Scooters Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Scooters. Here they are! All 100 of them:

I can't promise we'll ever use you for a hasty getaway," Cole said, "but with a little work, you might be able to race my grandmother-while she's on her scooter.
Gena Showalter (Alice in Zombieland (White Rabbit Chronicles, #1))
I can’t promise we’ll ever use you for a hasty getaway,” Cole said, “but with a little work, you might be able to race my grandmother—while she’s on her scooter.
Gena Showalter (Alice in Zombieland (White Rabbit Chronicles, #1))
Tea Party members go to meetings on Medicare scooters.
Ishmael Reed
Yes, I call my scooter Jessie, and I don't think that's weird in the slightest." (...) "Doesn't your truck have a name ?" she asked Blake with mock surprise. "Sure. Toyota...
M.J. Hearle (Winter's Shadow (Winter Saga, #1))
In every big-budget science fiction movie there's the moment when a spaceship as large as New York suddenly goes to light speed. A twanging noise like a wooden ruler being plucked over the edge of a desk, a dazzling refraction of light, and suddenly the stars have all been stretched out thin and it's gone. This was exactly like that, except that instead of a gleaming twelve-mile-long spaceship, it was an off-white twenty-year-old motor scooter. And you didn't have the special rainbow effects. And it probably wasn't going at more than two hundred miles an hour. And instead of a pulsing whine sliding up the octaves, it just went putputputputput ... VROOOOSH. But it was exactly like that anyway.
Neil Gaiman (Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch)
LINA's RULES OF SCOOTER RIDING: 1. Never ride a scooter sopping wet. 2. Never ride a scooter wearing a short skirt. 3. Try to pay attention to the light signals. Otherwise, every time the driver accelerates you'll smash into him and you'll have this awkward untangling moment and then you'll worry he's thinking you're doing it on purpose. 4. If by chance you aren't abiding by rule number two, be sure to avoid eye contact with male drivers. Otherwise they'll honk enthusiastically every time your skirt flies up.
Jenna Evans Welch (Love & Gelato (Love & Gelato, #1))
His mother got her purse. His father reached for the door. "Scooter," he said, by way of good-bye, "have fun with your friends." But Hale was shaking his head. He put his arm around Kat's shoulders. "She's not my friend, Dad. She's my girlfriend." Hale's parents must have walked away, but Kat wasn't looking. She was too busy staring up at Hale, trying to see into his eyes and know if he was okay. The sadness that had lingered for weeks was fading, and the boy that held her was the boy she knew. A boy who kissed her lightly.
Ally Carter (Perfect Scoundrels (Heist Society, #3))
He told me he fell for me the moment I shouted at him from across the street when he almost ran me off my scooter. I told him it took me longer than that. He doesn't care. I love him now, and that's all that matters.
Paige Toon (Chasing Daisy)
It was like walking through a scene from an Italian movie. The street was lined with clothing stores and little coffee shops and restaurants, and people kept calling to one another from windows and cars. Halfway down the street a horn beeped politely and everyone cleared out of the street to make way for an entire family crowded onto a scooter. There was even a string of laundry hanging between two buildings, a billowy red housedress flapping right in the middle of it. Any second now a director was going to jump out and yell, Cut!
Jenna Evans Welch (Love & Gelato (Love & Gelato, #1))
As a technology, the book is like a hammer. That is to say, it is perfect: a tool ideally suited to its task. Hammers can be tweaked and varied but will never go obsolete. Even when builders pound nails by the thousand with pneumatic nail guns, every household needs a hammer. Likewise, the bicycle is alive and well. It was invented in a world without automobiles, and for speed and range it was quickly surpassed by motorcycles and all kinds of powered scooters. But there is nothing quaint about bicycles. They outsell cars.
James Gleick
The only thing that can stop you is you... Stay focused and never mind any of the crap anybody says. That's not you, that's them. That's the negative place they want to live in. You choose to live in a positive place. - Scooter Braun
Justin Bieber (First Step 2 Forever)
It's the ride of life the journey from here to there living and loving every moment like we have none to spare.
Jess "Chief" Brynjulson (Highway Writings)
Outside, washing hung still on the rotary line, bone dry and stiff from the sun. A child's scooter lay abandoned on the stepping-stone path. Just one human heart beat within a kilometer radius of the farm. So nothing reacted when, deep inside the house, the baby started crying.
Jane Harper (The Dry (Aaron Falk, #1))
That’s okay. I just want to live long enough to ride the scooter shopping cart at Walmart.” Mack
Nicole James (Wolf (Evil Dead MC, #4))
Ove gives the box a skeptical glance, as if it’s a highly dubious sort of box, a box that rides a scooter and wears tracksuit pants and just called Ove “my friend” before offering to sell him a watch.
Fredrik Backman (A Man Called Ove)
Private, everything is mind over matter, If you don’t mind, it don’t matter.
Joseph Perry Grassi (The Little Guy (or The Motor Scooter): The story of a diminutive soldier in the rear with the gear)
Always keep a part of your mind empty, so you can go there to rest.
Benny Bellamacina (The Scooter Five: Strawberry Bees)
Woah there, Scooter...looks like you might be starting to veer towards nihilism...anyway, it's sand time now.
Allie Brosh (Solutions and Other Problems)
No consigo dormirme. Estoy enamorado, y cuando estás enamorado lo menos que te puede pasar es no dormir. Hasta la noche más negra se vuelve roja. Se te amontona tal cantidad de cosas en la cabeza que querrías pensar en ellas todas a la vez y el corazón no consigue calmarse. Y además resulta extraño porque todo te parece hermoso. Haces la misma vida de todos los días, con las mismas cosas y el mismo hartazgo. Y luego te enamoras y esa misma vida se vuelva grandiosa y diferente. Sabes que vives en el mismo mundo de Beatrice y entonces qué más da si el examen te sale mal, si se pincha la rueda del scooter, si Terminator quiere mear, si se pone a llover y no llevas paraguas. Te da lo mismo porque sabes que esas cosas son transitorias. El amor, en cambio, no. Tu estrella roja brilla siempre. Beatrice está ahí, tu amor está dentro de tu corazón y es grande, te hace soñar y nadie puede arrancártelo porque está en un sitio al que nadie puede llegar. No sé cómo describirlo: ojalá no se acabe nunca.
Alessandro D'Avenia (Bianca come il latte, rossa come il sangue)
Mrs. Schaap didn’t just slip and fall, as reported; she was actually knocked down by a scooter. The driver, who wishes to remain anonymous, had been a bit too intent on his shopping basket.
Hendrik Groen (The Secret Diary of Hendrik Groen, 83¼ Years Old)
She tries to move toward him, but the path is covered with gravel, which slows her down. Then he turns his head and sees her. He puts down his brush and comes closer, and the closer he comes, the closer he comes, the happier she is she didn't put on mascara, she doesn't want to cry but she can't help it, she can hardly see him through the welling tears. She quickly wipes her eyes. She looks at him. He's standing two steps away. She could stretch out her hand, he'd come even closer, she could touch him. He's the same, thinner, the most beautiful man in the world, with the eyes Germain Pire described to her, a very pale blue, almost gray, quiet and gentle, with something struggling in their depths, a child, a soul of agony. His voice hasn't changed. The first thing she hears him say--it's terrible--he asks her, "You can't walk?" She shakes her head. He sighs, goes back to his painting. She pushes the wheels, moves toward the shed. He looks over at her again, he smiles. "You want to see what I'm doing?" She nods her head. "I'll show you in a little bit," he says. "But not right now, it's not finished." So while she waits, she sits up straight in her scooter, she crosses her hands in her lap, she looks at him. Yes, she looks at him, she looks at him, life is long and can still carry a great deal more on its back. She looks at him.
Sébastien Japrisot
LINA"S RULES FOR SCOOTER RIDING: 1.Never ride a scooter sopping wet. 2. Never ride a scooter wearing a short skirt. 3. Try to pay attention to light signals. Otherwise, every time the driver accelerates you'll smash into him and you'll have this awkward untangling moment and then you'll worry he 's thinking you're doing it on purpose.
Jenna Evans Welch (Love & Gelato (Love & Gelato, #1))
If I'm forced to sign an NDA to never speak of someone again, I won't do it because it would be silencing my voice from saying what I've been through. I respect Taylor Swift for turning her back on silencers like Scooter Braun.
Laika Constantino
For a kid who has achieved as much as he has, it is amazing how much he is doubted
Scooter Braun talking about Justin Bieber
Jealousy makes people act dumb sometimes
Joseph Perry Grassi (The Little Guy (or The Motor Scooter): The story of a diminutive soldier in the rear with the gear)
Yesterday never happened; today will never end; and tomorrow will never come.
Joseph Perry Grassi (The Little Guy (or The Motor Scooter): The story of a diminutive soldier in the rear with the gear)
So Annabeth was kidnapped on a motor scooter,” she summed up, “by Gregory Peck and Audrey Hepburn.” “Not kidnapped, exactly,” Percy said. “But I’ve got this bad feeling.…” He took a deep breath, like he was trying hard not to freak out. “Anyway, she’s—she’s gone. Maybe I shouldn’t have let her, but—” “You had to,” Piper said. “You knew she had to go alone. Besides, Annabeth is tough and smart. She’ll be fine.” Piper put some charmspeak in her voice, which maybe wasn’t cool, but Percy needed to be able to focus. If they went into battle, Annabeth wouldn’t want him getting hurt because he was too distracted about her. His shoulders relaxed a little. “Maybe you’re right. Anyway, Gregory—I mean Tiberinus—said we had less time to rescue Nico than we thought. Hazel and the guys aren’t back yet?” Piper checked the time on the helm control. She hadn’t realized how late it was getting. “It’s two in the afternoon. We said three o’clock for a rendezvous.” “At the latest,” Jason said. Percy pointed at Piper’s dagger. “Tiberinus said you could find Nico’s location…you know, with that.” Piper bit her lip. The last thing she wanted to do was check Katoptris for more terrifying images. “I’ve tried,” she said. “The dagger doesn’t always show what I want to see. In fact, it hardly ever does.” “Please,” Percy said. “Try again.” He pleaded with those sea-green eyes, like a cute baby seal that needed help. Piper wondered how Annabeth ever won an argument with this guy.
Rick Riordan (The Mark of Athena (The Heroes of Olympus, #3))
Lambretta It doesn't get much better Though I'm trying to forget her That girl on that Lambretta Stole my heart. But my feelings just got fonder As she disappeared off yonder But I couldn't get my Honda Bike to start. So I'll admit defeat It's not partial, it's complete 'Cos I'll never get to meet That work of art. Now I've ceased to be a suitor I imagine that'll suit her An' I 'ope her rotten scooter Falls apart.
Robbie Franklin (The Ipswich Bus)
s Middags ging ik met Sven lunchen in de stad. We liepen langs een groep jongens met petjes en scooters. 'Homo's!' riep een van de jongens. De andere lachten en een plastic flesje stuiterde over de straatstenen onze kant op. 'Hoorde je dat?' vroeg ik verrukt aan Sven. 'Ze bedoelen mij ook!
Thomas van der Meer (Welkom bij de club)
Man, all the time somebody is telling me, ‘Cassius, you know I’m the one who made you.’ I know some guys in Louisville who used to give me a lift to the gym in their car when my motor scooter was broke down. Now they’re trying to tell me they made me, and how not to forget them when I get rich. And my daddy, he tickles me. He says, ‘Don’t listen to the others, boy; I made you.’ He says he made me because he fed me vegetable soup and steak when I was a baby, going without shoes to pay the food bill. Well, he’s my father and I guess more teenagers ought to realize what they owe their folks. But listen here. When you want to talk about who made me, you talk to me. Who made me is me.”3
Thomas Hauser (Muhammad Ali: His Life and Times)
On an impulse he cannot explain, he buys himself a one-way ticket - and the evening of that very same day finds him wandering the streets of the old colonial quarter of the Colombian town. Girls in love with boys on scooters, screeching birds, tropical flowers on winding vines, saudade, and solitude, One Hundred Years of it; and then, as the tropical dusk darkens the corners of the Plaza de la Adana, he sees a woman, her fingers toying with a necklace of lapis lazuli, and they stand still as the world eddies about them.
David Mitchell (The Bone Clocks)
Work harder; not smarter
Joseph Perry Grassi (The Little Guy (or The Motor Scooter): The story of a diminutive soldier in the rear with the gear)
Rank comes with responsibility whether you’re ready or not
Joseph Perry Grassi (The Little Guy (or The Motor Scooter): The story of a diminutive soldier in the rear with the gear)
Private, everything is mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it don’t matter.
Joseph Perry Grassi (The Little Guy (or The Motor Scooter): The story of a diminutive soldier in the rear with the gear)
To be in the Army, you need to be smart or strong, and you privates ain’t either.
Joseph Perry Grassi (The Little Guy (or The Motor Scooter): The story of a diminutive soldier in the rear with the gear)
Work harder; not smarter.
Joseph Perry Grassi (The Little Guy (or The Motor Scooter): The story of a diminutive soldier in the rear with the gear)
In the Army, the drill sergeants said, "Eat it now and taste it later.
Joseph Perry Grassi (The Little Guy (or The Motor Scooter): The story of a diminutive soldier in the rear with the gear)
Lou Reed drove Honda scooters these days, and I was a hell of a lot closer to the wild side than him.
Warren Moore (Broken Glass Waltzes)
On Duval Street, the buzzing of motorized scooters and the cacophony of happy tourists meshed together in a noisy symphony.
Kimberly G. Giarratano (One Night Is All You Need: A Short Story)
like when you misplace your scooter keys or your phone and then they turn up and you get a rush of luckiness, as if the stars or fate or something has singled you out for a win.
Margaret Atwood (The Heart Goes Last)
I stop dead in my tracks again; this time a businessman on a scooter runs over my foot.
Beth O'Leary (The Flatshare)
Three morbidly obese hill people on motorized scooters are between me and my morning coffee.
Gillian Flynn (Gone Girl)
The population is getting fatter faster than a mobility scooter hurtling towards Greggs at closing time.
Adam Kay (This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor)
most scooter operators are terrible drivers, worse even than Mr. Magoo.
Hendrik Groen (The Secret Diary of Hendrik Groen, 83¼ Years Old)
Do you remember how as kids we sat in front of a scooter & believed we were the one steering it, while someone else was actually driving & we never really had any control? That's how life works.
Nitya Prakash
Motor scooters appeared on the scene—in France and especially Italy, where the first national motor-scooter rally, held in Rome on November 13th 1949, was followed by an explosive growth in the market for these convenient and reasonably priced symbols of urban freedom and mobility, popular with young people and duly celebrated—the Vespa model in particular—in every contemporary film from or about Italy.
Tony Judt (Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945)
When she wasn't at Courtney's, she was perched on top of a stationary bike at spinning class. Siobhán would much rather ride a scooter. It never made sense to her why anyone would want to pedal like mad on top of something that was never going to go anywhere.
Carlene O'Connor (Murder in an Irish Village (Irish Village Mystery, #1))
myself.” “Only a hanky?” said Mummy, smiling. “I will bring one for you, and your favourite cookies too.” Jack was quiet for a moment; the cookies giving him pause for serious consideration. “OK,” he conceded. “But next time, surely I will come.” Mummy went out on her scooter.
D.R. Tara (The Agent With a Bone to Pick (Adventures of Jack))
If you visit London, you’ll occasionally cross paths with young men (and less often women) on motor scooters, blithely darting in and out of traffic while studying maps affixed to their handlebars. These studious cyclists are training to become London cabdrivers. Before they can receive accreditation from London’s Public Carriage Office, cabbies-in-training must spend two to four years memorizing the locations and traffic patterns of all 25,000 streets in the vast and vastly confusing city, as well as the locations of 1,400 landmarks. Their training culminates in an infamously daunting exam called “the Knowledge,” in which they not only have to plot the shortest route between any two points in the metropolitan area, but also name important places of interest along the way. Only about three out of ten people who train for the Knowledge obtain certification.
Joshua Foer (Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything)
Oh, it's a beautiful day, it's an elegant, graceful day, and I'm sailing down the Strip in glamorous Las Vegas, on my motor scooter, in company with a certified illegal prostitute who loves poetry and remembers it. Sonofabitch, I'm a real writer! I used to worry about it, but no more. Life is good.
Peter S. Beagle (I See by My Outfit)
The Arcturan megafreighters used to carry most of the bulky trade between the Galactic Center and the outlying regions. The Betelgeuse trading scouts used to find the markets and the Arcturans would supply them. There was a lot of trouble with space pirates before they were wiped out in the Dordellis wars, and the megafreighters had to be equipped with the most fantastic defense shields known to Galactic science. They were real brutes of ships, and huge. In orbit round a planet they would eclipse the sun. “One day, young Zaphod here decides to raid one. On a tri-jet scooter designed for stratosphere work, a mere kid. I
Douglas Adams (The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Hitchhiker's Guide, #1))
Carthage had a bigger drug epidemic than I ever knew: The cops had been here just yesterday, and already the druggies had resettled, like determined flies. As we made our way through the piles of humans, an obese woman shushed up to us on an electric scooter. Her face was pimply and wet with sweat, her teeth catlike.
Gillian Flynn (Gone Girl)
Anyway, Ms. Rothschild wasn’t my first crush.” “She wasn’t?” “No. You were.” It takes me a few seconds to process this. Even then, all I can manage is, “Huh?” “When I first moved here, before I knew your true personality.” I kick him in the shin for that, and he yelps. “I was twelve, and you were eleven. I let you ride my scooter, remember? That scooter was my pride and joy. I saved up for it for two birthdays. And I let you take it for a ride.” “I thought you were just being generous.” “You crashed it and you got a big scratch on the side,” he continues. “Remember that?” “Yeah, I remember you cried.” “I didn’t cry. I was justifiably upset. And that was the end of my little crush.
Jenny Han (To All the Boys I've Loved Before (To All the Boys I've Loved Before, #1))
He bent down and brushed his lips against mine. I know he planned on it being a quck little peck, but I grabbed the back of his head and held him to me as I - very thoroughly - explored his mouth. "Seriously? Again?" Logan complained from beside me. "Dude, I think her tonsils are just fine," Scooter joined in. "You can stop checking them any time now.
Tracy Deebs
I've got the money I've got the place You've got the figure You've got the face lets get together we're jumping all over the world
Scooter
People are like the waves, all similar, none the same
Benny Bellamacina (The Scooter Five: Strawberry Bees)
my scooter. So can I borrow yours?” Bella stared at me. “If you ride my scooter, what will I ride?” she asked. “You can borrow AJ’s scooter,” I said. “But what if AJ wants to ride his scooter?” “Then he can borrow Francis’s scooter.” “But what will Francis ride?” “He can ride his bike.” “Francis doesn’t have a bike,” Bella said. “Only a scooter.” I gave up. Because that girl was talking
Robbie Hyman (ZOE ZIMMER: Neighborhood Watch Kid)
Truly?" I turned around, It was Calhoun. "Hey," I said. "Would you like to dance?" My mouth dropped open for the second time that evening. "Uh, sure," I mananged to squeak out. "You snooze, you lose," said Calhoun, his dark eyes gleaming in triumph. This time he wasn't talking to me, though. He was talking to Scooter, who was standing behind us with two cups of punch and a shocked look on his face.
Heather Vogel Frederick
Well, there are lot of people who make a lot of money off the fifth- and sixth-life crises. All of a sudden they have a ton of consumers scared out of their minds and willing to buy facial cream, designer jeans, SAT test prep courses, condoms, cars, scooters, self-help books, watches, wallets, stocks, whatever…all the crap that the twenty-somethings used to buy, they now have the ten-somethings buying. They doubled their market!
Ned Vizzini (It's Kind of a Funny Story)
Dodo Conway was a Catholic who had gone to Barnard and then married an architect who had gone to Columbia and was also a Catholic. They had a big, rambling house up the street from us, set behind a morbid façade of pine trees, and surrounded by scooters, tricycles, doll carriages, toy fire trucks, baseball bat, badminton nets, croquet wickets, hamster cages and cocker spaniel puppies--the whole sprawling paraphernalia of suburban childhood.
Sylvia Plath (The Bell Jar)
But inevitably, armed with a complimentary map—no GPS devices are permitted on Farside—you’ll want to explore the city. If you still haven’t gotten your moonlegs you might elect to hire a motorized scooter or to strap on some hydraulic walk-assist devices. You’ll be relieved to discover, in any case, that most of the tourist districts have heavily padded surfaces, and that the windows, should you fall against them, are made of lunar glass—the most unbreakable glass in existence.
Anthony O'Neill (The Dark Side)
Replaying in my mind the Martha Stewart, Leonidas Young, and Scooter Libby cases, I argued that if we weren’t going to hold retired generals and CIA directors accountable for blatantly lying during investigations, how could we justify jailing thousands of others for doing the same thing? I believed, and still believe, that Petraeus was treated under a double standard based on class. A poor person, an unknown person—say a young black Baptist minister from Richmond—would be charged with a felony and sent to jail.
James Comey (A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership)
Nei bar in cui non si poteva nè leggere nè piangere. Quando guardavi indietro sembrava poi tutto sacro. Quando a separarci prima c’era una parete e adesso ci sono due rampe di scale con un eco fortissimo che si ripetono le parole per due volte tutte intere ma i nostri silenzi infiniti. Sprechiamo ancora qualcosa ma assieme, non come i tuoi giri di quando cadevi sempre in scooter. Per immaginarla mi metto degli occhiali da sole anche se non ce n’è bisogno, per il colore della sua pelle che è più scuro. Per resuscitare in un altro bar alle sette di sera. Queste grandiose solitudini, e questi scavi archeologici per mettersi a scrivere sulle tastiere di pianoforti affittati che suonano da anni nei pianobar. Mi ricordi quel personaggio di Moebius che è vestito di un cielo stellato. Uscendo dalla metropolitana non riuscivo mai a capire in che punto sarei arrivato in superficie, in quale degli incroci. Vedevo solo questo rettangolo di cielo che difficilmente era colorato. Poi subito ti travolgevano se ti guardavi troppo attorno ma era bello lo stesso. Se dentro siamo fatti siamo fatti di minerali. E il nostro lato instabile è un cerchio. se l’ametista delle nostre iridi e il piombo delle nostre viscere si fondessero, sai che freddo amore mio d’inverno a mettersi a volare.
Vasco Brondi
When I finally leave the market, the streets are dark, and I pass a few blocks where not a single electric light appears – only dark open storefronts and coms (fast-food eateries), broom closet-sized restaurants serving fish, meat, and rice for under a dollar, flickering candles barely revealing the silhouettes of seated figures. The tide of cyclists, motorbikes, and scooters has increased to an uninterrupted flow, a river that, given the slightest opportunity, diverts through automobile traffic, stopping it cold, spreads into tributaries that spill out over sidewalks, across lots, through filling stations. They pour through narrow openings in front of cars: young men, their girlfriends hanging on the back; families of four: mom, dad, baby, and grandma, all on a fragile, wobbly, underpowered motorbike; three people, the day’s shopping piled on a rear fender; women carrying bouquets of flapping chickens, gathered by their feet while youngest son drives and baby rests on the handlebars; motorbikes carrying furniture, spare tires, wooden crates, lumber, cinder blocks, boxes of shoes. Nothing is too large to pile onto or strap to a bike. Lone men in ragged clothes stand or sit by the roadsides, selling petrol from small soda bottles, servicing punctures with little patch kits and old bicycle pumps.
Anthony Bourdain (A Cook's Tour: Global Adventures in Extreme Cuisines)
Adam había sacado la conclusión que, de todas las industrias del país, la reparación de vespas era la que representaba una mayor sobredemanda respecto a la oferta. En teoría, a quien se dispusiese a satisfacer esa demanda le esperaba una fortuna; pero en el fondo de su corazón Adam dudaba de que las vespas fuesen reparables, en el sentido normal del término; eran las mariposas de la carretera, organismos frágiles que tardaban mucho en ser fabricados y muy poco en morir.
David Lodge (The British Museum Is Falling Down (King Penguin))
He saw a boy around Hannah’s age coming down the street dribbling a basketball. He looked over at Hannah to tell her that he thought she knew this kid, but she had already seen him and her face was flushed. He had the white-toothed glow of an athlete and a rich kid. He said to Toby’s daughter, “Hey, Hannah.” Hannah smiled and said, “Hey.” And the boy dribbled on. “Who was that?” Toby asked. Hannah turned to him, angry. Her eyes were wet. “Why can’t we take cabs like regular people?” “What is it? What happened?” “I just don’t know why we have to do this walking to the park all the time like we’re babies. I don’t want to go to the park. I want to go home.” “What is the matter with you? We always go to the park.” She sounded a great big aspirated grunt of frustration and continued walking ahead of them, her arms stiff and fisted and her legs marching. Toby jogged and caught up with Solly, who had stayed obediently until Toby got to him. “Why’s she so angry?” Solly asked as he remounted his scooter. “I don’t know, kid.” More and more, Toby never knew. — HANNAH WAS INVITED to a sleepover that night.
Taffy Brodesser-Akner (Fleishman Is in Trouble)
Disability is a set of innovative, virtuosic skills. When abled people fuss about how hard it is to make access happen, I laugh and think about the times I’ve stage-managed a show while having a panic attack, or the time the accessible van with three wheelchair-using performers and staff inside broke and we just brainstormed for two hours—Maybe if we pull another van up and lower their ramp onto the busted ramp folks can get out? Who has plywood? If we go to the bike shop, will they have welding tools?—until we figured out a way to fix the ramp so they could get out. If we can do this, why can’t anybody? And this innovation, this persistence, this commitment to not leaving each other behind, the power of a march where you move as slowly as the slowest member and put us in the front, the power of a lockdown of scooter users in front of police headquarters, the power of movements that know how to bring each other food and medicine and organize from tired without apology and with a sense that tired people catch things people moving fast miss—all of these are skills we have. I want us to know that—abled and disabled.
Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice)
The robot could no longer lift his head, had not read the message. They lifted his head, but he complained that his vision circuits had almost gone. They found a coin and helped him to the telescope. He complained and in-sulted them, but they helped him look at each individual letter in turn, The first letter was a “w”, the second an “e”. Then there was a gap. An “a” followed, then a “p”, an “o” and an “l”. Marvin paused for a rest. After a few moments they resumed and let him see the “o”, the “g”, the “i”, the “s” and the “e”. The next two words were “for” and “the”. The last one was a long one, and Marvin needed another rest before he could tackle it. It started with an “i”, then “n” then a “c”. Next came an “o” and an “n”, followed by a “v”, an “e”, another “n” and an “i”. After a final pause, Marvin gathered his strength for the last stretch. He read the “e”, the “n”, the “c” and at last the final “e”, and staggered back into their arms. “I think,” he murmured at last, from deep within his corroding rattling thorax, “I feel good about it.” The lights went out in his eyes for absolutely the very last time ever. Luckily, there was a stall nearby where you could rent scooters from guys with green wings.
Douglas Adams (So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish (The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #4))
The robot could no longer lift his head, had not read the message. They lifted his head, but he complained that his vision circuits had almost gone. They found a coin and helped him to the telescope. He complained and in- 159 sulted them, but they helped him look at each individual letter in turn, The first letter was a “w”, the second an “e”. Then there was a gap. An “a” followed, then a “p”, an “o” and an “l”. Marvin paused for a rest. After a few moments they resumed and let him see the “o”, the “g”, the “i”, the “s” and the “e”. The next two words were “for” and “the”. The last one was a long one, and Marvin needed another rest before he could tackle it. It started with an “i”, then “n” then a “c”. Next came an “o” and an “n”, followed by a “v”, an “e”, another “n” and an “i”. After a final pause, Marvin gathered his strength for the last stretch. He read the “e”, the “n”, the “c” and at last the final “e”, and staggered back into their arms. “I think,” he murmured at last, from deep within his corroding rattling thorax, “I feel good about it.” The lights went out in his eyes for absolutely the very last time ever. Luckily, there was a stall nearby where you could rent scooters from guys with green wings.
Douglas Adams (So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish (The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #4))
Motor-scooter riders with big beards and girl friends who bounce on the back of the scooters and wear their hair long in front of their faces as well as behind, drunks who follow the advice of the Hat Council and are always turned out in hats, but not hats the Council would approve. Mr. Lacey, the locksmith,, shups up his shop for a while and goes to exchange time of day with Mr. Slube at the cigar store. Mr. Koochagian, the tailor, waters luxuriant jungle of plants in his window, gives them a critical look from the outside, accepts compliments on them from two passers-by, fingers the leaves on the plane tree in front of our house with a thoughtful gardener's appraisal, and crosses the street for a bite at the Ideal where he can keep an eye on customers and wigwag across the message that he is coming. The baby carriages come out, and clusters of everyone from toddlers with dolls to teenagers with homework gather at the stoops. When I get home from work, the ballet is reaching its cresendo. This is the time roller skates and stilts and tricycles and games in the lee of the stoop with bottletops and plastic cowboys, this is the time of bundles and packages, zigzagging from the drug store to the fruit stand and back over to the butcher's; this is the time when teenagers, all dressed up, are pausing to ask if their slips shows or their collars look right; this is the time when beautiful girls get out of MG's; this is the time when the fire engines go through; this is the time when anybody you know on Hudson street will go by. As the darkness thickens and Mr. Halpert moors the laundry cart to the cellar door again, the ballet goes under lights, eddying back nad forth but intensifying at the bright spotlight pools of Joe's sidewalk pizza, the bars, the delicatessen, the restaurant and the drug store. The night workers stop now at the delicatessen, to pick up salami and a container of milk. Things have settled down for the evening but the street and its ballet have not come to a stop. I know the deep night ballet and its seasons best from waking long after midnight to tend a baby and, sitting in the dark, seeing the shadows and hearing sounds of the sidewalk. Mostly it is a sound like infinitely patterning snatches of party conversation, and, about three in the morning, singing, very good singing. Sometimes their is a sharpness and anger or sad, sad weeping, or a flurry of search for a string of beads broken. One night a young man came roaring along, bellowing terrible language at two girls whom he had apparently picked up and who were disappointing him. Doors opened, a wary semicircle formed around him, not too close, until police came. Out came the heads, too, along the Hudsons street, offering opinion, "Drunk...Crazy...A wild kid from the suburbs" Deep in the night, I am almost unaware of how many people are on the street unless someone calls the together. Like the bagpipe. Who the piper is and why he favored our street I have no idea.
Jane Jacobs
He saw a boy around Hannah’s age coming down the street dribbling a basketball. He looked over at Hannah to tell her that he thought she knew this kid, but she had already seen him and her face was flushed. He had the white-toothed glow of an athlete and a rich kid. He said to Toby’s daughter, “Hey, Hannah.” Hannah smiled and said, “Hey.” And the boy dribbled on. “Who was that?” Toby asked. Hannah turned to him, angry. Her eyes were wet. “Why can’t we take cabs like regular people?” “What is it? What happened?” “I just don’t know why we have to do this walking to the park all the time like we’re babies. I don’t want to go to the park. I want to go home.” “What is the matter with you? We always go to the park.” She sounded a great big aspirated grunt of frustration and continued walking ahead of them, her arms stiff and fisted and her legs marching. Toby jogged and caught up with Solly, who had stayed obediently until Toby got to him. “Why’s she so angry?” Solly asked as he remounted his scooter. “I don’t know, kid.” More and more, Toby never knew. — HANNAH WAS INVITED to a sleepover that night. Sleepovers, as far as Toby could tell, consisted of the girls in her class getting together and forming alliances and lobbing microaggressions at each other in an all-night cold war, and they did this voluntarily. It had begun when Hannah was in fourth grade, or maybe before that, wherein the alpha girls set to work on a reliable and unyielding establishment of a food chain system—jockeying for position, submitting to a higher position. Licking your wounds when you learn you are not the absolute top; rejoicing to know you are not the absolute bottom.
Taffy Brodesser-Akner (Fleishman Is in Trouble)
The cuisine of Northern Iran, overlooked and underrated, is unlike most Persian food in that it's unfussy and lighthearted as the people from that region. The fertile seaside villages of Mazandaran and Rasht, where Soli grew up before moving to the congested capital, were lush with orchards and rice fields. His father had cultivated citrus trees and the family was raised on the fruits and grains they harvested. Alone in the kitchen, without Zod's supervision, he found himself turning to the wholesome food of his childhood, not only for the comfort the simple compositions offered, but because it was what he knew so well as he set about preparing a homecoming feast for Zod's only son. He pulled two kilos of fava beans from the freezer. Gathered last May, shucked and peeled on a quiet afternoon, they defrosted in a colander for a layered frittata his mother used to make with fistfuls of dill and sprinkled with sea salt. One flat of pale green figs and a bushel of new harvest walnuts were tied to the back of his scooter, along with two crates of pomegranates- half to squeeze for fresh morning juice and the other to split and seed for rice-and-meatball soup. Three fat chickens pecked in the yard, unaware of their destiny as he sharpened his cleaver. Tomorrow they would braise in a rich, tangy stew with sour red plums, their hearts and livers skewered and grilled, then wrapped in sheets of lavash with bouquets of tarragon and mint. Basmati rice soaked in salted water to be steamed with green garlic and mounds of finely chopped parsley and cilantro, then served with a whole roasted, eight kilo white fish stuffed with barberries, pistachios, and lime. On the farthest burner, whole bitter oranges bobbed in blossom syrup, to accompany rice pudding, next to a simmering pot of figs studded with cardamom pods for preserves.
Donia Bijan (The Last Days of Café Leila)
investigations and reported the completion of significant investigations without charges. Anytime a special prosecutor is named to look into the activities of a presidential administration it is big news, and, predictably, my decision was not popular at the Bush White House. A week after the announcement, I substituted for the attorney general at a cabinet meeting with the president. By tradition, the secretaries of state and defense sit flanking the president at the Cabinet Room table in the West Wing of the White House. The secretary of the treasury and the attorney general sit across the table, flanking the vice president. That meant that, as the substitute for the attorney general, I was at Vice President Dick Cheney’s left shoulder. Me, the man who had just appointed a special prosecutor to investigate his friend and most senior and trusted adviser, Scooter Libby. As we waited for the president, I figured I should be polite. I turned to Cheney and said, “Mr. Vice President, I’m Jim Comey from Justice.” Without turning to face me, he said, “I know. I’ve seen you on TV.” Cheney then locked his gaze ahead, as if I weren’t there. We waited in silence for the president. My view of the Brooklyn Bridge felt very far away. I had assured Fitzgerald at the outset that this was likely a five- or six-month assignment. There was some work to do, but it would be a piece of cake. He reminded me of that many times over the next four years, as he was savagely attacked by the Republicans and right-leaning media as some kind of maniacal Captain Ahab, pursuing a case that was a loser from the beginning. Fitzgerald had done exactly as I expected once he took over. He investigated to understand just who in government had spoken with the press about the CIA employee and what they were thinking when they did so. After careful examination, he ended in a place that didn’t surprise me on Armitage and Rove. But the Libby part—admittedly, a major loose end when I gave him the case—
James Comey (A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership)
Both C.K. and Bieber are extremely gifted performers. Both climbed to the top of their industry, and in fact, both ultimately used the Internet to get big. But somehow Bieber “made it” in one-fifteenth of the time. How did he climb so much faster than the guy Rolling Stone calls the funniest man in America—and what does this have to do with Jimmy Fallon? The answer begins with a story from Homer’s Odyssey. When the Greek adventurer Odysseus embarked for war with Troy, he entrusted his son, Telemachus, to the care of a wise old friend named Mentor. Mentor raised and coached Telemachus in his father’s absence. But it was really the goddess Athena disguised as Mentor who counseled the young man through various important situations. Through Athena’s training and wisdom, Telemachus soon became a great hero. “Mentor” helped Telemachus shorten his ladder of success. The simple answer to the Bieber question is that the young singer shot to the top of pop with the help of two music industry mentors. And not just any run-of-the-mill coach, but R& B giant Usher Raymond and rising-star manager Scooter Braun. They reached from the top of the ladder where they were and pulled Bieber up, where his talent could be recognized by a wide audience. They helped him polish his performing skills, and in four years Bieber had sold 15 million records and been named by Forbes as the third most powerful celebrity in the world. Without Raymond’s and Braun’s mentorship, Biebs would probably still be playing acoustic guitar back home in Canada. He’d be hustling on his own just like Louis C.K., begging for attention amid a throng of hopeful entertainers. Mentorship is the secret of many of the highest-profile achievers throughout history. Socrates mentored young Plato, who in turn mentored Aristotle. Aristotle mentored a boy named Alexander, who went on to conquer the known world as Alexander the Great. From The Karate Kid to Star Wars to The Matrix, adventure stories often adhere to a template in which a protagonist forsakes humble beginnings and embarks on a great quest. Before the quest heats up, however, he or she receives training from a master: Obi Wan Kenobi. Mr. Miyagi. Mickey Goldmill. Haymitch. Morpheus. Quickly, the hero is ready to face overwhelming challenges. Much more quickly than if he’d gone to light-saber school. The mentor story is so common because it seems to work—especially when the mentor is not just a teacher, but someone who’s traveled the road herself. “A master can help you accelerate things,” explains Jack Canfield, author of the Chicken Soup for the Soul series and career coach behind the bestseller The Success Principles. He says that, like C.K., we can spend thousands of hours practicing until we master a skill, or we can convince a world-class practitioner to guide our practice and cut the time to mastery significantly.
Shane Snow (Smartcuts: The Breakthrough Power of Lateral Thinking)
I snapped the key to the side and revved the gas more than necessary, wishing my scooter was a Harley so I could blast my frustrations out through the rumble of serious exhaust pipes.
Kelly Said (Fangtales)
URB-E, an electric scooter so compact that it can easily squeeze onto a crowded subway car.
Anonymous
What I enjoy is music since it’s a rich world of story in sound. I love instrumental pieces, especially classical. I would love if others listened with me. I like to walk, or scooter, or ride my bike. I need to move and to release energy kinesthetically. I love swimming, to jump on a trampoline, and recently to work out. If someone played with me this way, I’d try to follow. I can’t explain why my senses prefer movement, but I’m resigned to it. I’m interested in cooking too, so I enjoy doing that.
Ido Kedar (Ido in Autismland: Climbing Out of Autism's Silent Prison)
Along with every other male of his acquaintance he loathed the Naked Chef with messianic passion and prayed for the day he suffered a fatal accident on his scooter or burst into flames with the friction of sliding down that nauseating banister. Mark hated to think how rich he must be. And the fact that a mere bloody cook was taking up space in The Times that could be filled by a train journalist. Like himself, for example. Bastard.
Wendy Holden (Farm Fatale: A Comedy of Country Manors)
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Now immobility is no more your problem
Despite this book, white people will still be able to enjoy Vespa scooters without comment and properly conjugate words without anyone being surprised.
Justin Simien (Dear White People: A Guide to Inter-Racial Harmony in "Post-Racial" America)
I killed a couple of people,” Scooter said. “Wanna play cards?
Forrest Carr (A Journal of the Crazy Year)
I really like those old shows. I’ve decided the way to know you’re becoming an old fogey is when the only shows you like are sponsored by Depends, the Scooter Store, and Viagra.
Joel Salatin (Folks, This Ain't Normal: A Farmer's Advice for Happier Hens, Healthier People, and a Better World)
I’d be hard-pressed to find a better start to a brand story than the one that chronicles the birth of “the people’s car,” the Tata Nano. The story goes that Ratan Tata, chairman of the well-respected Tata Group, was travelling along in the pouring rain behind a family who was precariously perched on a scooter weaving in and out of traffic on the slick wet roads of Bangalore. Tata thought that surely this was a problem he and his company could solve. He wanted to bring safe, affordable transport to the poor—to design, build, and sell a family car that could replace the scooter for a price that was less than $2,500. It was a business idea born from a high ideal and coming from a man with a track record in the industry, someone with the capability to innovate, design, and produce a high-quality product. People were captivated by the idea of what would be the world’s cheapest car. The media and the world watched to see how delivering on this seemingly impossible promise might pan out. Ratan Tata did deliver on his promise when he unveiled the Nano at the New Delhi Auto Expo in 2009, six years after having the idea. The hype around the new “people’s car” and the media attention it received meant that any mistakes were very public (several production challenges and safety problems were reported along the way). And while the general public seemed to be behind the idea of a new and fun Indian-led innovation, the number of Facebook likes (almost 4 million to date) didn’t convert to actual sales. It seemed that while Tata Motors was telling a story about affordability and innovating with frugal engineering (perhaps “lean engineering” might have worked better for them), the story prospective customers were hearing was one about a car that was cheap. The positioning of the car was at odds with the buying public’s perception of it. In a country where a car is an aspirational purchase, the Nano became symbolic of the car to buy if you couldn’t afford anything else. Since its launch in 2009, just over 200,000 Nanos have sold. The factory has the capacity to produce 21,000 cars a month. It turns out that the modest numbers of people buying the Nano are not the scooter drivers but middle-class Indians who are looking for a second car, or a car for their parents or children. The car that was billed as a “game changer” hasn’t lived up to the hype in the hearts of the people who were expected to line up and buy it in the tens of thousands. Despite winning design and innovation awards, the Nano’s reputation amongst consumers—and the story they have come to believe—has been the thing that’s held it back.
Bernadette Jiwa (The Fortune Cookie Principle: The 20 Keys to a Great Brand Story and Why Your Business Needs One)
scooter. Four more squads were double-parked farther up the street. As Lucas paused at the trash basket, disposing of the orange, a
John Sandford (Silent Prey (Lucas Davenport, #4))
I could have stayed holding on to Masimo and riding round forever, round and round, like that bloke on that doomed phantom boat, The Flying Dutchman. Of course there are differences—he was not on a scooter, and I don’t have a beard and I am not Dutch.
Louise Rennison (Away Laughing on a Fast Camel (Confessions of Georgia Nicolson, #5))
There had been one time Bush jumped off the Cheney bus, a big decision on bioterror defense at the end of 2002. Two sensitive intelligence reports set off alarms for the vice president. One said 'al Qaeda is interested in acquiring biological weapons, to include smallpox.' The other, from the CIA's Weapons Intelligence, Nonproliferation and Arms Control Center, assessed (with confidence ranging from 'medium' to 'very high') that North Korea, Iraq, France, and Russia had undeclared samples of the smallpox virus, variola, which no longer existed in nature. Cheney and his staff connected the dots and brought the government to the brink of a mass vaccination campaign. Scooter Libby argued so forcefully that colleagues called him Germ Boy behind his back.
Barton Gellman
All'improvviso, il ronzare del motorino che aveva udito pochi istanti prima si fece più intenso. Si voltò di colpo, sapendo che non era ammessa la circolazione di veicoli a motore su Ponte Vecchio. Stava perfino per dire qualcosa. Ma i rimproveri gli rimasero bloccati in gola. Lo scooter superò il netturbino. Il motociclista incrociò lo sguardo dell'addetto del Comune e proseguì dritto. Si fermò a un metro da lui. Paolini esaminò il suo volto anonimo mentre l'uomo estraeva dalla giacca una piccola rivoltella nera. Se la vide puntare addosso e, prima che potesse capire perché, udì il primo dei tre spari. Il gallerista si accasciò a terra, il ventre sanguinante. L'unica cosa che vide fu la statua di Benvenuto Cellini che veniva inghiottita dal buio.
G.L. Barone
Key West has become an imitation of its former self, its eccentricities commoditized for sale to tourists. That “character” you see with a parrot on his shoulder is about as authentic as vinyl siding, employed to provide local color. Gargantuan cruise ships dock two or three times a week, disgorging passengers by the thousands to troll the cheesy T-shirt shops on the main drag, Duval Street. And with all sorts of diversions to keep visitors occupied, like parasailing and jet skiing, tourist season is year-round, clogging the streets with autos, bikes, motor scooters, and pedestrians. I
Philip Caputo (The Longest Road: Overland in Search of America, from Key West to the Arctic Ocean)
There are the dopes who broke their arms and ankles on scooters (people really don’t listen), who are now wondering if it will cost them their lives. The
Tina Fey (Bossypants)
He kissed her and for a while they sat in silence watching the birds and the sway of the tree branches in the slight breeze. Babies in buggies and toddlers on tiny scooters and three wheeled bikes, it all went on around them, normality. In the end though they had to move, nothing had changed with the sharing of knowledge and they still had no plan. “So,
Diane M. Dickson (Layers of Lies)
Unleash the adventurer in you and drive through the streets with your well-maintained Kymco scooter with our wide collection of genuine spare parts.
kymcopartsonline
I would have crushed him gladly, I loathe children...One should reserve, on busy streets, special tracks for these nasty little creatures, their prams, hoops, sweats, scooters, skates, grandpas, grandmas, nannies, balloons, and balls, all their foul little happiness in a word.
Samuel Beckett (First Love and Other Novellas)
Carve your path with our range of high-quality e-scooters and e-skateboards at affordable prices. Whether you're a beginner who is looking for an affordable and fun alternative for your morning commute or adrenaline junky looking for fast, high quality and durable off-road skateboards, Path has the technology to help you carve your path.
Carve Your Path
Ryan was convinced of the aging fifties motto ‘Live fast, die young’, and, though his scooter didn’t do more than 22 m.p.h. downhill, he liked to warn Clara in grim tones not to get ‘too involved’, for he wouldn’t be here long; he was ‘going out’ early and with a ‘bang’”.
Zadie Smith (White Teeth)
By this time (in mid-2012) the country had been without a functioning government for more than twenty years, and the city was a byword for chaos, lawlessness, corruption, and violence. But this wasn’t the Mogadishu we saw. Far from it: on the surface, the city was a picture of prosperity. Many shops and houses were freshly painted, and signs on many street corners advertised auto parts, courses in business and English, banks, money changers and remittance services, cellphones, processed food, powdered milk, cigarettes, drinks, clothes, and shoes. The Bakara market in the center of town had a monetary exchange, where the Somali shilling—a currency that has survived without a state or a central bank for more than twenty years—floated freely on market rates that were set and updated twice daily. There were restaurants, hotels, and a gelato shop, and many intersections had busy produce markets. The coffee shops were crowded with men watching soccer on satellite television and good-naturedly arguing about scores and penalties. Traffic flowed freely, with occasional blue-uniformed, unarmed Somali National Police officers (male and female) controlling intersections. Besides motorcycles, scooters, and cars, there were horse-drawn carts sharing the roads with trucks loaded above the gunwales with bananas, charcoal, or firewood. Offshore, fishing boats and coastal freighters moved about the harbor, and near the docks several flocks of goats and sheep were awaiting export to cities around the Red Sea and farther afield. Power lines festooned telegraph poles along the roads, many with complex nests of telephone wires connecting them to surrounding buildings. Most Somalis on the street seemed to prefer cellphones, though, and many traders kept up a constant chatter on their mobiles. Mogadishu was a fully functioning city.
David Kilcullen (Out of the Mountains: The Coming Age of the Urban Guerrilla)
scooter back down the path he’s cleared to our front door and disappears into the overgrown forest. ‘I had the most amazing dream while we were asleep,’ says Terry. ‘I dreamed we added another 13
Andy Griffiths (The 52-Storey Treehouse: The Treehouse Books 05 (The Treehouse Series Book 4))
Scooter Libby/Valerie Plame debacle—wherein Valerie Plame, aka Valerie Wilson, was outed as a CIA operative by the State Department—covered that morning’s front page of The New York Times.
Penny Reid (Happily Ever Ninja (Knitting in the City, #5))
I know it's crazy but I've decided to stay in Rouen this weekend. Tisserand was astonished to hear it; I explained to him I wanted to see the town and that I had nothing better to do in Paris. I don't really want to see the town. And yet there are very fine medieval remains, some ancient houses of great charm. Five or six centuries ago Rouen must have been one of the most beautiful towns in France; but now it's ruined. Everything is dirty, grimy, run down, spoiled by the abiding presence of cars, noise, pollution. I don't know who the mayor is, but it only takes ten minutes of walking the streets of the old town to realize that he is totally incompetent, or corrupt. To make matters worse there are dozens of yobs who roar down the streets on their motorbikes or scooters, and without silencers. They come in from the Rouen suburbs, which are nearing total industrial collapse. Their objective is to make a deafening racket, as disagreeable as possible, a racket which should be unbearable for the local residents. They are completely successful.
Michel Houellebecq (Whatever)
He bragged about his friendship with Jeffrey Epstein and hit the town with scumbag aficionado Roy Cohn. As president, he pardoned notorious criminals like Joe Arpaio and Scooter Libby and cultivated friendships with authoritarian leaders like Kim Jong Un, Erdoğan, and Putin. It is rare for Trump to hide even the sleaziest of contacts, but he has taken pains to conceal his
Sarah Kendzior (Hiding in Plain Sight: The Invention of Donald Trump and the Erosion of America)
Call me crazy,” Hortense muttered as she opted for a wheeled scooter rather than a metal cart, “but I’m going to say they call it almond milk because no one can say nut juice without laughing.” Hortense’s observation was brilliant, but I had no time to appreciate my clever comrade’s remark.
Robyn Peterman (A Fashionable Fiasco (Hot Damned, #12))