S Woodley Quotes

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There was no ‘Miss Woodley.’ There was Willie. Willie was about life, and she grabbed it by the balls. Y’all know that. She loved a stiff drink, a stiff hundred, and she loved her business. And she didn’t judge nobody. She loved everyone equal—accountants, queers, musicians, she welcomed us all, said we were all idiots just the same.
Ruta Sepetys (Out of the Easy)
I fall in love with human beings based on who they are, not based on what they do or what sex they are.
Shailene Woodley
I think the most important thing in life is self-love, because if you don't have self-love, and respect for everything about your own body, your own soul, your own capsule, then how can you have an authentic relationship with anyone else?
Shailene Woodley
So often, I read scripts and am like, 'This would never happen in real life. It's not trying to be funny. It's trying to be serious.
Shailene Woodley
I'm already the most fortunate girl in the world, so I have zero expectations for what the future will bring.
Shailene Woodley
You're too late. She's my wife." "No, she's your widow." His revolver cracked, and I saw the blood spurt from the front of Woodley's waistcoat. He spun round with a scream and fell upon his back, his hideous red face turning suddenly to a dreadful mottled pallor.
Arthur Conan Doyle (The Return of Sherlock Holmes (Sherlock Holmes, #6))
I'd like to be like a hummingbird. You see them every now and then. You don't see them everywhere.
Shailene Woodley
A society concerned with shalom will care for the most marginalized among them. God has a special concern for the poor and needy, because how we treat them reveals our hearts, regardless of the rhetoric we employ to make ourselves sound just.
Randy Woodley
Jesus, properly understood as shalom, coming into the world from the shalom community of the Trinity, is the intention of God’s once-and-for-all mission. That is, the mission of birthing and restoring shalom to the world is in Christ, by Christ, and for the honor of Christ.
Randy Woodley (Shalom and the Community of Creation: An Indigenous Vision (Prophetic Christianity (PC)))
Shalom is not a utopian destination; it is a constant journey.
Randy Woodley
The distinctive conditions that generated Western excellence are set to continue deteriorating so long as selection does not favor heroes, geniuses, and saints, but rather “Last Men” whose quest for personal happiness likely cannot sustain a civilization in the long run.
Michael A Woodley of Menie (Modernity and Cultural Decline: A Biobehavioral Perspective)
Audrey tilted her head. “You are an idiot, Evan. An idiot. There, now I have spoken to
Jess Michaels (Deceived (The Wicked Woodleys, #2))
Woodley
Stephen King (Billy Summers)
How to Train Your Toad by Cassandra Jemina Woodley,' a voice said after a face had appeared on the book cover.
Katrina Kahler (Witch School, Book 1)
The reality that someone you love has died is its own tragedy. But it's separate, isn't it, from the way it happened?
Sherrida Woodley (Quick Fall of Light)
God commands both individuals and the society in which they live to be generous and always take care of the poor. In such a community, shalom has a chance to thrive. In such a community, God will actually be glad to assign his name and dwell.
Randy Woodley
Evolutionary thinkers who insist on a moralizing orientation when considering a complex biocultural phenomenon such as religion are not meaningfully advancing their field. But Pinker makes matters worse by compounding ideological bias with historical ignorance.
Michael A Woodley of Menie (Modernity and Cultural Decline: A Biobehavioral Perspective)
Shalom is communal, holistic, and tangible. There is no private or partial shalom. The whole community must have shalom or no one has shalom. As long as there are hungry people in a community that is well fed, there can be no shalom. . . . Shalom is not for the many, while a few suffer; nor is it for the few while many suffer. It must be available for everyone.
Randy Woodley
We need to both appreciate and engage leaders and thinkers who are involved in decolonial work, but it is not enough to let them shoulder the burden on their own. Those who occupy a place in centers of power must join in the anticolonial task of examining institutional practices, challenging hurtful and oppressive structures, and interrogating narratives of exclusion and superiority.
Randy Woodley (Decolonizing Evangelicalism: An 11:59 p.m. Conversation)
Willie never spoke about her childhood. I stared at the picture, shocked that she had ever been a child at all. Somehow, I imagined Willie Woodley had been born with a rusty voice and street smarts to outwit any hustler. But here she was, a sweet child with a wide smile. What had happened to the Willie in the photo? I often longed to look at childhood photos of myself, but there weren’t any.
Ruta Sepetys (Out of the Easy)
I had abandoned Elana; I deserved her uncertainty. I closed my eyes and focused on her touch. Perhaps she wouldn't have understood had I tried to explain it to her, but to me Elana was not only Elana--she was the sad-eyed love of mine who used to bag groceries at Woodley's in Buffalo; she was the sweet one who always sat across from me on the city bus in Niagara Falls; she was the girl I'd picked up hitchhiking in Mobile and dropped off in New Orleans, brash, full of sarcastic humor, but truly lonely and scared; she was the one I'd nabbed pinching Newports for her dad from the Marathon station I'd worked at in Bakersfield (I'd softened and paid for the pack myself); yes, she was the girl playing basketball with all the boys in the park, collecting cans by the side of the road, keeping secret pet kittens in an empty boxcar in the woods, walking alone at night through the rail yards, teaching her little sisters how to kiss, reading out loud to herself, so absorbed by the story, singing sadly in the tub, building a fort from the junked cars out in the meadow, by herself in the front row at the black-and-white movies or in the alley, gazing at an eddy of cigarette stubs and trash and fall leaves, smoking her first cigarette at dusk by a pile of dead brush in the desert, then wishing at the stars-she was all of them, and she was so much more that was just her that I still didn't know.
Davy Rothbart
Monotheistic peoples have prayed to the Creator of all things for millennia without ever knowing the Second Testament claim that Jesus Christ is the historic Creator. Put simply, if indigenous people have been praying the Creator and the Creator is Christ, to whom have the been praying? Asked in another way, since there exist among indigenous peoples numerous testimonies of the creator's intervention and blessing in their lives, with whom have they been in relationship? Certainly a broader missional view would have been good news to such people. Instead, indigenous peoples were most often told by Euro-western missionaries that they worshiped another god. One also wonders what has been the effect of a theology that separates the Creator-Son and Savior/Restorer of all things? Such an imbalance has prevented western theologians from understanding a broader view of salvation that has helped maintain a dualism that prevents people from understanding that all creation, together, comes under the covering of Christ's universal restoration. Based on the past missional perspectives, the result of such an imbalanced theology is apparent -- a weak salvation theology equals a weak god. A weak god is not great enough to reach all peoples everywhere or able to restore all creation. The god of western mission has too often been capricious, carrying with him an exceptionalist theology that favors the categories and conclusions of the Euro-western world. Perhaps God is greater than the west has presumed. There is nowhere that we can travel, including the depths of the ocean or outer space, where Christ is not active in creation. It would seem that part of our job on earth is to discover what Christ is up to, and to join him in it!
Randy Woodley
In order for Christians to muster enough mercy to accept the ramifications of such a broad salvation, we must be willing to rethink our current exclusivist claims on the gospel. . . Shalom living was God's plan for all nations from the beginning. God makes a nation of Abraham specifically for the purposes of spreading shalom as it is demonstrated by practicing justice and righteousness....Where does the condemnation stop and where does the acceptance of those who don't deserve more begin? The answer was clear to Jesus. Acceptance begins with just one. Each and every one. Ezekiel 16:49 states, "This was the guilt of your sister Sodom: she and her daughters had pride, excess of food, and prosperous ease, but did not aid the poor and needy." Such greedy living habits were clear violations of the hospitality ethic, sharing equity and such, that are God's expectations of people living out shalom. Again, the backdrop narrative of Sodom concerns inhospitality to strangers and not taking care of the poor and needy. This is the same rebuke Jesus makes to the Pharisees. Jesus' stories are trying to get the Pharisees to think about God's willingness to welcome and not condemn others whom they feel don't deserve acceptance into God's shalom community of creation. Jesus is still trying to get us all to do the same.
Randy Woodley
Western peoples need to develop an more honest history and a shalom-oriented theology, in practical partnership with the indigenous peoples of the world, to gain a better understanding of place. I suggest that the way forward is both structural and relational, requiring honest historical and theological rethinking and a coming to grips with the following concerns: colonialism and neocolonialism; the way current forms of capitalism resist shalom; the way racism affects our thinking and relationships; the practical implications for living on stolen land; how violence is thought to be needed in order to maintain the present system; what true reconciliation looks like. We need to find ways to share power, and we should seek to understand what justice issues are still unresolved among indigenous and other disempowered peoples.
Randy Woodley
In shalom, warring over turf, wealth, or national security are extinct practices. In shalom, family wealth is no longer the point of blessing because living out shalom offers an alternative way for people to view wealth.
Randy Woodley (Shalom and the Community of Creation: An Indigenous Vision (Prophetic Christianity (PC)))
Michael A. Woodley makes the point that individuals who can properly be classified as geniuses necessarily have brains that are wired differently from normal; they are programmed to focus on their destined tasks and therefore may be unable to deal with the small details of day to day affairs.61 For instance, Einstein once got lost not far from his home in Princeton, New Jersey. He went into a shop and said, ‘Hi, I’m Einstein, can you take me home please?’ He could not drive a car, and many tasks and chores that most people take for granted were beyond him.62 Woodley’s conclusion flows from the idea of genius as a group-selected trait adapted to be an asset to other people. In sum, the potential genius needs to be looked after; because in terms of negotiating the complexities of human society he is likely to be vulnerable and fragile. The corollary of which is that when geniuses are not looked after, they are less likely to fulfil their potential, and everybody loses. For instance, the American reclusive poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) was ‘managed’ by Colonel T.W. Higginson; Jane Austen (1775-1817) flourished in the obscurity of her family and the critic and social philosopher John Ruskin (1819-1900) was sheltered and nurtured by his parents, then a cousin. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) was looked after by his brother Friars; Genetics-founder Johann Mendel (1822-1884) was secluded in a monastery; Pascal (1623-1662) was looked after by his aristocratic French family.63 Plus many another genius was sustained by a capable wife – Kurt Gödel (1906-1978) depended on his, older, wife Adele; and would only eat food prepared by her; so that when she was hospitalized, Gödel literally starved.
Edward Dutton (The Genius Famine: Why We Need Geniuses, Why They're Dying Out, Why We Must Rescue Them)
Myth is not about whether something is fact or fiction; myth is more about truth. Good myth, according to the old adage, is about something that continues to be true again and again, over time.
Randy Woodley
she told the Boston Phoenix
Joe Allan (Becoming Divergent: An Unofficial Biography of Shailene Woodley and Theo James)
She has also spoken about her love of other Disney classics, The Little Mermaid and Pocahontas.
Joe Allan (Becoming Divergent: An Unofficial Biography of Shailene Woodley and Theo James)
...whenever I need a pick-me-up, I just watch Pocahontas.
Joe Allan (Becoming Divergent: An Unofficial Biography of Shailene Woodley and Theo James)
She has stated that there are several 'auteur' directors she'd like to work with - including Danny Boyle, Darren Aronofsky, and Terrence Malick. But, as if to prove her lack of movie buff credentials, in an interview with Time Out Chicago, when quizzed about her favourite Malick movie she said, 'Maybe if you name some, I'll remember which ones I've seen.' She still had a little to learn about massaging the egos of the Hollywood elite!
Joe Allan (Becoming Divergent: An Unofficial Biography of Shailene Woodley and Theo James)
As someone who had faced the harsh reality of her parents' divorce and experienced the fallout from that situation,
Joe Allan (Becoming Divergent: An Unofficial Biography of Shailene Woodley and Theo James)
I'm not her. I didn't do drugs in high school and I don't drink, and I'm not bitchy like she is
Joe Allan (Becoming Divergent: An Unofficial Biography of Shailene Woodley and Theo James)
What I'm really excited about - and it took me a long time to get it, to understand it - is that I have the ability to spread love and compassion back into the world. That's why I'm here.
Joe Allan (Becoming Divergent: An Unofficial Biography of Shailene Woodley and Theo James)
She told the Chicago Tribune at the real dirty words in Hollywood are not swear words. 'The F-word is "famous," the C-word is "celebrity" and the S-word is "star," she said, continuing, 'famous, celebrity and star, I think, are misused. Unless you're George Clooney and can't go to a baseball game without feeling smothered, you're not allowed to use those words [to describe yourself].
Joe Allan (Becoming Divergent: An Unofficial Biography of Shailene Woodley and Theo James)
There are substantial issues that remain, however, related to direction, hierarchy, and paternalism in missional mentalities. The heart and the willingness behind going are to be applauded. Jesus modeled an incarnational gospel and contextual approaches are to be valued over attractional models like those found in the megachurch movement. Concerns abound, though, in the shadow of the colonial legacy. How does one reclaim or reform a concept that has been so thoroughly corrupted and has taken on so much baggage? Is repentance enough? Can the form actually be redeemed and repurposed?
Randy Woodley (Decolonizing Evangelicalism: An 11:59 p.m. Conversation)
Yeon Lee-Woodley is a speech language pathologist with an M.S. in Speech- Language Pathology from Nova Southeastern University. She also holds a bachelor's in the same area. Yeon Lee-Woodley likes to take her children to parks in her free time and going running, walking, and biking with them.
Yeon Lee-Woodley
To accept our place as simple human beings—beings who share a world with every seen and unseen creature in this vast community of creation—is to embrace our deepest spirituality.
Randy Woodley (Becoming Rooted: One Hundred Days of Reconnecting with Sacred Earth)
Screw being comfortable," Ella burst out passionately, eyes flashing. "To be comfortable is to be boring. You gotta step outside the lines sometimes.
Sara Jane Woodley (More Than Just Friends (Aston Falls #2))
Your scars make you who you are today. They’re a part of your past and shape the person you become.
Sara Jane Woodley (The Summer I Fell for My Fake Boyfriend (Legacy Inn #2))
Every once in a while, right before I fell asleep, I’d think of you,” I said quietly. “And I’d wake up sometimes thinking about you, too. It was like you lingered at the back of my mind, visiting me in my dreams when I most needed you.
Sara Jane Woodley (More Than Second Chances (Aston Falls #1))
Way I see it, you should eat the things you love and do what makes you feel good. Life’s tough, why deprive yourself of the things that bring you joy?
Sara Jane Woodley (The Last Chance Road Trip (Love in Mirror Valley #1.5))
Loss is a good teacher.
Sara Jane Woodley (The Last Chance Road Trip (Love in Mirror Valley #1.5))
love isn’t about checking boxes. It’s not about being perfect or appearing a certain way. It’s not even about making someone else happy. Love exists in success and in failure, through weakness and hardship and doubt. It’s subconscious and unconditional. Love just is.
Sara Jane Woodley (More Than Meets the Eye (Aston Falls #3))
Mi bella, do you ever stop to think that life is about the journey, not the destination? If you are only focusing on hitting your goals, the only person you disappoint is yourself.
Sara Jane Woodley (The Summer I Fell for a Billionaire (Legacy Inn #3))
There’s a point where you have to stop thinking about all the things that are bothering you and actually watch what’s going on around you. I find that those are the times when Creator speaks to me the most, and usually the deepest. I don’t think there’s any special trick to it.
Randy Woodley (Indigenous Theology and the Western Worldview (Acadia Studies in Bible and Theology): A Decolonized Approach to Christian Doctrine)
Two weeks ago, my life was perfect. I lived in a nice house in a fancy Billings suburb, and I played quarterback for one of the best high school football teams in the state. My parents were together and, for all I knew, in love. And, I had a beautiful girlfriend by my side. Fast-forward fourteen days, and my life contains none of the above.
Sara Jane Woodley (The Complete Legacy Inn Collection (Legacy Inn #1-4))
Theologian Randy Woodley identifies this deeper engagement as the Hebrew word shalom, which is often translated simplistically as “peace.” Woodley asserts that shalom “is active and engaged, going far beyond the mere absence of conflict. A fuller understanding of shalom is the key to the door that can lead us to a whole new way of living in the world.”1 Shalom combats the dualism rampant in Western culture and is instead rooted in a more Hebraic “passion for equilibrium, a sense of system in which all the parts cohere.”2 Shalom, therefore, does not eschew or diminish the role of the other or the reality of a suffering world. Instead, it embraces the suffering other as an instrumental aspect of well-being. Shalom requires lament.
Soong-Chan Rah (Prophetic Lament: A Call for Justice in Troubled Times)
Shalom is meant to be both personal (emphasizing our relationships with others) and structural (replacing systems where shalom has been broken or which produce broken shalom, such as war-or greed-driven economic systems). In shalom, the old structures and systems are replaced with new structures and new systems.
Randy Woodley
A believer that chooses not to make prayer the center of life will soon find his faith has grown cold and stale; no matter how often he attends church, he will be in great need of supernatural resuscitation.
Joseph Woodley (Return Home Wounded Warriors: The Church is You)
We look up in tandem and see one of the world’s rarest phenomena — ball lightning. I’m breathless, watching the ball of light fly through the sky and away from us. It occurs to me that the things I once found so rare — so incomprehensible — are actually possible.
Sara Jane Woodley (The Complete Legacy Inn Collection (Legacy Inn #1-4))
You two had… something. Something special, like a language no one else understood. Sometimes, it seemed like you could read each other’s minds. Bree was an excitable child, but she was calm with you, and I’ve never seen you smile as much as when you were with her.
Sara Jane Woodley (The Complete Legacy Inn Collection (Legacy Inn #1-4))
looks
Sara Jane Woodley (The Summer I Fell for My Best Friend (Legacy Inn #1))
You will, Princess. We have all the time in the world.
Sara Jane Woodley (The Lying Game (The Brighton Brothers #1))
Of course, there are a lot of different contemplative traditions when it comes to silence. In our Native way, we are more or less listening, not just to ourselves or what we would say the Spirit puts in our hearts, but to what’s going on around us. We’re listening to the birds to see what kind of message they have. We’re listening to the wind to see if there’s a song in it for us. It might sound esoteric, but we’re listening to the way that we “spin in silence” by hearing what I believe is perhaps Creator’s most communicative means on earth—which is creation.   I think of that when I read Luke chapter 4, the story where Jesus goes out into the wilderness for forty days. [...] Jesus was watching creation. He was observing what was going on around him. He was listening. The reason that we know that is because when he comes back, he talks about creation for the rest of his life. He talks about flowers and birds and trees and seeds and crops and the earth, and the soil. He could have talked about all kinds of things—Roman chariots and their power and aqueducts and the ingenuity involved—but that’s not what we have a record of. What we have a record of is someone who seemed to be at peace with the quietness of creation.…
Randy Woodley
When I go out and I listen in creation and I’m listening to the birds, then all of a sudden the Spirit speaks in my heart. It’s not necessarily always silence. Engaged listening is such a sacred thing, and the Spirit works through that so often.
Randy Woodley