Richard Iii Quotes

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Dispute not with her: she is lunatic.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Richard Gansey III had forgotten how many times he had been told he was destined for greatness.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven King (The Raven Cycle, #4))
So wise so young, they say, do never live long.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
And thus I clothe my naked villainy With odd old ends stol'n out of holy writ; And seem a saint, when most I play the devil.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Out of my sight! Thou dost infect mine eyes.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Noah crouched over Gansey's body. He said, for the last time, 'You will live because of Glendower. Someone else on the ley line is dying when they should not, and so you will live when you should not.' Gansey died. 'Goodbye,' Noah said. 'Don't throw it away.' He quietly slid from time.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven King (The Raven Cycle, #4))
Wanting to live, but accepting death to save others: that was courage. That was to be Gansey's greatness.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven King (The Raven Cycle, #4))
It'll be OK. I'm ready. Blue, kiss me.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven King (The Raven Cycle, #4))
In the hall stood Richard Campbell Gansey III in his school uniform and overcoat and scarf and gloves, looking like someone from another world. Behind him was Ronan Lynch, his damn tie knotted right for once and his shirt tucked in. Humiliation and joy warred furiously inside Adam. Gansey strode between the pews as Adam's father stared at him. He went directly to the bench, straight up to the judge. Now that he stood directly beside Adam, not looking at him, Adam could see that he was a little out of breath. Ronan, behind him, was as well. they had run. For him.
Maggie Stiefvater (Blue Lily, Lily Blue (The Raven Cycle, #3))
And therefore, — since I cannot prove a lover, To entertain these fair well-spoken days, — I am determined to prove a villain, And hate the idle pleasures of these days.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Now is the winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this sun of York; And all the clouds that lour'd upon our house In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Gansey stepped in then, putting his phone neatly into his pocket, fetching out his keys instead. There was still something stretched thin about his expression. He looked, in fact, like he had in the cave, his face streaked and unfamiliar. It was so strange to see him without his Richard Campbell Gansey III guise on in public that Blue couldn't stop staring at his face. No — it wasn't his face. It was the way he stood, his shoulder shrugged, chin ducked, gaze from below uncertain eyebrows. "SHE WAS ALL RIGHT," Jesse assured him. "My head knew that," Gansey said. "But the rest of me didn't.
Maggie Stiefvater (Blue Lily, Lily Blue (The Raven Cycle, #3))
But what [Gansey] said was, "I'm going to need everyone to be straight with each other from now on. No more games. This isn't just for Blue, either. All of us." Ronan said, "I'm always straight." Adam replied, "Oh, man, that's the biggest lie you've ever told." Blue said, "Okay.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle, #1))
It had been a long time ago, but also, it was no time at all. Sometimes, Gansey felt like his life was made up of a dozen hours that he could never forget.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle, #1))
I have set my life upon a cast, And I will stand the hazard of the die.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
If Glendower had not saved Gansey's life, he did not know who to thank, or who to be, or how to live.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven King (The Raven Cycle, #4))
Now is the winter of our discontent.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
In thy foul throat thou liest.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Conscience is but a word that cowards use, Devis'd at first to keep the strong in awe: Our strong arms be our conscience, swords our law. March on, join bravely, let us to't pell-mell; If not to heaven, then hand in hand to hell.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Time tugged at his soul.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven King (The Raven Cycle, #4))
Sin, death, and hell have set their marks on him, And all their ministers attend on him.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Conscience is but a word that cowards use, devised at first to keep the strong in awe
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
What do I fear? Myself? There’s none else by. Richard loves Richard; that is, I and I. Is there a murderer here? No. Yes, I am. Then fly! What, from myself? Great reason why: Lest I revenge. What, myself upon myself? Alack, I love myself. Wherefore? For any good That I myself have done unto myself? O, no! Alas, I rather hate myself For hateful deeds committed by myself. I am a villain. Yet I lie. I am not. Fool, of thyself speak well. Fool, do not flatter: My conscience hath a thousand several tongues, And every tongue brings in a several tale, And every tale condemns me for a villain. Perjury, perjury, in the highest degree; Murder, stern murder, in the direst degree; All several sins, all used in each degree, Throng to the bar, crying all, “Guilty! guilty!” I shall despair. There is no creature loves me, And if I die no soul will pity me. And wherefore should they, since that I myself Find in myself no pity to myself?
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
What a tribute this is to art; what a misfortune this is for history. (In reference to Shakespeare's 'Richard III')
Paul Murray Kendall (Richard the Third)
Bloody thou art, bloody will be thy end; Shame serves thy life and doth thy death attend.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Despair and die. The ghosts
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Jane. You’ve got to see this!” His voice was full of the honey-baked accent of old Virginia money. As Blue staggered up the hill, telescope on her shoulder, she mentally tested the danger level: Am I in love with him yet? Gansey galloped down the hill to snatch he telescope from her. “This isn’t that heavy,” he told her, and strode back the way he’d come. She did not think she was in love with him. She hadn’t been in love before, but she was still pretty sure she’d be able to tell. Earlier in the year, she had had a vision of kissing him, and she could still picture that quite easily. But the sensible part of Blue, which was usually the only part of her, thought that had more to do with Richard Campbell Gansey III having a nice mouth than with any blossoming romance. Anyway, if fate thought it would tell her who to fall for, fate had another thing coming. Gansey added, “I would’ve thought you had more muscles. Don’t feminists have big muscles?” Decidedly not in love with him. “Smiling when you say that doesn’t make it funny,” Blue said.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Dream Thieves (The Raven Cycle, #2))
A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse!
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Richard knew, of course, that his was thought to be an unlucky title; only twice before had a Richard ruled England, and both met violent ends.
Sharon Kay Penman (The Sunne in Splendour)
Life repeats Shakespearian themes more often than we think. Did Lady Macbeth, Richard III, and King Claudius exist only in the Middle Ages? Shylock wanted to cut a pound of flesh from the body of the merchant of Venice. Is that a fairy tale?
Varlam Shalamov (Kolyma Tales)
Where the hell is Ronan?” Gansey asked, echoing the words that thousands of humans had uttered since mankind developed speech. As he stepped out of the science building, he tipped his head backwards, as if Ronan Lynch – dreamer of dreams, fighter of men, skipper of classes – might somehow be flying overhead.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven King (The Raven Cycle, #4))
It was a powerful thing, that laugh. He only did it once, but his eyes remained shaped like it. Something inside her did a complicated tug. Oh no! she thought. But then she calmed herself. Richard C. Gansey III has a nice mouth. Now I know he has nice eyes when he
Maggie Stiefvater (The Dream Thieves (The Raven Cycle, #2))
But then I sigh, with a piece of Scripture Tell them that God bids us to do evil for good; And thus I clothe my naked villany With odd old ends stolen out of Holy Writ; And seem a saint, when most I play the devil.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
I should like to freeze in time all those I do love, keep them somehow safe from the ravages of the passing years..."Rather like flowers pressed between the pages of a book!
Sharon Kay Penman (The Sunne in Splendour)
Shine out fair sun, till I have bought a glass, That I may see my shadow as I pass.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Not all the water in the rough rude sea Can wash the balm from an anointed King;
William Shakespeare (Richard II)
Nowhere and oblivion were completely different things/places to Richard Stein. For him, oblivion is when something goes into nothing and nowhere is the place where something can come out of nothing.
Carlton Mellick III (Satan Burger)
Are you coming to me for wisdom? Gansey shook his head head. ‘Courage.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven King (The Raven Cycle, #4))
Gansey turned to Adam, finally. He was still wearing his glorious kingly face, Richard Campbell Gansey III, white knight, but his eyes were uncertain. Is this okay? Was it okay? Adam had turned down so many offers of help from Gansey. Money for school, money for food, money for rent. Pity and charity, Adam had thought. For so long, he’d wanted Gansey to see him as an equal, but it was possible that all this time, the only person who needed to see that was Adam. Now he could see that it wasn’t charity Gansey was offering. It was just truth. And something else: friendship of the unshakable kind. Friendship you could swear on. That could be busted nearly to breaking and come back stronger than before. Adam held out his right hand, and Gansey clasped it in a handshake, like they were men, because they were men.
Maggie Stiefvater (Blue Lily, Lily Blue (The Raven Cycle, #3))
It shouldn't have happened at all, but their friendship had been cemented in only the time it took to get to school that morning - Adam demonstrating how to fasten the Camaro's ground wire more securely, Gansey lifting Adam's bike halfway into the trunk so they could ride to school together, Adam confessing he worked at a mechanic's to put himself through Aglionby, and Gansey turning to the passenger seat and asking, "What do you know about Welsh kings?
Maggie Stiefvater (The Dream Thieves (The Raven Cycle, #2))
We can pretend. Just once.” It was mint and memories and the past and the future and she felt as if she’d done this before and already she longed to do it again.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Dream Thieves (The Raven Cycle, #2))
He had had his own feelings hurt over and over by Adam, even when Adam had meant no harm. Some of the worst fractures had appeared because Adam hadn't realized the he was causing them.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven King (The Raven Cycle, #4))
My conscience hath a thousand several tongues, And every tongue brings in a several tale, And every tale condemns me for a villain. Perjury, perjury, in the high'st degree; Murder, stern murder in the dir'st degree, Throng to the bar, crying all, 'Guilty!, guilty!
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
He was just alive," [Gansey] said helplessly. "He just taught us four irregular verbs last week. And you killed him.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle, #1))
Things sweet to taste prove in digestion sour.
William Shakespeare (Richard II)
Gansey lifted her hand gently from his skin, holding it as formally as a dance. He put it against his mouth. Blue froze. Absolutely still. Her heart didn't beat. She didn't blink. She couldn't say don't kiss me. She couldn't even form don't. He just leaned his cheek and the edge of his mouth against her knuckles and then set her hand back.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Dream Thieves (The Raven Cycle, #2))
Now is the winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this sun of York
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
The world is grown so bad that wrens make pray where eagles dare not perch
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Bad is the world, and all will come to naught when such ill-dealing must be seen in thought.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Tis better, sir, to be brief than tedious.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Richard Gansey III had forgotten how many times he had been told he was destined for greatness. He was bred for it; nobility and purpose coded in both sides of his pedigree. His mother’s father had been a diplomat, an architect of fortunes; his father’s father had been an architect, a diplomat of styles. His mother’s mother had tutored the children of European princesses. His father’s mother had built a girls’ school with her own inheritance. The Ganseys were courtiers and kings, and when there was no castle to invite them, they built one. He was a king.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven King (The Raven Cycle, #4))
Tush! Fear not, my lord, we will not stand to prate; Talkers are no good doers: be assured We come to use our hands and not our tongues.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Discharge my followers; let them hence away, From Richard's night to Bolingbrooke's fair day.
William Shakespeare (Richard II)
What do I fear? Myself? There’s none else by. Richard loves Richard; that is, I and I.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
She felt bigger than her body. High as the stars. He leaned toward her — her heart spun again — and pressed his cheek against hers. His lips didn’t touch her skin, but she felt his breath, hot and uneven, on her face. His fingers splayed on either side of her spine. Her lips were so close to his jaw that she felt his hint of stubble at the end of them. It was mint and memories and the past and the future and she felt as if she’d done this before and already she longed to do it again. Oh, help, she thought. Help, help, help. He pulled away. He said, “And now we never speak of it again.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Dream Thieves (The Raven Cycle, #2))
At this, Gansey rolled over onto his back and folded his hands on his chest. He wore a salmon polo shirt, which, in Blue’s opinion, was far more hellish than anything they’d discussed to this point.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Dream Thieves (The Raven Cycle, #2))
What happened to your face?" Blue asked. Adam shrugged ruefully. Either he or Ronan smelled like a parking garage. His voice was self-deprecating. "Do you think it makes me look tougher?" What it did was make him look more fragile and dirty, somehow, like a teacup unearthed from the soil, but Blue didn't say that. Ronan said, "It makes you look like a loser." "Ronan," said Gansey. "I need everyone to sit down!" shouted Maura.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle, #1))
Ronan replied, ‘I’m waiting for you to tell me what to do, Gansey. Tell me where to go.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven King (The Raven Cycle, #4))
All springs reduce their currents to mine eyes, That I, being governed by the watery moon, May send forth plenteous tears to drown the world.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
For when I speak of the banality of evil, I do so only on the strictly factual level, pointing to a phenomenon which stared one in the face at the trial. Eichmann was not Iago and not Macbeth, and nothing would have been farther from his mind than to determine with Richard III 'to prove a villain.' Except for an extraordinary diligence in looking out for his personal advancement, he had no motives at all… He merely, to put the matter colloquially, never realized what he was doing… It was sheer thoughtlessness—something by no means identical with stupidity—that predisposed him to become one of the greatest criminals of that period. And if this is 'banal' and even funny, if with the best will in the world one cannot extract any diabolical or demonic profundity from Eichmann, this is still far from calling it commonplace… That such remoteness from reality and such thoughtlessness can wreak more havoc than all the evil instincts taken together which, perhaps, are inherent in man—that was, in fact, the lesson one could learn in Jerusalem.
Hannah Arendt (Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil)
Short summers lightly have a forward spring.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Somewhere along the way, during this hunt for Glendower, he'd forgotten to notice how much magic there was in the world. How much magic that wasn't just buried in a tomb. He was feeling it now.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven King (The Raven Cycle, #4))
Teach not thy lip such scorn, for it was made For kissing, lady, not for such contempt.
William Shakespeare
She called Gansey. "Blue?" he said. Just his voice. Her heart tethered itself. Not completely, but enough to stop quivering so much. She closed her eyes
Maggie Stiefvater
Plain and not honest is too harsh a style.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Wrong hath but wrong, and blame the due of blame.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse! -King Richard, from Richard III
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Henry shuffled the jewelled insect back out of his pocket. It amber heart warmed light through the pit again. “Back in the lab, of course, as father dear tries to copy it with nonmagical parts. My mother told me to keep this one to remind me of what I am.” “And what is that?” The bee illuminated both itself and Henry: its translucent wings, Henry’s wickedly cut eyebrows. “Something more.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven King (The Raven Cycle, #4))
Gansey sighed, small and quiet and ragged, like he hadn't meant to let it escape. She shifted her gaze from the window to the side of his head, watching him watch instead. He pressed his thumb against his lower lip-this was Gansey, that gesture- and then he swallowed. It was, she thought, just as she felt when she looked at the stars, when she walked in Cabeswater.
Maggie Stiefvater
Right,' he said. 'So it stands to reason there's something about the line that fortifies or protects a corpse. The soul. The ... animus. The quiddity of it.' 'Gansey, seriously,' Adam interrupted, to Blue's relief. 'Nobody knows what quiddity is.' 'The whatness, Adam. Whatever it is that makes a person who they are.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle, #1))
At the sight of Gansey's Aglionby sweater, Adam's father had charged out, firing on all cylinders. For weeks after that, Ronan had called Gansey "the S.R.F.," where the S stood for Soft, the R stood for Rich, and the F for something else.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle, #1))
Woe to that land that’s govern’d by a child!
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
KING RICHARD III: I am in So far in blood that sin will pluck on sin.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
I'll not meddle with it. It makes a man a coward: a man cannot steal but it accuseth him; a man cannot swear but it checks him; a man cannot lie with his neighbor's wife but it detects him. 'Tis a blushing, shamefaced spirit that mutinies in a man's bosom. It fills a man full of obstacles. It made me once restore a purse of gold that by chance I found. It beggars any man that keeps it. It is turned out of towns and cities for a dangerous thing, and every man that means to live well endeavors to trust to himself and live without it.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Every schoolboy turned over the final page of Richard III with relief, because now at last the Wars of the Roses were over and they could get on to the Tudors, who were dull but easy to follow.
Josephine Tey (The Daughter of Time (Inspector Alan Grant #5))
Richard, might I ask you something? We've talked tonight of what you must do, of what you can do, of what you ought to do.But we've said nothing of what you want to do.Richard, do you want to be King?" At first, she thought he wasn't going to answer her. But as she studied his face, she saw he was turning her question over in his mind, seeking to answer it as honestly as he could. "Yes," he said at last. "Yes...I do.
Sharon Kay Penman (The Sunne in Splendour)
I once came upon a definition of history as ‘the process by which complex truths are transformed into simplified falsehoods’. That is particularly true in the case of Richard III, where the normal medieval proclivity for moralizing and partisanship was further complicated by deliberate distortion to serve Tudor political needs.
Sharon Kay Penman (The Sunne In Splendour)
Not like this. At least you have a place to go. 'End of the world' ... What is your problem, Adam? I mean, is there something about my place that's too repugnant for you to imagine living there? Why is it that everything kind I do is pity to you? Everything is charity. Well, here it is: I'm sick of tiptoeing around your principles." "God, I'm sick of your condescension, Gansey," Adam said. "Don't try to make me feel stupid. Who whips out repugnant? Don't pretend you're not trying to make me feel stupid." "This is the way I talk. I'm sorry your father never taught you the meaning of repugnant. He was too busy smashing your head against the wall of your trailer while you apologized for being alive." Both of them stopped breathing. Gansey knew he'd gone too far. It was too far, too late, too much.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle, #1))
1. Bangladesh.... In 1971 ... Kissinger overrode all advice in order to support the Pakistani generals in both their civilian massacre policy in East Bengal and their armed attack on India from West Pakistan.... This led to a moral and political catastrophe the effects of which are still sorely felt. Kissinger’s undisclosed reason for the ‘tilt’ was the supposed but never materialised ‘brokerage’ offered by the dictator Yahya Khan in the course of secret diplomacy between Nixon and China.... Of the new state of Bangladesh, Kissinger remarked coldly that it was ‘a basket case’ before turning his unsolicited expertise elsewhere. 2. Chile.... Kissinger had direct personal knowledge of the CIA’s plan to kidnap and murder General René Schneider, the head of the Chilean Armed Forces ... who refused to countenance military intervention in politics. In his hatred for the Allende Government, Kissinger even outdid Richard Helms ... who warned him that a coup in such a stable democracy would be hard to procure. The murder of Schneider nonetheless went ahead, at Kissinger’s urging and with American financing, just between Allende’s election and his confirmation.... This was one of the relatively few times that Mr Kissinger (his success in getting people to call him ‘Doctor’ is greater than that of most PhDs) involved himself in the assassination of a single named individual rather than the slaughter of anonymous thousands. His jocular remark on this occasion—‘I don’t see why we have to let a country go Marxist just because its people are irresponsible’—suggests he may have been having the best of times.... 3. Cyprus.... Kissinger approved of the preparations by Greek Cypriot fascists for the murder of President Makarios, and sanctioned the coup which tried to extend the rule of the Athens junta (a favoured client of his) to the island. When despite great waste of life this coup failed in its objective, which was also Kissinger’s, of enforced partition, Kissinger promiscuously switched sides to support an even bloodier intervention by Turkey. Thomas Boyatt ... went to Kissinger in advance of the anti-Makarios putsch and warned him that it could lead to a civil war. ‘Spare me the civics lecture,’ replied Kissinger, who as you can readily see had an aphorism for all occasions. 4. Kurdistan. Having endorsed the covert policy of supporting a Kurdish revolt in northern Iraq between 1974 and 1975, with ‘deniable’ assistance also provided by Israel and the Shah of Iran, Kissinger made it plain to his subordinates that the Kurds were not to be allowed to win, but were to be employed for their nuisance value alone. They were not to be told that this was the case, but soon found out when the Shah and Saddam Hussein composed their differences, and American aid to Kurdistan was cut off. Hardened CIA hands went to Kissinger ... for an aid programme for the many thousands of Kurdish refugees who were thus abruptly created.... The apercu of the day was: ‘foreign policy should not he confused with missionary work.’ Saddam Hussein heartily concurred. 5. East Timor. The day after Kissinger left Djakarta in 1975, the Armed Forces of Indonesia employed American weapons to invade and subjugate the independent former Portuguese colony of East Timor. Isaacson gives a figure of 100,000 deaths resulting from the occupation, or one-seventh of the population, and there are good judges who put this estimate on the low side. Kissinger was furious when news of his own collusion was leaked, because as well as breaking international law the Indonesians were also violating an agreement with the United States.... Monroe Leigh ... pointed out this awkward latter fact. Kissinger snapped: ‘The Israelis when they go into Lebanon—when was the last time we protested that?’ A good question, even if it did not and does not lie especially well in his mouth. It goes on and on and on until one cannot eat enough to vomit enough.
Christopher Hitchens
But shall we wear these glories for a day? Or shall they last, and we rejoice in them?
William Shakespeare
Thus I clothe my naked villainy with old odd ends, stolen forth of holy writ, and seem a saint when most I play the devil.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
I think the day might come, Bess, when all men will know of Dickon is what they were told by Tudor historians like Rous." "Jesú, no!" Bess sounded both appalled and emphatic. "You mustn't think that. Whatever the lies being told about Dickon now, surely the truth will eventually win out. Scriptures does say that 'Great is truth and it prevails,' and I believe that, Grace." Bess straightened up in the bed, shoved yet another pillow against her back. "I have to believe that," she said quietly. "Not just for Dickon's sake, but for us all. For when all is said and done, the truth be all we have.
Sharon Kay Penman (The Sunne in Splendour)
I turn around from the window and for the first time I see him... It is Richard, smiling at my surprise. I run to him, without thinking what I am doing. I run to the first friendly face that I have seen since Christmas, and in a moment I am in his arms and he is holding me tightly and kissing my face, my closed eyes, my smiling mouth, kissing me till I am breathless and have to pull away from him.
Philippa Gregory (The Kingmaker's Daughter (The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels, #4; Cousins War #4))
So they were at an impasse. "Gansey boy! DICK." Ronan whirled and walked backward to face the shouter. He spread his arms wide. "Not now, Cheng. The king's a little busy." "I wasn't talking to you, Lynch. I need someone with a soul." The light that glinted off Ronan's snarl caught Gansey's eye, bringing him back to the present.
Maggie Stiefvater (Blue Lily, Lily Blue (The Raven Cycle, #3))
Adam miserably wondered which of the neighbors were coming to his father’s defense. In an hour, this will be over. You will never have to do it again. All you have to do is survive. The door cracked open. Adam didn’t want to look, but he did anyway. In the hall stood Richard Campbell Gansey III in his school uniform and overcoat and scarf and gloves, looking like someone from another world. Behind him was Ronan Lynch, his damn tie knotted right for once and his shirt tucked in. Humiliation and joy warred furiously inside Adam.
Maggie Stiefvater (Blue Lily, Lily Blue (The Raven Cycle, #3))
LADY ANNE: What, do you tremble? Are you all afraid? Alas, I blame you not, for you are mortal, And mortal eyes cannot endure the devil.—
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
A woman is hard to mistake for anything else." ~Richard Gansey III
Maggie Stiefvater (The Dream Thieves (The Raven Cycle, #2))
KING RICHARD III: A horse, a horse! my kingdom for a horse!
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Francis stared down at the Duchess of York's letter. He swallowed, then read aloud in a husky voice, "It was showed by John Sponer that King Richard, late mercifully reigning upon us, was through great treason piteously slain and murdered, to the great heaviness of this City." As Margaret listened, the embittered grey eyes had softened, misted with sudden tears. "My brother may lie in an untended grave," she said, "but he does not lack for an epitaph.
Sharon Kay Penman (The Sunne in Splendour)
And – I think you know, don’t you? – that I love you, Anne.’ I feel as if I have been living in a loveless world for too long. The last tender face I saw was my father’s when he sailed for England. ‘You do? Truly?’ ‘I do.’ He rises to his feet and pulls me up to stand beside him. My chin comes to his shoulder, we are both dainty, long-limbed, coltish: well-matched. I turn my face into his jacket. ‘Will you marry me?’ he whispers. ‘Yes,’ I say.
Philippa Gregory (The Kingmaker's Daughter (The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels, #4; Cousins War #4))
LADY ANNE: Villain, thou know'st nor law of God nor man: No beast so fierce but knows some touch of pity. RICHARD, DUKE OF GLOUCESTER: But I know none, and therefore am no beast. LADY ANNE: O wonderful, when devils tell the troth! RICHARD, DUKE OF GLOUCESTER: More wonderful, when angels are so angry.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
I couldn't sleep," Gansey said truthfully. Then, after a pause, "You're not going to try to kill Greenmantle, are you?" Ronan's chin lifted. His smile was sharp and humorless. "No. I've thought of a better option." "Do I want to know what it is is? Is it acceptance of the pointlessness of revenge?" The smile widened and sharpened yet more "It's not your problem, Gansey." He was so much more dangerous when he wasn't angry.
Maggie Stiefvater (Blue Lily, Lily Blue (The Raven Cycle, #3))
They had some things in common: Gansey had once been killed by hornets. Henry's family business was on the cutting edge of designing robotic drone bees. The two boys were friendly, but not friends. Henry ran with the Vancouver crowd, and Gansey ran with dead Welsh kings.
Maggie Stiefvater (Blue Lily, Lily Blue (The Raven Cycle, #3))
Sapphires for my bride-to-be and a severed head for the king my brother," said Duke Richard cheerfully. "As St Paul pointed out, gifts may vary but the spirit is the same. In the present instance, a spirit of goodwill.
Reay Tannahill (The Seventh Son)
Ronan, silent to this point, said, 'I'm going to kill him.' Gansey had a sudden, terrible vision of it: Ronan's hands painted with blood, his eyes blank and unknowable, a corpse at his feet. It was a savage an unshakable image, made worse because Gansey had seen enough of the pieces separately to know how accurate how they'd appear added together.
Maggie Stiefvater (Blue Lily, Lily Blue (The Raven Cycle, #3))
I love violent Shakespeare. It is to me what steak is to some people: the bloodier the better.
Mara Wilson (Where Am I Now?)
HENRY, EARL OF RICHMOND: True hope is swift and flies with swallow's wings, Kings it makes gods, and meaner creatures kings.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
I am determinèd to prove a villain,
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
SECOND MURDERER  Look behind you, my lord. 279 FIRST MURDERER   Take that, and that. (Stabs him.)
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
RICHARD, DUKE OF GLOUCESTER: I am too childish-foolish for this world.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Now is the winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this sun of York;
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
They that stand high have many blasts to shake 275 them, 276 And if they fall, they dash themselves to pieces.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
For their love Llies in their purses, and whoso empties them By so much fills their hearts with deadly hate.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse! 7
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
On thee, the troubler of the poor world's peace! The worm of conscience still be-gnaw thy soul! Thy friends suspect for traitors while thou liv'st, And take deep traitors for thy dearest friends!
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
Gansey clucked at his bedraggled reflection in the dark-framed mirror hanging in the front hallway. Chainsaw eyed herself briefly before hiding on the other side of Ronan's neck; Adam did the same, but without the hiding-in-Ronan's-neck bit. Even Blue looked less fanciful that usual, the lighting rendering her lampshade dress and spiky hair as a melancholy Pierrot.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Dream Thieves (The Raven Cycle, #2))
SCRIVENER. Here is the indictment of the good Lord Hastings; Which in a set hand fairly is engross'd That it may be to-day read o'er in Paul's. And mark how well the sequel hangs together: Eleven hours I have spent to write it over, For yesternight by Catesby was it sent me; The precedent was full as long a-doing; And yet within these five hours Hastings liv'd, Untainted, unexamin'd, free, at liberty. Here's a good world the while! Who is so gros That cannot see this palpable device? Yet who's so bold but says he sees it not? Bad is the world; and all will come to nought, When such ill dealing must be seen in thought.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
People, of course, like to think that they are special -- that's exciting. It's disappointing to discover otherwise.
J. Richard Gott III
And do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, that you may prove what is that good and acceptable and perfect will of God.
Richard Broadbent III (Prayers)
The fact is that there are many skeletons in the Tower’s cupboard.
A.J. Pollard (Richard III and the Princes in the Tower)
Like a lot of stupid people, it took a great deal to get an idea into the king's head, but once there, there was no shifting it.
Richard Killeen (A Brief History of Ireland)
They had some things in common: Gansey had once been killed by hornets. Henry's family business was on the cutting edge of designing robotic drone bees.
Maggie Stiefvater (Blue Lily, Lily Blue (The Raven Cycle, #3))
Bad is the world; and all will come to nought, When such ill dealing must be seen in thought.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Shine out, fair sun, till I have bought a glass, That I may see my shadow as I pass.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Come, lead me to the block. Bear him my head. 108 They smile at me who shortly shall be dead. 109
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Gansey turned to Adam, finally. He was still wearing his glorious kingly face, Richard Campbell Gansey III, white knight, but his eyes were uncertain. Is this okay?
Maggie Stiefvater (Blue Lily, Lily Blue (The Raven Cycle, #3))
Instead, though, as he drew nearer, his mind kept drifting back to Gansey's voice in the cave the day before. The tremulous note in it. The fear - a fear so profound that Gansey could not bring himself to climb out of the pit, though there was nothing physically preventing him. He had not known that Richard Gansey III had it in him to be a coward. Adam remembered crouching on the kitchen floor of his parents' double-wide, telling himself to take Gansey's oft-repeated advice to leave. "Just put what you need in the car, Adam." But he had stayed. Hung in the pit of his father's anger. A coward, too. Adam felt like he needed to reconfigure every conversation he'd ever had with Gansey in light of this new knowledge.
Maggie Stiefvater
KING RICHARD. I have learn'd that fearful commenting Is leaden servitor to dull delay; Delay leads impotent and snail-pac'd beggary. Then fiery expedition be my wing, Jove's Mercury, and herald for a king! Go, muster men. My counsel is my shield. We must be brief when traitors brave the field.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Say yes,’ he whispers. ‘Marry me.’ I hesitate. I open my eyes. ‘You will get my fortune,’ I remark. ‘When I marry you, everything I have becomes yours. Just as George has everything that belongs to Isabel.’ ‘That’s why you can trust me to win it for you,’ he says simply. ‘When your interests and mine are the same, you can be certain that I will care for you as for myself. You will be my own. You will find that I care for my own.’ ‘You will be true to me?’ ‘Loyalty is my motto. When I give my word, you can trust me.
Philippa Gregory (The Kingmaker's Daughter (The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels, #4; Cousins War #4))
brain activity in a heartbeat. All of that says Richard. But the DNA in consort with the paper trail of a genealogy available only for royalty says this was him. Richard III is now the oldest person to be unequivocally identified in death.
Adam Rutherford (A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Human Story Retold Through Our Genes)
I sit on the bed and kick off my shoes, and he kneels before me and takes the riding boots, holding one open for my bare foot. I hesitate; it is such an intimate gesture between a young woman and a man. His smiling upward glance tells me that he understands my hesitation but is ignoring it. I point my toe and he holds the boot, I slide my foot in and he pulls the boot over my calf. He takes the soft leather ties and fastens the boot, at my ankle, then at my calf, and then just below my knee. He looks up at me, his hand gently on my toe. I can feel the warmth of his hand through the soft leather. I imagine my toes curling in pleasure at his touch. ‘Anne, will you marry me?’ he asks simply, as he kneels before me.
Philippa Gregory (The Kingmaker's Daughter (The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels, #4; Cousins War #4))
As Richard mounted his horse to follow, some of his Household protested that he must not wear into battle the helmet with the golden crown, for it would mark him as the prime target for the enemy. Quietly Richard replied that he would live, and die, King of England.
Paul Murray Kendall (Richard the Third)
And what else would he get into? Kavinsky's dead so--Jesus Chrirst, listen to me. Jesus Christ." The cave walls crumbled yet more; the ritual before had been imperfect. Gansey sat back against the wall and closed his eyes. Adam watched him swallow. Again he heard Gansey's voice in the cave. "It's okay," Adam said. He did not care that Joseph Kavinsky was dead, but he liked that Gansey did. "I know what you meant.
Maggie Stiefvater (Blue Lily, Lily Blue (The Raven Cycle, #3))
I don't like using the word evil because it sounds as if that's all there is to be said about the person. I don't think Richard III is evil, I don't think it's helpful to say that...Iago he's not evil. Iago didn't get the job, he thinks his wife's been unfaithful to him, he doesn't like black people, he's extremely talented and very unfulfilled and he's a wonderful liar, and he's a mischeif maker and he does some dreadful, dreadful things. But that's already interesting, isn't it? Ooh, who is this guy? But if you just say "ah oh he's evil" how can you play that? I don't know how you play an evil person.
Ian McKellen
The house of the Plantagenets, from Henry II to Richard III himself, was brimming with blood. In their lust for power the members of the family turned upon one another. King John murdered, or caused to be murdered, his nephew Arthur; Richard II despatched his uncle, Thomas of Gloucester; Richard II was in turn killed on the orders of his cousin, Henry Bolingbroke; Henry VI was killed in the Tower on the orders of his cousin, Edward IV; Edward IV murdered his brother, Clarence, just as his own two sons were murdered by their uncle. It is hard to imagine a family more steeped in slaughter and revenge, of which the Wars of the Roses were only one effusion. It might be thought that some curse had been laid upon the house of the Plantagenets, except of course that in the world of kings the palm of victory always goes to the most violent and the most ruthless. It could be said that the royal family was the begetter of organized crime.
Peter Ackroyd (Foundation: The History of England from Its Earliest Beginnings to the Tudors (History of England #1))
God knows that, as we are prone to sin, so, when conscience is thoroughly awaked, we are as prone to despair for sin; and therefore he would have us know, that he setteth himself in the covenant of grace to triumph in Christ over the greatest evils and enemies we fear, and that his thoughts are not as our thoughts are, Isa. v. 8; that he is God, and not man, Hos. xi. 9; that there are heights, and depths, and breadths of mercy in him above all the depths of our sin and misery, Eph. iii. 18; that we should never be in such a forlorn condition, wherein there should be ground of despair, considering our sins be the sins of men, his mercy the mercy of an infinite God.
Richard Sibbes (The Bruised Reed)
us
Richard Broadbent III (Prayers)
Humility helps you to recognize that all you are and all you have is a gift from God and a result of other people contributing to your life.
Richard E. Simmons III (The True Measure of a Man, How Perceptions of Success, Achievement & Recognition Fail Men in Difficult Times)
The hopeless word of ‘never to return’ Breathe I against thee. [I.iii.152]
William Shakespeare (Richard II)
Bloody thou art; bloody will be thy end:
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
Voi plânge-n scrâșnet. Drag nu-s nimănui; Nu-i om să-i fie milă dacă mor; Și cum să-i fie, dacă-n mine însumi De mine însumi milă nu găsesc?
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Și într-un om tu nu poți desluși Decât ce pare-a fi; și zău ca rar Sau niciodat' nu-i una cu simțirea-i.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Știu eu? S-a înrăit atâta lumea, Că unde n-ajung vulturi, pradă găi. De când orice neam prost se face nobil, Mulți nobili neamuri proaste s-au făcut.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Dispreț pe buze nu purta, căci ele Sunt spre sărut, nu spre sfidări, făcute.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Ahora el invierno de nuestro descontento se vuelve verano con este sol de York
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
I fear ‘twill prove a giddy world. [II.iii.5]
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
And look you get a prayer-book in your hand, And stand between two churchmen, good my lord;
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
What! think you we are Turks or Infidels?
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
As it is won with blood, lost be it so!
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
Long die thy happy days before thy death;
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
Fathers that wear rags Do make their children blind; But fathers that bear bags Shall see their children kind. Fortune, that arrant whore, Ne'er turns the key to th' poor.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Oh, that deceit should steal such gentle shapes, And with a virtuous vizard hide foul guile! He is my son; yea, and therein my shame; Yet from my dugs he drew not this deceit.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
تو جهانی به خون آلودی و انجامت نیز چنین خواهد بود زندگی‌ات به رسوایی گذشت و مرگت نیز قرین رسوایی خواهد بود
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
O momentary grace of mortal men, Which we more hunt for than the grace of God!
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
Pray God, I say, I prove a needless coward.
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
I have learn'd that fearful commenting Is leaden servitor to dull delay; Delay leads impotent and snail-pac'd beggary.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Now is the winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this sun of York; And all the clouds that lour'd upon our house In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
Welcome destruction, blood, and massacre! [II.iv.53]
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
We are the Queen’s abjects. [I.i.106]
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Созданий божьих гнусный истребитель И величайший на земле тиран, Что среди тленья царствует и воплей
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Thou diest, though I the sicker be. [II.i.91]
William Shakespeare (Richard II)
One that made means to come by what he hath,
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
More pity that the eagles should be mew’d, Whiles kites and buzzards prey at liberty. [I.1.132]
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
My heart is ten times lighter than my looks.
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
Woe to that land that's govern'd by a child!
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
As grandes dores ressaltam de onde caem não por serem vazias: pela ação do próprio peso.
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
I'll join with black despair against my soul, and to myself become an enemy.
Richard III
QUEEN MARGARET: From forth the kennel of thy womb hath crept A hell-hound that doth hunt us all to death: That dog, that had his teeth before his eyes To worry lambs and lap their gentle blood, That foul defacer of God's handiwork, That excellent grand tyrant of the earth That reigns in galled eyes of weeping souls, Thy womb let loose to chase us to our graves.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
The humble are the strongest. They don’t make decisions by sticking their fingers in the air … They know who they are. Their lives are not consumed by trying to please and impress others.
Richard E. Simmons III (The True Measure of a Man, How Perceptions of Success, Achievement & Recognition Fail Men in Difficult Times)
QUEEN ELIZABETH. O thou well skill'd in curses, stay awhile And teach me how to curse mine enemies! QUEEN MARGARET. Forbear to sleep the nights, and fast the days; Compare dead happiness with living woe; Think that thy babes were sweeter than they were, And he that slew them fouler than he is. Bett'ring thy loss makes the bad-causer worse; Revolving this will teach thee how to curse. QUEEN ELIZABETH. My words are dull; O, quicken them with thine! QUEEN MARGARET. Thy woes will make them sharp and pierce like mine. DUCHESS. Why should calamity be fun of words? QUEEN ELIZABETH. Windy attorneys to their client woes, Airy succeeders of intestate joys, Poor breathing orators of miseries, Let them have scope; though what they will impart Help nothing else, yet do they case the heart. DUCHESS. If so, then be not tongue-tied. Go with me, And in the breath of bitter words let's smother My damned son that thy two sweet sons smother'd. The trumpet sounds; be copious in exclaims.
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Windy attorneys to their clients' woes, Airy succeeders of intestate joys, Poor breathing orators of miseries: Let them have scope, though what they will impart help nothing else, yet do they ease the heart.
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
Windy attorneys to their clinets' woes, Airy succeeders of intestate joys, Poor breathign orators of miseries: Let them ahve scope, though what they will impart Help nothing else, yet do they ease the heart
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
If heaven have any grievous plague in store Exceeding those that I can wish upon thee, O, let them keep it till thy sins be ripe, And then hurl down their indignation On thee, the troubler of the poor world's peace!
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
It is not well, when writing an autobiography, to follow your ancestry down too close to your own time—it is safest to speak only vaguely of your great-grandfather, and then skip from there to yourself, which I now do. I was born without teeth—and there Richard III had the advantage of me; but I was born without a humpback, likewise, and there I had the advantage of him. My parents were neither very poor nor conspicuously honest. But
Mark Twain (Mark Twain's Burlesque Autobiography)
Grant paused in the act of turning the thing over, to consider the face a moment longer. A judge? A soldier? A prince? Someone used to great responsibility, and responsible in his authority. Someone too-conscientious. A worrier; perhaps a perfectionist. A man at ease in a large design, but anxious over details. A candidate for gastric ulcer. Someone, too, who had suffered ill-health as a child. He had that incommunicable, that indescribable look that childhood suffering leaves behind it; less positive than the look on a cripple’s face, but as inescapable. This the artist had both understood and translated into terms of paint. The slight fullness of the lower eyelid, like a child that has slept too heavily; the texture of the skin; the old-man look in a young face. He turned the portrait over to look for a caption. On the back was printed: Richard the Third. From the portrait in the National Portrait Gallery. Artist Unknown.
Josephine Tey (The Daughter of Time (Inspector Alan Grant, #5))
Thou elvish-marked, abortive, rooting hog, 239 Thou that wast sealed in thy nativity 240 The slave of nature and the son of hell, 241 Thou slander of thy heavy mother’s womb, 242 Thou loathèd issue of thy father’s loins, 243 Thou rag of honor, thou detested—
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
Sir Thomas More, son of Sir John More, a justice of the King's Bench, was born in 1478, in Milk Street, in the city of London. After his earlier education at St. Anthony's School, in Threadneedle Street, he was placed, as a boy, in the household of Cardinal John Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury and Lord Chancellor. It was not unusual for persons of wealth or influence and sons of good families to be so established together in a relation of patron and client. The youth wore his patron's livery, and added to his state. The patron used, afterwards, his wealth or influence in helping his young client forward in the world. Cardinal Morton had been in earlier days that Bishop of Ely whom Richard III. sent to the Tower; was busy afterwards in hostility to Richard; and was a chief adviser of Henry VII., who in 1486 made him Archbishop of Canterbury, and nine months afterwards Lord Chancellor. Cardinal Morton—of talk at whose table there are recollections in "Utopia"—delighted in the quick wit of young Thomas More. He once said, "Whoever shall live to try it, shall see this child here waiting at table prove a notable and rare man.
Thomas More (Utopia)
We applaud both her dogged grit and the film’s message: that there are some people who, despite shutting everyone out of their lives in order to achieve their goals, can repair the untold damage they’ve wreaked by making a small admission of culpability late in Act III, followed by a declaration of love.
Richard Ayoade (Ayoade on Top)
I'll not meddle with it,—it makes a man coward; a man cannot steal, but it accuseth him; a man cannot swear, but it checks him; a man cannot lie with his neighbour's wife, but it detects him: 'tis a blushing shame-faced spirit that mutinies in a man's bosom; it fills a man full of obstacles: it made me once restore a purse of gold that by chance I found; it beggars any man that keeps it: it is turned out of towns and cities for a dangerous thing; and every man that means to live well endeavours to trust to himself and live without it.
William Shakespeare (King Richard III)
If America loses World War III [the Cold War], it will be because of the failure of its leadership class. In particular, it will be because of the attention, the celebrity, and the legitimacy given to the 'trendies'--those over-glamorized dilettantes who posture in the latest idea, mount the fashionable protests, and are slobbered over by the news media, whose creation they essentially are. The attention given them and their 'causes' romanticizes the trivial and trivializes the serious. It reduces public discussion to the level of a cartoon strip. These trendies are ready with an opinion at the drop of a microphone, and their opinions are treated as news--not because they are authorities, but because they are celebrities.
Richard M. Nixon (The Real War)
Heavenly Father, I (we) ask You to camp Your angels around us, our homes, and our properties, to guard us and protect us, and to destroy any evil spirits, demonic spirits, strongmen or messengers of satan, witchcraft, acts of witchcraft, or curse, that try to come against us, against our homes, or against our properties. In the Name of the Lord Jesus Christ of Nazareth, I (we) plead the Blood of Jesus Christ over us, over our sleep, over our thoughts, over everything in our rooms, over our homes, and over everything in our homes. I (we) plead the precious Blood of Jesus Christ as our protection. Heavenly Father, I (we) ask You to loose into each of us a Spirit of love, peace, joy, and restoration. Lord Jesus, I (we) ask You to give us sweet sleep tonight, give us peaceful sleep tonight and keep us safe according  to Psalms 4:8; and according to Psalms 127:2, I (we) ask that You give us Your beloved sleep tonight. I (we) ask You to keep Your hands on us while we sleep tonight and speak to our hearts tonight. I (we) ask You to do this in the Name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth. Heavenly Father, fill us with Your Holy Ghost anointing and power, fill us with Your presence, in the Holy Name of Jesus Christ, I (we) pray with thanksgiving. Lord Jesus, I (we) ask you to do all of these things according to John 14:14; and Heavenly Father I (we) ask You to give us these things according to John 16:23. In the Name of the Lord Jesus Christ of Nazareth, I (we) pray with thanksgiving. Amen.
Richard Broadbent III (Prayers)
The implication that the change in nomenclature from “Multiple Personality Disorder” to “Dissociative Identity Disorder” means the condition has been repudiated and “dropped” from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association is false and misleading. Many if not most diagnostic entities have been renamed or have had their names modified as psychiatry changes in its conceptualizations and classifications of mental illnesses. When the DSM decided to go with “Dissociative Identity Disorder” it put “(formerly multiple personality disorder)” right after the new name to signify that it was the same condition. It’s right there on page 526 of DSM-IV-R. There have been four different names for this condition in the DSMs over the course of my career. I was part of the group that developed and wrote successive descriptions and diagnostic criteria for this condition for DSM-III-R, DSM–IV, and DSM-IV-TR. While some patients have been hurt by the impact of material that proves to be inaccurate, there is no evidence that scientifically demonstrates the prevalence of such events. Most material alleged to be false has been disputed by someone, but has not been proven false. Finally, however intriguing the idea of encouraging forgetting troubling material may seem, there is no evidence that it is either effective or safe as a general approach to treatment. There is considerable belief that when such material is put out of mind, it creates symptoms indirectly, from “behind the scenes.” Ironically, such efforts purport to cure some dissociative phenomena by encouraging others, such as Dissociative Amnesia.
Richard P. Kluft
To take a modern example, let us say that Othello, Iago, Hamlet, Lear, Richard III, existed merely in the mind of Shakespeare, at the time of their conception or creation. And yet, Shakespeare also existed within each of these characters, giving them their vitality, spirit, and action. Whose is the "spirit" of the characters that we know as Micawber, Oliver Twist, Uriah Heep — is it Dickens, or have each of these characters a personal spirit, independent of their creator? Have the Venus of Medici, the Sistine Madonna, the Appollo Belvidere, spirits and reality of their own, or do they represent the spiritual and mental power of their creators? The Law of Paradox explains that both propositions are true, viewed from the proper viewpoints. Micawber is both Micawber, and yet Dickens. And, again, while Micawber may be said to be Dickens, yet Dickens is not identical with Micawber. Man, like Micawber, may exclaim: "The Spirit of my Creator is inherent within me — and yet I am not HE!" How different this from the shocking half-truth so vociferously announced by certain of the half-wise, who fill the air with their raucous cries of: "I Am God!" Imagine poor Micawber, or the sneaky Uriah Heep, crying: "I Am Dickens"; or some of the lowly clods in one of Shakespeare’s plays, grandiloquently announcing that: "I Am Shakespeare!" THE ALL is in the earth-worm, and yet the earth-worm is far from being THE ALL And still the wonder remains, that though the earth-worm exists merely as a lowly thing, created and having its being solely within the Mind of THE ALL — yet THE ALL is immanent in the earth-worm, and in the particles that go to make up the earth-worm. Can there be any greater mystery than this of "All in THE ALL; and THE ALL in All?
Three Initiates (Kybalion: A Study of the Hermetic Philosophy of Ancient Egypt and Greece)
BUCKINGHAM. No, so God help me, they spake not a word; But, like dumb statues or breathing stones, Star'd each on other, and look'd deadly pale. Which when I saw, I reprehended them, And ask'd the Mayor what meant this wilfull silence. His answer was, the people were not used To be spoke to but by the Recorder. Then he was urg'd to tell my tale again. 'Thus saith the Duke, thus hath the Duke inferr'd'- But nothing spoke in warrant from himself. When he had done, some followers of mine own At lower end of the hall hurl'd up their caps, And some ten voices cried 'God save King Richard!' And thus I took the vantage of those few- 'Thanks, gentle citizens and friends,' quoth I 'This general applause and cheerful shout Argues your wisdoms and your love to Richard.' And even here brake off and came away. GLOUCESTER. What, tongueless blocks were they? Would they not speak?
William Shakespeare (Richard III)
I’m having my lunch when I hear a familiar hoarse shout, ‘Oy Tony!’ I whip round, damaging my neck further, to see Michael Gambon in the lunch queue. … Gambon tells me the story of Olivier auditioning him at the Old Vic in 1962. His audition speech was from Richard III. ‘See, Tone, I was thick as two short planks then and I didn’t know he’d had a rather notable success in the part. I was just shitting myself about meeting the Great Man. He sussed how green I was and started farting around.’ As reported by Gambon, their conversation went like this: Olivier: ‘What are you going to do for me?’ Gambon: ‘Richard the Third.’ Olivier: ‘Is that so. Which part?’ Gambon: ‘Richard the Third.’ Olivier: ‘Yes, but which part?’ Gambon: ‘Richard the Third.’ Olivier: ‘Yes, I understand that, but which part?’ Gambon: ‘Richard the Third.’ Olivier: ‘But which character? Catesby? Ratcliffe? Buckingham’s a good part …’ Gambon: ‘Oh I see, beg your pardon, no, Richard the Third.’ Olivier: ‘What, the King? Richard?’ Gambon: ‘ — the Third, yeah.’ Olivier: “You’ve got a fucking cheek, haven’t you?’ Gambon: ‘Beg your pardon?’ Olivier: ‘Never mind, which part are you going to do?’ Gambon: ‘Richard the Third.’ Olivier: ‘Don’t start that again. Which speech?’ Gambon: ‘Oh I see, beg your pardon, “Was every woman in this humour woo’d.”‘ Olivier: ‘Right. Whenever you’re ready.’ Gambon: ‘ “Was ever woman in this humour woo’d –” ‘ Olivier: ‘Wait. Stop. You’re too close. Go further away. I need to see the whole shape, get the full perspective.’ Gambon: ‘Oh I see, beg your pardon …’ Gambon continues, ‘So I go over to the far end of the room, Tone, thinking that I’ve already made an almighty tit of myself, so how do I save the day? Well I see this pillar and I decide to swing round it and start the speech with a sort of dramatic punch. But as I do this my ring catches on a screw and half my sodding hand gets left behind. I think to myself, “Now I mustn’t let this throw me since he’s already got me down as a bit of an arsehole”, so I plough on … “Was ever woman in this humour woo’d –”‘ Olivier: ‘Wait. Stop. What’s the blood?’ Gambon: ‘Nothing, nothing, just a little gash, I do beg your pardon …’ A nurse had to be called and he suffered the indignity of being given first aid with the greatest actor in the world passing the bandages. At last it was done. Gambon: ‘Shall I start again?’ Olivier: ‘No. I think I’ve got a fair idea how you’re going to do it. You’d better get along now. We’ll let you know.’ Gambon went back to the engineering factory in Islington where he was working. At four that afternoon he was bent over his lathe, working as best as he could with a heavily bandaged hand, when he was called to the phone. It was the Old Vic. ‘It’s not easy talking on the phone, Tone. One, there’s the noise of the machinery. Two, I have to keep my voice down ’cause I’m cockney at work and posh with theatre people. But they offer me a job, spear-carrying, starting immediately. I go back to my work-bench, heart beating in my chest, pack my tool-case, start to go. The foreman comes up, says, “Oy, where you off to?” “I’ve got bad news,” I say, “I’ve got to go.” He says, “Why are you taking your tool box?” I say, “I can’t tell you, it’s very bad news, might need it.” And I never went back there, Tone. Home on the bus, heart still thumping away. A whole new world ahead. We tend to forget what it felt like in the beginning.
Antony Sher (Year of the King: An Actor's Diary and Sketchbook)
Kings were expected to lead their armies in person, which put them in the midst of a kind of hacking slaughter that clearly spared no one. That could qualify as a kind of rough egalitarianism, but the last European monarch to die in combat was King James IV of Scotland, who invaded England in 1513 with thirty thousand soldiers, noblemen, and clergy. He saw a third of his force annihilated before he himself was cut down. Almost thirty years earlier, King Richard III of England had been unhorsed and killed at Bosworth Field. After those battles, the kingly virtue of fighting alongside noblemen and commoners began to die out, and monarchs were content to order other men to do their fighting and dying for them. There is obviously little merit in having leaders of modern democracies do the work of combat infantry—even lieutenant colonels don't do that unless absolutely necessary—but that doesn't mean sacrifice need disappear from public life. In a deeply free society, not only would leaders be barred from exploiting their position, they would also be expected to make the same sacrifices and accept the same punishments as everyone else. The authors of the American Constitution were among the wealthiest and most powerful men of their society and yet, with a few narrow exceptions, they made themselves subject to the same laws and penalties that governed others. (Many also risked being hanged for treason if the British won the war.) It was one of the few times in recorded history that a society's elite stripped themselves of special protections and offered to serve the populace, rather than demanding to be served by them.
Sebastian Junger (Freedom)
RECOMMENDED READING Brooks, David. The Road to Character. New York: Random House, 2015. Brown, Peter C., Henry L. Roediger III, and Mark A. McDaniel. Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 2014. Damon, William. The Path to Purpose: How Young People Find Their Calling in Life. New York: Free Press, 2009. Deci, Edward L. with Richard Flaste. Why We Do What We Do: Understanding Self-Motivation. New York: Penguin Group, 1995. Duhigg, Charles. The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business. New York: Random House, 2012. Dweck, Carol. Mindset: The New Psychology of Success. New York: Random House, 2006. Emmons, Robert A. Thanks!: How the New Science of Gratitude Can Make You Happier. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2007. Ericsson, Anders and Robert Pool. Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016. Heckman, James J., John Eric Humphries, and Tim Kautz (eds.). The Myth of Achievement Tests: The GED and the Role of Character in American Life. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014. Kaufman, Scott Barry and Carolyn Gregoire. Wired to Create: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Creative Mind. New York: Perigee, 2015. Lewis, Sarah. The Rise: Creativity, the Gift of Failure, and the Search for Mastery. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2014. Matthews, Michael D. Head Strong: How Psychology is Revolutionizing War. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. McMahon, Darrin M. Divine Fury: A History of Genius. New York: Basic Books, 2013. Mischel, Walter. The Marshmallow Test: Mastering Self-Control. New York: Little, Brown, 2014. Oettingen, Gabriele. Rethinking Positive Thinking: Inside the New Science of Motivation. New York: Penguin Group, 2014. Pink, Daniel H. Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us. New York: Riverhead Books, 2009. Renninger, K. Ann and Suzanne E. Hidi. The Power of Interest for Motivation and Engagement. New York: Routledge, 2015. Seligman, Martin E. P. Learned Optimism: How To Change Your Mind and Your Life. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1991. Steinberg, Laurence. Age of Opportunity: Lessons from the New Science of Adolescence. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014. Tetlock, Philip E. and Dan Gardner. Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction. New York: Crown, 2015. Tough, Paul. How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012. Willingham, Daniel T. Why Don’t Students Like School: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What It Means for the Classroom. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2009.
Angela Duckworth (Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance)
Her roommate, Jane Stacy, was her dyed-in-the-wool opposite—completely sane, logical, dependable in every way that Irma was not. Jane narrated the stories with weary resignation, infusing the narrative with exasperation and love. Jane carried an unrequited torch for her boss, the millionaire Richard Rhinelander III. “Wouldn’t it be great,” she asked Irma one night, “if I wound up being Mrs. Richard Rhinelander the third?” Without missing a beat, Irma said, “What good will that do if he’s got two other wives?
John Dunning (On the Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio)
Earlier in the year, she had had a vision of kissing him, and she could still picture that quite easily. But the sensible part of Blue, which was usually the only part of her, thought that had to do more with Richard Campbell Gansey III having a nice mouth than with any blossoming romance.
Maggie Stiefvater (The Dream Thieves (The Raven Cycle, #2))
No society has ever survived or will ever survive without morality, and no morality has ever survived without a transcendent source.”19
Richard E. Simmons III (Reflections on the Existence of God: A Series of Essays)
This may be, methinketh, good cousin, great comfort in tribulation: that every tribulation which any time falleth unto us is either sent to be medicinable, if men will so take it; or may become medicinable, if men will so make it;
Thomas More (The Essential Works of Thomas More: Essays, Prayers, Poems, Letters & Biographies: Utopia, The History of King Richard III, Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation)
This may be, methinketh, good cousin, great comfort in tribulation: that every tribulation which any time falleth unto us is either sent to be medicinable, if men will so take it; or may become medicinable, if men will so make it; or is better than medicinable, unless we will forsake it.
Thomas More (The Essential Works of Thomas More: Essays, Prayers, Poems, Letters & Biographies: Utopia, The History of King Richard III, Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation)
For surely if a man may—as indeed he may—have great comfort in the clearness of his conscience, who hath a false crime put upon him and by false witness proved upon him, and who is falsely punished and put to worldly shame and pain for it; a hundred times more comfort may he have in his heart who, where white is called black and right is called wrong, abideth by the truth and is persecuted for justice.
Thomas More (The Essential Works of Thomas More: Essays, Prayers, Poems, Letters & Biographies: Utopia, The History of King Richard III, Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation)
don’t know what weapons will be used to fight World War III. But World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.” —Albert Einstein
Douglas E. Richards (Time Frame (Split Second, #2))
I don’t know what weapons will be used to fight World War III. But World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.” —Albert Einstein
Douglas E. Richards (Time Frame (Split Second, #2))
Two Talented Gladiators RVSTICVS MALIVS XII C XI M • TERNTIVS III C III Rsticus Malius XII, c(ornae) XI; M(rcus) Terntius III, c(ornae) III.
Richard A. LaFleur (Scribblers, Sculptors, and Scribes: A Companion to Wheelock's Latin and Other Introductory Textbooks)
Business is taboo at the dinner table, but crime and criminals aren’t, and the Rosenberg case hogged the conversation all through the anchovy fritters, partridge in casserole with no olives in the sauce, cucumber mousse, and Creole curds and cream. Of course it was academic, since the Rosenbergs had been dead for years, but the young princes had been dead for five centuries, and Wolfe had once spent a week investigating that case, after which he removed More’s Utopia from his bookshelves because More had framed Richard III.
Rex Stout (Death of a Doxy (Nero Wolfe, #42))
We are seldom taught that the key to experiencing a meaningful life is to make a difference in the lives of others.
Richard E. Simmons III
Grandeur," said Pangloss, "is extremely dangerous according to the testimony of philosophers. For, in short, Eglon, King of Moab,[Pg 167] was assassinated by Ehud; Absalom was hung by his hair, and pierced with three darts; King Nadab, the son of Jeroboam, was killed by Baasa; King Ela by Zimri; Ahaziah by Jehu; Athaliah by Jehoiada; the Kings Jehoiakim, Jeconiah, and Zedekiah, were led into captivity. You know how perished Crœsus, Astyages, Darius, Dionysius of Syracuse, Pyrrhus, Perseus, Hannibal, Jugurtha, Ariovistus, Cæsar, Pompey, Nero, Otho, Vitellius, Domitian, Richard II. of England, Edward II., Henry VI., Richard III., Mary Stuart, Charles I., the three Henrys of France, the Emperor Henry IV.! You know——" "I know also," said Candide, "that we must cultivate our garden.
Voltaire (Candide)
He had not known that Richard Gansey III had it in him to be a coward.
Maggie Stiefvater (Blue Lily, Lily Blue (The Raven Cycle, #3))
In the midst of slaughter the only choice is often between hate and lust. Human beings become objects, objects to extinguish or to provide carnal gratification. The widespread casual and frenetic sex in wartime often crosses the line into perversion and violence. It exposes the vast moral void. When life becomes worth nothing, when one is not sure of survival, when a society is ruled by fear, there often seems only death or fleeting, carnal pleasure. This is why Lady Ann in Shakespeare’s Richard III goes to Richard’s bed. She sleeps with Richard because her moral universe has been destroyed. This kind of love is the product of the impersonal violence of war.
Chris Hedges (War Is a Force that Gives Us Meaning)
Si nosotros, vanas sombras, te hemos ofendido, piensa nada más esto, y todo estará bien: que te has quedado aquí durmiendo mientras han aparecido esas visiones. Y esta débil y humilde fantasía no tendrá sino la inconsistencia de un sueño
William Shakespeare (3 by Shakespeare: A Midsummer Night's Dream / Romeo and Juliet / Richard III)
Gardnerian witchcraft, particularly its early forms, clearly draws heavily from Crowley. The symbolic great rite comes from OTO’s VI ° ritual; the pagan catchphrase “Perfect love and perfect trust” is drawn from “The Revival of Magick,” and the Wiccan III ° initiation—the highest in the Craft—is essentially a Gnostic Mass. And, for all its evocative beauty, the Charge of the Goddess is largely a paraphrase of The Book of the Law. Even Gardner himself, in a cagey way, admits the lineage of his witchcraft movement: in his second book, Witchcraft Today,
Richard Kaczynski (Perdurabo, Revised and Expanded Edition: The Life of Aleister Crowley)
all yearn for. God
Richard E. Simmons III (Reflections on the Existence of God: A Series of Essays)
Among other prominent errors in the texts were assertions that Robert Francis Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr., were assassinated during the Republican presidency of Richard Nixon rather than the Democratic regime of his predecessor, Lyndon Johnson, and that George Bush defeated Michael Dukakis in the election of 1989 rather than 1988—a calendar howler that ought to have jumped out at any author, editor,
William A. Henry III (In Defense of Elitism)
An interesting footnote to the centuries of accusations that have swirled around Richard III and the disappearance of his nephews took place in the United States in 1997. In an extraordinary mock trial, Richard III was brought up on charges of murdering his nephews. Presiding was a panel of three US Supreme Court judges. Cases for both prosecution and defence were duly presented. The judges returned a unanimous verdict of ‘not guilty on all counts’.
Daniel Diehl (Tales from the Tower of London)
GLOUCESTER. Madam, my mother, I do cry you mercy;I did not see your Grace. Humbly on my knee I crave your blessing. DUCHESS. God bless thee; and put meekness in thy breast,love, charity, obedience, and true duty! GLOUCESTER. Amen! [Aside] And make me die a good old man! That is the butt end of a mother's blessing; I marvel that her Grace did leave it out.
William Shakespeare
And if King Edward be as true and just As I am subtle, false, and treacherous, This day should Clarence closely be mewed up...
William Shakespeare
Bloody thou art, Bloody will be thy end William Shakespeare, Richard III
John Paul Davis (The Plantagenet Vendetta)
It doesn’t take much leadership ability to understand why mutual trust and competence are important. The next two aspects of this organizational climate for operational success may be less familiar. Both the concepts of mission and focus allow a superior to make sure that the intent of his subordinates harmonizes with his own, without stifling the subordinates’ initiative and in consequence, without slowing down the organization’s OODA loops. Between individuals, the device the Germans came up with is the mission, which we can consider as a contract, or Auftrag, between superior and subordinate. Back in chapter III, on agility, I described how this works in war. In today’s chaotic, ruthlessly competitive commercial environment, business needs such a device, and a little experimenting should convince
Chet Richards (Certain to Win: The Strategy of John Boyd, Applied to Business)