Truly Devious Quotes

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Where her books were, she was. Get the books right and the rest will follow. Now she could address the rest of the room.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
You have to take things as they are, not how you hear they're supposed to be.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
All the money, all the power—none of it compares to a good book. A book gives you everything. It gives you a window into other souls, other worlds.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
When you have enough power and money, you can dictate the meanings of words.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Of course I worry too much,” Nate said. “But I’m usually right. The people who worry are always right. That’s how that works.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
There is nothing so serious as a game.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
The wonderful thing about reality is that it is highly flexible. One minute, all is doom; the next, everything is abloom with possibility.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
10/30/38 Where do you look for someone who's never really there? Always on a staircase but never on a stair
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Albert Ellingham said knowledge was his religion and libraries were his church, so he built a church.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Civilized people must, I believe, satisfy the following criteria: 1) They respect human beings as individuals and are therefore always tolerant, gentle, courteous and amenable ... They do not create scenes over a hammer or a mislaid eraser; they do not make you feel they are conferring a great benefit on you when they live with you, and they don't make a scandal when they leave. (...) 2) They have compassion for other people besides beggars and cats. Their hearts suffer the pain of what is hidden to the naked eye. (...) 3) They respect other people's property, and therefore pay their debts. 4) They are not devious, and they fear lies as they fear fire. They don't tell lies even in the most trivial matters. To lie to someone is to insult them, and the liar is diminished in the eyes of the person he lies to. Civilized people don't put on airs; they behave in the street as they would at home, they don't show off to impress their juniors. (...) 5) They don't run themselves down in order to provoke the sympathy of others. They don't play on other people's heartstrings to be sighed over and cosseted ... that sort of thing is just cheap striving for effects, it's vulgar, old hat and false. (...) 6) They are not vain. They don't waste time with the fake jewellery of hobnobbing with celebrities, being permitted to shake the hand of a drunken [judicial orator], the exaggerated bonhomie of the first person they meet at the Salon, being the life and soul of the bar ... They regard prases like 'I am a representative of the Press!!' -- the sort of thing one only hears from [very minor journalists] -- as absurd. If they have done a brass farthing's work they don't pass it off as if it were 100 roubles' by swanking about with their portfolios, and they don't boast of being able to gain admission to places other people aren't allowed in (...) True talent always sits in the shade, mingles with the crowd, avoids the limelight ... As Krylov said, the empty barrel makes more noise than the full one. (...) 7) If they do possess talent, they value it ... They take pride in it ... they know they have a responsibility to exert a civilizing influence on [others] rather than aimlessly hanging out with them. And they are fastidious in their habits. (...) 8) They work at developing their aesthetic sensibility ... Civilized people don't simply obey their baser instincts ... they require mens sana in corpore sano. And so on. That's what civilized people are like ... Reading Pickwick and learning a speech from Faust by heart is not enough if your aim is to become a truly civilized person and not to sink below the level of your surroundings. [From a letter to Nikolay Chekhov, March 1886]
Anton Chekhov (A Life in Letters)
Sometimes Stevie felt bad for her parents. Their idea of what constituted interesting was so limited. They were never going to have as much fun as she did.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
It was like she had been punched in the gut. Stevie said stuff like that all the time and was told she was wrong. David said it once and got a nod and a compliment. Oh, the magic of dudes. If only they bottled it.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
What did you do?” she hissed. “Me?” “Don’t be a dick,” she said. “That ship has sailed. Hang on. We can’t fight yet. Where’s my hug?
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Look! A riddle! Time for fun! Should we use a rope or gun? Knives are sharp and gleam so pretty Poison’s slow, which is a pity Fire is festive, drowning’s slow Hanging’s a ropy way to go A broken head, a nasty fall A car colliding with a wall Bombs make a very jolly noise Such ways to punish naughty boys! What shall we use? We can’t decide. Just like you cannot run or hide. Ha ha. Truly, Devious
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
So much of anxiety was anxiety about having anxiety.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Stevie woke the next morning, which was a good start. When things are bad, give yourself a point for everything.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Few words are more chilling when put together than make friends.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
DETECTION HAS MANY METHODS, MANY PATHWAYS, NARROW AND subtle. Fingerprints. The lost piece of thread. The dog barking in the night. But there is also Google.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Where her books were, she was. Get the books right and the rest will follow.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
You have to try. Trying is the first step to whatever comes next.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
The real magic rocks are the friends we make along the way.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
A book gives you everything. It gives you a window into other souls, other worlds. The world is a door. Books are the key.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Anxiety and excitement are cousins; they can be mistaken for each other at points. They have many features in common—the bubbling, carbonated feel of the emotion, the speed, the wide eyes and racing heart. But where excitement tends to take you up, into the higher, brighter levels of feeling, anxiety pulls you down, making you feel like you have to grip the earth to keep from sliding off as it turns.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Why. Do. People. Do. Stupid. Things." "Because we're stupid," she said.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Sherlock said, “I consider that a man’s brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Anxiety does not ask your permission. Anxiety does not come when expected. It's very rude. It barges in at the strangest moments, stopping all activity, focusing everything on itself It sucks the air our of your lungs and scrambles the world.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
He looked a bit more confused by Stevie and David, but nodded politely. “I’m a watch ad,” David said. “She’s a hipster grandpa. Together, we solve crime.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
QUESTION EVERYTHING; STAND BACK, I’M GOING TO TRY SCIENCE!; I REJECT YOUR REALITY AND SUBSTITUTE MY OWN.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious #1))
Anything is better than doing what I'm supposed to be doing.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Last things were so strange. Most people had no control over of what their last acts would be.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
What you lack in any investigation is time. With every passing hour, evidence slips away. Crime scenes are compromised by people and the elements. Things are moved, altered, smeared, shifted. Organisms rot. Wind blows dust and contaminants. Memories change and fade. As you move away from the event, you move away from the solution.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
I annoy people," he said. "Believe me. I'm aware. It's an effective way to communicate if you don't have any other options. If you can't get in through the door, throw a rock through the window. And I think maybe you're the same way. - David, to Stevie
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
It's funny when you smile," she said. "It's like a rainbow on a cloudy day." "Don't ever say that to me again.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
My moose,” she said in a low voice. “I finally got it. The universe paid me in moose.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
There is something about early mornings that changes your perceptions subtly. The light is new; no one has put on the defences of the day. All is reset and not quite real yet.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Shock is a funny thing. Things get both sharp and fuzzy. Time stretches and distorts. Things come rushing into focus and seem larger than they are. Other things vanish to a single point.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
His voice was deep and smooth and rich, like what gravy might sound like if gravy could talk.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
How does this keep happening to you?” David said. “Because I look,” Stevie replied. “A lot of things happen when you go out and do them on purpose.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
No moose," Stevie said. "The moose is a lie.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
You have to take things as they are, not how you hear they’re supposed to be.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
I always wanted stories to be real, so I started writing my own.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
You probably don't like snow, right?' 'Oh, I like it,' Nate said. 'Snow makes it socially acceptable to stay in.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Did they know that Arthur Conan Doyle went on to investigate mysteries in his real life and absolved a man for a crime for which he has been convicted? Did they know how Agatha Christie brilliantly staged her own disappearance in order to exact an elegant revenge on a cheating husband? They probably did not. And no one was going to discount Stevie Bell, who had gotten into this school on the wings of her interest in the Ellingham case, and who had been a bystander at a death that was now looking more and more suspicious.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Vitamin D,” Stevie said. “You need it.” “You don’t know that,” he said. “I want to eat my meat in my room with the lights off.” “As a writer, are those really the words you want to use?” Stevie asked.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious #1))
Except for his eyes. Those were completely bloodshot. “What time did you get up?” David said, looking him over. “Four twenty?
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious #1))
Her parents had no idea that you could meet people outside of school and it wasn’t freaky and the internet was the way of finding your people.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious #1))
You don't get things past librarians.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Games are not fun when you don't know you're playing.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
For anyone who has ever dreamed of finding a body in the library. - Dedication of Truly Devious
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Are you trying to make me have an emotion?...Because I've spent by whole life learning how to repress and deflect and you're kind of ruining my thing
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
What do you do when the devil turns up in your living room and offers you everything you want?
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Anxiety, her therapist had told her many times, never killed anyone. It felt like death, but it was an illusion. A terrible illusion that inhabited your body and tried to make it its puppet. It told you nothing mattered because everything was made of fear.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
The thing about looking just a little bit means it’s really easy to look a little bit more.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
I like to look nice when I go to see His Majesty, the Burger King.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Mostly, Stevie forgot she had a body, and when someone else noticed her body, it made her look down and go, huh. Would you look at that. How long has that been there?
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
There are reasons for everything, even if we don't know them," Stevie said. "Motive." "Okay," Nate said. "My motive is that I prefer dragons." "To what?" "To the absence of dragons.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Aunt Amelia would perish on the spot if she walked in on such… impropriety.” “Hmm. Her untimely end would excuse you from any more embroidery lessons, would it not? Perhaps we should skip the dancing and passionately embrace instead.” “Thomas,” I chided. I told myself the sooner we discovered who the murderer was, the sooner I’d be rid of Thomas Cresswell and his devious ways. We’d be kissing in back alleys before I knew it. Then my reputation would truly be in the gutter.
Kerri Maniscalco (Stalking Jack the Ripper (Stalking Jack the Ripper, #1))
The critical scene of the mystery is when the detective enters. The action shifts to Sherlock’s sitting room. The little Belgian man with the waxed moustache appears in the lobby of the grand hotel. The gentle old woman with a bag of knitting comes to visit her niece when the poison pen letters start going around the village. The private detective comes back to the office after a night of drinking and finds the woman with the cigarette and the veiled hat this is when things will change.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
That was something they taught you in anxiety therapy- the thoughts may come, but you don't have to chase them all. It was sort of the opposite of good detective work, in which you had to follow every lead.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
She stood back and examined the overall effect, then tweaked until the arrangement was just right. Where her books were, she was. Get the books right and the rest will follow. Now she could address the rest of the room.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Slippers always seemed like kind of a nonsense item until she came to Ellingham and felt the bathroom floor on the first proper day of wintry weather. Once skin touched tile and part of her soul died, she knew what slippers were for.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Don't follow someone into the dark, Stevie. I've seen it happen too many times.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
It's everyone's dream... Come to Ellingham Academy, move a ramp out of a hole in the dark. - Nate
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Every contact leaves a trace.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
How could she be anxious when everything was so cheerful? Very easily, as it happens. Brain chemistry doesn’t care about how pretty things are.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
All the money, all the power—none of it compares to a good book. A book gives you everything. It gives you a window into other souls, other worlds. The world is a door. Books are the key.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Allow me to presume upon this new friendship of ours by telling you that denying your fiance your company in order to gain whatever it is you want, is not only foolish but risky. It was obvious to me that his grace has a great affection for you, and I truly think he would give you anything you want if you simply gave him that lovely smile of yours and asked him for it. Deceit and deviousness do you no credit, my child, and what's more, they will get you absolutely nowhere with the duke. He has known females far more skilled in deception and trickery than you, and all those ladies ever got from him was the opportunity to amuse him for a very brief time. While you, by being direct and forthright as I sense that you are, have gained the very thing those other females most desired. You have gained the offer of his grace's hand in marriage." -Dr. Whitticomb
Judith McNaught (Whitney, My Love (Westmoreland, #2))
People say depression lies. Anxiety is just stupid. It’s unable to tell the difference between things that are actually scary (being buried alive, for example) and things that are not scary at all (being in bed under the covers). It hits all the same buttons. Stop. Go. Up. Down. It’s all the same to anxiety.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Stevie always tried to be truthful, but she didn't want to make her first acquaintance in her new house and say, "Your show was mediocre and overrated but I see why you are valued: for your looks and deep voice." People tended not to warm to that kind of thing.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Maybe he understood how terrifying it is to do the thing you meant to do.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
When the darkness came for Dottie, it was quick and it was total.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Pumpkins were the watermelons of fall.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
There is a mistaken notion that wealth makes people content. It does the opposite, generally. It stirs a hunger in many - and no matter what they eat, they will never be full.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Panic attacks are mean little freaks.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
She didn’t want to be brave anymore. It was exhausting. Anxiety crawled under her skin all the time, like some alien creature that might burst through at any moment. Stevie
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Where do you look for someone who's never really there? Always on a staircase but never on a stair.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
I'm scared." To Nate's credit, he did not ask why she was scared, and he did not tell her not to be scared. Maybe he understood how terrifying it is to do the thing you meant to do.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
One of the first questions I get about the skeleton is... is it real? Usually they're plastic, but this one is the real deal. It was a private donation to the academy, and every year, someone attempts to steal it. It is alarmed. Don't steal the skeleton. His name is Mr. Nelson. Be nice to Mr. Nelson. - Pix
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Nate, she is back - what are you doing?" Janelle said. "She's back!" Janelle bounced on the balls of her feet a bit. "I'm hugging you with my mind," he replied. "I'm awkwardly accepting your hug in my mind," Stevie said.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Fun fact," Stevie said, trying to lighten the mood in the vast, gloomy space. "This fireplace? Henry the Eighth had one just like it, in Hampton Court. Albert Ellingham had an exact copy made." "Fun fact," Nate replied, "Henry the Eighth killed two of his wives. Who wants a murderer's fireplace?" "I'm not sure, but that's the name of my new game show.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
It turns out I'm really good at this stuff." "I always believed in you," Stevie said. "Did you?" "No," Stevie said. "But you have a nice ass, so I let you slide." They smiled at each other from a thousand miles away. Stevie had never felt closer to him.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
The moose is a lie," Stevie Bell said. Her mother turned to her, looking like she often looked - a bit tired, forced to engage in whatever Stevie was about to say out of parental obligation. "What?" she said. Stevie pointed out the window of the coach. "See that?" Stevie indicated a sign that simply read MOOSE. "We've passed five of those. That's a lot of promise. Not one moose." "Stevie ..." "They also promised falling rocks. Where are my falling rocks?" "Stevie ..." "I'm a strong believer in truth in advertising," Stevie said.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Few words are more chilling when put together than make friends. The command to pair bond sent ice water through Stevie’s veins. She wanted falling rocks. But she knew what would happen if she didn’t do the talking—her parents would. And if her parents started, anything could happen.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
There were night sounds that Stevie had still not come to grips with - the rustling on the ground and above, the hooting of owls - things that suggested that far more happened here at night than during the day. (And yet, Stevie had yet to see the one creature that had been promised in sign after sign along the highway, the ones that read MOOSE. One moose. That's all she wanted. Was that too much to ask? Instead, there were these suggestions of owls, and all Stevie ever heard about the owls was that they liked shiny things and would eat your eyes given half the chance.)
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
How are you so smart?” Stevie asked. “I read a lot,” Janelle said, smiling. She unzipped the front of her bag, shoved her pass inside and secured the lanyard to a clip, and zipped the bag back up again. Janelle did everything completely, even putting her pass away. “And I’m just amazing.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious #1))
the famous Mr. Ellingham leaned forward, resting his elbows on his knees and bringing his large, suntanned hands together in a knot. Dottie had never seen anyone with a suntan in March before. This, more than anything, was the most powerful sign of Mr. Ellingham’s wealth. He could have the sun itself.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Stevie, how many stories -" "It's all one story," Stevie said, and the confidence in her voice surprised her. "It was about money then, and it's about money now.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Once skin touched tile and part of her soul died, she knew what slippers were for.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Yeah. She said that there was weird shit in the walls at Ellingham. Things and hollow spaces. Stuff. She’d found things. Shit in the walls.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Is that going to work?" she said. "We have to try." She nodded. She got that. You have to try. Trying is the first step to whatever comes next.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
The whole thing smelled like a thrift shop that had been baked in a low oven and felt like a too-tight and too-long hug by a rejected Muppet.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
It is unclear what I bring to the table here, but I thank you for having me. -Acknowledgements
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Ellie's mind was an active and colorful place and she decorated her world with its contents
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Stevie had no fears of the dead. The living, however, sometimes gave her the creeps.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
When she opened the window, a giant moth blew in. It beat a hasty path to the ceiling light and landed against it with a thunk. “I know the feeling,” Stevie said to it.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Stevie said stuff like that all the time and was told she was wrong. David said it once and he got a nod and a compliment. Oh, the magic of dudes. If only they bottled it.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
she was color and glitter and chaos
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Fine," he said. "Anything is better than what I'm supposed to be doing.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
He grinned the grin of a presenter on some educational show with a cartoon dog, as if to say, “Come with me if you want to learn.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Hayes had a smile like a hammock—just get in, go to sleep, forget your troubles and cares.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
And then, it arrived. Anxiety does not ask your permission. Anxiety does not come when expected. It's very rude. It barges in at the strangest moments, stopping all activity, focusing everything on itself. It sucks the air out of your lungs and scrambles the world. Her vision went spotty around the edges. The ringing in her ears swelled again. Her knees buckled.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Dawn broke over Ellingham Academy in a swirl of rose pink going into a bloodless blue. Stevie watched the newly risen sun come up over the Great House like a celestial game of peekaboo.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Stevie's other big interest outside crime was disaster, so she had seen Titanic many times. It was clear to her that there was plenty of room on that door for two people. Jack was murdered.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
How did everyone else know how to do yoga? The one advantage to all of this was that it cleared Stevie's mind of everything. She heard exercise did that. Was this what they meant? You were so busy being confused and trying to stop your sweaty hands from slipping on a mat that you couldn't think anymore? Stevie did approve of the fact that yoga ended by lying on the floor in a corpse pose.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
It’s two thousand pages and nothing happens. It’s all terrible. I wrote the first book and then I forgot how to write. It used to be that I would sit and write and I would go into some other world—I could see it all. I was totally in another place. But the second it became something I had to do, something in me broke. It’s like I used to know the way to some magical land and I lost the map.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
That particular April day was strange and foggy, blurring spaces between the trees and blanketing all of Ellingham in a milky mist. Dottie decided that the weather lent itself to a mystery. Sherlock Holmes would be perfect.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
one of the worst things is when witnesses start talking to each other. As soon as you start talking to someone else, the story you have in your head changes. Human memory is rewritten like computer memory. You just get the most updated file.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Tell her about the screaming," Janelle said. "Because I can't." "The screaming?" Stevie repeated. "The other morning he started something called 'screaming meditation'," Nate said. "Guess what happens in screaming meditation? Did you guess screaming? For fifteen minutes? Because that's what happens in screaming meditation. Fifteen. Minutes. Outside. At five in the morning. Do you know what happens when someone screams outside at a remote location in the mountains, especially after a...
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Think about what you could be stopping—someone who uses racist policies to hurt or kill people. Someone who could do untold damage to the environment. Someone who could start an illegal war to distract from his political problems. You know, Vi, that he’s capable of that.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Her attention was drawn to a movement in the woods in the direction of the river. The trees were slowly coming back into bud, but they were still bare enough that she could make out a shape. "Moose," she said, almost in a whisper. "Moose. Moose." She tugged Nate's sleeve. "Moose," she repeated. The object moved away, out of sight. Stevie blinked. It had just been there, the massive antlers moving through the trees. "My moose," she said in a low voice. "I finally got it. The universe paid me in moose." With one backward glance at the magical spot, Stevie Bell resumed walking toward her class. Anatomy was still ahead of her. Lots of things were ahead of her, but this one was the closest. "That wasn't a moose, was it?" Janelle said when Stevie was out of earshot. "That's a branch, right? It moved in the wind?" "It's a branch," Nate replied. "Like, that's obviously a branch," Vi said. "Should we tell her? She seems really invested in this." "Definitely not," Nate said as Stevie vanished in the direction of the classroom buildings, earbuds already in her ears. "Let her have her moose.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Reading is on of the greatest pleasure of life - maybe the greatest. It's true. All the money, all the power - none of it compares to a good book. A book gives you everything. It gives you a window into other souls, other worlds. The world is a door. Books are the key" -Albert Ellingham
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
David had, in fact, done the Sherlock thing that Stevie had dismissed for herself, specifically, the BBC one. He was wearing a sharply cut blue dress shirt, slender, tailored pants, and a long gray-black coat with a red interior. He had teased out his hair a bit and made sure it curled. In many ways, it was a perfect costume while not being a costume at all. And it was obviously intentional, directed at her.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Writing is a lot of sitting down... It's a lot of trying things out and screwing up... It's either amazing or it's the worst thing in the world. Sometimes it goes well, and it's all you think about, and then, it's gone. It's like you're taking a ride down a river really fast, and then all of a sudden, there's no water. You're just sitting in a raft, trying to push it along in the mud. And then you've become me.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Stevie had often wondered how these conversations worked, when people talked about feelings and touching and all of the stuff she thought was meant to be kept carefully bottled inside her own personal apothecary. Now someone wanted in, to take the lids off the vials, to peer at the contents. Stevie was unaware that people were even allowed to talk about emotions this frankly. This was not how things happened at home.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Charles was dressed more casually than normal, in a heavy fleece and sweatpants. Dr. Quinn rose to the occasion in a rose-gray cashmere sweater, a sweeping wool skirt, black cashmere tights, and tall black boots. No amount of cold was going to rob her of her queenly graces. Charles had a look on his face that said, "I'm not angry, but I am disappointed." Dr. Quinn's expression said, "He's passive-aggressive. I'm not. I am aggressive. I have killed before."
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Oh my God,” he said. “What are you, a saint or something?” “I stole this mug,” she said. “So, no. Besides, if the school closed down, you’d have to go home and finish your book or something. I did it for you. I’m not even telling anyone else. I mean, aside from my friends. Like you.” “Are you trying to make me have an emotion?” Nate said, his eyes reddening a bit. “Because I’ve spent my whole life learning how to repress and deflect and you’re kind of ruining my thing.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
She means," Nate said, turning away from the books, "That David has gone full weird." "He was always that way<' Janelle said in a low voice. "Yeah, but now he's completed his journey. Our little caterpillar has turned into a freaky butterfly." "Tell her about the screaming," Janelle said. "Because I can't." "The screaming? Stevie repeated. "The other morning he started something called 'screaming meditation'," Nate said. "Guess what happens in screaming meditation? Did you guess screaming? For fifteen minutes? Because that's what happens in screaming meditation. Fifteen. Minutes. Outside. At five in the morning. Do you know what happens when someone screams outside for fifteen minutes at five in the morning at a remote location in the mountains, especially after a . . ." The implied dot dot dot was "student dies in a terrible accident or maybe murder and another one goes missing." "When security got to him he claimed it was his new religion and that it is something he needs to do every morning now as a way to talk to the sun." So this is what Edward King had been referring to. "Sometimes," Nate went on, tapping the books into place so that the spines lined up perfectly, "he sleeps on the roof. Or somewhere else. Sometimes the green." "Naked," Janelle added. "He sleeps on the green naked." "Or in classrooms," Nate said. "Someone said they went into differential equations and he was asleep in the corner of the room under a Pokémon comforter." "Your boy has not been well," Janelle said.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Nate came into the room and kicked the door half closed behind him. "Here's the thing. You've gone kind of psycho. I have never willingly gone to a dance in my life. But I am doing this because you are my friend, okay? And something is wrong with you. I don't want to go to this, obviously. And you don't want to go to this. I'm doing this for you, for your own good. This is the one and only time I'm offering to do something like this. Sometimes you have to leave the fucking Shire, Frodo. If we're friends, get up, and come with me now. And you should take that seriously, because you are kind of losing friends all over the place." He extended his hand to her. "You're serious." "I'm serious." She looked down at her lists and up at Nate. "You're wearing a tie," she said. "I know." "Is that a dance thing?" "How would I know? Do I look like I go to a lot of dances?" Stevie felt like she was made of concrete and attached to the floor. But seeing Nate there, seeing the effort he was going to, she felt her moorings come loose.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
People might be dismissive of someone obsessed with mystery stories, as if the line between fiction and reality was so distinct. They didn’t know, perhaps, that Sherlock Holmes was based on a real man, Dr. Joseph Bell, and that the methods Arthur Conan Doyle created for his fictional detective inspired generations of real-world detectives. Did they know that Arthur Conan Doyle went on to investigate mysteries in his real life and even absolved a man of a crime for which he had been convicted? Did they know how Agatha Christie brilliantly staged her own disappearance in order to exact an elegant revenge on a cheating husband?
Maureen Johnson, Truly Devious
I'm trying to figure out if this is the stupidest thing I've ever done," Nate said as he kept up the rear with Stevie. "I don't think it is, and that worries me." "It probably isn't." "I mean, the thing with the files is crazy. I honestly don't even know if I'm going to look at them" "Then why did you stay?" she asked. "Because," Nate said, tipping his head toward David, "when you and he get together, something bad happens to you." Stevie swallowed down a lump in her throat. She wanted to reach over and grab Nate's hand at that moment, except that Nate would probably receive the gesture with as much enthusiasm as a handful of spiders.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
The chalkboard menu really seemed to emphasize that everything was local and that everything had maple syrup in it. The BBQ beef was in maple syrup BBQ sauce. The mac and cheese was made with smoked maple cheese. There was maple tofu and maple-syrup dressing for the salads. "Did you forget you were in Vermont for a second?" Stevie said to Janelle as they took their trays. "Look down. You are standing in maple syrup." "Yeah," Janelle replied, a bit dispiritedly, as she took some tofu and vegetables. "It's not my favorite." Nate stared down the sneeze guard at the mapleized meats. "I'll drink the living blood of trees," he said. "Hit me.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
There was a bowl of tuna salad. She grabbed two slices of the closest bread and smacked on a gob, squashing it flat. She sliced it with one long cut and dropped down into a chair at the far end of the table. David sat at the other end, one of the old tablets next to him, facedown. "I don't eat tuna salad," he said, grabbing a piece of bread. "It's too mysterious. People sneak things into it. It's a sneak food." "I like it," Hunter said. "We make it at home with sliced-up dill pickle and Old Bay Seasoning." "Good to know," David said. "Nate, where do you come down on tuna salad?: Nate was trying to read and eat some cold mac and cheese in peace. "I don't eat fish," he said. "Fish freak me out.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
years: You. Your spouse. Your child. Your friends. The people who love you. The people who hate you. Terrorists in the Middle East. The politicians raising your taxes and making bad policies. The teacher who gave your son a bad grade. The couple who didn’t invite you to a dinner. I have gone down this mental path when things have upset me. I find it puts life in perspective. It can be a good thing, to remember that there is very little that truly matters. A bad grade. A dumb politician. A social slight. Unfortunately, there are things that do matter. Things that can ruin what little time we have here. Things that cannot be done over or remedied. These are the things that we regret. And regret is more devious than guilt. It is more corrosive than envy. And it is more powerful than fear.
Wendy Walker (All Is Not Forgotten)
I did it," she said. "Yup." "You made fun of me when i first got here," she said. "But I did it." "I was being friendly." "You were being a dick," she said. "Why do you think we like each other?" Stevie asked. "Does it matter?" "I don't know," she said. "I don't know how these things work." "Neither do I. Neither does anybody." "Some people seem to. I thin Janelle does." "Janelle," he said, "may know everything, but she doesn't know that. And I like you because . . ." He rolled up to his side and onto one elbow, gazing down into her face. He traced her jawline with one finger, sending such shivers down her body that she struggled not to squirm. ". . because you came to do something impossible and you did it. And you're smart. And you're really, really attractive." There, on the floor that had been scuffed by a thousand dance shoes, under the eyes of the masks on the wall that had seen decades go by, they kissed, over and over, each one renewing the last.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
physic
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Dottie
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Stevie had no fears of the dead. The living, however, sometimes gave her the creeps.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
You don't get things past librarians." -Albert Ellingham
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
The security system is about to go down. Ready? Three, two, one." He put his phone back in his coat pocket. It was impossible for Stevie to ignore the fact that security-shutting-off David was sexy.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Oh, I like it,” Nate said. “Snow makes it socially acceptable to stay in.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
You didn't improvise that speech back there," she said. "How long were you working on that?" "Day or two. Got a bunch of it from The West Wing. That was the only show I was never allowed to watch when I was a kid, so it's my favourite. I wonder who my dad will have as VP if he gets into the White House? I'm rooting for a cloud of bats. What about you, Stevie? You know him better than I do.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Трябваше да открие един човек, този, който винаги присъства, независимо дали го засичаш, или не.
Морийн Джонсън (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
That's what she gets, if she gets anything at all," Stevie said. "All of this starts in late May and goes on through June. What dose this suggest?" "Morning sickness," Nate said, his eyes widening. "Morning sickness," Stevie replied, smiling. "You terrify me," Nate said quietly.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Every contact leaves a trace." -The Hand on the Wall, Truly Devious #3
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
WHEN things are bad, give yourself a point for everything.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Тревогата и вълнението са братовчеди и си приличат в известна степен. Те имат множество общи черти - "газираната" емоция, скоростта, ококорените очи и препускащото сърце. Но докато вълнението има склонност да те въздигне към още по-светли нива на чувства, тревогата те дърпа надолу, карайки те да се вкопчиш в земята, за да не се изпързаляш, когато тя се залюшка.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Човек трябва да се опитва. Опитването е първата стъпка към успеха.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Никой не иска да се крие вечно. В природата на човека е заложено да общува.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
При мятото, където се събира цялата информация, не се вижда нищо.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
because displaying real emotion would be gross.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
It's true. All the money, all the power - none of it compares to a good book. A book gives you everything. It gives you a window into other souls, other worlds. The world is a door. Books are the key.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Stevie hated football, and she specifically hated the car commercials that were in football, and she specifically hated the car commercials that were in football, with the meaningless slogans and aggressive masculine messages about how important it was for Americans to drive up rocks and treat every trip to the store or a soccer game like a single-person invasion. Maybe she was overthinking this.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
The walked in silence for a moment. The world was spinning easily as she comprehended what was going on--he was doing sexy for _her._ Not the other way around. He was trying so hard, reaching for her.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
When people at school looked online for party outfits and looks, she was genuinely confused. There were people who seemed not only to understand these things, but to accomplish them. A striped top, a wide-brimmed hat, shorts for that “special beach weekend.” Lipsticks for fall, jeans that were perfect for a hayride, pendant earrings for that holiday party and snowball fight. Who lived these lives?
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
For almost a century, the school had been home to creative geniuses, radical thinkers, and innovators. Ellingham had no application, no list of requirements, no instructions other than, "If you would like to be considered for Ellingham Academy, please get in touch." That was it. One simple sentence that drove every high-flying student frantic. What did they want? What were they looking for? This was like a riddle from a fantasy story or fairy tale - something the wizard makes you do before you are allowed into the Cave of Secrets. Applications were supposed to be rigid lists of requirements and test scores and essays and recommendations and maybe a blood sample and a few bars from a popular musical. Not Elllingham. Just knock on the door. Just knock on the door in the special, correct way they would not describe. You just had to get in touch with something. They looked for a spark. If they saw such a spark in you, you could be one of the fifty students they took each year. The program was only two years long, just the junior and senior years of high school. There were no tuition fees. If you got in, it was free. You just had to get in.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
You know what's weird?" David said as Stevie was lost in thought. "What's weird is making a hobby out of the death of your classmate. You know what's also weird? Going through people's rooms, including the room of your dead classmate. Because you seem crazy." People might be dismissive of someone obsessed with mystery stories, as if the line between fiction and reality was so distinct. They didn't know, perhaps, that Sherlock Holmes was based on a a real man, Dr. Joseph Bell, and that the methods Arthur Conan Doyle created for his fictional detective inspired generations of real-world detectives. Did they know that Arthur Conan Doyle went on to investigate mysteries in his real life and even absolved a man of a crime for which he had been convicted? Did they know how Agatha Christie brilliantly staged her own disappearance in order to exact an elegant revenge on a cheating husband? They probably did not. And no one was going to discount Stevie Bell, who had gotten into this school on the wings of her interest in the Ellingham case, and who had been a bystander at a death that was now looking more and more suspicious. She was not crazy. And Hayes's key was in her pocket and Pix was on her way back. Stevie turned away and left David's room without saying anything else. Because she was also not going to let him see her cry.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Nate exhaled long through his nose. 'Fine,' he said. 'Anything is better than doing what I'm supposed to be doing.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Stevie distinctly felt part of her soul die She hoped it wasn't an important part.
Maureen Johnson, Truly Devious
All the money, all the power - none of it compares to a good book. A book gives you everything. It gives you a window into other souls, other worlds. The world is a door. Books are the key.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
It’s true. All the money, all the power—none of it compares to a good book. A book gives you everything. It gives you a window into other souls, other worlds. The world is a door. Books are the key.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Day or two. Got a bunch of it from The West Wing. That was the only show I was never allowed to watch when I was a kid, so it’s my favorite. I wonder who my dad will have as VP if he gets into the White House? I’m rooting for a cloud of bats. What about you, Stevie? You know him better than I do.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Vi greeted Stevie mush as Janelle had, with an incomprehensible string of affection. "I can't believe it," they said. They turned to Janelle. There were greeting kisses at breakfast now, like a couple from TV. Nate tore his waffle slowly as the pair leaned cozily into one another. "You know we're cute," Janelle said to him. "Cuteness is my favorite," he said. "It's good for when you write romances in your book, right?" Stevie said. "I don;'t write romance. I write about finding dragons and breaking magic rocks in half." "The real magic rocks are the friends we make along the way," Stevie replied. "Right?" "He's happy for us," Janelle said. "This is how he shows it." Nate looked up at all of them, dark shadows under his eyes. "This is why I prefer books to people." "We love you too," Janelle said.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Stevie tucked her hands up into the arms of Poirot's jacket to keep from being cut and numbly felt her way along, taking half-sized steps, and right into David's back. "That's you, right?" he said. "I'm afraid of monsters. Also, it stinks down here." This was true. There was a low-lying funk in the air. "The drone would work better," she said. "You know, if that's a leaking gas line or something." "Did you just say leaking gas line?" Nate said from above. "Smells more like ass than gas," David replied. "Tight, dark, smelly. This tunnel has it all! Five out of five stars." "It's really okay to leave him to die," Nate said.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Her old high school was a fine high school, if you liked high school. It wasn’t bad or evil. It was just like it was supposed to be - miles of linoleum and humming lights, the warm funk of cafeteria stink too early in the morning, the flashes of inspiration that were quickly quashed by long stretches of tedium, and the perpetual desire to be somewhere else.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Okay. How about detectives? What about Sherlock Holmes?” Stevie rolled her eyes. “What’s wrong with Sherlock Holmes?” Janelle asked. “Nothing is wrong with Sherlock Holmes,” Stevie said. “But he’s not a costume. He’s . .
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
David had, in fact, done the Sherlock thing that Stevie had dismissed for herself, specifically, the BBC one.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
WOKE THE NEXT MORNING, WHICH WAS A GOOD START. WHEN things are bad, give yourself a point for everything.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Училищата стават известни с много неща, но предимно с учителите, учениците и спортните си отбори. Не е нормално да добиват известност чрез убийства.
Морийн Джонсън (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
... понякога магьосникът държи да се поразмърдаш, преди да ти позволи да влезеш в Пещерата на тайните.
Морийн Джонсън (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Програмата бе с продължителност едва две години - имаше само първокурсници и второкурсници. Обучението бе безплатно. Влезеш ли, не плащаш нищо. Само трябва да влезеш.
Морийн Джонсън (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Човек усеща кога моментът да сподели нещо е отминал.
Морийн Джонсън (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Просто човек знае кога е най-върлият фен - онзи, който разбира понятията и улавя пропуските и разминаванията. Знаеш, когато си онзи, който усеща нещата.
Морийн Джонсън (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Стиви не се страхуваше от мъртвите. Живите обаче понякога я караха да настръхне.
Морийн Джонсън (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Някои грешки си заслужаваше да се направят.
Морийн Джонсън (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Човек трябва да се научи да приема фактите, каквито са, не каквито е чул че трябва да бъдат.
Морийн Джонсън (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Нямаше право да се страхува, нито да плаче, щом види предмет, пораждащ тъжни спомени.
Морийн Джонсън (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
It wasn’t about the money,” she said. “If I even tried to claim it, think of the lawyers and the creeps I’d have to deal with. It would ruin my life.” “Seriously?” he said. “You’re not going to fight for seventy million dollars?” “What can I buy for seventy million dollars?” “Anything. Almost literally anything.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
would rather eat bees than share her tender inner being with anyone else—she didn’t even want to share it with herself.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
I think I'm fine. Maybe it hasn't hit yet. Is that bad?" "It's not bad or good. It just is. That's something you'll find out if you decide to go into this line of work. You have to take things as they are, not how you hear they're supposed to be.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Finally, Stevie sat down with Nate at the farm table for five hours and side by side, passing the computer back and forth, they assembled ten pages of script. The scene opened in a tunnel, with Hayes reading the Truly Devious letter. Then it went to the scene of the ransom drop, with Hayes playing Albert Ellingham. How Hayes was going to play Albert Ellingham, a man thirty years his senior, was not their problem.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
You don't just write something and it's done. You don't just do it. You write parts and you rewrite and you have new ideas and you move stuff. I don't want to talk about the book.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Nate was in Minerva Four, the first one along the hall. The door was shut but he could be heard moving inside. Janelle knocked. When there was no immediate answer, she texted. A moment later, the door opened a bit and Nate's long face appeared. He didn't do anything for a moment, and then, with a barely audible sigh, he opened the door enough to let them in. "Do you do hugs?" Janelle asked. "Not really," Nate replied, moving back. "Then no hug it is," Janelle said. "How about salutes?" Stevie said. "Those are tolerable." Stevie gave him a salute.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Ellingham was splendid in the sunshine. That was the only word for it. The light fell like rain in droplets that hung in the air. A cloud of them surrounded the fountain that gushed merrily on the green, creating its own ecosystem of rainbows. The light found every nook and crook of the bright redbrick buildings. It made the gargoyles seem to smile. It deepened the green of the trees. It made the statues - well, it didn't do anything to the statues except reveal just how many of them there were. "Do you think these get less creepy with time?" Nate asked as they passed yet another cluster of naked Greeks or Romans. "I hope not," Stevie replied.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Stevie swept her light around, steering it away from a terrifying crack in the side, and then aimed it squarely forward. "I'm going to the end," she said. "Seriously?" Nate said. "This is what I came here for. My dragons are down there." "Stevie, I wouldn't ..." "You're not me," Stevie said. "If I die, avenge me." She was joking, but not totally. She had to go, and it also felt like a possible mistake. Some mistakes you have to make.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Stevie had great hopes for the boarding school dining hall. She knew better than to hope for floating candlesticks and ghosts, but long wooden tables didn't seem out of the question. Long tables were also featured in so may murder mysteries, when all the guests of the house were arranged, eyeing each other over their wineglasses, wondering who Lord Dudley was going to put in his will or who might have killed Ratchets with the golf club.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
That was something they taught you in anxiety therapy—the thoughts may come, but you don’t have to chase them all.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
I always wanted stories to be real, so I started writing my own.
Maureen Johnson, Truly Devious
That was the genius of the demand - no time to think, no time to plan.
Maureen Johnson, Truly Devious
The fact is," he said, "I liked you from the first moment I saw you, when you looked like you wanted to punch me in the face for just being alive. That probably says something dark about me. And I think you like me because I annoy you. Both of us have real problems, but maybe we should make our weird personalities work for us.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
It’s two thousand pages and nothing happens. It’s all terrible. I wrote the first book and then I forgot how to write. It used to be that I would sit and write and I would go into some other world—I could see it all. I was totally in another place. But the second it became something I had to do, something in me broke. It’s like I used to know the way to some magical land and I lost the map. I hate myself.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Writing is a lot of sitting down,” Nate said, finally answering the question. “It’s a lot of trying things out and screwing up. You saw it when we worked on the script.” “But we used things that existed,” Stevie said. “What if you’re totally making it up?” “It’s either amazing or it’s the worst thing in the world,” he said. “Sometimes it goes well, and it’s all you think about, and then, it’s gone. It’s like you’re taking a ride down a river really fast, and then all of a sudden, there’s no water. You’re just sitting in a raft, trying to push it along in the mud. And then you’ve become me.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
If Gertie van Coevorden had two brain cells, each would be amazed to know of the other's existence.
Maureen Johnson (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
It was the kind of morning that mocked the fear of the night before.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Look, a riddle, time for fun,’” George read. “‘Should we use a rope or gun? Knives are sharp and gleam so pretty. Poison’s slow, which is a pity. Fire is festive, drowning’s slow. Hanging’s a ropy way to go. A broken head, a nasty fall. A car colliding with a wall. Bombs make a very jolly noise. Such ways to punish naughty boys! What shall we use? We can’t decide. Just like you cannot run or hide. Ha ha. Truly, Devious.’” “The envelope was postmarked Burlington,” Robert added.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
My project . . . is solving the case.” “Solving it?” Charles said, cocking his head. “Doing a report on it?” “No,” she said. “I mean . . . figuring out what happened.” Charles removed his glasses, folded them, and leaned back in his chair. “That’s a fairly tall order,
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
A virus particle is a very small capsule made of proteins locked together in a mathematical pattern. The pattern of the interlocking proteins in a virus is far more complicated than a snowflake. The protein capsule is sometimes wrapped in an oily membrane. Inside the capsule there is a small amount of DNA or RNA, the molecules that contain the genetic code of the virus. The genetic code is the virus’s operating system, or wetware, the complete set of instructions for the virus to make copies of itself. Unlike a snowflake or any other kind of crystal, a virus is able to re-create its form. It would be as if a single snowflake started copying itself as it falls, and those copies of the snowflake copy themselves, creating ever-growing numbers of identical copies of the first snowflake, until the air is filled with falling snow, and each flake is a perfect replica of the first flake. Many virologists feel that viruses are not truly living things. At the same time, viruses are obviously not dead. Virologists like to describe them as life forms. The term is a contradiction: How can something be a form of life that isn’t alive? Viruses carry on their existence in a misty borderland that lies between life and death, a gray zone where the things we encounter are neither provably alive nor certainly dead. One way to understand viruses is to think about them as biological machines. A virus is a wet nanomachine, a tiny, complicated, slightly fuzzy mechanism, which is rubbery, flexible, wobbly, and often a little bit imprecise in its operation—a microscopic nugget of squishy parts. Viruses are subtle, logical, tricky, reactive, devious, opportunistic. They are constantly evolving, their forms steadily changing as time passes. Like all kinds of life, viruses possess a relentless drive to reproduce themselves so that they can persist through time. When a virus starts copying itself strongly and rapidly in a host, the process is called virus amplification. As a virus amplifies itself in its host, the host, a living organism, can be destroyed. Viruses are the undead of the living world, the zombies of deep time. Nobody knows the origin of viruses—how they came into existence or when they appeared in the history of life on earth. Viruses may be examples or relics of life forms that operated at the dawn of life. Viruses may have come into existence with the first stirrings of life on the planet, roughly four billion years ago. Or they may have arisen after life started, during the time when single-celled bacteria had already come into existence—nobody knows.
Richard Preston (Crisis in the Red Zone: The Story of the Deadliest Ebola Outbreak in History, and of the Outbreaks to Come)
Why was she so anxious? Because she had anxiety.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Back in Pittsburgh, if someone had infiltrated the library with fifty squirrels, that person would have been hailed as a hero. But Ellingham was full of library lovers, and there was the feeling in the air that this was, perhaps, a bridge too far. You could be naked, you could scream and hang out on the roof, but you do not mess with the place with the books.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Трябва да разберем миналото, за да видим настоящето и бъдещето.
Морийн Джонсън (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
Това, че хората лъжат, не беше интересно. Самата лъжа нямаше значение, от значение беше причината за нея.
Морийн Джонсън (The Hand on the Wall (Truly Devious, #3))
It was like she’d been punched in the gut. Stevie said stuff like that all the time and was told she was wrong. David said it once and he got a nod and a compliment. Oh, the magic of dudes. If only they bottled it.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
Money should never stand in the way of learning.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
The world is a door. Books are the key.
Maureen Johnson, Truly Devious
when people talked about feelings and touching and all of the stuff she thought was meant to be kept carefully bottled inside her own personal apothecary.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
It's not bad or good. It just is. That's something you'll find out if you decide to go into this line of work. You have to take things as they are, not how you hear they're supposed to be.
Maureen Johnson (Truly Devious (Truly Devious, #1))
She marveled at Janelle, who moved through the patches of sun that came through the leaves, with her perfect style. It wasn't fancy, but it made every moment feel like an occasion. Many people existed; Janelle lived.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
A half hour later, with a new schedule and an alarming set of "personal academic benchmarks" to meet, Steve was released back into the wild, feeling a confusing blend of joy and terror, which was often a ticket to a ride on the anxiety roller coaster.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
Stevie meant to smile and nod, but she ended up enacting the shrug emoticon.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
David Eastman....was a shade under six feet, his build wiry, like he had been made of bundles of snapping electrical cables that had wound themselves together into a person, sparks still coming from the ends.......Everything on his face was too narrow, too fine. The lines sharp. His eyes always looked half closed, but they had more life behind them than most. It's the creature that pretends to be asleep that you need to watch out for.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))
David had a way of walking - a way that suggested that he belonged anywhere he went. In this, he had his father's manner, which was gross and horrific. But there was something else, something of the rake in a casino movie, who has come in to knock the place over, or an entertainer who might at any point somersault into the center of the room. Or maybe he was just walking in and her brain chemistry was telling her stories.
Maureen Johnson (The Vanishing Stair (Truly Devious, #2))