Shakespeare Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Shakespeare. Here they are! All 200 of them:

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The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.
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William Shakespeare (As You Like It)
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Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none.
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William Shakespeare (All's Well That Ends Well)
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Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind, And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.
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William Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream)
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Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and others have greatness thrust upon them.
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William Shakespeare (Twelfth Night)
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Doubt thou the stars are fire; Doubt that the sun doth move; Doubt truth to be a liar; But never doubt I love.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves.
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William Shakespeare (Julius Caesar)
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There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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This above all: to thine own self be true, And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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Hell is empty and all the devils are here.
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William Shakespeare (The Tempest)
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It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves.
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William Shakespeare
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But it is the nature of stars to cross, and never was Shakespeare more wrong than when he has Cassius note, β€˜The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars / But in ourselves.
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John Green (The Fault in Our Stars)
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If music be the food of love, play on, Give me excess of it; that surfeiting, The appetite may sicken, and so die.
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William Shakespeare (Twelfth Night)
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When he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night And pay no worship to the garish sun.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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We know what we are, but not what we may be.
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William Shakespeare
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All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages.
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William Shakespeare (As You Like It)
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You speak an infinite deal of nothing.
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William Shakespeare (The Merchant of Venice)
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Words are easy, like the wind; Faithful friends are hard to find.
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William Shakespeare (The Passionate Pilgrim (By Shakspere, Marlowe, Barnfield, Griffin, And Other Writers Unknown))
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Though she be but little, she is fierce!
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William Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream)
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These violent delights have violent ends And in their triump die, like fire and powder Which, as they kiss, consume
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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Music expresses that which cannot be said and on which it is impossible to be silent.
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Victor Hugo (William Shakespeare)
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My tongue will tell the anger of my heart, or else my heart concealing it will break.
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William Shakespeare (The Taming of the Shrew)
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My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep; the more I give to thee, The more I have, for both are infinite.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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By the pricking of my thumbs, Something wicked this way comes.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Cowards die many times before their deaths; The valiant never taste of death but once. Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, It seems to me most strange that men should fear; Seeing that death, a necessary end, Will come when it will come.
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William Shakespeare (Julius Caesar)
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The course of true love never did run smooth.
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William Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream)
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Stars, hide your fires; Let not light see my black and deep desires.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Lord, what fools these mortals be!
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William Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream)
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My only love sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late! Prodigious birth of love it is to me, That I must love a loathed enemy.
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William Shakespeare
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I like this place and could willingly waste my time in it.
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William Shakespeare
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Don't waste your love on somebody, who doesn't value it.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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thus with a kiss I die
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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Double, double, toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble!
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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To die, to sleep - To sleep, perchance to dream - ay, there's the rub, For in this sleep of death what dreams may come...
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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Good night, good night! parting is such sweet sorrow, That I shall say good night till it be morrow.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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If a man is called to be a street sweeper, he should sweep streets even as a Michaelangelo painted, or Beethoven composed music or Shakespeare wrote poetry. He should sweep streets so well that all the hosts of heaven and earth will pause to say, 'Here lived a great street sweeper who did his job well.
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Martin Luther King Jr.
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There are more things in Heaven and Earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come.
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William Shakespeare (The Merchant of Venice)
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All that glisters is not gold; Often have you heard that told: Many a man his life hath sold But my outside to behold: Gilded tombs do worms enfold.
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William Shakespeare (The Merchant of Venice)
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Dispute not with her: she is lunatic.
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William Shakespeare (Richard III)
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Our doubts are traitors, and make us lose the good we oft might win, by fearing to attempt.
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William Shakespeare (Measure for Measure)
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Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more, Men were deceivers ever,- One foot in sea and one on shore, To one thing constant never.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Though this be madness, yet there is method in't.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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Though [Abraham Lincoln] never would travel to Europe, he went with Shakespeare’s kings to Merry England; he went with Lord Byron poetry to Spain and Portugal. Literature allowed him to transcend his surroundings.
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Doris Kearns Goodwin
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Did my heart love till now? forswear it, sight! For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo & Juliet)
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Life ... is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Expectation is the root of all heartache.
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William Shakespeare
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For never was a story of more woe than this of Juliet and her Romeo.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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Brevity is the soul of wit.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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Listen to many, speak to a few.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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Give sorrow words; the grief that does not speak knits up the o-er wrought heart and bids it break.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Love is heavy and light, bright and dark, hot and cold, sick and healthy, asleep and awake- its everything except what it is! (Act 1, scene 1)
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William Shakespeare (Romeo & Juliet)
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To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day, To the last syllable of recorded time; And all our yesterdays have lighted fools The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player, That struts and frets his hour upon the stage, And then is heard no more. It is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Do not swear by the moon, for she changes constantly. then your love would also change.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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The breaking of so great a thing should make A greater crack: the round world Should have shook lions into civil streets, And citizens to their dens.
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William Shakespeare (Antony and Cleopatra)
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One may smile, and smile, and be a villain.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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Look like the innocent flower, But be the serpent under it.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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They do not love that do not show their love.
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William Shakespeare (The Two Gentlemen of Verona)
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We are such stuff as dreams are made on, and our little life is rounded with a sleep.
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William Shakespeare (The Tempest)
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Conscience doth make cowards of us all.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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How far that little candle throws his beams! So shines a good deed in a weary world.
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William Shakespeare (The Merchant of Venice)
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Presume not that I am the thing I was.
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William Shakespeare (Henry IV, Part 2)
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I can see he's not in your good books,' said the messenger. 'No, and if he were I would burn my library.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers.
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William Shakespeare (King Henry VI, Part 2)
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Men at some time are masters of their fates. The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves, that we are underlings.
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William Shakespeare (Julius Caesar)
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I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow, than a man swear he loves me.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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In time we hate that which we often fear.
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William Shakespeare (Antony and Cleopatra)
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I have good reason to be content, for thank God I can read and perhaps understand Shakespeare to his depths.
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John Keats
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What's done cannot be undone.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Let me be that I am and seek not to alter me.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Et tu, Brute?
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William Shakespeare (Julius Caesar)
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And yet,to say the truth, reason and love keep little company together nowadays.
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William Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream)
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My words fly up, my thoughts remain below: Words without thoughts never to heaven go.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo? Deny thy father refuse thy name, thou art thyself thou not a montegue, what is montegue? tis nor hand nor foot nor any other part belonging to a man What is in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet, So Romeo would were he not Romeo called retain such dear perfection to which he owes without that title, Romeo, Doth thy name! And for that name which is no part of thee, take all thyself.
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William Shakespeare
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What's past is prologue.
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William Shakespeare (The Tempest)
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Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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Wisely and slow; they stumble that run fast.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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This above all: to thine own self be true.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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O teach me how I should forget to think (1.1.224)
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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What's in a name? that which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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Now cracks a noble heart. Good-night, sweet prince; And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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I'm not absolutely certain of the facts, but I rather fancy it's Shakespeare who says that it's always just when a fellow is feeling particularly braced with things in general that Fate sneaks up behind him with the bit of lead piping.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Jeeves and the Unbidden Guest)
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Do you not know I am a woman? when I think, I must speak.
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William Shakespeare (As You Like It)
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Parting is such sweet sorrow that I shall say goodnight till it be morrow.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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Some are born great, others achieve greatness.
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William Shakespeare (Twelfth Night)
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...Who could refrain, That had a heart to love, and in that heart Courage to make love known?
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Shakespeare is the happy hunting ground of all minds that have lost their balance.
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James Joyce (Ulysses)
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When sorrows come, they come not single spies. But in battalions!
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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I do love nothing in the world so well as you- is not that strange?
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo & Juliet)
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When we are born, we cry that we are come to this great stage of fools.
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William Shakespeare (King Lear)
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Life is the tragedy,' she said bitterly. 'You know how they categorize Shakespeare's plays, right? If it ends with a wedding, it's a comedy. And if it ends with a funeral, it's a tragedy. So we're all living tragedies, because we all end the same way, and it isn't with a goddamn wedding.
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Robyn Schneider (The Beginning of Everything)
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Let me not to the marriage of true minds Admit impediments. Love is not love Which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove. O no, it is an ever-fixed mark That looks on tempests and is never shaken; It is the star to every wand'ring barque, Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken. Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks Within his bending sickle's compass come; Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, But bears it out even to the edge of doom. If this be error and upon me proved, I never writ, nor no man ever loved.
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William Shakespeare (Great Sonnets)
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Love is not love Which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove. O no, it is an ever-fixed mark That looks on tempests and is never shaken; It is the star to every wand'ring bark, Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken." (Sonnet 116)
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William Shakespeare (Shakespeare's Sonnets)
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I am not bound to please thee with my answers.
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William Shakespeare (The Merchant of Venice)
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My soul is in the sky.
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William Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream)
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God hath given you one face, and you make yourself another.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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See how she leans her cheek upon her hand. O, that I were a glove upon that hand That I might touch that cheek!
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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These violent delights have violent ends.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves.
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William Shakespeare (Julius Caesar)
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O, beware, my lord, of jealousy; It is the green-ey'd monster, which doth mock The meat it feeds on.
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William Shakespeare (Othello)
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Sweets to the sweet.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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If love be rough with you, be rough with love. Prick love for pricking and you beat love down.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo & Juliet)
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Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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The lady doth protest too much, methinks.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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Better a witty fool, than a foolish wit.
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William Shakespeare (Twelfth Night)
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You're just trying on different identities, like everyone in those Shakespeare plays. And the people we pretend at, they're already in us. That's why we pretend them in the first place.
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Gayle Forman (Just One Day (Just One Day, #1))
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The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.
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William Shakespeare (The Merchant of Venice)
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For she had eyes and chose me.
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William Shakespeare (Othello)
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Come, gentle night; come, loving, black-browed night; Give me my Romeo; and, when I shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night...
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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Lord Polonius: What do you read, my lord? Hamlet: Words, words, words. Lord Polonius: What is the matter, my lord? Hamlet: Between who? Lord Polonius: I mean, the matter that you read, my lord.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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The lunatic, the lover, and the poet, are of imagination all compact.
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William Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream)
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Are you sure/That we are awake? It seems to me/That yet we sleep, we dream
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William Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream)
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If you prick us, do we not bleed? if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?". - (Act III, scene I).
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William Shakespeare (The Merchant of Venice)
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Madness in great ones must not unwatched go.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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Women may fall when there's no strength in men. Act II
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep; No more; and by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause: there's the respect That makes calamity of so long life; For who would bear the whips and scorns of time, The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of despised love, the law's delay, The insolence of office and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of? Thus conscience does make cowards of us all; And thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought, And enterprises of great pith and moment With this regard their currents turn awry, And lose the name of action.--Soft you now! The fair Ophelia! Nymph, in thy orisons Be all my sins remember'd!
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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I defy you, stars.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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O serpent heart hid with a flowering face! Did ever a dragon keep so fair a cave? Beautiful tyrant, feind angelical, dove feather raven, wolvish-ravening lamb! Despised substance of devinest show, just opposite to what thou justly seemest - A dammed saint, an honourable villain!
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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So wise so young, they say, do never live long.
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William Shakespeare (Richard III)
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Go wisely and slowly. Those who rush stumble and fall.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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All's well that ends well.
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William Shakespeare (All's Well That Ends Well)
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I must be cruel only to be kind; Thus bad begins, and worse remains behind.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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If we are true to ourselves, we can not be false to anyone.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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For which of my bad parts didst thou first fall in love with me?
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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I know a bank where the wild thyme blows, Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows, Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine, With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine.
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William Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream)
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Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometimes too hot the eye of heaven shines, And too often is his gold complexion dimm'd: And every fair from fair sometimes declines, By chance or natures changing course untrimm'd; By thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this and this gives life to thee.
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William Shakespeare (Shakespeare's Sonnets)
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Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and is heard no more. It is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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He that hath a beard is more than a youth, and he that hath no beard is less than a man. He that is more than a youth is not for me, and he that is less than a man, I am not for him.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Be great in act, as you have been in thought.
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William Shakespeare (King John)
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Me, poor man, my library Was dukedom large enough.
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William Shakespeare (The Tempest)
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Nothing will come of nothing: speak again.
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William Shakespeare (King Lear)
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Cry havoc and let slip the dogs of war!
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William Shakespeare (Julius Caesar)
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Men in rage strike those that wish them best.
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William Shakespeare (Othello)
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Words, words, words.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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I loved Ophelia. Forty thousand brothers could not, with all their quantity of love, make up my sum.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Two households, both alike in dignity In fair Verona, where we lay our scene From ancient grudge break to new mutiny Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life Whose misadventured piteous overthrows Do with their death bury their parents' strife.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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There's an old saying that applies to me: you can't lose a game if you don't play the game. (Act 1, scene 4)
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William Shakespeare (Romeo & Juliet)
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Exit, pursued by a bear.
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William Shakespeare (The Winter's Tale)
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O, wonder! How many goodly creatures are there here! How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world, That has such people in't!
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William Shakespeare (The Tempest)
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I’ll follow thee and make a heaven of hell, To die upon the hand I love so well.
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William Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream)
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Oh, I am fortune's fool!
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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False face must hide what the false heart doth know.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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There was a star danced, and under that was I born.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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A sad tale's best for winter: I have one of sprites and goblins.
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William Shakespeare (The Winter's Tale)
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If music be the food of love, play on.
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William Shakespeare (Twelfth Night)
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Love comforteth like sunshine after rain.
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William Shakespeare (The Complete Sonnets and Poems)
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Some are born mad, some achieve madness, and some have madness thrust upon 'em.
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Emilie Autumn (The Asylum for Wayward Victorian Girls)
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A coward dies a thousand times before his death, but the valiant taste of death but once. It seems to me most strange that men should fear, seeing that death, a necessary end, will come when it will come.
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William Shakespeare (Julius Caesar)
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Lovers and madmen have such seething brains Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend More than cool reason ever comprehends.
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William Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream)
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I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions; fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, heal'd by the same means, warm'd and cool'd by the same winter and summer, as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, do we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in that.
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William Shakespeare
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Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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Nothing is so common-place as to wish to be remarkable.
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Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. (Autocrat of the Breakfast Table)
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Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind.
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William Shakespeare (King Henry VI, Part 3)
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I pray you, do not fall in love with me, for I am falser than vows made in wine.
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William Shakespeare (As You Like It)
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I love you with so much of my heart that none is left to protest.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
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Under loves heavy burden do I sink. --Romeo
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William Shakespeare (Romeo & Juliet)
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So full of artless jealousy is guilt, It spills itself in fearing to be spilt.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
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Of all the wonders that I have heard, It seems to me most strange that men should fear; Seeing death, a necessary end, Will come when it will come. (Act II, Scene 2)
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William Shakespeare (Julius Caesar)
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[Thine] face is not worth sunburning.
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William Shakespeare (Henry V)
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Out of my sight! Thou dost infect mine eyes.
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William Shakespeare (Richard III)
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I wasted time, and now doth time waste me.
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William Shakespeare (Richard II)
β€œ
As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods. They kill us for their sport.
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William Shakespeare (King Lear)
β€œ
I wish my horse had the speed of your tongue.
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
β€œ
My only love sprung from my only hate.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
β€œ
in black ink my love may still shine bright.
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William Shakespeare (Shakespeare's Sonnets)
β€œ
Our revels now are ended. These our actors, As I foretold you, were all spirits and Are melted into air, into thin air: And, like the baseless fabric of this vision, The cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve And, like this insubstantial pageant faded, Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff As dreams are made on, and our little life Is rounded with a sleep.
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William Shakespeare (The Tempest)
β€œ
Beware the ides of March.
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William Shakespeare (Julius Caesar)
β€œ
You are a lover. Borrow Cupid's wings and soar with them above a common bound.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
β€œ
I dare do all that may become a man; Who dares do more, is none
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
β€œ
Where shall we three meet again in thunder, lightning, or in rain? When the hurlyburly 's done, when the battle 's lost and won
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
β€œ
And thus I clothe my naked villainy With odd old ends stol'n out of holy writ; And seem a saint, when most I play the devil.
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William Shakespeare (Richard III)
β€œ
He made me feel unhinged . . . like he could take me apart and put me back together again and again.
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Chelsie Shakespeare
β€œ
I know that David Tennant's Hamlet isn't till July. And lots of people are going to be doing Dr Who in Hamlet jokes, so this is just me getting it out of the way early, to avoid the rush... "To be, or not to be, that is the question. Weeelll.... More of A question really. Not THE question. Because, well, I mean, there are billions and billions of questions out there, and well, when I say billions, I mean, when you add in the answers, not just the questions, weeelll, you're looking at numbers that are positively astronomical and... for that matter the other question is what you lot are doing on this planet in the first place, and er, did anyone try just pushing this little red button?
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Neil Gaiman
β€œ
O sleep, O gentle sleep, Nature's soft nurse, how have I frightened thee. That thou no more will weigh my eyelids down, And steep my senses in forgetfulness?
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William Shakespeare (Henry IV, Part 2)
β€œ
Why, what's the matter, That you have such a February face, So full of frost, of storm and cloudiness?
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William Shakespeare (Much Ado About Nothing)
β€œ
Sit by my side, and let the world slip: we shall ne'er be younger.
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William Shakespeare (The Taming of the Shrew)
β€œ
All the world's a stage.
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William Shakespeare (As You Like It)
β€œ
The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones.
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William Shakespeare (Julius Caesar)
β€œ
To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep; No more; and, by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to, ’tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub.
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
β€œ
Journeys end in lovers meeting.
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William Shakespeare (Twelfth Night)
β€œ
The prince of darkness is a gentleman!
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William Shakespeare (King Lear)
β€œ
Lovers and madmen have such seething brains, Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend More than cool reason ever comprehends. The lunatic, the lover and the poet Are of imagination all compact: One sees more devils than vast hell can hold, That is, the madman: the lover, all as frantic, Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt: The poet's eye, in fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven; And as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes and gives to airy nothing A local habitation and a name.
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William Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream)
β€œ
O, here Will I set up my everlasting rest, And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last! Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
β€œ
He that is thy friend indeed, He will help thee in thy need: If thou sorrow, he will weep; If thou wake, he cannot sleep: Thus of every grief in heart He with thee doth bear a part. These are certain signs to know Faithful friend from flattering foe.
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William Shakespeare (The Passionate Pilgrim)
β€œ
What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason, how infinite in faculty! In form and moving how express and admirable! In action how like an Angel! in apprehension how like a god! The beauty of the world! The paragon of animals! And yet to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me; no, nor Woman neither; though by your smiling you seem to say so.. Act II scene ii
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William Shakespeare (Hamlet)
β€œ
If we shadows have offended, Think but this, and all is mended, That you have but slumbered here While these visions did appear. And this weak and idle theme, No more yielding but a dream, Gentles, do not reprehend: If you pardon, we will mend: And, as I am an honest Puck, If we have unearned luck Now to 'scape the serpent's tongue, We will make amends ere long; Else the Puck a liar call; So, good night unto you all. Give me your hands, if we be friends, And Robin shall restore amends.
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William Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream)
β€œ
Hark,” he said, his tone very dry. β€œWhat stone through yonder window breaks?” Kami yelled up at him, β€œIt is the east, and Juliet is a jerk!” Jared abandoned Shakespeare and demanded, β€œWhat do you think you’re doing?” β€œThrowing a pebble,” said Kami defensively. β€œUh… and I’ll pay for the window.” Jared vanished and Kami was ready to start shouting again, when he reemerged with the pebble clenched in his fist. β€œThis isn’t a pebble! This is a rock.” β€œIt’s possible that your behaviour has inspired some negative feelings that caused me to pick a slightly overlarge pebble,” Kami admitted.
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Sarah Rees Brennan (Unspoken (The Lynburn Legacy, #1))
β€œ
The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fictionβ€”until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define β€œliterature”. The Latin root simply means β€œletters”. Those letters are either deliveredβ€”they connect with an audienceβ€”or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their booksβ€”and thus what they count as literatureβ€”really tells you more about them than it does about the book.
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Brent Weeks
β€œ
From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be remembered- We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; For he to-day that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother; be he ne’er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition; And gentlemen in England now-a-bed Shall think themselves accurs’d they were not here, And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks That fought with us upon Saint Crispin’s day.
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William Shakespeare (Henry V)
β€œ
Why then, O brawling love! O loving hate! O any thing, of nothing first create! O heavy lightness, serious vanity, Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms, Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health, Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is! This love feel I, that feel no love in this.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
β€œ
Romeo: If I profane with my unworthiest hand This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this: My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss. Juliet: Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much, Which mannerly devotion shows in this; For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch, And palm to palm is holy palmers' kiss. Romeo: Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too? Juliet: Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer. Romeo: O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do; They pray, grant thou, lest faith turn to despair. Juliet: Saints do not move, though grant for prayers' sake. Romeo: Then move not, while my prayer's effect I take. Thus from my lips, by yours, my sin is purged. Juliet: Then have my lips the sin that they have took. Romeo: Sin from thy lips? O trespass sweetly urged! Give me my sin again. Juliet: You kiss by the book.
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
β€œ
Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises, Sounds, and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not. Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments Will hum about mine ears; and sometime voices, That, if I then had waked after long sleep, Will make me sleep again: and then, in dreaming, The clouds methought would open, and show riches Ready to drop upon me; that, when I waked, I cried to dream again.
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William Shakespeare (The Tempest)
β€œ
Actors are so fortunate. They can choose whether they will appear in tragedy or in comedy, whether they will suffer or make merry, laugh or shed tears. But in real life it is different. Most men and women are forced to perform parts for which they have no qualifications. Our Guildensterns play Hamlet for us, and our Hamlets have to jest like Prince Hal. The world is a stage, but the play is badly cast.
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Oscar Wilde (Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories)
β€œ
Sonnet 130 My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red; If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare.
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William Shakespeare (Shakespeare's Sonnets)
β€œ
Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs; Being purg'd, a fire sparkling in lovers' eyes; Being vex'd, a sea nourish'd with lovers' tears; What is it else? A madness most discreet, A choking gall, and a preserving sweet. *Here’s what love is: a smoke made out of lovers' sighs. When the smoke clears, love is a fire burning in your lover’s eyes. If you frustrate love, you get an ocean made out of lovers' tears. What else is love? It’s a wise form of madness. It’s a sweet lozenge that you choke on.*
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
β€œ
All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances, And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant, Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms. Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel And shining morning face, creeping like snail Unwillingly to school. And then the lover, Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier, Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard, Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel, Seeking the bubble reputation Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice, In fair round belly with good capon lined, With eyes severe and beard of formal cut, Full of wise saws and modern instances; And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts Into the lean and slippered pantaloon, With spectacles on nose and pouch on side; His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
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William Shakespeare (As You Like It)
β€œ
Reading list (1972 edition)[edit] 1. Homer – Iliad, Odyssey 2. The Old Testament 3. Aeschylus – Tragedies 4. Sophocles – Tragedies 5. Herodotus – Histories 6. Euripides – Tragedies 7. Thucydides – History of the Peloponnesian War 8. Hippocrates – Medical Writings 9. Aristophanes – Comedies 10. Plato – Dialogues 11. Aristotle – Works 12. Epicurus – Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus 13. Euclid – Elements 14. Archimedes – Works 15. Apollonius of Perga – Conic Sections 16. Cicero – Works 17. Lucretius – On the Nature of Things 18. Virgil – Works 19. Horace – Works 20. Livy – History of Rome 21. Ovid – Works 22. Plutarch – Parallel Lives; Moralia 23. Tacitus – Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania 24. Nicomachus of Gerasa – Introduction to Arithmetic 25. Epictetus – Discourses; Encheiridion 26. Ptolemy – Almagest 27. Lucian – Works 28. Marcus Aurelius – Meditations 29. Galen – On the Natural Faculties 30. The New Testament 31. Plotinus – The Enneads 32. St. Augustine – On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine 33. The Song of Roland 34. The Nibelungenlied 35. The Saga of Burnt NjΓ‘l 36. St. Thomas Aquinas – Summa Theologica 37. Dante Alighieri – The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy 38. Geoffrey Chaucer – Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales 39. Leonardo da Vinci – Notebooks 40. NiccolΓ² Machiavelli – The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy 41. Desiderius Erasmus – The Praise of Folly 42. Nicolaus Copernicus – On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres 43. Thomas More – Utopia 44. Martin Luther – Table Talk; Three Treatises 45. FranΓ§ois Rabelais – Gargantua and Pantagruel 46. John Calvin – Institutes of the Christian Religion 47. Michel de Montaigne – Essays 48. William Gilbert – On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies 49. Miguel de Cervantes – Don Quixote 50. Edmund Spenser – Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene 51. Francis Bacon – Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis 52. William Shakespeare – Poetry and Plays 53. Galileo Galilei – Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences 54. Johannes Kepler – Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World 55. William Harvey – On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals 56. Thomas Hobbes – Leviathan 57. RenΓ© Descartes – Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy 58. John Milton – Works 59. MoliΓ¨re – Comedies 60. Blaise Pascal – The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises 61. Christiaan Huygens – Treatise on Light 62. Benedict de Spinoza – Ethics 63. John Locke – Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education 64. Jean Baptiste Racine – Tragedies 65. Isaac Newton – Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics 66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz – Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology 67. Daniel Defoe – Robinson Crusoe 68. Jonathan Swift – A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal 69. William Congreve – The Way of the World 70. George Berkeley – Principles of Human Knowledge 71. Alexander Pope – Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man 72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu – Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws 73. Voltaire – Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary 74. Henry Fielding – Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones 75. Samuel Johnson – The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
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Mortimer J. Adler (How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading)
β€œ
Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him; The evil that men do lives after them, The good is oft interred with their bones, So let it be with Caesar ... The noble Brutus Hath told you Caesar was ambitious: If it were so, it was a grievous fault, And grievously hath Caesar answered it ... Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest, (For Brutus is an honourable man; So are they all; all honourable men) Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral ... He was my friend, faithful and just to me: But Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man…. He hath brought many captives home to Rome, Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill: Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff: Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. You all did see that on the Lupercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown, Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition? Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And, sure, he is an honourable man. I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know. You all did love him once, not without cause: What cause withholds you then to mourn for him? O judgement! thou art fled to brutish beasts, And men have lost their reason…. Bear with me; My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar, And I must pause till it come back to me
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William Shakespeare (Julius Caesar)