mains nues. Mais si futile que puisse sembler sa tentative, elle valait mieux que l’inaction, que rester à l’écart en assistant au saccage. Cela, oui, demeurait au-dessus de ses forces.
Alex Nikolavitch (Trois coracles cinglaient vers le couchant)
...a good soldier should ride into Paradise bearing the soul of the woman he loved.
Warwick Deeping (Uther and Igraine)
The wrongs of Uther and of Cain were wrongs which could have been righted only by the blessing of forgetting them.
T.H. White (The Once & Future King)
12    All have turned aside; together they have become worthless;         no one does good,         not even one.” 13     o “Their throat is  p an open grave;         they use their tongues to deceive.”      q “The venom of asps is under their lips.” 14         r “Their mouth is full of curses and bitterness.” 15     s “Their feet are swift to shed blood; 16        in their paths are ruin and misery, 17    and  t the way of peace they have not known.” 18         u “There is no fear of God before their eyes.
Anonymous (The Holy Bible: English Standard Version)
The chronological list of rulers differs on different lists, some lists do not include known kings, and some include kings who probably were mythological—as if a tally of English rulers matter-of-factly included King Arthur and his father, Uther Pendragon. The
Charles C. Mann (1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus)
Uther: “I wish you were a foolish woman I could despise, damn you” “If your priests are right,” said Viviane calmly, “I am already thoroughly damned and you may save your breath.
Marion Zimmer Bradley (The Mists of Avalon (Avalon, #1))
Quite simply, when she came near him, she knew that she had discovered some lost part of herself; with him she was whole. Whatever might happen between them as ordinary man and woman, something lay beyond it which would never die or lessen in its intensity. They shared a destiny, and somehow they must fulfill it together... and often when she had come so far in her thoughts she would stop and stare at herself in disbelief.
Marion Zimmer Bradley (The Mists of Avalon (Avalon, #1))