Samuel Taylor Coleridge Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Here they are! All 200 of them:

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Common sense in an uncommon degree is what the world calls wisdom.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Literary Remains, Vol. 1)
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What if you slept And what if In your sleep You dreamed And what if In your dream You went to heaven And there plucked a strange and beautiful flower And what if When you awoke You had that flower in you hand Ah, what then?
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Poems)
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Water, water, everywhere, And all the boards did shrink; Water, water, everywhere, Nor any drop to drink.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Silence does not always mark wisdom.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Poetry: the best words in the best order.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Day after day, day after day, We stuck, nor breath nor motion; As idle as a painted ship Upon a painted ocean.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Sir, I admit your general rule, That every poet is a fool, But you yourself may serve to show it, That every fool is not a poet.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Advice is like snow; the softer it falls, the longer it dwells upon, and the deeper it sinks into the mind.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Our own heart, and not other men's opinions, forms our true honor.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Alone, alone, all, all alone, Alone on a wide wide sea! And never a saint took pity on My soul in agony.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Her lips were red, her looks were free, Her locks were yellow as gold: Her skin was white as leprosy, The Nightmare Life-in-Death was she, Who thicks man's blood with cold.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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He who is best prepared can best serve his moment of inspiration.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Since then, at an uncertain hour, That agony returns: And till my ghastly tale is told, This heart within me burns.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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The happiness of life is made up of minute fractions - the little, soon forgotten charities of a kiss or a smile, a kind look or heartfelt compliment.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Like one, that on a lonesome road Doth walk in fear and dread, And having once turned round walks on, And turns no more his head; Because he knows, a frightful fiend Doth close behind him tread.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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A great mind must be androgynous.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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What comes from the heart goes to the heart
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree: Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Poems)
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Language is the armory of the human mind, and at once contains the trophies of its past and the weapons of its future conquests.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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I have seen gross intolerance shown in support of tolerance.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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The many men, so beautiful! And they all dead did lie: And a thousand thousand slimy things Lived on; and so did I.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Readers may be divided into four classes: I. Sponges, who absorb all they read, and return it nearly in the same state, only a little dirtied. II. Sand-glasses, who retain nothing, and are content to get through a book for the sake of getting through the time. III. Strain-bags, who retain merely the dregs of what they read. IV. Mogul diamonds, equally rare and valuable, who profit by what they read, and enable others to profit by it also.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Notes And Lectures Upon Shakespeare And Some Of The Old Poets And Dramatists)
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Nothing is as contagious as enthusiasm. It is the real allegory of the myth of Orpheus; it moves stones, and charms brutes. It is the genius of sincerity, and truth accomplishes no victories without it.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Deep thinking is attainable only by a man of deep feeling, and all truth is a species of revelation
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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No mind is thoroughly well-organized that is deficient in a sense of humor.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Prose: words in their best order; poetry: the best words in the best order.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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A grief without a pang, void, dark and drear, A drowsy, stifled, unimpassioned grief, Which finds no natural outlet or relief, In word, or sigh, or tear.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Works of imagination should be written in very plain language; the more purely imaginative they are the more necessary it is to be plain.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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The fair breeze blew, The white foam flew, And the forrow followed free. We were the first to ever burst into the silent sea.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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If men could learn from history, what lessons it might teach us. But passion and party blind our eyes, and the light which experience gives us is a lantern on the stern, which shines only on the waves behind us.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Little is taught by contest or dispute, everything by sympathy and love.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Good and bad men are each less so than they seem.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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He went like one that hath been stunn'd, And is of sense forlorn: A sadder and a wiser man He rose the morrow morn.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Swans sing before they dieβ€” 't were no bad thing Should certain persons die before they sing.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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A man’s desire is for the woman, but the woman’s desire is rarely other than for the desire of the man.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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If a man could pass through Paradise in a dream, and have a flower presented to him as a pledge that his soul had really been there, and if he found that flower in his hand when he awoke - Aye! and what then?
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Anima Poetae from the Unpublished Note-Books of Samuel Taylor Coleridge)
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Ah! well a-day! what evil looks Had I from old and young! Instead of the cross, the Albatross About my neck was hung.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Sympathy constitutes friendship; but in love there is a sort of antipathy, or opposing passion. Each strives to be the other, and both together make up one whole.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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In politics, what begins in fear usually ends in folly.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Swiftly, swiftly flew the ship, Yet she sailed softly too: Sweetly, sweetly blew the breeze - On me alone it blew.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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To see him act is like reading Shakespeare by flashes of lightning.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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To be loved is all I need, And whom I love, I love indeed.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Poems)
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Alas; they had been friends in youth but whispering tongues can poison truth
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Christabel: Kubla Khan, a Vison; The Pains of Sleep)
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Let every book-worm, when in any fragrant, scarce old tome, he discovers a sentence, a story, an illustration, that does his heart good, hasten to give it the widest circulation that newspapers and magazines, penny and halfpenny, can afford.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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The happiness of life is made up of minute fractions,β€”the little, soon-forgotten charities of a kiss, a smile, a kind look, a heartfelt compliment in the disguise of a playful raillery, and the countless other infinitesimals of pleasant thought and feeling.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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In nature there is nothing melancholy
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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And all who heard should see them there, And all should cry, Beware! Beware! His flashing eyes, his floating hair! Weave a circle round him thrice, And close your eyes with holy dread, For he on honey-dew hath fed, And drunk the milk of Paradise.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Kubla Khan: or A Vision in a Dream)
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Until you understand a writer's ignorance, presume yourself ignorant of his understanding.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Biographia Literaria: Or, Biographical Sketches of My Literary Life and Opinions; And Two Lay Sermons; I.-The Statesman's Manual. II.-Blessed Are Ye That Sow Beside All Waters.)
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Everyone should have two or three hives of bees. Bees are easier to keep than a dog or a cat. They are more interesting than gerbils.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Kubla Khan: or A Vision in a Dream)
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If you would stand well with a great mind, leave him with a favorable impression of yourself; if with a little mind, leave him with a favorable impression of himself.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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An orphans curse would drag to hell A spirit from on high; But oh! How more horrible that that Is the curse in a dead man’s eye!
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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The one red leaf, the last of its clan, That dances as often as dance it can, Hanging so light, and hanging so high, On the topmost twig that looks up at the sky.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Christabel)
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They stood aloof the scars remaining. Like cliffs which had been rent asunder.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Christabel: 1816 (Revolution & Romanticism, 1789 1834))
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He prayeth best who loveth best, all things both great and small.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Nature has her proper interest; and he will know what it is, who believes and feels, that every thing has a life of its own, and that we are all one life.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Oh sleep! it is a gentle thing, Beloved from pole to pole! To Mary Queen the praise be given! She sent the gentle sleep from Heaven, That slid into my soul.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Willing Suspension of Disbelief
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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What if you slept And what if In your sleep You dreamed And what if In your dream You went to heaven And there plucked a strange and beautiful flower And what if When you awoke You had that flower in your hand Ah, what then? β€” SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE
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Maggie Stiefvater (The Dream Thieves (The Raven Cycle, #2))
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Not one man in a thousand has the strength of mind or the goodness of heart to be an atheist.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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A savage place! as holy and enchanted As e'er beneath a waning moon was haunted By woman wailing for her demon-lover!
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Kubla Khan: or A Vision in a Dream)
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About, about, in reel and rout The death-fires danced at night; The water, like a witch's oils, Burnt green, and blue, and white
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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What is an Epigram? A dwarfish whole, Its body brevity, and wit its soul.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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I look'd to Heav'n, and try'd to pray; But or ever a prayer had gusht, A wicked whisper came and made My heart as dry as dust.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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A sight to dream of, not to tell!
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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The frost performs its secret ministry, Unhelped by any wind.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Poems)
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76. David Hume – Treatise on Human Nature; Essays Moral and Political; An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding 77. Jean-Jacques Rousseau – On the Origin of Inequality; On the Political Economy; Emile – or, On Education, The Social Contract 78. Laurence Sterne – Tristram Shandy; A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy 79. Adam Smith – The Theory of Moral Sentiments; The Wealth of Nations 80. Immanuel Kant – Critique of Pure Reason; Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals; Critique of Practical Reason; The Science of Right; Critique of Judgment; Perpetual Peace 81. Edward Gibbon – The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; Autobiography 82. James Boswell – Journal; Life of Samuel Johnson, Ll.D. 83. Antoine Laurent Lavoisier – TraitΓ© Γ‰lΓ©mentaire de Chimie (Elements of Chemistry) 84. Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison – Federalist Papers 85. Jeremy Bentham – Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation; Theory of Fictions 86. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe – Faust; Poetry and Truth 87. Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier – Analytical Theory of Heat 88. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel – Phenomenology of Spirit; Philosophy of Right; Lectures on the Philosophy of History 89. William Wordsworth – Poems 90. Samuel Taylor Coleridge – Poems; Biographia Literaria 91. Jane Austen – Pride and Prejudice; Emma 92. Carl von Clausewitz – On War 93. Stendhal – The Red and the Black; The Charterhouse of Parma; On Love 94. Lord Byron – Don Juan 95. Arthur Schopenhauer – Studies in Pessimism 96. Michael Faraday – Chemical History of a Candle; Experimental Researches in Electricity 97. Charles Lyell – Principles of Geology 98. Auguste Comte – The Positive Philosophy 99. HonorΓ© de Balzac – PΓ¨re Goriot; Eugenie Grandet 100. Ralph Waldo Emerson – Representative Men; Essays; Journal 101. Nathaniel Hawthorne – The Scarlet Letter 102. Alexis de Tocqueville – Democracy in America 103. John Stuart Mill – A System of Logic; On Liberty; Representative Government; Utilitarianism; The Subjection of Women; Autobiography 104. Charles Darwin – The Origin of Species; The Descent of Man; Autobiography 105. Charles Dickens – Pickwick Papers; David Copperfield; Hard Times 106. Claude Bernard – Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine 107. Henry David Thoreau – Civil Disobedience; Walden 108. Karl Marx – Capital; Communist Manifesto 109. George Eliot – Adam Bede; Middlemarch 110. Herman Melville – Moby-Dick; Billy Budd 111. Fyodor Dostoevsky – Crime and Punishment; The Idiot; The Brothers Karamazov 112. Gustave Flaubert – Madame Bovary; Three Stories 113. Henrik Ibsen – Plays 114. Leo Tolstoy – War and Peace; Anna Karenina; What is Art?; Twenty-Three Tales 115. Mark Twain – The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; The Mysterious Stranger 116. William James – The Principles of Psychology; The Varieties of Religious Experience; Pragmatism; Essays in Radical Empiricism 117. Henry James – The American; The Ambassadors 118. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche – Thus Spoke Zarathustra; Beyond Good and Evil; The Genealogy of Morals;The Will to Power 119. Jules Henri PoincarΓ© – Science and Hypothesis; Science and Method 120. Sigmund Freud – The Interpretation of Dreams; Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis; Civilization and Its Discontents; New Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis 121. George Bernard Shaw – Plays and Prefaces
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Mortimer J. Adler (How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading)
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Day after day, day after day, we stuck nor breath nor motion As idle as a painted ship upon a painted ocean Water, water everywhere and all the boards did shrink Water, water everywhere nor any drop to drink.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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E se tu dormissi? E se nel sonno tu sognassi? E se nel tuo sogno salissi al cielo e lì cogliessi un mirabile fiore? E se al tuo risveglio quel fiore fosse fra le tue mani? (Samuel Taylor Coleridge)
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Kerstin Gier (Das erste Buch der TrΓ€ume (Silber, #1))
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Where true Love burns Desire is Love's pure flame; It is the reflex of our earthly frame, That takes its meaning from the nobler part, And but translates the language of the heart.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Poems)
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Until my ghastly tale is told, this heart within me burns.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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For he on honey-dew hath fed, And drunk the milk of Paradise.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Kubla Khan: or A Vision in a Dream)
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What if you slept? And what if, in your sleep you dreamed? And what if, in your dream, you went to heaven and there plucked a strange and beautiful flower? And what if, when you awoke, you had the flower in your hand? β€”SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE
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Wayne W. Dyer (Real Magic: Creating Miracles in Everyday Life)
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Whiles all the night, through fog-smoke white, Glimmered the white moonshine. [...] Day after day, day after day, We stuck, nor breath nor motion; As idle as a painted ship Upon a painted ocean.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Farewell, farewell! but this I tell To thee, thou Wedding-Guest! He prayeth well, who loveth well Both man and bird and beast. He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us He made and loveth all.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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I should much wish, like the Indian Vishna, to float along an infinite ocean cradled in the flower of the Lotus, and wake once in a million years for a few minutes – just to know that I was going to sleep a million years more.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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And life is thorny; and youth is vain
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Christabel)
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I shot the ALBATROSS.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Experience informs us that the first defense of weak minds is to recriminate.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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that willing suspension of disbelief for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Friendship is a sheltering tree.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Weave a circle round him thrice, And close your eyes with holy dread, For he on honey-dew hath fed, And drank the milk of Paradise.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Kubla Khan: or A Vision in a Dream)
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The reader should be carried forward, not merely or chiefly by the mechanical impulse of curiosity, or by a restless desire to arrive at the final solution; but by the pleasurable activity of mind excited by the attractions of the journey itself.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Biographia Literaria: Biographical Sketches of my Literary Life & Opinions)
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The selfmoment I could pray; And from my neck so free The Albatross fell off, and sank Like lead into the sea.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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As a man without forethought scarcely deserves the name of a man, so forethought without reflection is but a metaphorical phrase for the instinct of a beast. - (1772-1834)
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Every reform, however necessary, will by weak minds be carried to an excess, that itself will need reforming.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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And in Life's noisiest hour, There whispers still the ceaseless Love of Thee, The heart's Self-solace and soliloquy.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Poems)
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Therefore all seasons shall be sweet to thee, Whether the summer clothe the general earth With greenness, or the redbreast sit and sing Betwixt the tufts of snow on the bare branch Of mossy apple-tree, while the nigh thatch Smokes in the sun-thaw; whether the eave-drops fall Heard only in the trances of the blast, Or if the secret ministry of frost Shall hang them up in silent icicles, Quietly shining to the quiet Moon.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Frost At Midnight)
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And I had done a hellish thing, And it would work 'em woe: For all averred, I had killed the bird That made the breeze to blow. Ah wretch! said they, the bird to slay, That made the breeze to blow!
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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The act of praying is the very highest energy of which the human mind is capable; praying, that is, with the total concentration of the faculties. The great mass of worldly men and of learned men are absolutely incapable of prayer.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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There are four kinds of readers. The first is like the hourglass; and their reading being as the sand, it runs in and runs out, and leaves not a vestige behind. A second is like the sponge, which imbibes everything, and returns it in nearly the same state, only a little dirtier. A third is like a jelly bag, allowing all that is pure to pass away, and retaining only the refuse and dregs. And the fourth is like the slaves in the diamond mines of Golconda, who, casting aside all that is worthless, retain only pure gems.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Ere I was old? Ah woeful Ere, Which tells me, Youth's no longer here! O Youth! for years so many and sweet, 'Tis known that Thou and I were one, I'll think it but a fond conceit-- It cannot be that Thou art gone!
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Then all the charm Is broken--all that phantom-world so fair Vanishes, and a thousand circlets spread, And each mis-shape the other.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Kubla Khan: or A Vision in a Dream)
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Party men always hate a slightly differing friend more than a downright enemy.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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People of humor are always in some degree people of genius.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Alas! they had been friends in youth; But whispering tongues can poison truth; And constancy lives in realms above; And life is thorny; and youth is vain; And to be wroth with one we love Doth work like madness in the brain.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Christabel)
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An orphan's curse would drag to hell A spirit from on high; But oh! more horrible than that Is the curse in a dead man's eye! Seven days, seven nights, I saw that curse, And yet I could not die.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Men, I still think, ought to be weighed, not counted. Their worth ought to be the final estimate of their value.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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ΨΉΩ†Ψ―Ω…Ψ§ Ω†Ψ¬Ψ― ΨΊΩ„Ψ·Ψ© في ΩƒΨͺΨ§Ψ¨Ψ© ΩƒΨ§ΨͺΨ¨ جيد، فلنفΨͺΨ±ΨΆ Ψ£ΩˆΩ„Ψ§Ω‹ Ψ£Ω†Ω†Ψ§ Ω„Ω… نفهم Ω‚Ψ¨Ω„ Ψ£Ω† نفΨͺΨ±ΨΆ Ψ£Ω† Ψ§Ω„ΩƒΨ§ΨͺΨ¨ Ψ¬Ψ§Ω‡Ω„
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Yea, slimy things did crawl with legs Upon the slimy sea.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Kubla Khan: or A Vision in a Dream)
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Common sense in an uncommon degree is what the world calls wisdom. -Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Louisa Thomsen Brits (The Book of Hygge: The Danish Art of Living Well)
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Like cliffs which had been rent asunder; A dreary sea now flows between, But neither heat, nor frost, nor thunder, Shall wholly do away, I ween, The marks of that which once hath been.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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And now this spell was snapt: once more I viewed the ocean green, And look'd far forth, yet little saw Of what had else been seen - Like one that on a lonesome road Doth walk in fear and dread, And having once turn'd round, walks on And turns no more his head; Because he knows a frightful fiend Doth close behind him tread.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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And in Life's noisiest hour, There whispers still the ceaseless Love of Thee, The heart's Self-solace and soliloquy. You mould my Hopes, you fashion me within ; And to the leading Love-throb in the Heart Thro' all my Being, thro' my pulse's beat ; You lie in all my many Thoughts, like Light, Like the fair light of Dawn, or summer Eve On rippling Stream, or cloud-reflecting Lake. And looking to the Heaven, that bends above you, How oft! I bless the Lot that made me love you.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Still flutters there, the sole unquiet thing. Methinks, its motion in this hush of nature Gives it dim sympathies with me who live, Making it a companionable form, Whose puny flaps and freaks the idling Spirit By its own moods interprets, every where Echo or mirror seeking of itself, And makes a toy of Thought.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Frost At Midnight)
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O my brethren! I have told Most bitter truth, but without bitterness. Nor deem my zeal fractious or mistimed; For never can true courage dwell with them Who, playing tricks with conscience, dare not look At their own vices.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Poems)
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They passed the hall, that echoes still, Pass as lightly as you will. The brands were flat, the brands were dying, Amid their own white ashes lying; But when the lady passed, there came A tongue of light, a fit of flame; And Christabel saw the lady's eye, And nothing else saw she thereby,
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Christabel)
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II A grief without a pang, void, dark, and drear, Β  Β  Β  A stifled, drowsy, unimpassioned grief, Β  Β  Β  Which finds no natural outlet, no relief, Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  In word, or sigh, or tear β€” O Lady! in this wan and heartless mood, To other thoughts by yonder throstle woo'd, Β  Β  Β  All this long eve, so balmy and serene, Have I been gazing on the western sky, Β  Β  Β  And its peculiar tint of yellow green: And still I gaze β€” and with how blank an eye! And those thin clouds above, in flakes and bars, That give away their motion to the stars; Those stars, that glide behind them or between, Now sparkling, now bedimmed, but always seen: Yon crescent Moon as fixed as if it grew In its own cloudless, starless lake of blue; I see them all so excellently fair, I see, not feel how beautiful they are! III Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  My genial spirits fail; Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  And what can these avail To lift the smothering weight from off my breast? Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  It were a vain endeavour, Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Though I should gaze for ever On that green light that lingers in the west: I may not hope from outward forms to win The passion and the life, whose fountains are within.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Poems)
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I readily believe that there are more invisible than visible Natures in the universe. But who will explain for us the family of all these beings, and the ranks and relations and distinguishing features and functions of each? What do they do? What places do they inhabit? The human mind has always sought the knowledge of these things, but never attained it. Meanwhile I do not deny that it is helpful sometimes to contemplate in the mind, as on a tablet, the image of a greater and better world, lest the intellect, habituated to the petty things of daily life, narrow itself and sink wholly into trivial thoughts. But at the same time we must be watchful for the truth and keep a sense of proportion, so that we may distinguish the certain from the uncertain, day from night.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Water, water everywhere Nor any drop to drink.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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On Pilgrim's Progress: β€œI could not have believed beforehand that Calvinism could be painted in such exquisitely delightful colors.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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When a man is unhappy he writes damned bad poetry, I find.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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They groaned, they stirred, they all uprose, Nor spake, nor moved their eyes; It had been strange, even in a dream, To have seen those dead men rise.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Friends should be weighed, not told; who boasts to have won a multitude of friends has never had one.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Why look'st thou so?'β€” With my cross-bow I shot the ALBATROSS.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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But yester-night I prayed aloud In anguish and in agony, Up-starting from the fiendish crowd Of shapes and thoughts that tortured me: A lurid light, a trampling throng, Sense of intolerable wrong, And whom I scorned, those only strong! Thirst of revenge, the powerless will Still baffled, and yet burning still! Desire with loathing strangely mixed On wild or hateful objects fixed. Fantastic passions! maddening brawl! And shame and terror over all! Deeds to be hid which were not hid, Which all confused I could not know Whether I suffered, or I did: For all seemed guilt, remorse or woe, My own or others still the same Life-stifling fear, soul-stifling shame.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Poems)
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For I was reared in the great city, pent with cloisters dim, and saw naught lovely but the sky and stars. But thou, my babe! Shalt wander like a breeze By lakes and sandy shores, beneath the crags Of ancient mountains, and beneath the clouds, Which image in their bulk both lakes and shores And mountain crags: so shall thou see and hear The lovely shapes and sounds intelligible Of that eternal language, which thy God Utters, who from eternity doth teach Himself in all, and al things in himself Great universal teacher! He shall mold Thy spirit and by giving , make it ask.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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What if you slept? And what if, in your sleep, you dreamed? And what if, in your dream, you went to heaven And there plucked a strange and beautiful flower? And what if, when you awoke, you had that flower in your hand? Ah, what then?Β  - Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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J. Steve Miller (Near-Death Experiences as Evidence for the Existence of God and Heaven: A Brief Introduction in Plain Language)
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And what if all of animated nature Be but organic harps diversely framed, That tremble into thought, as o'er them sweeps Plastic and vast, one intellectual breeze, At once the Soul of each, and God of All?
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Poems)
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge was right when he claimed, 'In politics, what begins in fear usually ends up in folly.' Political activists are more inclined, though, to heed an observation from Richard Nixon: 'People react to fear, not love. They don't teach that in Sunday school, but it's true.' That principle, which guided the late president's political strategy throughout his career, is the sine qua non of contemporary political campaigning. Marketers of products and services ranging from car alarms to TV news programs have taken it to heart as well. The short answer to why Americans harbor so many misbegotten fears is that immense power and money await those who tap into our moral insecurities and supply us with symbolic substitutes.
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Barry Glassner (The Culture of Fear: Why Americans Are Afraid of the Wrong Things)
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You appear to me not to have understood the nature of my body & mind. Partly from ill-health, & partly from an unhealthy & reverie-like vividness of Thoughts, & (pardon the pedantry of the phrase) a diminished Impressibility from Things, my ideas, wishes, & feelings are to a diseased degree disconnected from motion & action. In plain and natural English, I am a dreaming & therefore an indolent man. I am a Starling self-incaged, & always in the Moult, & my whole Note is, Tomorrow, & tomorrow, & tomorrow.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Letters: Volume 2)
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Thus Milton refines the question down to a matter of faith," said Coleridge, bringing the lecture to a close, "and a kind of faith more independent, autonomous - more truly strong, as a matter of fact - than the Puritans really sought. Faith, he tells us, is not an exotic bloom to be laboriously maintained by the exclusion of most aspects of the day to day world, nor a useful delusion to be supported by sophistries and half-truths like a child's belief in Father Christmas - not, in short, a prudently unregarded adherence to a constructed creed; but rather must be, if anything, a clear-eyed recognition of the patterns and tendencies, to be found in every piece of the world's fabric, which are the lineaments of God. This is why religion can only be advice and clarification, and cannot carry any spurs of enforcement - for only belief and behavior that is independently arrived at, and then chosen, can be praised or blamed. This being the case, it can be seen as a criminal abridgement of a person's rights willfully to keep him in ignorance of any facts - no piece can be judged inadmissible, for the more stones, both bright and dark, that are added to the mosaic, the clearer is our picture of God.
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Tim Powers (The Anubis Gates)
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Kita tidak tahu bagaimana hari esok, Yang bisa kita lakukan ialah berbuat sebaik-baiknya dan berbahagia pada hari ini.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Plagiarists are always suspicious of being stolen from
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Tis calm indeed! so calm, that it disturbs And vexes meditation with its strange And extreme silentness.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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He prayeth well, who loveth well Both man and bird and beast.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Coleridge's Ancient Mariner and Select Poems)
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The mariners all β€˜gan work the ropes, where they were wont to do: They raised their limbs like lifeless tools - We were a ghastly crew.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Truth I pursued,as Fancy sketch'd the way, And wiser men than I went worse astray.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Samuel Taylor Coleridge)
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The ship was cheered, the harbor cleared, Merrily did we drop Below the kirk, below the hill, Below the lighthouse top.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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It is a dull and obtuse mind, that must divide in order to distinguish; but it is a still worse that distinguishes in order to divide.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Aids to Reflection)
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The very deep did rot: O Christ! That ever this should be! Yea, slimy things did crawl with legs Upon the slimy sea.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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Praises of the unworthy are felt by ardent minds as robberies of the deserving.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Biographia Literaria: Biographical Sketches of my Literary Life & Opinions)
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Hence, viper thoughts, that coil around my mind, Reality's dark dream! I turn from you, and listen to the wind.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Dejection: An Ode)
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We must believe, or as Samuel Taylor Coleridge suggested, we must willingly suspend our disbelief.
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Robert McKee (Story: Style, Structure, Substance, and the Principles of Screenwriting)
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Friendship is a sheltering tree." Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Nina Post (Danger Returns in Pairs (Shawn Danger Mysteries Book 2))
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We owe pandemonium to Milton’s Paradise Lost (where it is β€˜the high Capital of Satan and his Peers’), diplomacy to Edmund Burke, and pessimism to Samuel Taylor Coleridge.
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Henry Hitchings (The Secret Life of Words: How English Became English)
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The primary imagination I hold to be the Living Power. SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE
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Julia Cameron (The Artist's Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity)
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The primary Imagination I hold to be the living Power and prime Agent of all human Perception, and as a repetition in the finite mind of the eternal act of creation in the infinite I Am.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Biographia literaria)
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All Nature seems at work. Slugs leave their lairβ€” The bees are stirringβ€”birds are on the wingβ€” And Winter, slumbering in the open air, Wears on his smiling face a dream of Spring! And I, the while, the sole unbusy thing, Nor honey make, nor pair, nor build, nor sing. Yet well I ken the banks where amaranths blow, Have traced the fount whence streams of nectar flow. Bloom, O ye amaranths! bloom for whom ye may, For me ye bloom not! Glide, rich streams, away! With lips unbrighten'd, wreathless brow, I stroll: And would you learn the spells that drowse my soul? Work without Hope draws nectar in a sieve, And Hope without an object cannot live. - Work without Hope
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Poems)
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Every other science presupposes intelligence as already existing and complete: the philosopher contemplates it in its growth, and as it were represents its history to the mind from its birth to its maturity.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Biographia Literaria: Biographical Sketches of my Literary Life & Opinions)
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but later English Romantics such as Samuel Taylor Coleridge and American Transcendentalists such as Ralph Waldo Emerson would declare that man had once been one with nature – during a long vanished Golden Age. It was this lost unity that they strove to restore, insisting that the only way to do so was through art, poetry and emotions. According to the Romantics, nature could only be understood by turning inwards.
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Andrea Wulf (The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt's New World)
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But oh! that deep romantic chasm which slanted Down the green hill athwart a cedarn cover! A savage place! as holy and enchanted As e’er beneath a waning moon was haunted By woman wailing for her demon-lover!
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Kubla Khan: or A Vision in a Dream)
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It is a pity that no one in Paris bothered to quote Coleridge, who wrote, long before cubism, that the true poet is able to reduce 'succession to an instant.' Simultaneity in this sense is the property of all great poetry.
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LeRoy C. Breunig (The Cubist Poets in Paris: An Anthology)
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In poems, equally as in philosophic disquisitions, genius produces the strongest impressions of novelty while it rescues the most admitted truths from the impotence caused by the very circumstance of their universal admission.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Biographia Literaria: Chapters 1-4, 14-22; Prefaces and Essays on Poetry, 1800-181chapters 1-4, 14-22; Prefaces and Essays on Poetry, 1800-1815 (1920) 5 (1920))
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Down dropt the breeze, the sails dropt down, 'Twas sad as sad could be; And we did speak only to break The silence of the sea! All in a hot and copper sky, The bloody Sun, at noon, Right up above the mast did stand, No bigger than the Moon. Day after day, day after day, We stuck, nor breath nor motion; As idle as a painted ship Upon a painted ocean.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Other Poems)
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A great poet must have the ear of a wild Arab listening in the silent desert, the eye of a North American Indian tracing the footsteps of an enemy upon the leaves that strew the forest, the touch of a blind man feeling the face of a darling child.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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How long in that same fit I lay, I have not to declare; But ere my living life returned, I heard and in my soul discerned Two VOICES in the air. "Is it he?" quoth one, "Is this the man? By him who died on cross, With his cruel bow he laid full low, The harmless Albatross. "The spirit who bideth by himself In the land of mist and snow, He loved the bird that loved the man Who shot him with his bow." The other was a softer voice, As soft as honey-dew: Quoth he, "The man hath penance done, And penance more will do.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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But I do not doubt that it is beneficial sometimes to contemplate in the mind, as in a picture, the image of a grander and better world; for if the mind grows used to the trivia of daily life, it may dwindle too much and decline altogether into worthless thoughts.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Major Works)
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Tho' veiled in spires of myrtle wreath, Love is a sword that cuts its sheath, And thro' the clefts, itself has made, We spy the flashes of the Blade! But thro' the clefts, itself has made, We likewise see Love's flashing blade, By rust consumed or snapt in twain: And only Hilt and Stump remain. - Song
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Poems)
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And aye, beside her stalks her amarous knight! Still on his thighs their wonted brogues are worn, And thro' those brogues, still tatter'd and betorn, His hindward charms glean an unearthly white, Ah! thus thro' broken clouds at night's high Noon Peeps in fair fragments forth the full-orb'd harvest-moon!
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Biographia Literaria: Biographical Sketches of my Literary Life & Opinions)
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By around 1850, the annual consumption of opium averaged 5g per person. It was even spooned into the mouths of infants to relieve teething troubles. The result was that many people became addicted, including the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Abraham Lincoln’s wife, Mary, and even Queen Victoria herself.
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Kathryn Harkup (A is for Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie)
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They partedβ€”ne'er to meet again! But never either found another To free the hollow heart from painingβ€” They stood aloof, the scars remaining, Like cliffs which had been rent asunder; A dreary sea now flows between;β€” But neither heat, nor frost, nor thunder, Shall wholly do away, I ween, The marks of that which once hath been.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Christabel)
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What a scream of agony by torture lengthened out that lute sent forth!
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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O lady! we receive but what we give And in our life alone does Nature live.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Coleridge's Poetry and Prose)
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EPITAPH ON AN INFANT Ere Sin could blight or Sorrow fade, Β  Death came with friendly care: The opening Bud to Heaven convey’d, Β  And bade it blossom there.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Delphi Complete Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge)
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O Wedding-Guest! this soul hath been Alone on a wide wide sea: So lonely 'twas, that God himself Scarce seemed there to be.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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By thy long grey beard and glittering eye, Now wherefore stopp'st thou me?
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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A new Earth and new Heaven.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Dejection: An Ode)
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This was my sole resource, my only plan: Till that which suits a part infects the whole, And now is almost grown the habit of my soul.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Dejection: An Ode)
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The ice was here, the ice was there, Β Β The ice was all around: 60 Β Β It cracked and growled, and roared and howled, Β Β Like noises in a swound!
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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God save thee, ancient Mariner! From the fiends, that plague thee thus! β€” Why look'st thou so?' β€” With my cross-bow I shot the Albatross.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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The heart should have fed upon the truth, as insects on a leaf, till it be tinged with the color, and show its food in every ... minutest fiber.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Our quaint metaphysical opinions, in an hour of anguish, are like playthings by the bedside of a child deadly sick.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Coleridge's Notebooks: A Selection)
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For the sky and the sea, and the sea and the sky Lay like a load on my weary eye, And the dead were at my feet.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (THE RIME OF THE ANCIENT MARINER)
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Instead of the cross, the Albatross About my neck was hung.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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La felicitΓ  della vita Γ¨ fatta di frazioni infinitesimali: di piccole elemosine, presto dimenticate, di un bacio, di un sorriso, di uno sguardo gentile, di un complimento fatto col cuore.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Farewell, farewell! but this I tell To thee, thou Wedding-Guest! He prayeth well, who loveth well Both man and bird and beast. He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us He made and loveth all. The Mariner, whose eye is bright, Whose beard with age is hoar, Is gone: and now the Wedding-Guest Turned from the bridegroom's door.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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The intelligible forms of ancient poets, The fair humanities of old religion, The Power, the Beauty, and the Majesty That had their haunts in dale or piny mountain, Or forest, by slow stream, or pebbly spring, Or chasms and watery depths; all these have vanished; They live no longer in the faith of reason; But still the heart doth need a language; still Doth the old instinct bring back the old names; Spirits or gods that used to share this earth With man as with their friend; and at this day 'Tis Jupiter who brings whate'er is great, And Venus who brings every thing that's fair.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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All students of man and society who possess that first requisite for so difficult a study, a due sense of its difficulties, are aware that the besetting danger is not so much of embracing falsehood for truth, as of mistaking part of the truth for the whole. It might be plausibly maintained that in almost every one of the leading controversies, past or present, in social philosophy, both sides were in the right in what they affirmed, though wrong in what they denied; and that if either could have been made to take the other’s views in addition to its own, little more would have been needed to make its doctrine correct.
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John Stuart Mill (An Essay on Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Illustrated))
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Tutti gli uomini nascono aristotelici o platonici, cioè razionali o irrazionali: le opinioni e le interpretazioni difficilmente interesseranno i primi, i fatti e le dimostrazioni non convinceranno mai i secondi.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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His (Samuel Coleridge) dark senses were constantly in play, the frustration of them bringing illness. Weather and organic nature combined in a synaesthetic multi-media event, and this was the ground of all perception before it was divded up in daily living: the Primary Imagination giving way to the Secondary. Poetry was forever seeking a conscious return to this state, which existed all the time, whether he knew it or not.
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Peter Redgrove (The Black Goddess and the Unseen Real: Our Uncommon Senses and Their Common Sense)
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Whose bells, the poor man's only music, rang From morn to evening, all the hot Fair-day, So sweetly, that they stirred and haunted me With a wild pleasure, falling on mine ear Most like articulate sounds of things to come! So gazed I, till the soothing things, I dreamt, Lulled me to sleep, and sleep prolonged my dreams! And so I brooded all the following morn, Awed by the stern preceptor's face, mine eye Fixed with mock study on my swimming book.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Frost At Midnight)
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…the rising movement of romanticism, with its characteristic idealism, one that tended toward a black-and-white view of the world based on those ideas, preferred for different reasons that women remain untinged by β€œmasculine” traits of learning. Famous romantic writers such as Lord Byron, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Hazlitt criticized the bluestockings. …and Hazlitt declared his 'utter aversion to Bluestockingism … I do not care a fig for any woman that knows even what an author means.' Because of the tremendous influence that romanticism gained over the cultural mind-set, the term bluestocking came to be a derogatory term applied to learned, pedantic women, particularly conservative ones. ... Furthermore, learned women did not fit in with the romantic notion of a damsel in distress waiting to be rescued by a knight in shining armor any more than they fit in with the antirevolutionary fear of progress.
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Karen Swallow Prior (Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah Moreβ€”Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist)
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Joy lift her spirit, joy attune her voice; To her may all things live, from pole to pole, Their life the eddying of her living soul! O simple spirit, guided from above, Dear Lady! friend devoutest of my choice, Thus mayest thou ever, evermore rejoice.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Poems)
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Visit her, gentle Sleep! with wings of healing, Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β  And may this storm be but a mountain-birth, May all the stars hang bright above her dwelling, Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β  Silent as though they watched the sleeping Earth! Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β  With light heart may she rise, Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β  Gay fancy, cheerful eyes, Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β  Joy lift her spirit, joy attune her voice; To her may all things live, from pole to pole, Their life the eddying of her living soul! Β Β Β Β Β Β Β Β  O simple spirit, guided from above, Dear Lady! friend devoutest of my choice, Thus mayest thou ever, evermore rejoice.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Samuel Taylor Coleridge)
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Sonnet: To the River Otter Dear native brook! wild streamlet of the West! How many various-fated years have passed, What happy and what mournful hours, since last I skimmed the smooth thin stone along thy breast, Numbering its light leaps! Yet so deep impressed Sink the sweet scenes of childhood, that mine eyes I never shut amid the sunny ray, But straight with all their tints thy waters rise, Thy crossing plank, thy marge with willows grey, And bedded sand that, veined with various dyes, Gleamed through thy bright transparence! On my way, Visions of childhood! oft have ye beguiled Lone manhood's cares, yet waking fondest sighs: Ah! that once more I were a careless child!
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
β€œ
Literately’ was used in a novel by Elizabeth Griffiths. While no other examples of use have been forthcoming, it is, in my opinion, an elegant extension of β€˜literate’. Dr. Murray agreed I should write an entry for the Dictionary, but I have since been told it is unlikely to be included. It seems our lady author has not proved herself a β€˜literata’- an abomination of a word coined by Samuel Taylor Coleridge that refers to a β€˜literary lady’. It too has only one example of use, but its inclusion is assured. This may sound like sour grapes, but I can’t see it catching on. The number of literary ladies in the world is surely so great as to render them ordinary and deserving members of the literati.
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Pip Williams (The Dictionary of Lost Words)
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I ask'd my fair one happy day, What I should call her in my lay; By what sweet name from Rome or Greece; [319] Lalage, Neaera, Chloris, Sappho, Lesbia, or Doris, 5 Arethusa or Lucrece. 'Ah!' replied my gentle fair, 'BelovΓ©d, what are names but air? Choose thou whatever suits the line; Call me Sappho, call me Chloris, 10 Call me Lalage or Doris, Only, only call me Thine.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Poetical Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge Vol I and II)
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All this long eve, so balmy and serene, Have I been gazing on the western sky, And its peculiar tint of yellow green: And still I gazeβ€”and with how blank an eye! And those thin clouds above, in flakes and bars, That give away their motion to the stars; Those stars, that glide behind them or between, Now sparkling, now bedimmed, but always seen: Yon crescent Moon, as fixed as if it grew In its own cloudless, starless lake of blue; I see them all so excellently fair, I see, not feel, how beautiful they are!
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Dejection: An Ode)
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One great distinction, I appeared to myself to see plainly between even the characteristic faults of our elder poets, and the false beauty of the moderns. In the former, from Donne to Cowley, we find the most fantastic out-of-the-way thoughts, but in the most pure and genuine mother English, in the latter the most obvious thoughts, in language the most fantastic and arbitrary. Our faulty elder poets sacrificed the passion and passionate flow of poetry to the subtleties of intellect and to the stars of wit; the moderns to the glare and glitter of a perpetual, yet broken and heterogeneous imagery, or rather to an amphibious something, made up, half of image, and half of abstract meaning. The one sacrificed the heart to the head; the other both heart and head to point and drapery.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: Poetry, Plays, Literary Essays, Lectures, Autobiography and Letters (Classic Illustrated Edition): The Entire ... Conversation Poems and Biographia Literaria)
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In the perusal of philosophical works I have been greatly benefited by a resolve, which, in the antithetic form and with the allowed quaintness of an adage or maxim, I have been accustomed to word thus: until you understand a writer's ignorance, presume yourself ignorant of his understanding. This golden rule of mine does, I own, resemble those of Pythagoras in its obscurity rather than in its depth. If however the reader will permit me to be my own Hierocles, I trust, that he will find its meaning fully explained by the following instances. I have now before me a treatise of a religious fanatic, full of dreams and supernatural experiences. I see clearly the writer's grounds, and their hollowness. I have a complete insight into the causes, which through the medium of his body has acted on his mind; and by application of received and ascertained laws I can satisfactorily explain to my own reason all the strange incidents, which the writer records of himself. And this I can do without suspecting him of any intentional falsehood. As when in broad day-light a man tracks the steps of a traveller, who had lost his way in a fog or by a treacherous moonshine, even so, and with the same tranquil sense of certainty, can I follow the traces of this bewildered visionary. I understand his ignorance.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
β€œ
I'm dull and sad! indeed, indeed I know I have no reason! Perhaps I am not well in health, And 'tis a gloomy season. - The Three Graves
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Complete Poems)
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(The word β€œclerisy,” which I’ll use often, is of German origin, and is how Samuel Taylor Coleridge and I refer to the intelligentsia, journalists, ministers, professors, novelists, and the rest of the scribbling tribe.)
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Deirdre Nansen McCloskey (Why Liberalism Works: How True Liberal Values Produce a Freer, More Equal, Prosperous World for All)
β€œ
Somewhere in that volume we would surely find a chapter on the place of the opium poppy and cannabis in the romantic imagination. It’s well known that many English romantic poets used opium, and several of the French romantics experimented with hashish soon after Napoleon’s troops brought it back with them from Egypt. What’s harder to know is precisely what role these psychoactive plants may have played in the revolution in human sensibility we call romanticism. The literary critic David Lenson, for one, believes it was crucial. He argues that Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s notion of the imagination as a mental faculty that β€œdissolves, diffuses, dissipates, in order to re-create,” an idea whose reverberations in Western culture haven’t yet been stilled, simply cannot be understood without reference to the change in consciousness wrought by opium
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Michael Pollan (The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World)
β€œ
I know the Bible is inspired because it finds me at greater depths of my being than any other book
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Tissez un triple cercle autour de lui, et fermez les yeux de terreur sacrΓ©e : Car il s'est nourri de miellΓ©e, et a bu le lait du Paradis.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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In 1799, the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge goes to Germany on a winter walking trip and writes home to his wife about the opposite sense: of winter as a mysterious magnetic season that the wanderer is expelled into for his own good, for the purification and improvement of his soul. β€œWhat sublime scenery I have beheld!” Coleridge’s’ words are one of those rare passages of prose that truly mark the arrival of an epoch. It would be impossible to find anything like it in European literature only twenty-five years before… This kind of love of the winter scene is not of the force outside pressing in on the window, bringing family together. Instead it is for the ice-spirit pulling us out. This winter window is wrenched open by the level of the sublime. The new idea (of winter’s beauty) is associated with Edmund Burke’s great essay on the sublime and beautiful from the middle of the eighteenth century. Burke’s was one of the three or four most powerful ideas in the history of thought, because he wrenched aesthetics away from the insipid idea of beauty (physical, manicured) towards recognition of the full span of human sympathy. Oceans and thunderstorms, precipices and abysses, towering volcanoes and, above all, snow-capped mountains- they rival and outdo the heritage of classical beauty exactly because they frighten us; they fill us with fear, with awe, with a sense of the inestimable mystery of the world.
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Adam Gopnik (Winter: Five Windows on the Season)
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And a thousand thousand slimy things Lived on; and so did I.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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The happiness of life is made up of minute fractionsβ€”the little soon forgotten charities of a kiss or smile, a kind look, a heartfelt compliment, and the countless infinitesimals of pleasurable and genial feelings.’ Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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Jan Karon (Somewhere Safe with Somebody Good (Mitford))
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O happy things! no tongue Their beauty might declare: A spring of love gished from my heart, And I blessed them unaware
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
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La jeunesse contemple le Bonheur qui scintille loin devant elle – l'Γ’ge contemple le Bonheur qui scintille loin derriΓ¨re lui. C'est le Bonheur de l'Γ’ge que de contempler a posteriori le Bonheur de la Jeunesse; et faute d'espΓ©rer, nous nous souvenons avec plaisir que nous avons espΓ©rΓ©.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Coleridge's Notebooks: A Selection)
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The volume offers an overview of how British writers interpreted the French Enlightenment and Revolution against the backdrop of the Terror and the rise and fall of Napoleon, these events welcomed by few and feared by many in Britain as likely to foment a second revolution in that state as the United Irish insurrection had attempted to do in Ireland. Deane’s focus is on the intellectual careers of Edmund Burke, James Mackintosh, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Godwin, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and William Hazlitt, though there are slighter cameos also of William Wordsworth, Robert Southey, John Wilson Croker, Francis Jeffrey, Thomas Holcroft, Thomas Paine, and Joseph Priestley. The study teases out how the main figures here engaged conceptually with some of their leading French counterparts including Jean Jacques Rousseau, Montesquieu, Baron d’Holbach, La Mettrie, HelvΓ©tius, and others. It examines instances of the intricate relay of ideas of freedom and liberty as they migrated from England into the works of the eighteenth-century French philosophes and then travelled from there back to nineteenth-century England, where French writings were rejected or reabsorbed by some of the leading English writers of the apocalyptic years between Burke’s late career and those that ended the first Romantic generation.
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Seamus Deane (Small World: Ireland, 1798–2018)
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For who will dare to force his way out of the crowd, β€” not of the mere vulgar, β€” but of the vain and banded aristocracy of intellect, and presume to join the almost supernatural beings that stand by themselves aloof?
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (SHAKESPEARE, THE DRAMA & THE STAGE: Coleridge's Essays and Lectures on Shakespeare and Other Old Poets and Dramatists)
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at an uncertain hour, That agony returns: And till my ghastly tale is told, This heart within me burns. I pass, like night, from land to land; I have strange power of speech; That moment that his face I see, I know the man that must hear me: To him my tale I teach.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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That Nature ne'er deserts the wise and pure; No plot so narrow, be but Nature there, No waste so vacant, but may well employ Each faculty of sense, and keep the heart Awake to Love and Beauty! and sometimes 'Tis well to be bereft of promis'd good, That we may lift the soul, and contemplate With lively joy the joys we cannot share.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Samuel Taylor Coleridge)
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge speaks of the power of creative imagination which β€˜reveals itself in the balance or reconciliation of opposite or discordant qualities; of sameness with difference; of the general with the (22>23) concrete; of the sense of novelty and freshness with old and familiar objects.[…] The inescapable truth is that aesthetic reward only follows when the pattern has been identified after a degree of effort . The idea of aesthetic reward is, for most, bound up with the concept of harmony.
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Peter F. Smith (The Dynamics of Delight: Architecture and Aesthetics)
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personally.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Biographia Literaria)
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All thoughts, all passions, all delights Whatever stirs this mortal frame All are but ministers of Love And feed His sacred flame." Educated Jatt
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______Samuel Taylor Coleridge____
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El lenguaje es el arsenal de la mente humana: contiene al mismo tiempo los trofeos de su pasado y las armas de sus futuras conquistas.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Biographia Literaria)