Odo Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Odo. Here they are! All 75 of them:

How do you do?" said Violet. "How do you do?" said Klaus. "Odo yow!" said Sunny.
Lemony Snicket (The Bad Beginning (A Series of Unfortunate Events, #1))
Satan wants to claim our souls and those of our children. He want our marriages and our families to fail. He wants darkness to reign. Despite thise, we needn't worry or back away from our duty to our family (present or future), our community, or others, for God will always support and bless us in our honest efforts t odo His will. He wants us to suceed more than Satan wants us to fail- and God is always more powerful.
John H. Groberg (Anytime, Anywhere)
In the infinitesimal glow of the stars, the trees and flowers were strewing their cool odos. There was no moon.
Sylvia Plath
Sempre caro mi fu quest'ermo colle, e questa siepe, che da tanta parte dell'ultimo orizzonte il guardo esclude. Ma sedendo e mirando, interminati spazi di là da quella, e sovrumani silenzi, e profondissima quiete io nel pensier mi fingo, ove per poco il cor non si spaura. E come il vento odo stormir tra queste piante, io quello infinito silenzio a questa voce vo comparando: e mi sovvien l'eterno, e le morte stagioni, e la presente e viva, e il suon di lei. Così tra questa immensità s'annega il pensier mio: e il naufragar m'è dolce in questo mare.
Giacomo Leopardi
‎È un gran miracolo che io non abbia rinunciato a tutte le mie speranze perché esse sembrano assurde e inattuabili. Le conservo ancora, nonostante tutto, perché continuo a credere nell'intima bontà dell'uomo. Mi è impossibile costruire tutto sulla base della morte, della miseria, della confusione. Vedo il mondo mutarsi lentamente in un deserto, odo sempre più forte l'avvicinarsi del rombo che ucciderà noi pure, partecipo al dolore di milioni di uomini, eppure quando guardo il cielo, penso che tutto si volgerà nuovamente al bene, che anche questa spietata durezza cesserà, che ritorneranno l'ordine, la pace e la serenità.
Anne Frank (Il diario di Anna Frank)
A promise is a direction taken, a self-limitation of choice. As Odo pointed out, if no direction is taken, if one goes nowhere, no change will occur. One's freedom to choose and to change will be unused, exactly as if one were in jail, a jail of one's own building, a maze in which no one way is better than any other.
Ursula K. Le Guin (The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia)
Odo had not tried to renew the basic relationships of music, when she renewed the relationships of men. She had always respected the necessary. The Settlers of Anarres had left the laws of man behind them, but had brought the laws of harmony along.
Ursula K. Le Guin (The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia)
The philosopher Odo Marquard has noted a correlation in the German language between the word zwei, which means 'two,' and the word zweifel, which means 'doubt' - suggesting that two of anything brings the automatic possibility of uncertainty to our lives. Now imagine a life in which every day a person is presented with not two or even three but dozens of choices, and you can begin to grasp why the modern world has become, even with all its advantages, a neurosis-generating machine of the highest order. In a world of such abundant possibility, many of us simply go limp from indecision. Or we derail our life's journey again and again, backing up to try the doors we neglected on the first round, desperate to get it right this time. Or we become compulsive comparers - always measuring our lives against some other person's life, secretly wondering if we should have taken her path instead.
Elizabeth Gilbert (Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage)
S'i' credesse che mia risposta fosse a persona che mai tornasse al mondo, questa fiamma staria sanza più scosse; ma però che già mai di questo fondo non tornò vivo alcun, s'i' odo il vero, sanza tema d'infamia ti rispondo.
Dante Alighieri (Inferno)
Ripe strawberries hung from the little plants, row after row. They gleamed like baubles, bright and red among the leaves, weighing down their stalks.
Odo Hirsch (Darius Bell and the Glitter Pool (Darius Bell, #1))
The Odo Sedoh dreamed, and in his dreams, he was legion. He was black-winged murder flying over a vast sea. He was the bloodthirsty havoc of beak and talon. He was the stately flock that wheeled over a city stained by injustice. He became the shout of a thousand prayers on a thousand lips. He became a prophecy of revenge. He became the blossoming shadow that engulfed a sun. He was Crow who then became the slaughter.
Rebecca Roanhorse (Fevered Star (Between Earth and Sky, #2))
Do not renounce your roots in order to sit on the white mans chair.
Surinam proverb
The future belongs to all who, refusing to look back at the past move ahead with the clock as it ticks.
Odo Simon Agbo (The Dancing Sun)
Be strong and courageous.  oDo
Anonymous (The Holy Bible: English Standard Version)
9Have I not commanded you?  nBe strong and courageous.  oDo not be frightened, and do not be dismayed, for the LORD your God is with you wherever you go.
Anonymous (The Holy Bible: English Standard Version)
As far as he can tell, that's what Odo spends most of his time doing: being in time, like one sits by the river, watching the water go by. It's a lesson hard learned, just to sit there and be.
Yann Martel (The High Mountains of Portugal)
While Odo has mastered the simple human trick of making porridge, Peter has learned the difficult animal skill of doing nothing. He's learned to unshackle himself from the race of time and contemplate time itself. As far as he can tell, that's what Odo spends most of his time doing: being in time, like one sits by a river, watching the water go by. It's a lesson hard learned, just to sit there and be.
Yann Martel (The High Mountains of Portugal)
As Sybil drew the frail boy close, she realized something: Odo had apologized to her. The monk had said he needed her. They boy had blessed her. In all her life no one had ever said or done any of those things. Here, in one day, were all three. Was that not a kind of magic?
Avi (The Book without Words: A Fable of Medieval Magic)
Él esta sosteniendo mi rostro, esperando que siga vivo solo porque él me lo dijo, porque él es el maldito Simon Snow, y el consigue odo no que quiere si llora lo suficiente. Creo que tal vez lo bese antes de enviarlo volando(...) Creo que lo besaré. Está justo ahí y sus labios están abiertos, respira por la boca, y sus ojos estan vivos. Vivos, vivos, vivos. Estás tan vivo, Simon Snow Tú eres esa parte de mí. Él sacude la cabeza, y está diciendo algo, y pienso que lo besaré. Nunca he besado a alguien más. Nunca he querido besar a nadie salvo a él. Solo quiero besarlo, luego, irme. -Simon- digo. Y luego él me besa a mí
Rainbow Rowell (Carry On (Simon Snow, #1))
9Have I not commanded you?  n Be strong and courageous.  o Do not be frightened, and do not be dismayed, for the LORD your God is with you wherever you go.
Anonymous (The Holy Bible: English Standard Version)
Be strong and courageous.  o Do not be frightened, and do not be dismayed, for the LORD your God is with you wherever you go.
Anonymous (The Holy Bible: English Standard Version)
Odo ancora, mentre scrivo, l'intenso silenzio in cui si cessarono tutti i suoni della sera. Le cornacchie smisero di gracchiare nel cielo dorato e l’ora amica smarrì, per quell'orribile momento, tutta la sua voce. Ma non ci fu nessun altro cambiamento intorno a me, se cambiamento non era vedere con tanto singolare chiarezza. L’oro luccicava ancora nel cielo, l’aria era limpida e l’uomo che mi osservava da sopra i merli risaltava quanto un ritratto nella sua cornice. Ecco perché pensai, con straordinaria rapidità, a tutti coloro che egli avrebbe potuto essere e che non era. Ci fissammo attraverso lo spazio abbastanza a lungo perché potessi chiedermi ansiosamente chi fosse mai, e provare, dinanzi all'incapacità di rispondervi, uno sbigottimento che, a poco a poco, si faceva sempre più intenso.
Henry James (The Turn of the Screw)
The columns of the Cathedral porch were still supported on featureless porphyry lions worn smooth by generations of loungers; and above the octagonal baptistery ran a fantastic basrelief wherein the spirals of the vine framed an allegory of men and monsters symbolising, in their mysterious conflicts, the ever-recurring Manicheism of the middle ages. Fresh from his talk with Crescenti, Odo lingered curiously
Edith Wharton (Works of Edith Wharton)
Meanwhile the old Marquess, visibly moved, was charging Odo to respect his elders and superiors, while in the same breath warning him not to take up with the Frenchified notions of the court, but to remember that for a lad of his condition the chief virtues were a tight seat in the saddle, a quick hand on the sword and a slow tongue in counsel. "Mind your own business," he concluded, "and see that others mind theirs." The Marchioness thereupon, with many tears, hung a
Edith Wharton (Edith Wharton: Collection of 115 Works with analysis and historical background (Annotated and Illustrated) (Annotated Classics))
He recognized that need, in Odonian terms, as his "cellular function." the analogic term for the individual's individuality, the work he can do best, therefore his best contribution to his society. A healthy society would let him exercise that optimum function freely, in the coordination of all such functions finding its adaptability and strength. That was a central idea of Odo's Analogy. That the Odonian society on Anarres had fallen short of the ideal did not, in his eyes, lessen his responsibility to it; just the contrary. With the myth of the State out of the way, the real mutuality and reciprocity of society and the individual became clear. Sacrifice mught be demanded of the individual, but never compromise: for though only the society could give security and stability, only the individual, the person, had the power of moral choice -- the power of change, the essential function of life. The Odonian society was conceived as a permanent revolution, and revolution begins in the thinking mind.
Urusla K Le Guin
Donnaz and kept him there a whole summer adorning the banqueting-room. "But I advise you, little master," Bruno added, "not to talk too loudly of your discovery; for we live in changed days, do you see, and it seems those are pagan sorcerers and witches painted on the wall, and because of that, and their nakedness, the chaplain has forbidden all the young boys and wenches about the place to set foot there; and the Marchioness herself, I'm told, doesn't enter without leave." This was the more puzzling to Odo that he had
Edith Wharton (Edith Wharton: Collection of 115 Works with analysis and historical background (Annotated and Illustrated) (Annotated Classics))
childish. Thereupon Filomena excused herself, that she might put a clean shirt on Jacopone, and Odo was left to his melancholy musings. His mind had of late run much on economic abuses; but what was any philandering with reform to this close contact with misery? It was as though white hungry faces had suddenly stared in at the windows of his brightly-lit life. What did these people care for education, enlightenment, the religion of humanity? What they wanted was fodder for their cattle, a bit of meat on Sundays and a faggot on the hearth.
Edith Wharton (Works of Edith Wharton)
It's a tiny, inexpungable parcel of fear, yet not incapacitating nor even a source of much worry. He never feels dread or anxiety with Odo, never anything so lingering. It rather goes like this: The ape appears without the least sound, seemingly out of nowhere, and among the emotions Peter feels--the surprise, the wonder, the pleasure, the joy--there is a pulse of fear.He can do nothing about it except wait for the pulse to go away. That is a lesson he has learned, to treat fear as a powerful but topical emotion. He is afraid only when he needs to be.
Yann Martel
These personages, grouped about the toilet-table where the Countess sat under the hands of a Parisian hairdresser, were picturesquely relieved against the stucco panelling and narrow mirrors of the apartment, with its windows looking on a garden set with mossy statues. To Odo, however, the scene suggested the most tedious part of his day's routine. The compliments to be exchanged, the silly verses to be praised, the gewgaws from Paris to be admired, were all contrasted in his mind with the vision of that other life which had come to him on the hillside of the Superga. On
Edith Wharton (Edith Wharton: Collection of 115 Works with analysis and historical background (Annotated and Illustrated) (Annotated Classics))
is light, and in him is no darkness at all. 6 n If we say we have fellowship with him while we walk in darkness, we lie and  o do not practice the truth. 7But  p if we walk in the light,  q as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and  r the blood of Jesus his Son cleanses us from all sin.
Anonymous (The Holy Bible: English Standard Version)
What more she said, or what de Crucis answered, he could never afterward recall. He had a confused sense of having cried out a last unavailing protest, faintly, inarticulately, like a man struggling to make himself heard in a dream; then the room grew dark about him, and in its stead he saw the old chapel at Donnaz, with its dimly-gleaming shrine, and heard the voice of the chaplain, harsh and yet strangely shaken:— “My chief prayer for you is that, should you be raised to this eminence, it may be at a moment when such advancement seems to thrust you in the dust.” Odo lifted his head and saw de Crucis standing alone before him. “I am ready,” he said.
Edith Wharton (Works of Edith Wharton)
Kai akys mato spalvas - tai yra geismas. Kai ausys girdi garsus - tai yra geismas. Kai nosis užuodžia kvapus - tai yra geismas. Kai vienintelė mintis tiesiog dygsta - tai irgi vadinama geismu. Kūnas kyla iš aistros, tad natūralu, jog stipriai jaučia ir geidžia. Tačiau tokiame kūne yra ir geismų nepažįstanti prigimtis, tiesiog ji paslėpta už karštakošiškumo, o jos esmė sunkiai matoma. Šią prigimtį sunku apsaugoti. nes ji žvelgia į dešimt tūkstančių daiktų išoriniame pasaulyje, ji užklota Šešiais geismais ir glūdi po jais. (Šeši geismai - geismai, kilę iš šešių jutimų: regos, klausos, uoslės, skonio, lytėjimo ir mąstymo. Arba tai gali būti kūniški potraukiai, kylantys iš spalvų, formų, laikysenos, garsų, švelnios odos ir gražių veido bruožų.)
Takuan Soho
city and spoke  m encouragingly to them, saying, 7 n “Be strong and courageous.  o Do not be afraid or dismayed before the king of Assyria and all the horde that is with him,  p for there are more with us than with him. 8With him is  q an arm of flesh,  r but with us is the LORD our God, to help us and to fight our battles.” And the people took confidence from the words of Hezekiah king of Judah.
Anonymous (The Holy Bible: English Standard Version)
Odo in fact owed his first acquaintance with the French writers to Alfieri, who, in the intervals of his wandering over Europe, now and then reappeared in Turin laden with the latest novelties in Transalpine literature and haberdashery. What his eccentric friend failed to provide, Odo had little difficulty in obtaining for himself; for though most of the new writers were on the Index, and the Sardinian censorship was notoriously severe, there was never yet a barrier that could keep out books, and Cantapresto was a skilled purveyor of contraband dainties. Odo had thus acquainted himself with the lighter literature of England and France; and though he had read but few philosophical treatises, was yet dimly aware of the new standpoint from which, north of the Alps, men were beginning to test the accepted forms of thought. The
Edith Wharton (Edith Wharton: Collection of 115 Works with analysis and historical background (Annotated and Illustrated) (Annotated Classics))
He had grown up among people to whom such emotions were unknown. The old Marquess's passion for his fields and woods was the love of the agriculturist and the hunter, not that of the naturalist or the poet; and the aristocracy of the cities regarded the country merely as so much soil from which to draw their maintenance. The gentlefolk never absented themselves from town but for a few weeks of autumn, when they went to their villas for the vintage, transporting thither all the diversions of city life and venturing no farther afield than the pleasure-grounds that were but so many open-air card-rooms, concert-halls and theatres. Odo's tenderness for every sylvan function of renewal and decay, every shifting of light and colour on the flying surface of the year, would have been met with the same stare with which a certain enchanting Countess
Edith Wharton (Edith Wharton: Collection of 115 Works with analysis and historical background (Annotated and Illustrated) (Annotated Classics))
This conversation revealed to Odo a third conception of the religious idea. In Piedmont religion imposed itself as a military discipline, the enforced duty of the Christian citizen to the heavenly state; to the Duke it was a means of purchasing spiritual immunity from the consequences of bodily weakness; to the Bishop, it replaced the panem et circenses of ancient Rome. Where, in all this, was the share of those whom Christ had come to save? Where was Saint Francis’s devotion to his heavenly bride, the Lady Poverty? Though here and there a good parish priest like Crescenti ministered to the temporal wants of the peasantry, it was only the free-thinker and the atheist who, at the risk of life and fortune, laboured for their moral liberation. Odo listened with a saddened heart, thinking, as he followed his host through the perfumed shade of the gardens, and down
Edith Wharton (Works of Edith Wharton)
running to and fro with trays of refreshments. Odo, who knew that his mother lived in the Duke's palace, had vaguely imagined that his father's death must have plunged its huge precincts into silence and mourning; but as he followed the abate up successive flights of stairs and down long corridors full of shadow he heard a sound of dance music below and caught the flash of girandoles through the antechamber doors. The thought that his father's death had made no difference to any one in the palace was to the child so much more astonishing than any of the other impressions crowding his brain, that these were scarcely felt, and he passed as in a dream through rooms where servants were quarrelling over cards and waiting-women rummaged in wardrobes full of perfumed finery, to a bedchamber in which a lady dressed in weeds sat disconsolately at supper. "Mamma! Mamma!" he cried, springing
Edith Wharton (Edith Wharton: Collection of 115 Works with analysis and historical background (Annotated and Illustrated) (Annotated Classics))
Outside the gates the spectacle seemed tame in comparison; for the road bent toward Pontesordo, and Odo was familiar enough with the look of the bare fields, set here and there with oak-copses to which the leaves still clung. As the carriage skirted the marsh his mother raised the windows, exclaiming that they must not expose themselves to the pestilent air; and though Odo was not yet addicted to general reflections, he could not but wonder that she should display such dread of an atmosphere she had let him breathe since his birth. He knew of course that the sunset vapours on the marsh were unhealthy: everybody on the farm had a touch of the ague, and it was a saying in the village that no one lived at Pontesordo who could buy an ass to carry him away; but that Donna Laura, in skirting the place on a clear morning of frost, should show such fear of infection, gave a sinister emphasis to the ill-repute of the region.
Edith Wharton (Edith Wharton: Collection of 115 Works with analysis and historical background (Annotated and Illustrated) (Annotated Classics))
Es conveniente el intentar dar de este modo, con la imaginación, a una especie cualquiera, una ventaja sobre otra. Es probable que ni en un solo caso sabríamos cómo hacerlo. Esto debiera convencernos de nuestra ig- norancia acerca de las relaciones mutuas de todos los seres orgánicos, convicción tan necesaria como difícil de adquirir. Todo lo que podemos hacer es tener siempre presente que todo ser orgánico está esforzándose por aumentar en razón geométrica, que todo ser orgánico, en algún perí- odo de su vida, durante alguna estación del año, durante todas las gene- raciones o con intervalos, tiene que luchar por la vida y sufrir gran des- trucción. Cuando reflexionamos sobre esta lucha nos podemos consolar con la completa seguridad de que la guerra en la naturaleza no es ince- sante, que no se siente ningún miedo, que la muerte es generalmente rá- pida y que el vigoroso, el sano, el feliz, sobrevive y se multiplica. (El origen de las especies p.66 cap 3 la lucha por la existencia)
Charles Darwin (The Origin of Species)
He recognized that need, in Odonian terms, as his "cellular function." the analogic term for the individual's individuality, the work he can do best, therefore his best contribution to his society. A healthy society would let him exercise that optimum function freely, in the coordination of all such functions finding its adaptability and strength. That was a central idea of Odo's Analogy. That the Odonian society on Anarres had fallen short of the ideal did not, in his eyes, lessen his responsibility to it; just the contrary. With the myth of the State out of the way, the real mutuality and reciprocity of society and the individual became clear. Sacrifice mught be demanded of the individual, but never compromise: for though only the society could give security and stability, only the individual, the person, had the power of moral choice -- the power of change, the essential function of life. The Odonian society was conceived as a permanent revolution, and revolution begins in the thinking mind
Ursula K. Le Guin
For what were these ancient manipulators of ideas, prestidigitators of a vanished world of thought, but the forbears of the long line of theorists of whom Fulvia was the last inconscient mouthpiece? The new game was still played with the old counters, the new jugglers repeated the old tricks; and the very words now poured out in defence of the new cause were but mercenaries scarred in the service of its enemies. For generations, for centuries, man had fought on; crying for liberty, dreaming it was won, waking to find himself the slave of the new forces he had generated, burning and being burnt for the same beliefs under different guises, calling his instinct ideas and his ideas revelations; destroying, rebuilding, falling, rising, mending broken weapons, championing extinct illusions, mistaking his failures for achievements and planting his flag on the ramparts as they fell. And as the vision of this inveterate conflict rose before him, Odo saw that the beauty, the power, the immortality, dwelt not in the idea but in the struggle for it.
Edith Wharton (Works of Edith Wharton)
The Call of Jeremiah 4Now the word of the LORD came to me, saying,     5  i “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you,     and before you were born  j I consecrated you;     I appointed you a prophet  k to the nations.” 6Then I said, “Ah, Lord GOD! Behold,  l I do not know how to speak,  m for I am only a youth.” 7But the LORD said to me,     “Do not say, ‘I am only a youth’;     for to all to whom I send you, you shall go,     and  n whatever I command you, you shall speak. 8     o Do not be afraid of them,      p for I am with you to deliver you, declares the LORD.
Anonymous (The Holy Bible: English Standard Version)
Bol som taký slepý a prehnane ctižiadostivý, že som svojim skutočným emóciam nevenoval pozornosť a vinu som hádzal na druhých - čiernych, gejov, Židov a všetkých ostatných, ktorí sa odo mňa odlišovali. Pripisoval som im vinu za moje vlastné problémy, na ktorých nemali žiadny podiel. Moje neodôvodnene zdesenie sa rýchlo a neoprávnene začalo prejavovať ako zlostná nenávisť, ktorá sa ešte zradikalizovala pôsobením tých, ktorí vo mne videli ľahko formátovateľného chlapca. A keďže som zúfalo potreboval dať svojmu životu nejaký zmysel, žral som všetky drobky, ktorými ma kŕmili a ktoré sa tvárili ako významné. Stotožnil som sa s nimi a pripustil som, aby zatienili môj skutočný charakter. Pomocou nezvládnutej nevraživosti som sa stal jedným veľkým nafúknutým rasistickým surovcom. Chorobne nafúknutým od tých nekonečných lží, kt. ma kŕmili ti, ktorí zneužili moju mladickú naivitu a osamelosť. Pažravo som si pochutnával na jedoch. Nastal čas, aby som sa tých posratých jedov raz a navždy zbavil. Sedem rokov tvrdohlavého popierania pravdy a ľudskosti si žiada neuveriteľné množstvo energie. Ako dvadsaťjedenročný som už nemal silu angažovať sa v neustálom boji s vlastným svedomím.
Christian Picciolini (Romantic Violence: Memoirs of an American Skinhead)
This conversation revealed to Odo a third conception of the religious idea. In Piedmont religion imposed itself as a military discipline, the enforced duty of the Christian citizen to the heavenly state; to the Duke it was a means of purchasing spiritual immunity from the consequences of bodily weakness; to the Bishop, it replaced the panem et circenses of ancient Rome. Where, in all this, was the share of those whom Christ had come to save? Where was Saint Francis’s devotion to his heavenly bride, the Lady Poverty? Though here and there a good parish priest like Crescenti ministered to the temporal wants of the peasantry, it was only the free-thinker and the atheist who, at the risk of life and fortune, laboured for their moral liberation. Odo listened with a saddened heart, thinking, as he followed his host through the perfumed shade of the gardens, and down the long saloon at the end of which the Venus stood, of those who for the love of man had denied themselves such delicate emotions and gone forth cheerfully to exile or imprisonment. These were the true lovers of the Lady Poverty, the band in which he longed to be enrolled; yet how restrain a thrill of delight as the slender dusky goddess detached herself against the cool marble of
Edith Wharton (Works of Edith Wharton)
Her departure left no traces but were speedily repaired by the coming of spring. The sun growing warmer, and the close season putting an end to the Marquess's hunting, it was now Odo's chief pleasure to carry his books to the walled garden between the castle and the southern face of the cliff. This small enclosure, probably a survival of medieval horticulture, had along the upper ledge of its wall a grass walk commanding the flow of the stream, and an angle turret that turned one slit to the valley, the other to the garden lying below like a tranquil well of scent and brightness: its box trees clipped to the shape of peacocks and lions, its clove pinks and simples set in a border of thrift, and a pear tree basking on its sunny wall. These pleasant spaces, which Odo had to himself save when the canonesses walked there to recite their rosary, he peopled with the knights and ladies of the novelle, and the fantastic beings of Pulci's epic: there walked the Fay Morgana, Regulus the loyal knight, the giant Morgante, Trajan the just Emperor and the proud figure of King Conrad; so that, escaping thither from the after-dinner dullness of the tapestry parlour, the boy seemed to pass from the most oppressive solitude to a world of warmth and fellowship.
Edith Wharton (Edith Wharton: Collection of 115 Works with analysis and historical background (Annotated and Illustrated) (Annotated Classics))
is the message we have heard from him and proclaim to you, that  m God is light, and in him is no darkness at all. 6 n If we say we have fellowship with him while we walk in darkness, we lie and  o do not practice the truth. 7But  p if we walk in the light,  q as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and  r the blood of Jesus his Son cleanses us from all sin. 8 s If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and  t the truth is not in us. 9 u If we confess our sins, he is  v faithful and just to forgive us our sins and  r to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. 10If we say we have not sinned,  w we make him a liar, and  x his word is not in us.
Anonymous (The Holy Bible: English Standard Version)
Moses my servant is dead. Now therefore arise, go over this Jordan, you and all this people, into the land that I am giving to them, to the people of Israel. 3 cEvery place that the sole of your foot will tread upon I have given to you, just as I promised to Moses. 4 dFrom the wilderness and this Lebanon as far as the great river, the river Euphrates, all the land of the Hittites to the Great Sea toward the going down of the sun shall be your territory. 5 eNo man shall be able to stand before you all the days of your life. Just  fas I was with Moses, so  gI will be with you.  hI will not leave you or forsake you. 6 iBe strong and courageous, for you shall cause this people to inherit the land that I swore to their fathers to give them. 7Only be strong and  jvery courageous, being careful to do according to all the law  kthat Moses my servant commanded you.  lDo not turn from it to the right hand or to the left, that you may have good success [1] wherever you go. 8This Book of the Law shall not depart from your mouth, but  myou shall meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do according to all that is written in it. For then you will make your way prosperous, and then you will have good success. 9Have I not commanded you?  nBe strong and courageous.  oDo not be frightened, and do not be dismayed, for the LORD your God is with you wherever you go.
Anonymous (The Holy Bible: English Standard Version)
Walking in the Light 5 l This is the message we have heard from him and proclaim to you, that  m God is light, and in him is no darkness at all. 6 n If we say we have fellowship with him while we walk in darkness, we lie and  o do not practice the truth. 7But  p if we walk in the light,  q as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and  r the blood of Jesus his Son cleanses us from all sin. 8 s If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and  t the truth is not in us. 9 u If we confess our sins, he is  v faithful and just to forgive us our sins and  r to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. 10If we say we have not sinned,  w we make him a liar, and  x his word is not in us.
Anonymous (The Holy Bible: English Standard Version)
As with most thoughtful natures, Odo's first disillusionment was to come from discovering not what his God condemned, but what He condoned. Between Cantapresto's coarse philosophy of pleasure and the refined complaisances of his new confessor he felt the distinction to be one rather of taste than of principle; and it seemed to him that the religion of the aristocracy might not unfairly be summed up in the ex-soprano's cynical aphorism: "As respectful children of our Heavenly Father it behoves us not to speak till we are spoken to." Even the religious ceremonies he witnessed did not console him for that chill hour of dawn, when, in the chapel at Donnaz, he had served the mass for Don Gervaso, with a heart trembling at its own unworthiness yet uplifted by the sense of the Divine Presence. In the churches adorned like aristocratic drawing-rooms, of which some Madonna, wreathed in artificial flowers, seemed the amiable and indulgent hostess, and where the florid passionate music of the mass was rendered by the King's opera singers before a throng of chattering cavaliers and ladies, Odo prayed in vain for a reawakening of the old emotion. The sense of sonship was gone. He felt himself an alien in the temple of this affable divinity, and his heart echoed no more than the cry which had once lifted him on wings of praise to the very threshold of the hidden glory — Domine, dilexi decorem domus tuae et
Edith Wharton (Edith Wharton: Collection of 115 Works with analysis and historical background (Annotated and Illustrated) (Annotated Classics))
JOSHUA 1 After the death of Moses the  aservant of the LORD, the LORD said to Joshua the son of Nun, Moses’  bassistant, 2“Moses my servant is dead. Now therefore arise, go over this Jordan, you and all this people, into the land that I am giving to them, to the people of Israel. 3 cEvery place that the sole of your foot will tread upon I have given to you, just as I promised to Moses. 4 dFrom the wilderness and this Lebanon as far as the great river, the river Euphrates, all the land of the Hittites to the Great Sea toward the going down of the sun shall be your territory. 5 eNo man shall be able to stand before you all the days of your life. Just  fas I was with Moses, so  gI will be with you.  hI will not leave you or forsake you. 6 iBe strong and courageous, for you shall cause this people to inherit the land that I swore to their fathers to give them. 7Only be strong and  jvery courageous, being careful to do according to all the law  kthat Moses my servant commanded you.  lDo not turn from it to the right hand or to the left, that you may have good success [1] wherever you go. 8This Book of the Law shall not depart from your mouth, but  myou shall meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do according to all that is written in it. For then you will make your way prosperous, and then you will have good success. 9Have I not commanded you?  nBe strong and courageous.  oDo not be frightened, and do not be dismayed, for the LORD your God is with you wherever you go.
Anonymous (The Holy Bible: English Standard Version)
American DEWAR FAMILY Cameron Dewar Ursula “Beep” Dewar, his sister Woody Dewar, his father Bella Dewar, his mother PESHKOV-JAKES FAMILY George Jakes Jacky Jakes, his mother Greg Peshkov, his father Lev Peshkov, his grandfather Marga, his grandmother MARQUAND FAMILY Verena Marquand Percy Marquand, her father Babe Lee, her mother CIA Florence Geary Tony Savino Tim Tedder, semiretired Keith Dorset OTHERS Maria Summers Joseph Hugo, FBI Larry Mawhinney, Pentagon Nelly Fordham, old flame of Greg Peshkov Dennis Wilson, aide to Bobby Kennedy Skip Dickerson, aide to Lyndon Johnson Leopold “Lee” Montgomery, reporter Herb Gould, television journalist on This Day Suzy Cannon, gossip reporter Frank Lindeman, television network owner REAL HISTORICAL CHARACTERS John F. Kennedy, thirty-fifth U.S. president Jackie, his wife Bobby Kennedy, his brother Dave Powers, assistant to President Kennedy Pierre Salinger, President Kennedy’s press officer Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Lyndon B. Johnson, thirty-sixth U.S. president Richard Nixon, thirty-seventh U.S. president Jimmy Carter, thirty-ninth U.S. president Ronald Reagan, fortieth U.S. president George H. W. Bush, forty-first U.S. president British LECKWITH-WILLIAMS FAMILY Dave Williams Evie Williams, his sister Daisy Williams, his mother Lloyd Williams, M.P., his father Eth Leckwith, Dave’s grandmother MURRAY FAMILY Jasper Murray Anna Murray, his sister Eva Murray, his mother MUSICIANS IN THE GUARDSMEN AND PLUM NELLIE Lenny, Dave Williams’s cousin Lew, drummer Buzz, bass player Geoffrey, lead guitarist OTHERS Earl Fitzherbert, called Fitz Sam Cakebread, friend of Jasper Murray Byron Chesterfield (real name Brian Chesnowitz), music agent Hank Remington (real name Harry Riley), pop star Eric Chapman, record company executive German FRANCK FAMILY Rebecca Hoffmann Carla Franck, Rebecca’s adoptive mother Werner Franck, Rebecca’s adoptive father Walli Franck, son of Carla Lili Franck, daughter of Werner and Carla Maud von Ulrich, née Fitzherbert, Carla’s mother Hans Hoffmann, Rebecca’s husband OTHERS Bernd Held, schoolteacher Karolin Koontz, folksinger Odo Vossler, clergyman REAL HISTORICAL PEOPLE Walter Ulbricht, first secretary of the Socialist Unity Party (Communist) Erich Honecker, Ulbricht’s successor Egon Krenz, successor to Honecker Polish Stanislaw “Staz” Pawlak, army officer Lidka, girlfriend of Cam Dewar Danuta Gorski, Solidarity activist REAL HISTORICAL PEOPLE Anna Walentynowicz, crane driver Lech Wałesa, leader of the trade union Solidarity General Jaruzelski, prime minister Russian DVORKIN-PESHKOV FAMILY Tanya Dvorkin, journalist Dimka Dvorkin, Kremlin aide, Tanya’s twin brother Anya Dvorkin, their mother Grigori Peshkov, their grandfather Katerina Peshkov, their grandmother Vladimir, always called Volodya, their uncle Zoya, Volodya’s wife Nina, Dimka’s girlfriend OTHERS Daniil Antonov, features editor at TASS Pyotr Opotkin, features editor in chief Vasili Yenkov, dissident Natalya Smotrov, official in the Foreign Ministry
Ken Follett (Edge of Eternity (The Century Trilogy, #3))
Mai te aj v ohi a yaar tera... Mei ne bdlea bdl gya tu te sady naal pyar tera.... Krda tuvi c je bharr lassi meri.... Jarr lydy c assi v har nzakt teri.... Kyo ay na aj raas tenu dity hoey oh jawab mery... J nhi c bolda te hunda odo v ksur mera... J aj bolea te aakhda ae bdl gya oh 'khass' mera....
Jagdeep singh sandhu
Un mét odo extr emadamente bu eno p ara adquir ir el control mental es sentarse con el tronco erguido y aspirar una respiración completa de limpieza. Después, aspire a razón de uno, cuatro, dos. Es decir ( ¡ hablemos ahora de segundos para cambiar ! ), aspire durante cinco segundos, luego retenga la respiración durante cuatro veces cinco segundos, o sea, veinte segundos. Cuando haya hecho esto, expulse el aire durante diez segundos. Respirando adecua damente podrá usted librarse de muchos padecimientos, y éste es un método excelente.
Anonymous
Before I could knock on the open door of his office I heard, “Get your ass in here!!”      I by-passed the knock and went straight to his desk and stopped front and center.      “Christ, what the hell is going on out there this morning.  I come in here drop my cover and car keys on my desk, look at the morning availability report and see we got 13 aircraft up.  I go down to the ready room to get a cup of coffee, see on the schedules board we got an 8 plane launch going out, look at the weather, shoot the shit with the ODO for a couple minutes and by the time I get back to my office, I got 4 aircraft up out of 18 and the entire launch has been scrubbed, what the FUCK?!”      “The thunderstorm got us Sir.  Flight line had the aircraft all ready to go, canopies up waiting on pilots and everything got drenched before we could close up and run for cover.”      “Oh for Christ’s sake, didn’t anyone notice a huge thunderstorm heading our way?
W.R. Spicer (Sea Stories of a U.S. Marine Book 4 Harrier)
One man could manage an empty barrel but it took two to move a full one over uneven ground. The two brothers took the empty to the alehouse, with Brindle trotting behind. While they were paying Leaf, two passengers arrived for the ferry. Edgar recognized them as Odo and Adelaide, a husband-and-wife courier team from Cherbourg. They had passed through Dreng’s Ferry two weeks earlier on their way to Shiring, accompanied by two men-at-arms, carrying letters and money to Ragna. Edgar
Ken Follett (The Evening and the Morning (Kingsbridge, #0))
The conversation went on. It was difficult for Shevek to follow, both in language and in substance. He was being told about things he had no experience of at all. He had never seen a rat, or an army barracks, or an insane asylum, or a poorhouse, or a pawnshop, or an execution, or a thief, or a tenement, or a rent collector, or a man who wanted to work and could not find work to do, or a dead baby in a ditch. All these things occurred in Efor's reminiscences as commonplaces or as commonplace horrors. Shevek had to exercise his imagination and summon every scrap of knowledge he had about Urras to understand them at all. And yet they were familiar to him in a way that nothing he had yet seen there was, and he did understand. This was the Urras he had learned about in school on Anarres. This was the world from which his ancestors had fled, preferring hunger and the desert and endless exile. This was the world that had formed Odo's mind and had jailed her eight times for speaking it. This was the human suffering in which the ideals of his society were rooted, the ground from which they sprang. It was not 'the real Urras.' The dignity and beauty of the room he and Efor were in was as real as the squalor to which Efor was native. To him a thinking man's job was not to deny one reality at the expense of the other, but to include and connect. It was not an easy job.
Ursula K. Le Guin (The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia)
Lastly, the story that the Tapestry tells is inevitably selective and in places demonstrably inaccurate; some events are left out and others are deliberately distorted. No other source, for example, suggests that Harold swore his famous oath to William at Bayeux, or that it was Odo who heroically turned the tide for the Normans during the Battle of Hastings. The Tapestry, it bears repeating, is really an embroidery.
Marc Morris (The Norman Conquest: The Battle of Hastings and the Fall of Anglo-Saxon England)
The philosopher Odo Marquard has noted a correlation in the German language between the word zwei, which means “two,” and the word zweifel, which means “doubt”—suggesting that two of anything brings the automatic possibility of uncertainty to our lives.
Elizabeth Gilbert (Committed: A Love Story)
Sono romantico, Bernie. Odo voci gridare nella notte e vado a vedere che cosa succede. In questo modo non si guadagna un centesimo. Voi invece avete buon senso; chiudete le finestre e aumentate il volume del televisore. Oppure, se state guidando, premete l'acceleratore e vi allontanate il più rapidamente possibile. State alla larga dai guai altrui. Il meglio che possa capitare è uno smacco. L'ultima volta che vidi Terry Lennox bevemmo insieme una tazza di caffè che preparai io stesso in questa casa e fumammo una sigaretta. E così, quando seppi che era morto, andai in cucina, e preparai il caffè e riempii una tazza per lui e accesi per lui una sigaretta, e quando il caffè si fu raffreddato e la sigaretta fu consumata, gli augurai la buonanotte. In questo modo non si guadagna un centesimo. Voi non lo fareste. Ecco perché siete un abile poliziotto e io sono un investigatore privato.
Raymond Chandler (The Long Goodbye (Philip Marlowe, #6))
And Odo the hero, they bore him back home To the place that he’d known as a lad, They laid him to rest with his hat inside out And his wand snapped in two, which was sad.
J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Harry Potter, #6))
William spent the winter of 1066 in England while his wife ran Normandy, and when he and his cronies returned to France in the spring the Parisians were ‘dazzled by the beauty of their clothing, which was embroidered with gold’. The new Norman elite were vastly wealthy; according to a 2000 Sunday Times estimate Bishop Odo, who was given Kent and land in twenty-two counties, was worth £43.2 billion ($52 billion) in today’s money, which would put him ahead of the most rapacious third world kleptocrat. William’s other half brother, Robert of Mortain, was worth £46.1 billion ($56 billion) while William of Warenne a staggering £57.6 billion ($71 billion); he held lands in thirteen counties. The new king was richer still, but despite William being staggeringly wealthy, the Godwin family had been probably even richer than he was.
Ed West (1066 and Before All That: The Battle of Hastings, Anglo-Saxon and Norman England)
He wrapped his arms around her, and they stood that way for a long time. Then Kira felt his body soften, shift, change. His flesh dissolved around her into lambent light. She raised her arms over her head and spread them wide as the essence of his being curled around her in a warm, soothing display of love that she had ever only experienced with Odo. For
David R. George III (The Long Mirage (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine))
It was not that Abbenay was short of power, not with her wind turbines and the earth temperature-differential generators used for heating; but the principle of organic economy was too essential to the functioning of the society not to affect ethics and aesthetics profoundly. “Excess is excrement,” Odo wrote in the Analogy. “Excrement retained in the body is a poison.
Ursula K. Le Guin (The Dispossessed)
t oDos teneMos un pasaDoy algunos dejan que éste defina sus vidas.
Sue Zurita (El viaje de los colibríes (Spanish Edition))
And Odo the hero, they bore him back home To the place that he’d known as a lad, sang Slughorn plaintively. They laid him to rest with his hat inside out And his wand snapped in two, which was sad.
J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Harry Potter, #6))
E l'aria è nuova. E tutto, attimo per attimo, è com'è, che s'avviva per apparire. Volto subito gli occhi per non vedere più nulla fermarsi nella sua apparenza e morire. Così soltanto io posso vivere, ormai. Rinascere attimo per attimo. Impedire che il pensiero si metta in me di nuovo a lavorare, e dentro mi rifaccia il vuoto delle cane costruzioni. La città è lontana. Me ne giunge, a volte, nella calma del vespro, il suono delle campane. Ma ora quelle campane le odo non più dentro di me, ma fuori, per sé sonare, che forse ne fremono di gioja nella loro cavità ronzante, in un bel cielo azzurro pieno di sole caldo tra lo stridio delle rondini o nel vento nuvoloso, pesanti e così alte sui campanili aerei. Pensare alla morte, pregare. C'è pure chi ha ancora questo bisogno, e se ne fanno voce le campane. Io non l'ho più questo bisogno, perché muojo ogni attimo, io, e rinasco nuovo e senza ricordi: vivo e intero, non più in me, ma in ogni cosa fuori.
Luigi Pirandello (Uno, nessuno e centomila)
designs for Aachen, Odo consciously mimicked features of famous late-Roman buildings.
Dan Jones (Powers and Thrones: A New History of the Middle Ages)
What would you have me do, Odo? We’re all terminal cases. Even our cultures. Even our worlds. A hundred years for an individual and he’s gone, only a memory for a hundred more, at most. Perhaps longer if he’s someone to whom they build statues. But after a thousand years, whom do we really remember?
Judith Reeves-Stevens (Millennium: Fall of Terok Nor/War of the Prophets/Inferno (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine))
American DEWAR FAMILY Cameron Dewar Ursula “Beep” Dewar, his sister Woody Dewar, his father Bella Dewar, his mother PESHKOV-JAKES FAMILY George Jakes Jacky Jakes, his mother Greg Peshkov, his father Lev Peshkov, his grandfather Marga, his grandmother MARQUAND FAMILY Verena Marquand Percy Marquand, her father Babe Lee, her mother CIA Florence Geary Tony Savino Tim Tedder, semiretired Keith Dorset OTHERS Maria Summers Joseph Hugo, FBI Larry Mawhinney, Pentagon Nelly Fordham, old flame of Greg Peshkov Dennis Wilson, aide to Bobby Kennedy Skip Dickerson, aide to Lyndon Johnson Leopold “Lee” Montgomery, reporter Herb Gould, television journalist on This Day Suzy Cannon, gossip reporter Frank Lindeman, television network owner REAL HISTORICAL CHARACTERS John F. Kennedy, thirty-fifth U.S. president Jackie, his wife Bobby Kennedy, his brother Dave Powers, assistant to President Kennedy Pierre Salinger, President Kennedy’s press officer Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Lyndon B. Johnson, thirty-sixth U.S. president Richard Nixon, thirty-seventh U.S. president Jimmy Carter, thirty-ninth U.S. president Ronald Reagan, fortieth U.S. president George H. W. Bush, forty-first U.S. president British LECKWITH-WILLIAMS FAMILY Dave Williams Evie Williams, his sister Daisy Williams, his mother Lloyd Williams, M.P., his father Eth Leckwith, Dave’s grandmother MURRAY FAMILY Jasper Murray Anna Murray, his sister Eva Murray, his mother MUSICIANS IN THE GUARDSMEN AND PLUM NELLIE Lenny, Dave Williams’s cousin Lew, drummer Buzz, bass player Geoffrey, lead guitarist OTHERS Earl Fitzherbert, called Fitz Sam Cakebread, friend of Jasper Murray Byron Chesterfield (real name Brian Chesnowitz), music agent Hank Remington (real name Harry Riley), pop star Eric Chapman, record company executive German FRANCK FAMILY Rebecca Hoffmann Carla Franck, Rebecca’s adoptive mother Werner Franck, Rebecca’s adoptive father Walli Franck, son of Carla Lili Franck, daughter of Werner and Carla Maud von Ulrich, née Fitzherbert, Carla’s mother Hans Hoffmann, Rebecca’s husband OTHERS Bernd Held, schoolteacher Karolin Koontz, folksinger Odo Vossler, clergyman REAL HISTORICAL PEOPLE Walter Ulbricht, first secretary of the Socialist Unity Party (Communist) Erich Honecker, Ulbricht’s successor Egon Krenz, successor to Honecker Polish Stanislaw “Staz” Pawlak, army officer Lidka, girlfriend of Cam Dewar Danuta Gorski, Solidarity activist REAL HISTORICAL PEOPLE Anna Walentynowicz, crane driver Lech Wałesa, leader of the trade union Solidarity General Jaruzelski, prime minister Russian DVORKIN-PESHKOV FAMILY Tanya Dvorkin, journalist Dimka Dvorkin, Kremlin aide, Tanya’s twin brother Anya Dvorkin, their mother Grigori Peshkov, their grandfather Katerina Peshkov, their grandmother Vladimir, always called Volodya, their uncle Zoya, Volodya’s wife Nina, Dimka’s girlfriend OTHERS Daniil Antonov, features editor at TASS Pyotr Opotkin, features editor in chief Vasili Yenkov, dissident Natalya Smotrov, official in the Foreign Ministry Nik Smotrov, Natalya’s husband Yevgeny Filipov, aide to Defense Minister Rodion Malinovsky Vera Pletner, Dimka’s secretary Valentin, Dimka’s friend Marshal Mikhail Pushnoy REAL HISTORICAL CHARACTERS Nikita Sergeyevitch Khrushchev, first secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Andrei Gromyko, foreign minister under Khrushchev Rodion Malinovsky, defense minister under Khrushchev Alexei Kosygin, chairman of the Council of Ministers Leonid Brezhnev, Khrushchev’s successor Yuri Andropov, successor to Brezhnev Konstantin Chernenko, successor to Andropov Mikhail Gorbachev, successor to Chernenko Other Nations Paz Oliva, Cuban general Frederik Bíró, Hungarian politician Enok Andersen, Danish accountant
Ken Follett (Edge of Eternity Deluxe (The Century Trilogy #3))
Odo said it all her life. 'Only peace brings peace, only just acts bring justice!
Ursula K. Le Guin (The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia)
The next instant felt very long. At last Odo straightened up and faced Skyler. He wore a fixed grin. “It could be a sign of new processes going on in Europa. A massive volcanic eruption of water vapor. This could completely alter our understanding of cryovolcanism on Jupiter’s icy moons!
Felix R. Savage (Freefall (Earth's Last Gambit, #1))
Se gli orologi scomparissero dal mondo. Mi sentivo perso e senza punti di appoggio. Quanti minuti erano trascorsi da quando mi ero svegliato? In genere controllavo l'ora sulla sveglia accanto al letto, ora però mi era impossibile perchè gli orologi erano scomparsi. Cominciavo a sentirmi trascinato in un vortice senza tempo e senza età. Gli esseri umani dormono, si svegliano, lavorano e mangiano in base a una tabella oraria stabilita da loro stessi. Conducono un'esistenza impostata sugli orologi. In altre parole, prima hanno inventato il sistema dei giorni, dei mesi e degli anni, ovvero del tempo in generale, per imporsi dei limiti, poi hanno inventato gli strumenti per misurare quegli stessi limiti. La libertà comporta ansia e insicurezza. Gli esseri umani avevano ceduto la libertà totale in cambio dalla certezza data dalle regole e dalle abitudini. Tutti i momenti che avevo vissuto più o meno in maniera inconsapevole cominciavano ora ad acquisire importanza. Quante altre mattine mi sarei alzato insieme a Cavolo? Nel tempo che mi rimaneva, quante altre volte avrei ascoltato la mia canzone preferita? Quante altre volte avrei bevuto il caffè? Mentre ci pensavo, ho udito il ticchettio delle lancette di un orologio. Al colmo dello stupore, mi sono voltato di scatto verso il letto, ma ovviamente la sveglia non era al suo posto. Però avvertivo la presenza di qualcosa alle mie spalle, qualcosa che mi dava sostegno. Ho cominciato a udire milioni e milioni di ticchettii, che nel breve intervallo di un istante si sono trasformati nel battito dei cuori di tutte le persone che vivevano in questo mondo. La torre dell'orologio illuminata dai primi raggi di sole. Fidanzati che si danno appuntamento ai piedi della torre. Salto sul tram che è arrivato in ritardo. Arrivo davanti a un piccolo negozio di orologi. Odo il ticchettio Scandiscono il tempo. E' un suono familiare, lo conosco da quando ero piccolo. Regola la mia vita e la rende libera. Il mio cuore comincia a trovare la pace. E, poco alla volta, il suono si allontana fino a scomparire.
Genki Kawamura (If Cats Disappeared from the World)
(…) Contemplando o rio, Iñe-e e o menino sentiram, cada um ao seu modo, um sentimento assombroso de não estarem no lugar certo e ficaram ambos tão agitados que o passeio fora encurtado. Mas por maravilhoso que fosse, o rio de algum modo soube compreender Iñe-e, porque todos os rios sabem todas as línguas do mundo, e desde aquele dia sua voz inaudível à maioria chegava, não obstante, aonde quer que ela estivesse. A menina, entretida no silêncio que era seu, começou a perceber a voz densa do rio, apurando aos ouvidos, colocando-os entre as conchas das mãos, para escutá-lo melhor, tentando entender o que dizia. A voz atravessava distâncias, grossas paredes, massas de ar gelado. No começo, não havia nenhum som que pudesse distinguir como palavra, fluss-fluss-fluss, era o que ouvia, som comum de correnteza. Mas não demorou para que as águas se fizessem minimamente inteligíveis. Pode me chamar de rio, odo, Fluss, river, rivière, flumine, fluxo de água rasgando a terra com a trajetória de sangue em um corpo animal. Pode me chamar de água. E água é tudo e está em tudo que compõe este mundo. Aqui, neste lugar, me chamam Isar, Isar Fluss. Esse nome significa torrente, e por ser torrente um nome de mulher eu sou Isar, rio-fêmea. E, embora os homens pouco atentem a isso quando nos nomeiam, há outros rios fêmea como eu, como o seu Paranáhuazú. Fossem as mulheres a dar nomes às coisas, cidades, rios, passagens, montanhas, talvez percebessem melhor que nem tudo no mundo é definido como macho.
Micheliny Verunschk (O Som do Rugido da Onça)
(…) Contemplando o rio, Iñe-e e o menino sentiram, cada um ao seu modo, um sentimento assombroso de não estarem no lugar certo e ficaram ambos tão agitados que o passeio fora encurtado. Mas por maravilhoso que fosse, o rio de algum modo soube compreender Iñe-e, porque todos os rios sabem todas as línguas do mundo, e desde aquele dia sua voz inaudível à maioria chegava, não obstante, aonde quer que ela estivesse. A menina, entretida no silêncio que era seu, começou a perceber a voz densa do rio, apurando aos ouvidos, colocando-os entre as conchas das mãos, para escutá-lo melhor, tentando entender o que dizia. A voz atravessava distâncias, grossas paredes, massas de ar gelado. No começo, não havia nenhum som que pudesse distinguir como palavra, fluss-fluss-fluss, era o que ouvia, som comum de correnteza. Mas não demorou para eu as águas se fizessem minimamente inteligíveis. Pode me chamar de rio, odo, Fluss, river, rivière, flumine, fluxo de água rasgando a terra com a trajetória de sangue em um corpo animal. Pode me chamar de água. E água é tudo e está em tudo que compõe este mundo. Aqui, neste lugar, me chamam Isar, Isar Fluss. Esse nome significa torrente, e por ser torrente um nome de mulher eu sou Isar, rio-fêmea. E, embora os homens pouco atentem a isso quando nos nomeiam, há outros rios fêmea como eu, como o seu Paranáhuazú. Fossem as mulheres a dar nomes às coisas, cidades, rios, passagens, montanhas, talvez percebessem melhor que nem tudo no mundo é definido como macho.
Micheliny Verunschk (O Som do Rugido da Onça)
As Odo pointed out, if no direction is taken, if one goes nowhere, no change will occur.
Ursula K. Le Guin (The Dispossessed)