Niels Bohr Quotes

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An expert is a person who has made all the mistakes that can be made in a very narrow field.
Niels Bohr
The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement. But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.
Niels Bohr
Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future.
Niels Bohr
Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real.
Niels Bohr
Those who are not shocked when they first come across quantum theory cannot possibly have understood it.
Niels Bohr (Essays 1932-1957 on Atomic Physics and Human Knowledge)
How wonderful that we have met with a paradox. Now we have some hope of making progress.
Niels Bohr
No, no, you're not thinking; you're just being logical.
Niels Bohr
There are some things so serious that you have to laugh at them.
Niels Bohr
Never express yourself more clearly than you are able to think
Niels Bohr
A physicist is just an atom's way of looking at itself.
Niels Bohr
Stop telling God what to do with his dice.
Niels Bohr
The meaning of life consists in the fact that it makes no sense to say that life has no meaning.
Niels Bohr
I remember discussions with Bohr which went through many hours till very late at night and ended almost in despair; and when at the end of the discussion I went alone for a walk in the neighbouring park I repeated to myself again and again the question: Can nature possibly be so absurd as it seemed to us in these atomic experiments?
Werner Heisenberg
Every great and deep difficulty bears in itself it’s own solution. It forces us to change our thinking in order to find it.
Niels Bohr
We are all agreed that your theory is crazy. The question which divides us is whether it is crazy enough to have a chance of being correct. My own feeling is that it is not crazy enough.
Niels Bohr
There are trivial truths and there are great truths. The opposite of a trivial truth is plainly false. The opposite of a great truth is also true.
Niels Bohr
Every sentence I utter must be understood not as an affirmation, but as a question. [A caution he gives his students, to be wary of dogmatism.]
Niels Bohr (Nuclear Physics (1929-1952))
You can recognize a small truth because its opposite is a falsehood. The opposite of a great truth is another truth.
Niels Bohr
Physics is not about how the world is, it is about what we can say about the world
Niels Bohr
We must be clear that when it comes to atoms, language can be used only as in poetry. The poet, too, is not nearly so concerned with describing facts as with creating images and establishing mental connections. [About describing atomic models in the language of classical physics:]
Niels Bohr
The very nature of the quantum theory ... forces us to regard the space-time coordination and the claim of causality, the union of which characterizes the classical theories, as complementary but exclusive features of the description, symbolizing the idealization of observation and description, respectively.
Niels Bohr
An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made in a very narrow field.
Niels Bohr
Your theory is crazy, but it's not crazy enough to be true.
Niels Bohr
We are suspended in language.
Niels Bohr
Mental patterns do not originate out of inorganic nature. They originate out of society, which originates out of inorganic nature. And, as anthropologists know so well, what a mind thinks is as dominated by biological patterns as social patterns are dominated by biological patterns and as biological patterns are dominated by inorganic patterns. There is no direct scientific connection between mind and matter. As the atomic scientist, Niels Bohr, said, "We are suspended in language." Our intellectual description of nature is always culturally derived.
Robert M. Pirsig
It is not enough to be wrong, one must also be polite.
Niels Bohr
It is the hallmark of any deep truth that its negation is also a deep truth
Niels Bohr
Prediction,” as Niels Bohr liked to say, “is very difficult, especially if it’s about the future.
Steven D. Levitt (Think Like a Freak)
The ultimate lesson is that science isn’t special – at least not anymore. Maybe back when Einstein talked to Niels Bohr, and there were only a few dozen important workers in every field. But there are now three million researchers in America. It’s no longer a calling, it’s a career. Science is as corruptible a human activity as any other. Its practitioners aren’t saints, they’re human beings, and they do what human beings do – lie, cheat, steal from one another, sue, hide data, fake data, overstate their own importance and denigrate opposing views unfairly. That’s human nature. It isn’t going to change
Michael Crichton (Next)
You must come to Copenhagen to work with us. We like people who can actually perform thought experiments!
Niels Bohr
The Stone Age didn't end because the World ran out of stones
Niels Bohr
Vivere est Cogitare
Niels Bohr
Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real. If quantum mechanics hasn't profoundly shocked you, you haven't understood it yet.
Niels Bohr
And at that age, the only boys I didn’t think were gross were dead scientists – and it’s not like I wanted to kiss those guys. (No offense, Niels Bohr.)
Sarah Cross (Dull Boy)
The opposite of a truth," Klaus quoted, "is a falsehood; but the opposite of a profound truth...may be another profound truth." [Niels Bohr]
Ben Lerner (The Topeka School)
In our description of nature the purpose is not to disclose the real essence of the phenomena but only to track down, as far as possible, relations between the manifold aspects of our experience.
Niels Bohr (Atomic Physics And Human Knowledge)
[About the great synthesis of atomic physics in the 1920s] It was a heroic time. It was not the doing of any one man; it involved the collaboration of scores of scientists from many different lands. But from the first to last the deeply creative, subtle and critical spirit of Niels Bohr guided, restrained, deepened and finally transmuted the enterprise.
J. Robert Oppenheimer
The legendary Danish physicist Niels Bohr distinguished two kinds of truths. An ordinary truth is a statement whose opposite is a falsehood. A profound truth is a statement whose opposite is also a profound truth.
Frank Wilczek (The Lightness of Being: Mass, Ether, and the Unification of Forces)
Nobody knows how the stand of our knowledge about the atom would be without him. Personally, Bohr is one of the amiable colleagues I have met. He utters his opinions like one perpetually groping and never like one who believes himself to be in possession of the truth.
Albert Einstein
The difference between science and philosophy is that the scientist learns more and more about less and less until she knows everything about nothing, whereas a philosopher learns less and less about more and more until he knows nothing about everything. There is truth in this clever crack, but, as Niels Bohr impressed, while the opposite of a trivial truth is false, the opposite of a great truth is another great truth.
Dorion Sagan
Truth is: I was always that kind of girl. Truth is: they don’t make dresses any whiter than mine. Truth is: I am not Demeter’s daughter. I am Heisenberg’s ripe tomato I am Niels Bohr’s piece on the side. In the winter I am a particle. In the summer I am a wave. And I didn’t get to be queen of hell by letting folks off easy.
Catherynne M. Valente
I myself find the division of the world into an objective and a subjective side much too arbitrary. The fact that religions through the ages have spoken in images, parables, and paradoxes means simply that there are no other ways of grasping the reality to which they refer. But that does not mean that it is not a genuine reality. And splitting this reality into an objective and a. subjective side won't get us very far.
Niels Bohr
The best weapon of a dictatorship is secrecy, but the best weapon of a democracy should be the weapon of openness.
Niels Bohr
The opposite of a correct statement is an incorrect statement. The opposite of a profound truth is another profound truth (Niels Bohr)." By this, he means that we require a larger reading of the human past, of our relations with each other, the universe and God, a retelling of our older tales to encompass many truths and to let us grow with change.
Neil Postman (Building a Bridge to the 18th Century: How the Past Can Improve Our Future)
If you can fathom quantum mechanics without getting dizzy, you don't get it Et kvantebitte spring nærmere supercomputeren
Niels Bohr
كف عن إخبار الرب عما يجب عليه ان يفعله
Niels Bohr
Anyone who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it.
Niels Bohr
Perhaps I have found out a little about the structure of atoms.
Niels Bohr
الخبير هو شخص ارتكب كل الأخطاء الممكنة في مجال محدد للغاية.
Niels Bohr
Niels Bohr wrote, ‘The opposite of a true statement is a false statement, but the opposite of a profound truth can be another profound truth.
Anne Lamott (Almost Everything: Notes on Hope)
The physicist Niels Bohr was fond of saying, “Prediction is very hard to do. Especially about the future
Michio Kaku (Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration of the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel)
Despite the earnest belief of most of his fans, Einstein did not win his Nobel Prize for the theory of relativity, special or general. He won for explaining a strange effect in quantum mechanics, the photoelectric effect. His solution provided the first real evidence that quantum mechanics wasn’t a crude stopgap for justifying anomalous experiments, but actually corresponds to reality. And the fact that Einstein came up with it is ironic for two reasons. One, as he got older and crustier, Einstein came to distrust quantum mechanics. Its statistical and deeply probabilistic nature sounded too much like gambling to him, and it prompted him to object that “God does not play dice with the universe.” He was wrong, and it’s too bad that most people have never heard the rejoinder by Niels Bohr: “Einstein! Stop telling God what to do.
Sam Kean (The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements)
The great physicist Niels Bohr said, “There are two types of truth. In the shallow type, the opposite of a true statement is false. In the deeper kind, the opposite of a true statement is equally true.
Gunilla Norris (A Mystic Garden: Working with Soil, Attending to Soul)
Chinese dialectical reasoning had an impact on the physicist Niels Bohr, who was highly knowledgeable about Eastern thought. He attributed his development of quantum theory in part to the metaphysics of the East. There had been a centuries-long debate in the West about whether light consists of particles or waves. Belief in one was assumed to contradict and render impossible belief in the other. Bohr’s solution was to say that light can be thought of in both ways. In quantum theory, light can be viewed either as a particle or as a wave. Just never both at the same time.
Richard E. Nisbett (Mindware: Tools for Smart Thinking)
An expert is a person who has made all the mistakes that can be made in a very narrow field.” –Niels Bohr
Timothy Ferriss (Tribe of Mentors: Short Life Advice from the Best in the World)
Uncertainty and Complementarity It is wrong to think that the task of physics is to find out how Nature is. Physics concerns what we can say about Nature. —NIELS BOHR       DETERMINISM—THE
Heinz R. Pagels (The Cosmic Code (Books on Physics))
In quantum mechanics...an observation here and now changes in general the 'state' of the observed system....I consider the unpredictable change of the state by a single observation...to be an abandonment of the idea of the isolation of the observer from the course of physical events outside himself.
Niels Bohr
Bohr's standpoint, that a space-time description is impossible, I reject a limine. Physics does not consist only of atomic research, science does not consist only of physics, and life does not consist only of science. The aim of atomic research is to fit our empirical knowledge concerning it into our other thinking. All of this other thinking, so far as it concerns the outer world, is active in space and time. If it cannot be fitted into space and time, then it fails in its whole aim and one does not know what purpose it really serves.
Erwin Schrödinger
Un experto es una persona que ha cometido todos los errores que se pueden cometer en un determinado campo.
Niels Bohr
عكس مقولة صحيحة هو مقولة خاطئة ، ولكن عكس حقيقة مثبتة يمكن ان يكون حقيقة مؤكدة
Niels Bohr
Il fatto che la terra fosse rotonda, e non piatta come loro credevano, non impedì ai Fenici di circumnavigare l'Africa. Anche se il loro modello atomico era sbagliato, è pur sempre a Enrico Fermi e Niels Bohr che si deve il successo nella costruzione della bomba atomica. Quello che conta è che la base operativa funzioni.
Tullio Avoledo (L'elenco telefonico di Atlantide)
And even if Einstein could not be defied, he might be evaded. Those who sponsored this view talked hopefully about shortcuts through higher dimensions, lines that were straighter than straight, and hyperspacial connectivity. They were fond of using an expressive phrase coined by a Princeton mathematician of the last century: “Wormholes in space.” Critics who suggested that these ideas were too fantastic to be taken seriously were reminded of Niels Bohr’s “Your theory is crazy—but not crazy enough to be true.” If
Arthur C. Clarke (2001: A Space Odyssey (Space Odyssey, #1))
I feel personally responsible for the universe's inevitable heat death.
Niels Bohr
When [Niels] Bohr is about everything is somehow different. Even the dullest gets a fit of brilliancy.
Isidor Isaac Rabi
It is wrong to think that the task of physics is to find out how Nature is. Physics concerns what we say about Nature.
Niels Bohr
The very fact that knowledge is itself the basis for civilization points directly to openness as the way to overcome the present crisis.
Niels Bohr
An expert is a person who has made all the mistakes that can be made in a very narrow field. —NIELS BOHR, Danish physicist and Nobel Prize winner
Timothy Ferriss (The 4 Hour Workweek, Expanded And Updated: Expanded And Updated, With Over 100 New Pages Of Cutting Edge Content)
We all agree your theory is crazy. What divides us is whether it is crazy enough to have a chance of being right.”* { Niels Bohr }
John Kehoe (Quantum Warrior: The Future of the Mind)
Nature is far more inventive than is human imagination, and the microscopic world is not what Niels Bohr or anyone else could have guessed.
Daniel J. Siegel (Aware: The Science and Practice of Presence--A Complete Guide to the Groundbreaking Wheel of Awareness Meditation Practice)
Copenhagen interpretation Niels Bohr’s combination of instrumentalism, anthropocentrism and studied ambiguity, used to avoid understanding quantum theory as being about reality.
David Deutsch (The Beginning of Infinity: Explanations That Transform the World)
Critics who suggested that these ideas were too fantastic to be taken seriously were reminded of Niels Bohr’s ‘Your theory is crazy - but not crazy enough to be true.’ If
Arthur C. Clarke (2001: A Space Odyssey (Space Odyssey, #1))
Nobel Prize–winning physicist Niels Bohr: “An expert is someone who has made all possible mistakes in one field and there are no more to make.
Dan Rothstein (Make Just One Change: Teach Students to Ask Their Own Questions)
How wonderful that we have met with paradox. Now we have some hope of making progress. —NIELS BOHR
Michio Kaku (Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration of the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel)
With personal intervention on behalf of the principle of openness, which exposes crime as well as error to public view, Niels Bohr played a decisive part in the rescue of the Danish Jews.
Richard Rhodes (Making of the Atomic Bomb)
The opposite of a truth," Klaus quoted, "is a falsehood; but the opposite of a profound truth...may be another profound truth." It either is or is not August...if I assert it's August when it isn't--simply false; but if I say that life is pain, that is true, profoundly so; so, too, that life is joy; the more profound the statement, the more reversible the deep truths are sedimented in syntax, the terms can be reversed... [Niels Bohr]
Ben Lerner (The Topeka School)
Looking at the waves scudding outwards and getting lost on the horizon, he could not help but recall the words of his mentor, the Danish physicist Niels Bohr, who had once told him that a part of eternity lies in reach of those capable of staring, unblinking, at the sea’s deranging expanses.
Benjamín Labatut (When We Cease to Understand the World)
It’s quite interesting to note that Townes’s colleagues at Columbia were skeptical of his idea. Niels Bohr, one of the great quantum physicists, and Nobel laureate Isadore Rabi, head of the university's physics department, told Townes his maser idea would never work and urged him to abandon the project.
James Scott Bell (27 Fiction Writing Blunders - And How Not To Make Them!)
Using the word much as it is used in atomic physics to characterize the relationship between experience obtained by different experimental arrangements and visualized only by mutually exclusive ideas, we may truly say that different human cultures are complimentary to each other ... each such culture represents a harmonious balance of traditional conventions by means of which latent potentialities of human life unfold themselves in a way which reveals to us new aspects of its unlimited richness and variety.
Niels Bohr (The Philosophical Writings of Niels Bohr, Vol. 2: Essays 1932-1957 Atomic Physics and Human Knowledge)
Einstein came to distrust quantum mechanics. Its statistical and deeply probabilistic nature sounded too much like gambling to him, and it prompted him to object that “God does not play dice with the universe.” He was wrong, and it’s too bad that most people have never heard the rejoinder by Niels Bohr: “Einstein! Stop telling God what to do.
Sam Kean (The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements)
All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. ” —Arthur Schopenhauer “We are all agreed that your theory is crazy. The question that divides us is whether it is crazy enough to have a chance of being correct.” —Niels Bohr, Nobel Laureate & Quantum Physics Pioneer
Douglas E. Richards (Quantum Lens)
An expert is a person who has found out by his own painful experience all the mistakes that one can make in a very narrow field.
Niels Bohr
We walked up and down in the snow, I on skis and she on foot (she said and proved that she could get along just as fast that way), and gradually the idea took shape that this was no chipping or cracking of the nucleus but rather a process to be explained by Bohr's idea that the nucleus was like a liquid drop; such a drop might elongate and divide itself. {On his aunt and fellow science Lise Meitner}
Otto Robert Frisch
...Bir gün insanların hayatını kurtaran bir doktor olacak. Onlara mutluluk dağıtacak. Ya da mutluluktan daha iyi bir şey: Huzur. Saygı görecek. Bir gün. Bu olaylar, paskalya tavşancığı diye bir şeyin olmadığı ortaya çıktıktan sonra gerçekleşiyor. Noel baba, diş perisi, Aziz Christopher, Newton fiziği ve atomun Niels Bohr modelinden çok sonra bile bizim salak çocuk Anneciğin söylediklerine hala inanıyor.
Chuck Palahniuk (Choke)
There is no quantum world. There is only an abstract quantum physical description. It is wrong to think that the task of physics is to find out how nature is. Physics concerns what we can say about Nature.
Niels Bohr
Richard Rhodes’s exceptionally readable The Making of the Atomic Bomb is the place to start. This sweeping chronicle of the difficult and sobering history of the endeavor called the Manhattan Project is marked by Rhodes’s insightful studies of the complicated people who were most involved in the creation of the bomb, from Niels Bohr to Robert Oppenheimer. Rhodes followed this book with Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb.
Nancy Pearl (Book Lust: Recommended Reading for Every Mood, Moment, and Reason)
Niels Bohr believed that the complementarity that existed between the wave and the particle aspects of nature were indications of a much deeper complementarity in which irreconcilable pairs of opposites need not be contradictory. As he once said, "the opposite of a small truth may be a lie, but the opposite of a great truth is also a great truth." Thus the ring i may be a symbol of the reconciliation of complementary parts of the whole.
Fred Alan Wolf (The Dreaming Universe: A Mind-Expanding Journey into the Realm Where Psyche and Physics Meet)
the dark lady who inspired Shakespeare’s sonnets, the lady of Arosa may remain forever mysterious.” (Unfortunately, because Schrödinger had so many girlfriends and lovers in his life, as well as illegitimate children, it is impossible to determine precisely who served as the muse for this historic equation.) Over the next several months, in a remarkable series of papers, Schrödinger showed that the mysterious rules found by Niels Bohr for the hydrogen atom were simple consequences of his equation. For the first time, physicists had a detailed picture of the interior of the atom, by which one could, in principle, calculate the properties of more complex atoms, even molecules. Within months, the new quantum theory became a steamroller, obliterating many of the most puzzling questions about the atomic world, answering the greatest mysteries that had stumped scientists since the Greeks. The
Michio Kaku (Einstein's Cosmos: How Albert Einstein's Vision Transformed Our Understanding of Space and Time)
[On famous Nobel Laureate Niels Bohr] [Niels] Bohr's sort of humor, use of parables and stories, tolerance, dependence on family, feelings of indebtedness, obligation, and guilt, and his sense of responsibility for science, community, and, ultimately, humankind in general, are common traits of the Jewish intellectual. So too is a well-fortified atheism. Bohr ended with no religious belief and a dislike of all religions that claimed to base their teachings on revelations.
Finn Aaserud (Love, Literature, and the Quantum Atom: Niels Bohr's 1913 Trilogy Revisited)
It fascinates me that Albert Einstein tossed off a remark once which is frequently quoted out of context. He said to Niels Bohr that he did not believe in telepathy. Then he said, “But if it does exist, it probably has more to do with physics than psychology.” The second sentence is often quoted but they don’t quote that he didn’t believe in it. Einstein changed his mind about that later. He was very impressed with Upton Sinclair’s research on ESP. I think Einstein was on the right track and I think the physicists today who are thinking along those lines are on the right track.
Robert Anton Wilson (Coincidance: A Head Test)
Early in April 1933, the German government passed a law declaring that Jews (defined as anyone with a Jewish grandparent) could not hold an official position, including at the Academy or at the universities. Among those forced to flee were fourteen Nobel laureates and twenty-six of the sixty professors of theoretical physics in the country. Fittingly, such refugees from fascism who left Germany or the other countries it came to dominate—Einstein, Edward Teller, Victor Weisskopf, Hans Bethe, Lise Meitner, Niels Bohr, Enrico Fermi, Otto Stern, Eugene Wigner, Leó Szilárd, and others—helped to assure that the Allies rather than the Nazis first developed the atom bomb. Planck
Walter Isaacson (Einstein: His Life and Universe)
Physics is to be regarded not so much as the study of something a priori given, but rather as the development of methods of ordering and surveying human experience. In this respect our task must be to account for such experience in a manner independent of individual subjective judgement and therefore objective in the sense that it can be unambiguously communicated in ordinary human language.
Niels Bohr
For a parallel to the lesson of atomic theory regarding the limited applicability of such customary idealizations, we must in fact turn to quite other branches of science, such as psychology, or even to that kind of epistemological problems with which already thinkers like Buddha and Lao Tzu have been confronted, when trying to harmonize our position as spectators and actors in the great drama of existence.
Niels Bohr
After the discovery of spectral analysis no one trained in physics could doubt the problem of the atom would be solved when physicists had learned to understand the language of spectra. So manifold was the enormous amount of material that has been accumulated in sixty years of spectroscopic research that it seemed at first beyond the possibility of disentanglement. An almost greater enlightenment has resulted from the seven years of Röntgen spectroscopy, inasmuch as it has attacked the problem of the atom at its very root, and illuminates the interior. What we are nowadays hearing of the language of spectra is a true 'music of the spheres' in order and harmony that becomes ever more perfect in spite of the manifold variety. The theory of spectral lines will bear the name of Bohr for all time. But yet another name will be permanently associated with it, that of Planck. All integral laws of spectral lines and of atomic theory spring originally from the quantum theory. It is the mysterious organon on which Nature plays her music of the spectra, and according to the rhythm of which she regulates the structure of the atoms and nuclei.
Arnold Sommerfeld (Atombau Und Spektrallinien)
Lo que sigue es una pregunta de un examen de física en la Universidad de Copenhague: «Describa cómo se puede determinar la altura de un rascacielos con un barómetro». Un alumno respondió: «Se ata un largo cabo de cuerda al cuello del barómetro y entonces se descuelga el barómetro desde el tejado del rascacielos hasta el suelo. La longitud de la cuerda más la longitud del barómetro será igual a la altura del edificio». Esta original respuesta irritó tanto al examinador que el estudiante fue suspendido. El estudiante recurrió basándose en que su respuesta era indiscutiblemente correcta y la universidad nombró un árbitro independiente para decidir el caso. El árbitro juzgó que la respuesta era realmente correcta pero no mostraba ningún conocimiento apreciable de la física. Para resolver el problema se decidió llamar al estudiante y concederle seis minutos para que pudiera dar una respuesta oral que mostrase al menos una mínima familiaridad con los principios básicos de la física. Durante cinco minutos, el estudiante se sentó en silencio, centrado en sus pensamientos. El árbitro le recordó que el tiempo estaba corriendo, a lo que el estudiante respondió que tenía varias respuestas pero que no sabía cuál utilizar. Al ser advertido de que debía apresurarse, el estudiante respondió como sigue: «En primer lugar, se puede llevar el barómetro hasta el tejado del rascacielos, dejarlo caer desde el borde y medir el tiempo que tarda en llegar al suelo. La altura del edificio puede calcularse entonces a partir de la fórmula H = 0.5gt2. Pero ¡adiós barómetro! »O si hay sol, se podría medir la altura del barómetro, ponerlo luego vertical y medir la longitud de la sombra. Luego se podría medir la longitud de la sombra del rascacielos y, a partir de ahí, es una simple cuestión de aritmética proporcional calcular la altura del rascacielos. »Pero si uno quiere ser muy científico, se podría atar un corto cabo de cuerda al barómetro y hacerlo oscilar como un péndulo, primero al nivel del suelo y luego en el tejado del rascacielos. La altura se calcula por la diferencia en la fuerza gravitatoria restauradora T = 2π(l/g)1/2. »O si el rascacielos tiene una escalera de emergencia exterior, sería más fácil subirla y marcar la altura del rascacielos en longitudes del barómetro, y luego sumarlas. »Por supuesto, si simplemente se quiere ser aburrido y ortodoxo, se podría utilizar el barómetro para medir la presión del aire en el tejado del rascacielos y en el suelo, y convertir la diferencia de milibares en metros para saber la altura del edificio. »Pero puesto que continuamente se nos exhorta a ejercer la independencia mental y aplicar métodos científicos, indudablemente la mejor manera sería llamar a la puerta del conserje y decirle “Si usted quiere un bonito barómetro nuevo, le daré este si me dice la altura de este rascacielos”». El estudiante era Niels Bohr
Anonymous
An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made, in a narrow field. Niels Bohr (1885 – 1962)
M. Prefontaine (The Best Smart Quotes Book: Wisdom That Can Change Your Life (Quotes For Every Occasion Book 12))
A new phase of the quantum revolution was launched in 1913, when Niels Bohr came up with a revised model for the structure of the atom. Six years younger than Einstein, brilliant yet rather shy and inarticulate, Bohr was Danish and thus able to draw from the work on quantum theory being done by Germans such as Planck and Einstein and also from the work on the structure of the atom being done by the Englishmen J. J. Thomson and Ernest Rutherford. “At the time, quantum theory was a German invention which had scarcely penetrated to England at all,” recalled Arthur Eddington.
Walter Isaacson (Einstein: His Life and Universe)
Present at the first, in October 1927, were the three grand masters who had helped launch the new era of physics but were now skeptical of the weird realm of quantum mechanics it had spawned: Hendrik Lorentz, 74, just a few months from death, the winner of the Nobel for his work on electromagnetic radiation; Max Planck, 69, winner of the Nobel for his theory of the quantum; and Albert Einstein, 48, winner of the Nobel for discovering the law of the photoelectric effect. Of the remaining twenty-six attendees, more than half had won or would win Nobel Prizes as well. The boy wonders of the new quantum mechanics were all there, hoping to convert or conquer Einstein: Werner Heisenberg, 25; Paul Dirac, 25; Wolfgang Pauli, 27; Louis de Broglie, 35; and from America, Arthur Compton, 35. Also there was Erwin Schrödinger, 40, caught between the young Turks and the older skeptics. And, of course, there was the old Turk, Niels Bohr, 42, who had helped spawn quantum mechanics with his model of the atom and become the staunch defender of its counterintuitive ramifications.
Walter Isaacson (Einstein: His Life and Universe)
Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real. If quantum mechanics hasn't profoundly shocked you, you haven't understood it yet.
Niels Bohr
It was Oppenheimer’s good fortune to arrive shortly before an extraordinary revolution in theoretical physics drew to its close: Max Planck’s discovery of quanta (photons); Einstein’s magnificent achievement—the special theory of relativity; Niels Bohr’s description of the hydrogen atom; Werner Heisenberg’s formulation of matrix mechanics; and Erwin Schrödinger’s theory of wave mechanics. This truly innovative period began to wind down with Born’s 1926 paper on probability and causality. It was completed in 1927 with Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and Bohr’s formulation of the theory of complementarity.
Kai Bird (American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer)
It was about this same time that Oppenheimer met the great Danish physicist Niels Bohr, whose lectures he had attended at Harvard. Here was a role model finely attuned to Robert’s sensibilities. Nineteen years older than Oppenheimer, Bohr was born—like Oppenheimer—into an upper-class family surrounded by books, music and learning. Bohr’s father was a professor of physiology, and his mother came from a Jewish banking family. Bohr obtained his doctorate in physics at the University of Copenhagen in 1911. Two years later, he achieved the key theoretical breakthrough in early quantum mechanics by postulating “quantum jumps” in the orbital momentum of an electron around the nucleus of an atom. In 1922, he won the Nobel Prize for this theoretical model of atomic structure.
Kai Bird (American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer)
The development of quantum mechanics in the 1920s motivated physicists to tackle all the unsolved problems of physics with the new methods and see if they worked (they mostly did). But what was the evidence for any of this new way of thinking? The evidence that was persuasive at the time was a number of rather abstract physics experiments concerning the nature of atomic spectra or the interaction between light and metal surfaces. Each was important in its own way, but what ought to have played an important role in retrospect was something far, far simpler: the observation that magnets work. The crucial step was made by an unknown Dutch scientist called Hendreka van Leeuwen, and what she showed was that magnets couldn’t exist if you just use classical (i.e. pre-quantum) physics. Hendreka van Leeuwen’s doctoral work in Leiden was done under the supervision of Lenz and the work was published in the Journal de Physique et le Radium in 1921. Unfortunately, it subsequently transpired that her main result had been anticipated by Niels Bohr, the father of quantum mechanics, but as it had only appeared in his 1911 diploma thesis, written in Danish, it was unsurprising she hadn’t known about it. Their contribution, though conceived independently, is now known as the Bohr–van Leeuwen theorem, which states that if you assume nothing more than classical physics, and then go on to model a material as a system of electrical charges, then you can show that the system can have no net magnetization; in other words, it will not be magnetic. Simply put, there are no lodestones in a purely classical Universe.
Stephen J. Blundell (Magnetism: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions, #317))
When Oppenheimer took the floor and began speaking in his soft voice, everyone listened in absolute silence. Wilson recalled that Oppenheimer “dominated” the discussion. His main argument essentially drew on Niels Bohr’s vision of “openness.” The war, he argued, should not end without the world knowing about this primordial new weapon. The worst outcome would be if the gadget remained a military secret. If that happened, then the next war would almost certainly be fought with atomic weapons. They had to forge ahead, he explained, to the point where the gadget could be tested. He pointed out that the new United Nations was scheduled to hold its inaugural meeting in April 1945—and that it was important that the delegates begin their deliberations on the postwar world with the knowledge that mankind had invented these weapons of mass destruction. “I thought that was a very good argument,” said Wilson. For some time now, Bohr and Oppenheimer himself had talked about how the gadget was going to change the world. The scientists knew that the gadget was going to force a redefinition of the whole notion of national sovereignty. They had faith in Franklin Roosevelt and believed that he was setting up the United Nations precisely to address this conundrum. As Wilson put it, “There would be areas in which there would be no sovereignty, the sovereignty would exist in the United Nations. It was to be the end of war as we knew it, and this was a promise that was made. That is why I could continue on that project.” Oppenheimer had prevailed, to no one’s surprise, by articulating the argument that the war could not end without the world knowing the terrible secret of Los Alamos. It was a defining moment for everyone. The logic— Bohr’s logic—was particularly compelling to Oppenheimer’s fellow scientists. But so too was the charismatic man who stood before them. As Wilson recalled that moment, “My feeling about Oppenheimer was, at that time, that this was a man who is angelic, true and honest and he could do no wrong. . . . I believed in him.
Kai Bird (American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer)
On one occasion, sitting at the same Fuller Lodge dinner table with Niels Bohr, he heard Bohr’s concerns for an “open world.” Prompted by his conclusion that a postwar U.S. nuclear monopoly could lead to another war, in October 1944 Hall decided to act: “. . . it seemed to me that an American monopoly was dangerous and should be prevented. I was not the only scientist to take that view.
Kai Bird (American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer)
He was frustrated essentially because he wanted to be Niels Bohr or Albert Einstein, and he knew he wasn’t.” Weil
Kai Bird (American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer)
one from the great pioneer of quantum physics, Niels Bohr, who had said, “We all agree that your theory is crazy. The question that divides us is whether it is crazy enough.
Douglas E. Richards (The Immortality Code)
Some subjects are so serious that one can only joke about them.
Niels Bohr
Ama bütün çocuklar gibi kuram da kendi yoluna gitti, Einstein da onu artık tanıyamaz oldu. 1910'lar ve 1920'ler boyunca büyümesine yön verense Danimarkalı Niels Bohr oldu. Işık enerjisi gibi atomlardaki elektronların belirli bir enerjiyle yalnızca bir atom yörüngesinden diğerine "sıçrayabileceğini", bunu yaparken de bir foton saldığını veya soğurduğunu anlayan odur.
Carlo Rovelli (Fizik Üzerine Yedi Kisa Ders)
They discussed the long, thorough theoretical paper by Niels Bohr and John Wheeler, “The mechanism of nuclear fission,” that had been published in the September Physical Review and especially its conclusion, which Bohr and Wheeler had elaborated from Bohr’s Sunday-morning graph work, that U235 was probably the isotope of uranium responsible for slow-neutron fission.1205
Richard Rhodes (Making of the Atomic Bomb)
The Copenhagen Interpretation of quantum physics, created by Niels Bohr (another Nobel winner), says much the same as operationalism, in even more radical language. According to Bohr, "common sense" and traditional philosophy both have failed to account for the data of Quantum Mechanics (and of Relativity) and we need to speak a new language to understand what physics has discovered.
Robert Anton Wilson (Quantum Psychology: How Brain Software Programs You and Your World)
Scientists and engineers tend to divide their work into two large categories, sometimes described as basic research and directed research. Some of the most crucial inventions and discoveries of the modern world have come about through basic research—that is, work that was not directed toward any particular use. Albert Einstein’s picture of the universe, Alexander Fleming’s discovery of penicillin, Niels Bohr’s blueprint of the atomic nucleus, the Watson-Crick “double helix” model of DNA—all these have had enormous practical implications, but they all came out of basic research. There are just as many basic tools of modern life—the electric light, the telephone, vitamin pills, the Internet—that resulted from a clearly focused effort to solve a particular problem. In a sense, this distinction between basic and directed research encompasses the difference between science and engineering. Scientists, on the whole, are driven by the thirst for knowledge; their motivation, as the Nobel laureate Richard Feynman put it, is “the joy of finding things out.” Engineers, in contrast, are solution-driven. Their joy is making things work. The monolithic idea was an engineering solution. It worked around the tyranny of numbers by reducing the numbers to one: a complete circuit would consist of just one part—a single (“monolithic”) block of semiconductor material containing all the components and all the interconnections of the most complex circuit designs. The tangible product of that idea, known to engineers as the monolithic integrated circuit and to the world at large as the semiconductor chip, has changed the world as fundamentally as did the telephone, the light bulb, and the horseless carriage. The integrated circuit is the heart of clocks, computers, cameras, and calculators, of pacemakers and Palm Pilots, of deep-space probes and deep-sea sensors, of toasters, typewriters, cell phones, and Internet servers. The National Academy of Sciences declared the integrated circuit the progenitor of the “Second Industrial Revolution.” The first Industrial Revolution enhanced man’s physical prowess and freed people from the drudgery of backbreaking manual labor; the revolution spawned by the chip enhances our intellectual prowess and frees people from the drudgery of mind-numbing computational labor. A British physicist, Sir Ieuan Madlock, Her Majesty’s Chief Science Advisor, called the integrated circuit “the most remarkable technology ever to hit mankind.” A California businessman, Jerry Sanders, founder of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., offered a more pointed assessment: “Integrated circuits are the crude oil of the eighties.” All
T.R. Reid (The Chip : How Two Americans Invented the Microchip and Launched a Revolution)
the great pioneer of quantum physics, Niels Bohr, who had said, “We all agree that your theory is crazy. The question that divides us is whether it is crazy enough.
Douglas E. Richards (The Immortality Code)
When Niels Bohr—along with Einstein, the world’s greatest physicist—heard in 1938 that splitting a uranium atom could yield a tremendous burst of energy, he slapped his head and said, “Oh, what idiots we have all been!
Jon Gertner (The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation)
Other reports chronicled a mysterious September 1941 meeting where Werner Heisenberg admitted to Niels Bohr, who was living in Nazi-occupied Denmark, that a bomb could be made, “and we’re working on it.
Neal Bascomb (The Winter Fortress: The Epic Mission to Sabotage Hitler's Atomic Bomb)
Niels Bohr, who had said, “We all agree that your theory is crazy. The question that divides us is whether it is crazy enough.
Douglas E. Richards (The Immortality Code)
An expert is a person who has made all the mistakes that can be made in a very narrow field. —NIELS BOHR,
Timothy Ferriss (The 4 Hour Workweek, Expanded And Updated: Expanded And Updated, With Over 100 New Pages Of Cutting Edge Content)
But if anybody says he can think about quantum problems without getting giddy, that only shows that he has not understood the first thing about them. - Niels Bohr
Richard Rhodes (The Making of the Atomic Bomb)
Critics who suggested that these ideas were too fantastic to be taken seriously were reminded of Niels Bohr’s “Your theory is crazy—but not crazy enough to be true.
Arthur C. Clarke (2001: A Space Odyssey (Space Odyssey #1))
You want me to tell you not to do it? All right. I put my hand on your arm. I look you in the eye in my most papal way. Go back to Germany, Heisenberg. Gather your colleagues together in the laboratory. Get up on a table and tell them: ‘Niels Bohr says that in his considered judgment supplying a homicidal maniac with an improved instrument of mass murder is …’ What shall I say? ‘ … an interesting idea.’ No, not even an interesting idea. ‘ … a really rather seriously uninteresting idea.’ What happens? You all fling down your Geiger counters?” Excerpt From: Michael Frayn. “Copenhagen”.
Michael Frayn (Copenhagen)
One of the leading figures in quantum physics, Niels Bohr, would sometimes tell his students, “The problem with your idea is not that it is crazy, but that it is not crazy enough.” Bohr’s point was that reality has shown itself stranger than science fiction; indeed it is sometimes more bizarre than anything we can imagine. This strange new world offers possibilities that weren’t thought of before.
Anonymous
Existen dos clases de verdades: las triviales, cuyo opuesto es, evidentemente, imposible, y las verdades profundas, que se caracterizan porque su opuesto también es una verdad profunda. Niels Bohr
Anonymous
We are all agreed that your theory is crazy. The question that divides us is whether it is crazy enough to have a chance of being correct.” —Niels Bohr, Nobel Laureate & Quantum Physics Pioneer
Douglas E. Richards (Quantum Lens)
The Danish physicist and Nobel Prize winner Niels Bohr defined an expert as follows: ‘An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
Emma Sadleir (Selfies, Sexts and Smartphones: A Teenager’s Online Survival Guide)
On his journey home from delivering his acceptance speech in Sweden the following summer, Einstein stopped in Copenhagen to see Bohr, who met him at the train station to take him home by streetcar. On the ride, they got into a debate. “We took the streetcar and talked so animatedly that we went much too far,” Bohr recalled. “We got off and traveled back, but again rode too far.” Neither seemed to mind, for the conversation was so engrossing. “We rode to and fro,” according to Bohr, “and I can well imagine what the people thought about us.”43 More than just a friendship, their relationship became an intellectual entanglement that began with divergent views about quantum mechanics but then expanded into related issues of science, knowledge, and philosophy. “In all the history of human thought, there is no greater dialogue than that which took place over the years between Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein about the meaning of the quantum,” says the physicist John Wheeler, who studied under Bohr. The social philosopher C. P. Snow went further. “No more profound intellectual debate has ever been conducted,” he proclaimed.44 Their dispute went to the fundamental heart of the design of the cosmos: Was there an objective reality that existed whether or not we could ever observe it? Were there laws that restored strict causality to phenomena that seemed inherently random? Was everything in the universe predetermined?
Walter Isaacson (Einstein: His Life and Universe)
I have chosen to talk about one of the founder fathers of twentieth-century physics, Niels Bohr, because in both these respects he was a consummate artist. He had no ready-made answers. He used to begin his lecture courses by saying to his students, ‘Every sentence that I utter should be regarded by you not as an assertion but as a question’. What he questioned was the structure of the world. And the people that he worked with, when young and old (he was still penetrating in his seventies), were others who were taking the world to pieces, thinking it out, and putting it together. He
Jacob Bronowski (The Ascent of Man)
Əgər kvant fizikası sizi qorxutmayıbsa, düməli, siz ondan heçnə başa düşməmisiniz. Niels Bohr
Jo Nesbø (The Snowman (Harry Hole, #7))
The only way to find out if the bomb could be built, Niels Bohr had said in 1939, would be to “turn the whole United States into one huge factory.
Ronald Henkoff (Inferno: The Fall of Japan 1945)
The work of Max Planck, Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr and others showed that light appeared to be both a wave and a stream of particles. Although it was convenient for many purposes to think of light as behaving like a wave, the particle idea explained more phenomena. As the great American physicist Richard Feynman would later put it: ‘It is very important to know that light behaves like particles, especially for those of you who have gone to school, where you were probably told about light behaving like waves. I’m telling you the way it does behave – like particles.
Brian Clegg (Gravitational Waves: How Einstein’s spacetime ripples reveal the secrets of the universe (Hot Science))
The best weapon of a dictatorship is secrecy, but the best weapon of a democracy should be the weapon of openness. —NIELS BOHR
Jonathan Maberry (Extinction Machine (Joe Ledger, #5))
An expert is a person who has found out by his own painful experience all the mistakes that one can make in a very narrow field.
Niel Bohr
Chapter four describes the new model of matter that was proposed. Niels Bohr applied the new wave-particle relationship to the inside of an atom and a new explanation for atomic light presented itself. This time
Fred Alan Wolf (Taking the Quantum Leap: The New Physics for Nonscientists)
Sommerfeld's fine-structure theory was generally considered to be excellently and unambiguously confirmed by experiment. Because the theory rested on the foundation provided by Bohr, the experiments were also taken as strong support for his theory of atomic structure.
Helge Kragh (Niels Bohr and the Quantum Atom: The Bohr Model of Atomic Structure 1913-1925)
The quantum measurement problem is caused by a failure to understand that each species has its own sensory world and that when we say the wave function collapses and brings a particle into existence we mean the particle is brought into existence in the human sensory world by the combined operation of the human sensory apparatus, particle detectors and the experimental set up. This is similar to the Copenhagen Interpretation suggested by Niels Bohr and others, but the understanding that the collapse of the wave function brings a particle into existence in the human sensory world removes the need for a dividing line between the quantum world and the macro world.
Rochelle Forrester
Most humans, and even many dogs, picture atoms as tiny little solar systems, with negatively charged electrons orbiting a positively charged nucleus. This picture originated with Niels Bohr in 1913, when he proposed the first
Chad Orzel (How to Teach Physics to Your Dog)
A fellow scientist visited Bohr at his home and saw to his amazement that Bohr had fixed a horseshoe over the door for luck. ‘Surely, Niels, you don’t believe in that?’ ‘Of course not,’ Bohr replied. ‘But you see – the thing is that it works whether you believe in it or not.
Jonathan Sacks (The Great Partnership: God, Science and the Search for Meaning)
The yin-yang sign is an appropriate symbol for complementarity, and was adopted as such by Niels Bohr. Its two aspects are equal, but different; each contains, and is contained within, the other. Perhaps not coincidentally, Niels Bohr was very happily married. Once recognized, complimentarity is a wisdom we rediscover, and confirm, both in the physical world and beyond. It is a wisdom I embrace, and recommend to you.
Frank Wilczek (A Beautiful Question: Finding Nature's Deep Design)
Judaism, Christianity and Islam are not just three different religions or civilisations. Had this been so, the devotees of each might still consider themselves a chosen people. More generously, each might have come to Niels Bohr’s conclusion that the opposite of a trivial truth is a falsehood, but the opposite of a profound truth may be another profound truth. There is more than one way of being-in-the-world under the sovereignty of God. More probably they would simply have ignored one another. Their differences would not have led to centuries of bloodshed and animosity.
Jonathan Sacks (Not in God's Name: Confronting Religious Violence)
Our deepest description of physical reality, in quantum theory and in the four Core Theories of forces (gravitation, electromagnetism, strong and weak forces), bring in concepts that call to mind yin and yang. Niels Bohr, an influential founder of quantum theory, saw strong parallels between his concept of complementarity and the unified duality of yin-yang. He designed a coat of arms for himself, in which the yin-yang figures centrally (see figure 42, page 324). Our Core Theories center on the interplay between lightlike space filling fluids (yang) and substances (yin) they both direct and respond to.
Frank Wilczek (A Beautiful Question: Finding Nature's Deep Design)
Niels Bohr, the great Dane of quantum physics, was fond of saying, "It is wrong to think that the task of physics is to find out how nature is. Physics concerns what we can say about nature. The double- crossed, might-have-been history of my country is not the study of what actually took place here: it's the study of historians' studies. Historians have their axes to grind, just as physicists do. Memories are their own descendants masquerading as the ancestors of the present.
David Mitchell (Ghostwritten)
If quantum mechanics hasn’t profoundly shocked you, you haven’t understood it yet,” the Danish Nobel physicist Niels Bohr once said.
Satya Nadella (Hit Refresh: The Quest to Rediscover Microsoft's Soul and Imagine a Better Future for Everyone)
In fact, it took the resources of three countries to produce the bomb: the United States, Great Britain, and Canada. But there was more to it than that. In some sense it took some of the most valuable scientific talent of all Europe to do it. Consider this partial list: the Hungarians John von Neumann, Eugene Wigner, and Edward Teller; the Germans Hans Bethe and Rudolf Peierls; the Poles Stanislaw Ulam and Joseph Rotblat; the Austrians Victor Weisskopf and Otto Frisch; the Italians Enrico Fermi and Emilio Segrè; Felix Bloch from Switzerland; and, from Denmark, the Bohrs, Niels and his son Aage. This talent, the B-29 heavy bomber program that could deliver the bombs, plus Manhattan Project efforts—all together cost more than fifty billion in today’s dollars. Wilhelm
Gregory Benford (The Berlin Project)
Niels Bohr, one of the founding fathers of quantum physics and winner of the Nobel Prize in 1922, echoed Einstein when he said, “If quantum mechanics hasn’t profoundly shocked you, you haven’t understood it yet. Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real.
Ziad Masri (Reality Unveiled)
An expert is a person who has made all the mistakes that can be made in a very narrow field. — NIELS BOHR
Myquillyn Smith (The Nesting Place: It Doesn't Have to Be Perfect to Be Beautiful)
There’s a quote from the famous physicist Niels Bohr, who posits that the way you become an expert in a field is to make every mistake possible in that field.
Sebastian Gutiérrez (Data Scientists at Work)
The constant questioning of our values and achievements is a challenge without which neither science nor society can remain healthy.
Aage Niels Bohr
An expert is a person who has made all the mistakes that can be made in a very narrow field.” –Niels Bohr Danish physicist and Nobel Prize winner
Timothy Ferriss (Tribe of Mentors: Short Life Advice from the Best in the World)