Tupac Best Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Tupac Best. Here they are! All 9 of them:

My mama always used to tell me: 'If you can't find somethin' to live for, you best find somethin' to die for.
Tupac Shakur (Tupac: Resurrection, 1971-1996)
My mama always told me, that if you can't find something to live for, you best find something to die for.
tupac
I told them Tupac was the best…period. I sited the fact that he was more versatile than Biggie. Biggie was tight with the lyrics no doubt, but Tupac did it all. He made you dance and think at
Shareef Jaudon (TYCE 6)
the same time. You can’t be named the best rapper of all time if you didn’t use your gift to address social issues in the hood. Rapping about money and bitches is cool, but to leave an impression that lasts a lifetime you have to touch people’s heart. Tupac did that better than anybody.
Shareef Jaudon (TYCE 6)
Before we go any further, can we all just admit that junior high sucks eggs? I have never met a person who said, “Man. Seventh grade was the best.” And if I did, I would not want them in my life. Like a person who wears Crocs on purpose, or prefers Pepsi over Coke, I don’t need that kind of delusional idiocy in my life.
Tyler Merritt (I Take My Coffee Black: Reflections on Tupac, Musical Theater, Faith, and Being Black in America)
If you can't find something to live for, you best find something to die for.
Tupac Shakur
My mama always used to tell me if you can't find something to live for, you best find something to die for.
tupac
He would tell me stories about how the best rappers ever were Biggie and Tupac, but I always wondered if that was just because they were dead.
Jason Reynolds (Long Way Down)
I stuck to clips of him defending himself against the rape allegations and talking in general about wanting to inspire people. And yes, I took the best of what he had said about there not being an East Coast–West Coast beef and his clarification that it was about one person dealing with another person. My decision was to use the brief on-air cuts to put some good in the world—to leave his message in but take out the super-inflammatory stuff, even if it was about eighty-five percent of the interview. In the end I played the pieces that really captured the best part of Tupac.
Angie Martinez (My Voice: A Memoir)