Riis Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Riis. Here they are! All 34 of them:

When nothing seems to help, I go and look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that last blow that did it, but all that had gone before.
Jacob A. Riis
Svava: "Rule number one: Never make a fool of yourself." Riis: "Rule number two: Never be a burden to any one." Svava: "Rule number three: Always be in the fashion.
Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson
In self-defence, you know, all life eventually accommodates itself to its environment, and human life is no exception.
Jacob A. Riis (How the Other Half Lives)
Oh, God! That bread should be so dear, And flesh and blood so cheap!
Jacob A. Riis (How the Other Half Lives)
The world forgets easily, too easily, what it does not like to remember.
Jacob A. Riis
He may have been a trifle wild.
Jacob A. Riis (How The Other Half Lives)
When nothing seems to help, I go and look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that blow that did it--but all that had gone before.
Jacob A. Riis
How shall the love of God be understood by those who have been nurtured in sight only of the greed of man?
Jacob A. Riis (How the Other Half Lives: Studies Among the Tenements of New York (with 100+ endnotes))
Like the Chinese, the Italian is a born gambler.
Jacob A. Riis (How the Other Half Lives: Studies Among the Tenements of New York (with 100+ endnotes))
You will only see change in your results if you apply change to your actions. Every day!
RiiFerreira
Out of forty-eight boys twenty had never seen the Brooklyn Bridge that was scarcely five minutes’ walk away, three only had been in Central Park, fifteen had known the joy of a ride in a horse-car. The street, with its ash-barrels and its dirt, the river that runs foul with mud, are their domain.
Jacob A. Riis (How the Other Half Lives: Studies Among the Tenements of New York (with 100+ endnotes))
Long ago it was said that "one half of the world does not know how the other half lives." That was true then. It did not know because it did not care. The half that was on top cared little for the struggles, and less for the fate of those who were underneath, so long as it was able to hold them there and keep its own seat. There came a time when the discomfort and consequent upheavals so violent, that it was no longer an easy thing to do, and then the upper half fell to inquiring what was the matter. Information on the subject has been accumulating rapidly since, and the whole world has had its hands full answering for its old ignorance.
Jacob A. Riis (How the Other Half Lives)
Let’s ask him,” Lincoln Steffens suggested. The two men dashed across to headquarters and burst into Roosevelt’s office. Riis put the question directly. Was he working to be President? The effect, wrote Steffens, “was frightening.” TR leaped to his feet, ran around his desk, and fists clenched, teeth bared, he seemed about to throttle Riis, who cowered away, amazed. “Don’t you dare ask me that,” TR yelled at Riis. “Don’t you put such ideas into my head. No friend of mine would ever say a thing like that, you—you—” Riis’s shocked face or TR’s recollection that he had few friends as devoted as Jake Riis halted him. He backed away, came up again to Riis, and put his arm over his shoulder. Then he beckoned me close and in an awed tone of voice explained. “Never, never, you must never either of you remind a man at work on a political job that he may be President. It almost always kills him politically. He loses his nerve; he can’t do his work; he gives up the very traits that are making him a possibility. I, for instance, I am going to do great things here, hard things that require all the courage, ability, work that I am capable of … But if I get to thinking of what it might lead to—” He stopped, held us off, and looked into our faces with his face screwed up into a knot, as with lowered voice he said slowly: “I must be wanting to be President. Every young man does. But I won’t let myself think of it; I must not, because if I do, I will begin to work for it, I’ll be careful, calculating, cautious in word and act, and so—I’ll beat myself. See?” Again he looked at us as if we were enemies; then he threw us away from him and went back to his desk. “Go on away, now,” he said, “and don’t you ever mention the—don’t you ever mention that to me again.”141
Edmund Morris (The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt)
Mastery requires patience. The San Antonio Spurs, one of the most successful teams in NBA history, have a quote from social reformer Jacob Riis hanging in their locker room: “When nothing seems to help, I go and look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that last blow that did it—but all that had gone before.
James Clear (Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones)
Look at a stone cutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred-and-first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not the last blow that did it, but all that had gone before.
Jacob A. Riis
Nevertheless, like many of today’s reformers, Riis considered teachers the determining factor in whether a child escaped poverty. In his 1892 book The Children of the Poor, he wrote that schools are “our chief defense against the tenement and the flood of ignorance with which it would swamp us … it is the personal influence of the teacher that counts for most in dealing with the child. It follows it into the home, and often through life to the second and third generation, smoothing the way of sorrow and hardship with counsel and aid in a hundred ways.
Dana Goldstein (The Teacher Wars: A History of America's Most Embattled Profession)
Did not the manager of the Fresh Air Fund write to the pastor of an Italian Church only last year{9} that “no one asked for Italian children,” and hence he could not send any to the country?
Jacob A. Riis (How the Other Half Lives)
There's no such thing as a mercenary suicide bomber.
Riis Marshall (Nudge Nudge Wink Wink Die)
Ka toidujäätmete vaat tühjendati otse betoonpõrandale, misjärel Esimene ja Teine, kummikindad õlgadeni üll, selle tuhkatriinuliku püsivusega kahte hunnikusse jaotasid: raadiod, patareid, narkots ja väitsad esimesse ning riis, kala, kummipaelad, soust ja lihapallid teise.
Ervin Bernhardt (Minu Bangkok. Kaksteist trellitatud ust (Minu..., # 51))
Reporter Jacob Riis made it his mission to expose the horrors of poverty in New York. New to working with a camera, his flash actually set the walls of One apartment inhabited by five blind people on fire.
H.W. Brands (American Colossus: The Triumph of Capitalism, 1865-1900)
in 1890, of Jacob A. Riis’s How the Other Half Lives. A pioneering urban journalist, Riis, himself an immigrant from Denmark, had taken powerful photographs of tenement life.
Jon Meacham (The Soul of America: The Battle for Our Better Angels)
Banaba, for the land that we love and to what we have lost, will remain in our hearts... forever
Raobeia Ken Sigrah (Te Rii Ni Banaba)
This book is the first of its kind to record and express the past from a Banaban perspective.
Stacey M. King (Te Rii ni Banaba: Backbone of Banaba)
We would like to inspire young Banabans to uphold their rich culture and traditions for many future generations.
Raobeia Ken Sigrah (Te Rii Ni Banaba)
The National Park Service is planning to boost fees at Riis Park and other areas in the Gateway National Recreation Area.
Anonymous
Jacob Riis in his How the Other Half Lives
David McCullough (The Johnstown Flood)
Reformers believed moral and political relationships were learned in play. Given street-afforded license, kids would grow up bad. “If we let the gutter set its stamp upon their early days,” Jacob Riis warned in 1904, “we shall have the gutter reproduced in our politics.” The antidote to the street was the supervised playground. Settlement houses had opened rudimentary play spaces in the 1890s. In 1898 the Outdoor Recreation League (ORL), founded by Lillian Wald and Charles B. Stover and housed in the College Settlement, opened the city’s first outdoor playground in Hudsonbank Park (at West 53rd Street), whose sand gardens, running track, and equipment were supervised by Hartley House’s headworker. Playground proponents insisted the city take over and expand these programs. An 1898 University Settlement report argued: “Waterloo was won in part on the playing fields of Eton said Wellington; good government for New York may partially be won on the playgrounds of the East Side.” In 1902 the city assumed responsibility for the nine ORL playgrounds created to date. And in 1903 Seward Park became the first municipal park in the country to be equipped as a playground.
Mike Wallace (Greater Gotham: A History of New York City from 1898 to 1919 (The History of NYC Series))
When nothing seems to help, I go back and look at the stonecutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that blow that did it--but all that had gone before.
Jacob A. Riis
Kada ništa ne pomaže odem i gledam kamenoresca kako udara čekićem po velikom kamenu. Udari i stotinu puta, a na kamenu nema ni pukotine. Ipak, nakon stotinu i prvog udarca kamen pukne na pola...ja znam da nije pukao baš od toga udarca nego od svih prethodnih koji su zadani.
Jacob A. Riis
His two podium candidates looked like two blokes who had just got up from the Christmas buffet.
Bjarne Riis (Riis)
CSC and Bjarne Riis, who said something that’s stuck with me for ten years: his philosophy was ‘You never know how hard you can tighten something until it breaks’. Whether you are training, overtraining, or trying to get to your perfect race weight, you never know how far to push yourself until you actually break down.
Bradley Wiggins (My Hour)
Stone-cutter’s Credo, as described by photographer and activist Jacob Riis as he contemplated the slow pace of social reform: When nothing seems to help, I go and look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that blow that did it, but all that had gone before.
Rich Diviney (The Attributes: 25 Hidden Drivers of Optimal Performance)
The real things of life were getting a grip on him more and more,” Jacob Riis observed. In an essay on “fellow-feeling,” written a decade and a half later, Roosevelt maintained that empathy, like courage, could be acquired over time. “A man who conscientiously endeavors to throw in his lot with those about him, to make his interest theirs, to put himself in a position where he and they have a common object, will at first feel a little self-conscious, will realize too plainly his aims. But with exercise this will pass off. He will speedily find that the fellow-feeling which at first he had to stimulate was really existent, though latent, and is capable of a very healthy growth.” Indeed, he argued that a “very large part of the rancor of political and social strife” springs from the fact that different classes or sections “are so cut off from each other that neither appreciates the other’s passions, prejudices, and, indeed, point of view.
Doris Kearns Goodwin (Leadership: In Turbulent Times)
Riis hanging in their locker room: “When nothing seems to help, I go and look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it.19 Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that last blow that did it—but all that had gone before.
James Clear (Atomic Habits: An Easy and Proven Way to Build Good Habits and Break Bad Ones)