Oxy Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Oxy. Here they are! All 107 of them:

It wasn't the tequila and oxy. You really are that fucking gorgeous.
Adrian Phoenix (In the Blood (The Maker's Song, #2))
However, when given the chance, many people choose cocaine over love. I wouldn’t say that’s a bad choice. The endorphins released during infatuation are similar to heroin. OxyContin, “the cuddling hormone,” most often found in new mothers and newlyweds, is like ecstasy; every touch tingles. I think I read that somewhere. Love exists in powder. Love exists in pills. We are all addicts.
Pete Wentz (Gray)
I've never been in love, but I've always imagined it--weirdly--like some sort of OxiClean commercial. The TV host shows a scene from an ordinary day, and then takes a big old sponge soaked in love and swipes away the stains. Suddenly that same scene is missing all the mistakes, all the loneliness. The colors are like jewels, ten times richer than they were before. The music is louder and clearer. "Love," the host will say, "makes life a little brighter.
Jodi Picoult (Between the Lines (Between the Lines, #1))
The Oxys filled holes in me I hadn't realized were empty. It was, at least for those first few months, a wonderful way to be disabled. I felt blessed.
Donald Ray Pollock (Knockemstiff)
OxyContin is a simple pill. It contains only one drug: oxycodone, a painkiller that Germans synthesized in 1916 from thebaine, an opium derivative. Molecularly, oxycodone is similar to heroin.
Sam Quinones (Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic)
I had to take a moment to wonder who else fell into this category of default enemy. I went through a mental list of people who, in theory, I’d want to hit in the face with a meat tenderizer. My coworker from ten years ago who owes me like three grand? It was ten years ago! You were addicted to OxyContin! Go! Be free! My seventh-grade teacher, who told me that most child actors don’t succeed as adult actors? You just wanted to scare me into having a backup plan! Farewell! Good luck! Tori from fourth grade, who accused me of writing mean stuff about all our friends on the playground wall? BURN IN HELL, TORI. I KNOW IT WAS YOU!!! I’m still working on it.
Anna Kendrick (Scrappy Little Nobody)
She complained that because of Purdue’s message about the drug being “good for whatever ails you,” OxyContin was “creeping into a whole population of people where it doesn’t belong.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
JOHNNA: What pills does she take? BEVERLY: Valium. Vicodin. Darvon, Darvocet. Percodan, Percocet. Xanax for fun. OxyContin in a pinch. Some Black Mollies once, just to make sure I was still paying attention. And of course Dilaudid. I shouldn’t forget Dilaudid.
Tracy Letts (August: Osage County (TCG Edition))
Oxy prescriptions for chronic pain rose from 670,000 in 1997 to 6.2 million in 2002.
Sam Quinones (Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic)
In May 2001, Hale filed what is believed to be the first Oxy-related wrongful-death lawsuit against Purdue Pharma, on behalf of Jackie Burton. “Purdue
Sam Quinones (Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic)
1996:  Purdue releases OxyContin, timed-released oxycodone, marketed largely for chronic-pain patients. 1996:
Sam Quinones (Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic)
By 2006, Brownlee’s staff believed they had evidence that the company had knowingly misbranded OxyContin as virtually nonaddictive.
Sam Quinones (Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic)
They had passed a point of no return. And as it happened, there was an inexpensive substitute for OxyContin that was cheaper and stronger and widely available: heroin.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
Some participants had said that “the only difference between heroin and OxyContin is that you can get OxyContin from a doctor.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
Are you sure I can’t have a little sniff of Oxy?” the doctor asked. He brightened. “I’d share. We could get fucked up together.
Joe Hill (Horns)
OxyContin was, in his view, entirely beyond reproach—a magnificent gift that the Sacklers had bestowed upon humanity that was now being sullied by a nihilistic breed of hillbilly pill poppers.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in the quarter century following the introduction of OxyContin, some 450,000 Americans had died of opioid-related overdoses. Such overdoses were now the leading cause of accidental death in America, accounting for more deaths than car accidents—more deaths, even, than that most quintessentially American of metrics, gunshot wounds. In fact, more Americans had lost their lives from opioid overdoses than had died in all of the wars the country had fought since World War II.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
Unable to afford street OxyContin, Matt at some point switched to the black tar heroin that had saturated the Columbus market, brought in by young Mexican men from a small state on Mexico’s Pacific coast called Nayarit.
Sam Quinones (Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic)
I had a collection of ideas about West Virginia, but I had a hunch that they were all gross misinformation, plus none of them agreed: coal and the end of coal. Poverty and a mansion on a stripped mountain. Pickup trucks and VW buses. OxyContin and Jesus. Mother Jones and Don Blankenship. Knobby elbows and the fattest city in America.
Emma Copley Eisenberg (The Third Rainbow Girl: The Long Life of a Double Murder in Appalachia)
2007:  Purdue and three executives plead guilty to misdemeanor charges of false branding of OxyContin; fined $634 million. 2008:  Drug overdoses, mostly from opiates, surpass auto fatalities as leading cause of accidental death in the United States. 2010:
Sam Quinones (Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic)
In 1996, Purdue had introduced a groundbreaking drug, a powerful opioid painkiller called OxyContin, which was heralded as a revolutionary way to treat chronic pain. The drug became one of the biggest blockbusters in pharmaceutical history, generating some $35 billion in revenue.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
In some cases, these communities also happened to have long-standing problems with prescription drug abuse. In some parts of Appalachia, people would pair an OxyContin with a Valium—one of Richard Sackler’s pills and one of his uncle Arthur’s. They called this “the Cadillac high.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
His black tar, once it came to an area where OxyContin had already tenderized the terrain, sold not to tapped-out old junkies but to younger kids, many from the suburbs, most of whom had money and all of whom were white. Their transition from Oxy to heroin, he saw, was a natural and easy one.
Sam Quinones (Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic)
Phillip Prior was now knee-deep in what was unthinkable a few years before: rural, white heroin junkies. “I’ve yet to find one who didn’t start with OxyContin,” he said. “They wouldn’t be selling this quantity of heroin on the street right now if they hadn’t made these decisions in the boardroom.
Sam Quinones (Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic)
And besides having supreme, sometimes unfounded confidence, everything Kids These Days need to know can be accessed online in a five-step YouTube video or some think piece on Vice.com. Younger generations already know not to mix oxy and Seroquel. Many of them own small businesses. God, honestly, fuck off, teens!
Karen Kilgariff (Stay Sexy & Don't Get Murdered: The Definitive How-To Guide)
2019, a team of economists from Notre Dame, Boston University, and the National Bureau of Economic Research published a dense research paper on the timing of the “rapid rise in the heroin death rate” in the years since 2010. The title of the paper was “How the Reformulation of OxyContin Ignited the Heroin Epidemic.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
And so it went. OxyContin first, introduced by reps from Purdue Pharma over steak and dessert and in air-conditioned doctors’ offices. Within a few years, black tar heroin followed in tiny, uninflated balloons held in the mouths of sugarcane farm boys from Xalisco driving old Nissan Sentras to meet-ups in McDonald’s parking lots. Others,
Sam Quinones (Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic)
But Arthur Sackler is important to this story because he founded modern pharmaceutical advertising and, in the words of John Kallir, showed the industry “that amazing things can be achieved with direct selling and intensive direct advertising.” Years later, Purdue would put those strategies to use marketing its new opiate painkiller OxyContin.
Sam Quinones (Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic)
Those OxyContins he takes aren’t just pain pills, they’re stupid pills.
Stephen King (Finders Keepers (Bill Hodges Trilogy, #2))
seemed pretty hypocritical for society to pop Xanax and Oxy like Smarties while sanctimoniously looking down on a man who appreciated the benefits of bourbon.
Jamie Beck (Worth the Risk (St. James #3))
Nobody ever mentions the good side of OxyContin: It makes you feel like Jesus fucking a horse.
Douglas Coupland (Worst. Person. Ever.)
In some ways, Richard’s argument about OxyContin mirrored the libertarian position of a firearms manufacturer who insists that he bears no responsibility for gun deaths. Guns don’t kill people; people kill people.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
Walmart, for a long time, did not require a receipt for returned goods. Anything stolen could be returned for a gift card for the full value of the merchandise. Dealers bought those cards for half their value in pills. A five-hundred-dollar Walmart card was worth three OxyContin 80s—for which the dealer had paid a few dollars with the Medicaid card scam. A vast trade in Walmart cards kept Portsmouth’s army of pill dealers in household necessities.
Sam Quinones (Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic)
Hiểu cách những mối quan hệ biến dạng sau mỗi cuộc chuyển dời, nhất là giữa người với người, nhưng sau vài lần chuyển nhà, đồ đạc mới là thứ khiến bạn ngạc nhiên. Những thứ bạn phục thuộc vào, như thể chúng là tai, là mắt, là oxy, hóa ra buông bỏ được. Và có thể buông nhẹ không.
Nguyễn Ngọc Tư (Hành Lý Hư Vô)
They “duped the FDA, saying OxyContin lasted twelve hours,” Moore said. “They lied about the addictive properties. And they did all this to grow the opioid market, to make it okay to jump in the water. Then some of these other companies, they saw that the water was warm. And they said, ‘Okay, we can jump in, too.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
An overdose could induce respiratory failure: you fall into a sleep so deep and blissful that you stop breathing. At small hospitals, patients were being admitted close to death. In trailers and dingy apartments and remote farmhouses, police and paramedics would arrive to a familiar scene—the OxyContin overdose—and set about trying to revive the user.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
The Sacklers took the view that the same should go for OxyContin. To the degree that people are misusing the drug and overdosing, the blame lies with any number of potentially irresponsible parties—the prescribing doctor, the wholesaler, the pharmacist, the trafficker, the abuser, the addicted person—but not with the manufacturer. Not with Purdue. Much less the Sacklers.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
Death by drugs is now a national problem, but the crisis began as an epidemic of overprescribed painkillers in the distressed communities that were least likely to muster the resources to fight back. It erupted in rural fishing villages, coal communities, and mill towns—because Purdue’s sales strategy was to convince doctors that the nation’s injured miners and factory workers were better and more safely served by OxyContin than its weaker competitors. The company even maneuvered to convince the FDA to back this bogus claim.
Beth Macy (Raising Lazarus: Hope, Justice, and the Future of America's Overdose Crisis)
If you can prescribe opiates for back pain, why can’t you prescribe them for psychological pain? Imagine if a woman addicted to Oxy in Oklahoma City wasn’t abruptly told to stop using, with directions to the nearest Narcotics Anonymous group and a brisk “Good luck.” Imagine if, instead, she was told exactly what the patients in Geneva are told: you will be given a safe, legal dose for as long as you need it, and while you receive it, we will give you support and care to help you to rebuild your life, get secure housing, and keep your job. It
Johann Hari (Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs)
A few people had always made lousy choices. But how had a preexisting human propensity for self-destructive behavior exploded into a plague? As Mark’s real, much more complete story—the one he didn’t tell Berens—proved, it wasn’t the increased availability of a drug like heroin, though that was gas on the flames. Lancaster’s drug problem predated heroin, OxyContin, Percs. The problem wasn’t caused by drugs at all, or government handouts, or single-parent families. While addiction could be as individual as people, common themes included alienation and disconnection. *
Brian Alexander (Glass House: The 1% Economy and the Shattering of the All-American Town)
I want to.” That was it. Choice. The idea hit him like a defibrillator burst—spreading out from his chest in hot, sure waves that tore past the indecision and stagnation of the last week. The roar in his head crackled, then calmed, sanity returning like oxy gen to his starved Hulk brain. He didn’t have to, but he was choosing to. And may be that was what was missing from his life—choice. He hadn’t chosen to be gay. Hadn’t chosen to come out to the world. Hadn’t chosen where he’d go to college—free tuition from two professor parents made that a nondiscussion. Hadn’t chosen to come here. Hadn’t chosen to stay. But this? He was choosing this, and the freedom made his nerves jangle.
Annabeth Albert (Treble Maker (Perfect Harmony, #1))
Azita Ghahreman, is an Iranian poet.[1] She was born in Iran in 1962. She has written four books in Persian and one book in Swedish. She has also translated American poetry. She is a member of the Iranian Writers Association and International PEN. She has published four collections of poetry: Eve's Songs (1983), Sculptures of Autumn (1986), Forgetfulness is a Simple Ritual (1992) and The Suburb of Crows (2008), a collection reflecting on he exile in Sweden (she lives in an area called oxie on the outskirts of Malmö) that was published in both Swedish and Persian. Her poems directly address questions of female desire and challenge the accepted position of women. A collection of Azita's work was published in Swedish in 2009 alongside the work of Sohrab Rahimi and Christine Carlson. She has also translated a collection of poems by the American poet and cartoonist, Shel Silverstein, into Persian, The Place Where the Sidewalk Ends (2000). And she has edited three volumes of poems by poets from Khorasan, the eastern province of Iran that borders Afghanistan and which has a rich and distinctive history. Azita's poems have been translated into German, Dutch, Arabic, Chinese, Swedish, Spanish, Macedonian, Turkish, Danish, French and English. A new book of poetry, Under Hypnosis in Dr Caligari's Cabinet was published in Sweden in April 2012. [edit]Books Eva's Songs, (persian)1990 Autumn Sculptures,(persian) 1995 Where the sidewalk ends, Shell Silverstein(Translated to Persian with Morteza Behravan) 2000 The Forgetfulness has a Simple Ceremony,(persian) 2002 Here is the Suburb of Crows,(persian) 2009 four Poetry books ( collected poems 1990-2009 in Swedish), 2009 under hypnosis in Dr kaligaris Cabinet, (Swedish) 2012 Poetry Translation Center London( collected poems in English) 2012
آزیتا قهرمان (شبیه خوانی)
Kevin D. Williamson in a sneering screed published in March 2016 in National Review, a leading conservative journal: The problem isn’t that Americans cannot sustain families, but that they do not wish to. If you spend time in hardscrabble, white upstate New York, or eastern Kentucky, or my own native West Texas, and you take an honest look at the welfare dependency, the drug and alcohol addiction, the family anarchy—which is to say, the whelping of human children with all the respect and wisdom of a stray dog—you will come to an awful realization. It wasn’t Beijing. It wasn’t even Washington, as bad as Washington can be. It wasn’t immigrants from Mexico, excessive and problematic as our current immigration levels are. It wasn’t any of that. Nothing happened to them. There wasn’t some awful disaster. There wasn’t a war or a famine or a plague or a foreign occupation. Even the economic changes of the past few decades do very little to explain the dysfunction and negligence—and the incomprehensible malice—of poor white America. So the gypsum business in Garbutt ain’t what it used to be. There is more to life in the 21st century than wallboard and cheap sentimentality about how the Man closed the factories down. The truth about these dysfunctional, downscale communities is that they deserve to die. Economically, they are negative assets. Morally, they are indefensible. Forget all your cheap theatrical Bruce Springsteen crap. Forget your sanctimony about struggling Rust Belt factory towns and your conspiracy theories about the wily Orientals stealing our jobs. Forget your goddamned gypsum, and, if he has a problem with that, forget Ed Burke, too. The white American underclass is in thrall to a vicious, selfish culture whose main products are misery and used heroin needles. Donald Trump’s speeches make them feel good. So does OxyContin. What they need isn’t analgesics, literal or political. They need real opportunity, which means that they need real change, which means that they need U-Haul. For
Brian Alexander (Glass House: The 1% Economy and the Shattering of the All-American Town)
In 1994, Friedman wrote a memo marked “Very Confidential” to Raymond, Mortimer, and Richard Sackler. The market for cancer pain was significant, Friedman pointed out: four million prescriptions a year. In fact, there were three-quarters of a million prescriptions just for MS Contin. “We believe that the FDA will restrict our initial launch of OxyContin to the Cancer pain market,” Friedman wrote. But what if, over time, the drug extended beyond that? There was a much greater market for other types of pain: back pain, neck pain, arthritis, fibromyalgia. According to the wrestler turned pain doctor John Bonica, one in three Americans was suffering from untreated chronic pain. If that was even somewhat true, it represented an enormous untapped market. What if you could figure out a way to market this new drug, OxyContin, to all those patients? The plan would have to remain secret for the time being, but in his memo to the Sacklers, Friedman confirmed that the intention was “to expand the use of OxyContin beyond Cancer patients to chronic non-malignant pain.” This was a hugely audacious scheme. In the 1940s, Arthur Sackler had watched the introduction of Thorazine. It was a “major” tranquilizer that worked wonders on patients who were psychotic. But the way the Sackler family made its first great fortune was with Arthur’s involvement in marketing the “minor” tranquilizers Librium and Valium. Thorazine was perceived as a heavy-duty solution for a heavy-duty problem, but the market for the drug was naturally limited to people suffering from severe enough conditions to warrant a major tranquilizer. The beauty of the minor tranquilizers was that they were for everyone. The reason those drugs were such a success was that they were pills that you could pop to relieve an extraordinary range of common psychological and emotional ailments. Now Arthur’s brothers and his nephew Richard would make the same pivot with a painkiller: they had enjoyed great success with MS Contin, but it was perceived as a heavy-duty drug for cancer. And cancer was a limited market. If you could figure out a way to market OxyContin not just for cancer but for any sort of pain, the profits would be astronomical. It was “imperative,” Friedman told the Sacklers, “that we establish a literature” to support this kind of positioning. They would suggest OxyContin for “the broadest range of use.” Still, they faced one significant hurdle. Oxycodone is roughly twice as potent as morphine, and as a consequence OxyContin would be a much stronger drug than MS Contin. American doctors still tended to take great care in administering strong opioids because of long-established concerns about the addictiveness of these drugs. For years, proponents of MS Contin had argued that in an end-of-life situation, when someone is in a mortal fight with cancer, it was a bit silly to worry about the patient’s getting hooked on morphine. But if Purdue wanted to market a powerful opioid like OxyContin for less acute, more persistent types of pain, one challenge would be the perception, among physicians, that opioids could be very addictive. If OxyContin was going to achieve its full commercial potential, the Sacklers and Purdue would have to undo that perception.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
— PAULING’S ADVOCACY GAVE BIRTH TO a vitamin and supplement industry built on sand. Evidence for this can be found by walking into a GNC center—a wonderland of false hope. Rows and rows of megavitamins and dietary supplements promise healthier hearts, smaller prostates, lower cholesterol, improved memory, instant weight loss, lower stress, thicker hair, and better skin. All in a bottle. No one seems to be paying attention to the fact that vitamins and supplements are an unregulated industry. As a consequence, companies aren’t required to support their claims of safety or effectiveness. Worse, the ingredients listed on the label might not reflect what’s in the bottle. And we seem to be perfectly willing to ignore the fact that every week at least one of these supplements is pulled off the shelves after it was found to cause harm. Like the L-tryptophan disaster, an amino acid sold over the counter and found to cause a disease that affected 5,000 people and killed 28. Or the OxyElite Pro disaster, a weight-loss product that caused 50 people to suffer severe liver disease; one person died and three others needed lifesaving liver transplants. Or the Purity First disaster, a Connecticut company’s vitamin preparations that were found to contain two powerful anabolic steroids, causing masculinizing symptoms in dozens of women in the Northeast.
Paul A. Offit (Pandora's Lab: Seven Stories of Science Gone Wrong)
As I make clear throughout the book, OxyContin was hardly the only opioid to be fraudulently marketed or widely abused, and my choice to focus on Purdue is in no way a suggestion that other pharmaceutical companies do not deserve a great deal of blame for the crisis. The same could be said for the FDA, the doctors who wrote prescriptions, the wholesalers that distributed the opioids, and the pharmacies that filled the prescriptions. There’s plenty of blame to go around. I do share the view, however, of many doctors, public officials, prosecutors, and scholars that Purdue played a special role, as a pioneer. All
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
Prior to the introduction of OxyContin, America did not have an opioid crisis. After the introduction of OxyContin, it did.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
But after Purdue released the reformulated version of OxyContin in 2010, as the patent on the original formulation was set to expire, the company made an audacious about-face. Purdue filed papers with the FDA, asking the agency to refuse to accept generic versions of the original formulation of OxyContin—the version the company had been selling all these years—on grounds that it was unsafe. The company said that it was voluntarily withdrawing the original formulation from the market for reasons “of safety.” On the very day that the patent for the original formulation was set to expire, the FDA, ever obliging, declared that the benefits of the old version of OxyContin “no longer outweigh” the risks.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
Just as when all legal routes to alcohol were cut off, beer disappeared and whisky won, when all legal routes to opiates are cut off, Oxy disappears, and heroin prevails. This isn’t a law of nature, and it isn’t caused by the drug—it is caused by the drug policy we have chosen. After the end of alcohol prohibition, White Lightning vanished—who’s even heard of it now?—and beer went back to being America’s favorite alcoholic drink. There are heroin addicts all across the United States today who would have stayed happily on Oxy if there had been a legal route to it.
Johann Hari (Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs)
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The Oxy filled holes in me I hadn’t even realized were empty. It was, at least for those first few months, a wonderful way to be disabled. I felt blessed. In reality, though, my life was now on a downward course. Under the influence of the Oxy, I lost even the ambition to steal other people’s belongings.
Donald Ray Pollock (Knockemstiff)
Your priority is to sell, sell, sell OxyContin.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
The truth about these dysfunctional, downscale communities is that they deserve to die. Economically, they are negative assets. Morally, they are indefensible… The white American underclass is in thrall to a vicious, selfish culture whose main products are misery and used heroin needles. Donald Trump’s speeches make them feel good. So does OxyContin. What they need isn’t analgesics, literal or political. They need real opportunity, which means that they need real change, which means that they need U-Haul.
Victor Davis Hanson (The Case for Trump)
At a certain point, her doctors caught on to her and she was struggling to access enough black-market OxyContin, so she lapsed back into using heroin. One night, she bought a batch that, unbeknownst to her, was actually fentanyl, and she overdosed.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
Her father died in 1987, she pointed out, long before the introduction of OxyContin, and she and her siblings had agreed to sell their one-third stake in Purdue to her uncles soon thereafter. So, none of Arthur’s heirs had profited from OxyContin, she insisted.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
And heroin was a street drug, sold out of the back of a car by anonymous young Mexicans of uncertain immigration status, whereas OxyContin had been approved by no less an authority than the Food and Drug Administration. The Sacklers were legitimate businesspeople, pillars of American society. Even after the felony conviction for Purdue, as controversy continued to swirl around OxyContin, Richard Sackler served on the advisory board of the Yale Cancer Center.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
It was not just OxyContin that was problematic, Berman continued, but Arthur’s legacy as well. “The Sackler name is a problem, whether it’s the Arthur Sackler name, or all the Sackler names,” he said.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
People microwaved the pills, baked them in the oven, stuck them in the freezer, soaked them in all manner of solvents. But if Purdue’s narrow objective was to prevent people from breaking down the pills, then this new coating seemed to work. In fact, there were telling indications, almost immediately, in Purdue’s own sales data, which suggested that some habitual OxyContin users were frustrated by the tamperproof pills.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
It was now in the grip of a full-blown opioid epidemic. Millions of Americans had become addicted to OxyContin and other opioids, whether they had done so through recreational abuse or under a doctor’s care. Indeed, whatever the Sacklers might have wanted to tell themselves about their own intentions and the nature of the business they were in, this large population of addicted people was part of the reason that Purdue’s sales were still so strong. The numbers didn’t lie.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
Chemically speaking, the two drugs were closely related. In some ways, heroin had always been the benchmark for OxyContin. The tremendous potency of Oxy led to its reputation as “heroin in a pill.” When it first became popular as a recreational high in Appalachia, OxyContin acquired the nickname hillbilly heroin. So, it might have been only logical that when they could no longer count on OxyContin, people who already had an opioid use disorder would make the short segue to heroin itself.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
But I was astonished to discover that the family that presided over the company that made OxyContin was a prominent philanthropic dynasty with what appeared to be an unimpeachable reputation.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
As I make clear throughout the book, OxyContin was hardly the only opioid to be fraudulently marketed or widely abused, and my choice to focus on Purdue is in no way a suggestion that other pharmaceutical companies do not deserve a great deal of blame for the crisis. The same could be said for the FDA, the doctors who wrote prescriptions, the wholesalers that distributed the opioids, and the pharmacies that filled the prescriptions.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
The National Review essay that called white working-class communities “economically . . . negative assets” added that “Donald Trump’s speeches make them feel good. So does OxyContin.
Daniel Markovits (The Meritocracy Trap: How America's Foundational Myth Feeds Inequality, Dismantles the Middle Class, and Devours the Elite)
As the negative publicity continued to swirl around OxyContin, Richard Sackler was privately seething. “The whole thing is a sham,” a sympathetic friend reassured him. If people die because they abuse the drug, “then good riddance.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
I smiled at the young woman with the warmth and goodwill that only the pure of heart, or the people who’ve recently swallowed a handful of OxyContin, can muster. “I’m Allison Weiss. Are you Beatrice?” I had gotten the call the night before, from a woman who’d introduced herself as Kim Caster, a producer for The News on Nine, the local evening newscast. “Did you hear about that mess in Akron?” she had asked.
Jennifer Weiner (All Fall Down)
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Accutane, Opana, Ambien, Accutane, Oxycodone, Oxycodone, Ketamine, Klonopin Vyvanse, methyphenidate,
I'm looking for something," I said. "Got a minute?" "Amphetamines? Oxy? I think I have all your favorite ingredients." "Something special," I said. "Can we talk somewhere without all these..." "Genitalia?" Dr. G asked. "...distractions?" I said.
Daryl Gregory (Afterparty)
Oak washes the Oxy down with the beer. "We're showmen, Oak," their coach Tom Bowie said to him three weeks ago on opening day when Oak fought his first fight since February, his first of six in this season's first ten games, not counting the punch-up last week in the team bar parking lot that their mouthy Long Island-born winger started and Oak had to finish. "No one wants to see you finessing a wrist shot.
Jeff W. Bens (The Mighty Oak)
Panagulis, en 1973, la llevó a una colina del Peloponeso a ver tres letras escritas en la tierra, entre los árboles. Las letras eran OXI (que en griego significa «NO»). Cuenta cómo a pesar del viento y la lluvia, y del intento de los generales por desaparecerla con cal, las tres palabras reaparecían tercamente.
Jorge Ramos (Sin Miedo: Lecciones de rebeldes)
Pawning Shit Ipawnedmy baby blue TAMAdrum set, four a 1/2 ounce of primo. Ipawned my mom's diamond wedding ring, for an eightball of coke. I pawned myiPhone5 for some X and oxy. I pawned my Apple Mac Pro forcrystal, ketamine and heroin. I pawnedmy Fender Stratocaster for a weekend binge I can't remember. No regrets -- it's only stuff. But now it seems I've pawned my very soul getting high on love and missed the grace period of redemption.
Beryl Dov
He had even written a poem about one, titled “OxyContin,” published in Annals of Internal Medicine: It might have been easier If OxyContin swallowed the mountains, and took The promises of tens of thousands of young lives Slowly, like ever-encroaching kudzu. Instead, It engulfed us, Gently as napalm Would a school-yard. Mama said As hard as it was to bury Papa after the top fell in the mine up Caney Creek, it was harder yet to find Sis that morning cold and blue, with a needle stuck up her arm. Top of her class, with nothing but promise ahead until hi-jacked by the torment of needle and spoon.
Beth Macy (Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors, and the Drug Company that Addicted America)
Ohio was the second-ranked state in this category of physician purchasers. Its doctors bought about a million doses of oxycodone in 2009. The same year, through his doctors, Chris George bought more than twice as much oxy as every single doctor in Ohio. Four of American Pain’s full-time doctors ranked among the top nine physician purchasers of oxycodone in the country.
John Temple (American Pain: How a Young Felon and His Ring of Doctors Unleashed America's Deadliest Drug Epidemic)
problem-solution marketing. They would market and publicize the problem of untreated pain. Then they’d promote the solution: OxyContin.
John Temple (American Pain: How a Young Felon and His Ring of Doctors Unleashed America's Deadliest Drug Epidemic)
A favorite freebie was the heat-sensitive Oxy-Contin mug that bore the words: “The one to start with . . . .” When filled with hot coffee, the rest of the slogan materialized: “The one to stay with.
John Temple (American Pain: How a Young Felon and His Ring of Doctors Unleashed America's Deadliest Drug Epidemic)
Purdue drilled its reps on two selling points. One, OxyContin was the first narcotic that wouldn’t hook patients. And two, fewer than 1 percent of pain-management patients get addicted anyway.
John Temple (American Pain: How a Young Felon and His Ring of Doctors Unleashed America's Deadliest Drug Epidemic)
By 2002, six years after its release, Purdue was selling almost $1.5 billion of the drug each year—eight times the volume the company had projected. The single drug represented 80 percent of Purdue’s net sales. It was the biggest-selling brand-name controlled substance on the market. The once sleepy drugmaker was now a powerhouse, and it wasn’t about to concede that its star product had a major flaw. OxyContin’s
John Temple (American Pain: How a Young Felon and His Ring of Doctors Unleashed America's Deadliest Drug Epidemic)
News reports detailed a wave of OxyContin abuse that originated in rural areas with a tradition of pill dependency, such as western Virginia, eastern Maine, and Kentucky.
John Temple (American Pain: How a Young Felon and His Ring of Doctors Unleashed America's Deadliest Drug Epidemic)
As a pharmacist, Golbom could determine only two clear advantages OxyContin had over heroin as a recreational drug. One, OxyContin was legal. Two, it was pharmaceutical-grade—you knew exactly what was in it, unlike a bag of heroin bought on the street. Other than that, oxycodone addiction and heroin addiction were the same thing.
John Temple (American Pain: How a Young Felon and His Ring of Doctors Unleashed America's Deadliest Drug Epidemic)
In 1993, three years before OxyContin came out, the DEA allowed pharmaceutical companies to manufacture 3,520 kilograms of oxycodone. In 2007, the DEA signed off on the production of seventy thousand kilograms of oxycodone. Almost twenty times the amount manufactured just fourteen years earlier. Twenty times.
John Temple (American Pain: How a Young Felon and His Ring of Doctors Unleashed America's Deadliest Drug Epidemic)
Florida pumped millions upon millions of doses of those narcotics—oxycodone, mostly—northward, not through a major criminal organization like the cartels of Mexico, but via thousands of individuals who streamed up and down Interstate 75 or flew from the Tri-State Airport in Huntington, West Virginia, to Miami International, on a flight nicknamed the Oxy Express. They went to the pain clinics complaining of back pain and received a massive supply of narcotics once only available to ease the agony of a Stage 4 cancer patient. A supply that could keep even the most hardcore junkie satisfied for a couple of weeks. A supply worth $6,000 to $8,000 in the coal patches and hollows of Kentucky.
John Temple (American Pain: How a Young Felon and His Ring of Doctors Unleashed America's Deadliest Drug Epidemic)
oxys, roxys, morphine and Dilaudid
Anonymous
2. Công thức 2: Uống trà gừng giảm cân với bạc hà Thường xuyên giảm cân bằng gừng với bạc hà và nước trái cây sẽ giúp bạn bổ sung thêm rất nhiều vitamin, giúp bạn vận động nhiều hơn, đốt cháy calo và đặc biệt là giúp làm đẹp da. Sự kết hợp của cam và chanh trong cách giảm cân bằng gừng này sẽ tăng cường các chất chống oxy hóa, đặc biệt rất tốt cho những người bị tăng cân do tình trạng tích nước trong cơ thể.
Thegioidotap
From their remote home in the Andean cloud forests, the U’wa let it be known that if Occidental Petroleum carried out plans to drill for oil on their territory, they would commit mass ritual suicide by jumping off a cliff. Their elders explained that oil is part of ruiria, “the blood of Mother Earth.” They believe that all life, including their own, flows from ruiria, so pulling out the oil would bring on their destruction. (Oxy eventually withdrew from the region, saying there wasn’t as much oil as it had previously thought.)
Naomi Klein (On Fire: The Case for the Green New Deal)
Despite the easily available knowledge about Oxy and the Sacklers, MarketWorld embraced the family’s do-gooding and kept mum about the harm. The most common single-word descriptor for members of the family became “philanthropist.
Anand Giridharadas (Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World)
Yoga là sự kết hợp hoàn hảo giữa việc rèn luyện thân thể và rèn luyện tâm trí từ đó mang đến cho người tập vô số những lợi ích tuyệt vời. Để hoàn thành trọn vẹn một tư thế yoga, người tập phải học cách khai triển tư thế, kiểm soát suy nghĩ và một yếu tố quan trọng nữa đó là điều hòa hơi thở. Các tế bào bên trong cơ thể của bạn cũng cần được “nuông chiều” khi cơ thể hoạt động. Do vậy, yoga đã lồng ghép việc điều hòa hơi thở vào các bài tập của mình, tạo nên sự cân bằng cho các tế bào từ bên trong lẫn bên ngoài cơ thể. Tác dụng của việc hít thở đúng khi tập yoga đó là lượng oxy hít vào sẽ nhiều hơn giúp cung cấp đủ năng lượng cho quá trình hoạt động, khí độc sẽ được thải ra hoàn toàn. Điều này góp phần tạo nên những “phép màu” diệu kỳ cho cơ thể của bạn.
icado
Tác hại khi tập hít thở yoga không đúng cách Tác hại dễ thấy nhất đó là quá trình luyện tập kém hiệu quả, các tư thế yoga sẽ không phát huy hết tác dụng khi bạn thở chưa đúng phương pháp. Nếu tình trạng này kéo dài sẽ gây rối loạn nhịp thở, lượng oxy cung cấp không đủ cho các hoạt động của cơ thể. Từ việc không cung cấp đủ oxy bạn sẽ không đủ năng lượng cho bài tập và các hoạt động hằng ngày, đặc biệt khi oxy không đủ não dễ rơi vào trạng thái căng thẳng dẫn đến cách dấu hiệu không tốt về tinh thần như bất an, lo lắng.
icado
Wilby had a problem. He didn’t know which brand of toothpaste to buy. He decided to try this new opposing viewpoints idea he’d been reading about in The Fallacy Detective. He decided to go around and ask different people what they thought. Wendy, a store assistant who offered to help: This type with oxy-white pro is guaranteed to make your teeth whiter in twenty-four hours. (Wilby noticed that toothpaste brands with the oxy-white pro sticker were twice the price of other brands.) Phoebe, a friend of Wilby’s: Wilby, I think you’d have such a cute smile if you got rid of some of those blueberry Popsicle stains on your teeth. Judd, another friend: Toothpaste? What’s that? Real men don’t brush their teeth. Wilby’s Mom: Wilby, it really doesn’t matter, as long as you don’t buy anything that contains fluoride additives. You might come down with a terrible disease in a few years if you use fluoride. Austin, Wilby’s coworker: I only use Hug-A-Tree brand. It’s made by an environmentally conscious company from Denmark. They promise they don’t test their product on whales. Bob, who works out at the health club with Wilby: I heard on a talk show that if you chew organic mint leaves, then your breath will smell good without having to brush your teeth. Wilby concluded that he was worrying too much over nothing. He decided to keep using the brand of toothpaste he’d always used. It seemed to do the job. But now he understood more about how different people make their decisions.
Nathaniel Bluedorn (The Fallacy Detective: Thirty-Eight Lessons on How to Recognize Bad Reasoning)
That’s right: In the United States of America today, it is illegal for playing-by-the-rules, state-registered medical cannabis patients nationwide to bear arms. Whacked on OxyContin? Shoot away.
Doug Fine (Too High to Fail: Cannabis and the New Green Economic Revolution)
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They party all night Friday night, straight through Saturday and Saturday night, and then they sleep enough on Sunday to go to work on Monday. That's what people do when they don't have a direction or passion in their life. And then sooner or later they fuck up, get a chick pregnant, and then they try to grow up and deal with that. That's what the forgotten children of the world do. Your average suburbanite who isn't born rich or supersmart [sic]. A guy who will maybe learn a trade, but he won't like his job. He'll be angry about it. He'll get wasted to block it out, make bad decisions. And with a little bad luck, maybe even go to jail. Or you've been doing OxyContins every weekend, and so someone gives you some heroin, and at that moment it doesn't seem like that bad of an idea, so you stick a needle in your arm. One thing leads to another, and you die. It's that easy.
Jason Ellis
The Oxi Technique By now you know that I love OxiClean in a deeply unnatural way. If you promise not to slap a scarlet A on me for being some sort of sexual deviant, I’ll admit that sometimes I whisper sweet nothings to my bucket of Oxi. So it will surprise you not to learn that I consider Oxi to be one of the best products out there when it comes to getting ugly yellow pit stains out from shirts. But a curious thing happened when I started recommending it to people for this purpose: some would come back to let me know that the Oxi didn’t do a thing to help cure their pit stains, while others were practically rapturous describing the miracle visited unto their white T-shirts.
Jolie Kerr (My Boyfriend Barfed in My Handbag . . . and Other Things You Can't Ask Martha)
In some ways, Richard’s argument about OxyContin mirrored the libertarian position of a firearms manufacturer who insists that he bears no responsibility for gun deaths. Guns don’t kill people; people kill people. It is a peculiar hallmark of the American economy that you can produce a dangerous product and effectively off-load any legal liability for whatever destruction that product may cause by pointing to the individual responsibility of the consumer. “Abusers aren’t victims,” Richard said. “They are the victimizers.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
But Purdue was a privately held company entirely owned by Kathe Sackler and other members of her family. In 1996, Purdue had introduced a groundbreaking drug, a powerful opioid painkiller called OxyContin, which was heralded as a revolutionary way
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
radical strategy: the company would unveil this new, more powerful painkiller, OxyContin, and market it against MS Contin—against its own drug—in order to completely upend the current paradigm in pain treatment.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
OxyContin was stronger than morphine. That was a simple fact of chemistry—but one that the company would need to carefully obscure. After all, there are only so many cancer patients.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
Purdue argued that the patented Contin coating on a dose of OxyContin would obviate the risk of addiction.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
Within four years of the launch celebration at the Wigwam in Arizona, OxyContin hit $1 billion in sales, surpassing the quintessential blockbuster drug of that era, Viagra.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
The company literally could not make OxyContin fast enough to sell it.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
Giuliani was looking to make a lot of money quickly. In 2001, he had a net worth of $1 million; five years later, he would report $17 million in income and some $50 million in assets. For Purdue, which was working hard to frame OxyContin abuse as a law enforcement problem, rather than an issue that might implicate the drug itself or the way it was marketed, the former prosecutor who had led New York City after the 9/11 attacks would make an ideal fixer.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
not everyone who developed a problem with OxyContin started out as a recreational abuser. In fact, many people who were prescribed the drug for legitimate pain conditions and took it precisely as the doctor ordered found that they, too, had become hopelessly addicted.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
OxyContin had generated some $35 billion. A sizable amount of this revenue was channeled not through London or New York but through the tax haven of Bermuda, where, for decades, an anonymous-looking modern office building on a narrow street lined with palm trees had served as a clearinghouse for the family’s wealth.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
When it first became popular as a recreational high in Appalachia, OxyContin acquired the nickname hillbilly heroin.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
Purdue filed papers with the FDA, asking the agency to refuse to accept generic versions of the original formulation of OxyContin—the version the company had been selling all these years—on grounds that it was unsafe. The company said that it was voluntarily withdrawing the original formulation from the market for reasons “of safety.
Patrick Radden Keefe (Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty)
entities, including entire states, sued Purdue. The nation was soon swimming in OxyContin. It was cheap, available everywhere, and readily used by crushing, chewing, snorting, or even injecting.
Robert A. Yoho (Butchered by "Healthcare": What to Do About Doctors, Big Pharma, and Corrupt Government Ruining Your Health and Medical Care)
Over several months, the drug had completely rewired my brain, hijacking more and more of my pain receptors, and now I needed OxyContin simply to exist. I couldn’t sleep, or eat, or focus in class. And no one warned me this was going to happen. No one told me to expect a struggle.
Jason Rekulak (Hidden Pictures)
Heroin is such a big scary word but it feels like Oxy at a fraction of the price. You just have to get past any squeamishness regarding needles. Fortunately, there were plenty of YouTube videos to help me along—tutorials (ostensibly for diabetics) showing how to find a vein and how to gently draw back the plunger at just the right moment, to make sure you’ve made contact with the bloodstream
Jason Rekulak (Hidden Pictures)
The doctors prescribed OxyContin for the pain—a single forty-milligram tablet twice a day. Everyone said I would be fine for winter track in November.
Jason Rekulak (Hidden Pictures)