Rd Blackmore Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Rd Blackmore. Here they are! All 22 of them:

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...because I rant not, neither rave of what I feel, can you be so shallow as to dream that I feel nothing?
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone)
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May be we are not such fools as we look. But though we be, we are well content, so long as we may be two fools together.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone)
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Least said soonest mended, because less chance of breaking.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor)
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for boys of twelve are not yet prone to note the shapes of women;
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor)
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But a sigh is not (like a yawn) infectious; and we are all more prone to be sent to sleep than to sorrow by one another.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone)
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I cannot go through all my thoughts, so as to make them clear to you, nor have I ever dwelt on things, to shape a story of them. I know not where the beginning was, nor where the middle ought to be, nor even how at the present time I feel, or think, or ought to think. If I look for help to those around me, who should tell me right and wrong (being older and much wiser), I meet sometimes with laughter, and at other times with anger... ...I think; and nothing ever comes of it. Nothing, I mean, which I can grasp, and have with any surety; nothing but faint images, and wonderment, and wandering... ...Often too I wonder at the odds of fortune, which made me (helpless as I am, and fond of peace, and reading), the heiress of this mad domain... ...You must be tired of this story, and the time I take to think, and the weariness of my telling; but my life from day to day shows so little variance. Among the riders there is none whose safe return I watch for- I mean none more than any other- and indeed there seems no risk...
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone)
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Be-or, be-or, be-or, all day long, with you Englishmen!' 'Nay,' I replied, 'not all day long, if madam will excuse me. Only a pint at breakfast-time, and a pint and a half at eleven o'clock, and a quart or so at dinner. And then no more till the afternoon; and half a gallon at supper-time. No one can object to that.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor)
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The love of all things was upon me, and a softness to them all, and a sense of having something even such as they had.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone)
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There is nothing in this world to fear, nothing to revere or trust, nothing even to hope for; least of all, is there aught to love.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone)
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The motives of mankind are plainer than the motions they produce.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone)
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If I cared for influenceβ€”which means, for the most part, making people do one's will, without knowing itβ€”my first step toward it would be to be called, in common parlance, β€œslow but sure.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone)
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But during those two months of fog . . . the saddest and the heaviest thing was to stand beside the sea. To be upon the beach yourself, and see the long waves coming in; to know that they are long waves, but only see a piece of them. And to hear them lifting roundly, swelling over smooth green rocks, plashing down in the hollow corners, but bearing on all the same as ever, soft and sleek and sorrowful, till their little noise is over.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone)
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For nine women out of ten must have some kind of romance or other, to make their lives endurable; and when their love has lost this attractive element, this soft dew-fog (if such it be), the love itself is apt to languish; unless its bloom be well replaced by the budding hopes of children.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor)
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I for my part was most thankful that I had not killed. For to have the life of a fellow-man laid upon one's conscienceβ€”deserved he his death, or deserved it notβ€”is to my sense of right and wrong the heaviest of all burdens; and the one that wears most deeply inwards, with the dwelling of the mind on this view and on that of it.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor)
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There was power all around, that power and that goodness, which make us come, as it were, outside our bodily selves, to share them. Over and beside us breathes the joy of hope and promise; under foot are troubles past; in the distance bowering newness tempts us ever forward. We quicken with largesse of life, and spring with vivid mystery.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone)
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On the right-hand side was a mighty oven, where Betty threatened to bake us; and on the left, long sides of bacon, made of favoured pigs, and growing very brown and comely. Annie knew the names of all, and ran up through the wood-smoke, every now and then, when a gentle memory moved her, and asked them how they were getting on, and when they would like to be eaten. Then she came back with foolish tears, at thinking of that necessity; and I, being soft in a different way, would make up my mind against bacon. But, Lord bless you! it was no good. Whenever it came to breakfast-time, after three hours upon the moors, I regularly forgot the pigs, but paid good heed to the rashers.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor)
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The lanes and fields between Charing Cross and the village of Kensington, are, or were at that time, more than reasonably infested with footpads and with highwaymen. However, my stature and holly club kept these fellows from doing more than casting sheep's eyes at me. For it was still broad daylight, and the view of the distant villages, Chelsea, Battersea, Tyburn, and others, as well as a few large houses,
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone)
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Although a man may be as simple as the flowers of the field; knowing when, but scarcely why, he closes to the bitter wind; and feeling why, but scarcely when, he opens to the genial sun; yet without his questing much into the capsule of himselfβ€”to do which is a miseryβ€”he may have a general notion how he happens to be getting on.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone)
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Cetonia aurata liked it not, but pawed the air very naturally,
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R.D. Blackmore (The Works of R. D. Blackmore)
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All the beauty of the spring went for happy men to think of all the increase of the year was for other eyes to mark. Not a sign of any sunrise for me from my fount of life; not a breath to stir the dead leaves fallen on my heart’s Spring.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone)
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I delay so long, because I fear; because my whole life hangs in balance on a single word; because what I have near me now may never be more near me after, though more than all the world, or than a thousand worlds, to me.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone)
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Yes, I know enough of that; and I am frightened greatly, all the time, when I do not look at you.
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R.D. Blackmore (Lorna Doone)