Neurology Love Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Neurology Love. Here they are! All 69 of them:

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Two married partners do not just live with each other, they live in each other, neurologically speaking.
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Abhijit Naskar (Wise Mating: A Treatise on Monogamy (Humanism Series))
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Human thinking is born out of this neurological defect in the human species. Anything that is born out of human thinking is destructive. Thought is destructive. Thought is a protective mechanism. It draws frontiers around itself, and it wants to protect itself. It is for the same reason that we also draw lines on this planet and extend them as far as we can.
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U.G. Krishnamurti (Love (Love implies division, separation...))
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The gut is the seat of all feeling. Polluting the gut not only cripples your immune system, but also destroys your sense of empathy, the ability to identify with other humans. Bad bacteria in the gut creates neurological issues. Autism can be cured by detoxifying the bellies of young children. People who think that feelings come from the heart are wrong. The gut is where you feel the loss of a loved one first. It's where you feel pain and a heavy bulk of your emotions. It's the central base of your entire immune system. If your gut is loaded with negative bacteria, it affects your mind. Your heart is the seat of your conscience. If your mind is corrupted, it affects your conscience. The heart is the Sun. The gut is the Moon. The pineal gland is Neptune, and your brain and nervous system (5 senses) are Mercury. What affects the moon or sun affects the entire universe within. So, if you poison the gut, it affects your entire nervous system, your sense of reasoning, and your senses.
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Suzy Kassem (Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem)
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Companionate love is neurologically different from passionate love. Passionate love always spikes early, then fades away, while companionate love is less intense but grows over time. And, whereas passionate love lights up the brainโ€™s pleasure centers, companionate love is associated with the regions having to do with long-term bonding and relationships. Anthropologist Helen Fisher, the author of Anatomy of Love and one of the most cited scholars in the study of sex and
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Aziz Ansari (Modern Romance: An Investigation)
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Addiction to alcohol is also a neurological phenomenon, the result of a complex set of molecular alterations that take place in the brain when itโ€™s excessively and repeatedly exposed to the drug. The science of addiction is complicated, but the basic idea is fairly straightforward: alcohol appears to wreak havoc on the brainโ€™s natural systems of craving and reward, compromising the functioning of the various neurotransmitters and proteins that create feelings of well-being.
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Caroline Knapp (Drinking: A Love Story)
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Mother Nature created God as a neurological anti-depressant sentiment, but Man tore that God apart into pieces and made citadels of differentiation out of them.
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Abhijit Naskar (The Krishna Cancer)
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Among the older lovers, brain regions associated with anxiety were no longer active; instead, there was activity in the areas associated with calmness.โ€1 Neurologically itโ€™s similar to the kind of love you feel for an old friend or a family member.
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Aziz Ansari (Modern Romance: An Investigation)
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In forty years of medical practice, I have found only two types of non-pharmaceutical โ€˜therapyโ€™ to be vitally important for patients with chronic neurological diseases: music and gardens.
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Oliver Sacks (Everything in Its Place: First Loves and Last Tales)
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Phillip's Autistic. He just wants to be left alone, because something about his neurological make-up leaves him unequipped to deal with the sights, sounds, smells, and touches of our human world. I donโ€™t know how well equipped the rest of us are, but a lot more so than Phillip I suppose.
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Karole Cozzo (How to Say I Love You Out Loud)
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We gain from the new science of mind not only insights into ourselves - how we perceive, learn, remember, feel, believe and act - but also a new perspective of ourselves and our fellow human beings in the context of biological evolution.
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Abhijit Naskar (Love, God & Neurons: Memoir of a scientist who found himself by getting lost)
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The lessons of relationship that our primordial ancestors learned are deeply encoded in the genetics of our neurobiological circuits of love. They are present from the moment we are born and activated at puberty by the cocktail of neurochemicals. Itโ€™s an elegant synchronized system. At first our brain weighs a potential partner, and if the person ๏ฌts our ancestral wish list, we get a spike in the release of sex chemicals that makes us dizzy with a rush of unavoidable infatuation. Itโ€™s the ๏ฌrst step down the primeval path of pair-bonding.
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Abhijit Naskar (What is Mind?)
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religion is a neurological disorder for which faith is the only cure.
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Frank Schaeffer (Why I am an Atheist Who Believes in God: How to give love, create beauty and find peace)
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All our sentiments - religious, romantic or any other - are born in the neurons.
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Abhijit Naskar (Neurons of Jesus: Mind of A Teacher, Spouse & Thinker)
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I guess I was sad that love was not real? Or not all that real, anyway? I guess I was sad that love could feel so real and the next minute be gone, and all because of something Abnesti was doing.
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George Saunders
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Even though the world hails Joan of Arc as some sort of hero, which she undoubtedly was, what pains me the most is that her pathological condition ultimately led to her demise at the age of only nineteen.
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Abhijit Naskar (Love, God & Neurons: Memoir of a scientist who found himself by getting lost)
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I believe that a new philosophy will be created by those who were born after Hiroshima which will dramatically change the human condition. It will have these characteristics: (1) It will be scientific in essence and science-fiction in style. (2) It will be based on the expansion of consciousness, understanding and control of the nervous system, producing a quantum leap in intellectual efficiency and emotional equilibrium. (3) Politically it will stress individualism, decentralization of authority, a Iive-and-let-Iive tolerance of difference, local option and a mind-your-own-business libertarianism. (4) It will continue the trend towards open sexual expression and a more honest, realistic acceptance of both the equality of and the magnetic difference between the sexes. The mythic religious symbol will not be a man on a cross but a man-woman pair united in higher love communion. (5) It will seek revelation and Higher Intelligence not in formal rituals addressed to an anthropomorphic deity, but within natural processes, the nervous system, the genetic code, and without, in attempts to effect extra-planetary communication. (6) It will include practical, technical neurological psychological procedures for understanding and managing the intimations of union-immortality implicit in the dying process. (7) The emotional tone of the new philosophy will be hedonic, aesthetic, fearless, optimistic, humorous, practical, skeptical, hip. We are now experiencing a quiescent preparatory waiting period. Everyone knows something is going to happen. The seeds of the Sixties have taken root underground. The blossoming is to come.
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Timothy Leary (Neuropolitique (Revised))
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Lithium regulates the proteins that control the bodyโ€™s inner clock. This clock runs, oddly, on DNA, inside special neurons deep in the brain. Special proteins attach to peopleโ€™s DNA each morning, and after a fixed time they degrade and fall off. Sunlight resets the proteins over and over, so they hold on much longer. In fact, the proteins fall off only after darkness fallsโ€”at which point the brain should โ€œnoticeโ€ the bare DNA and stop producing stimulants. This process goes awry in manic-depressives because the proteins, despite the lack of sunlight, remain bound fast to their DNA. Their brains donโ€™t realize they should stop revving. Lithium helps cleave the proteins from DNA so people can wind down. Notice that sunlight still trumps lithium during the day and resets the proteins; itโ€™s only when the sunlight goes away at night that lithium helps DNA shake free. Far from being sunshine in a pill, then, lithium acts as โ€œanti-sunlight.โ€ Neurologically, it undoes sunlight and thereby compresses the circadian clock back to twenty-four hoursโ€”preventing both the mania bubble from forming and the Black Tuesday crash into depression.
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Sam Kean (The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements)
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If it is irrational and hypocritical to hold a minor to the same standard of behaviour control as a mature adult, it is equally unjust to hold a traumatised and neurologically impaired adult to the same standard as one not so afflicted
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Marin Teicher
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Christ was an ordinary man who upon the attainment of absolute divinity or Nirvana or Samadhi became a better version of himself. Such an experience of divine ecstasy neurologically transformed him into a great teacher for humanity filled with love, kindness and divinity.
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Abhijit Naskar (Neurons of Jesus: Mind of A Teacher, Spouse & Thinker)
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It's been long since thinking humanity has learnt that love is a majestic creation of the brain, yet that knowledge hasn't made love be deemed any less glorious. Then why should it threaten the religious believer to learn that divinity as well is a natural creation of the brain?
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Abhijit Naskar
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Our brains are designed to arrive at an accurate picture of the world, and to use that accurate picture to act on the world effectively, at least overall and in the long run. The same computational and neurological capacities that let us make discoveries about physics or biology also let us make discoveries about love.
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Alison Gopnik (The Philosophical Baby: What Children's Minds Tell Us About Truth, Love, and the Meaning of Life)
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Neuroscience makes us connect with each other at an emotional level. It makes us make friends. It makes us dream more positively. It makes us more optimistic about ourselves and the world even in our darkest days. It makes us achieve our goal endowed with strength even through immense miseries. It allows us to attain the subjective reality of our fellow humans. Imbued with the understanding of the mind we can walk in the shoes of other people.
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Abhijit Naskar (Love, God & Neurons: Memoir of a scientist who found himself by getting lost)
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When people think of slavery, they think of whips, chains and neurological implants. While these things may be necessary, the real tools of a successful slave culture are psychological. Through a myriad of non-violent techniques, such as carefully selecting entertainment material, staging supportive news, and well-timed acts of love, one can tightly control the subjectโ€™s perception of his world. The mark of a truly superior slave-bearing society is when the slaves support the system as vehemently as the masters.
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Kalin Ringkvist (Against a Rock)
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The three conditions without which healthy growth does not take place can be taken for granted in the matrix of the womb: nutrition, a physically secure environment and the unbroken relationship with a safe, ever-present maternal organism. The word matrix is derived from the Latin for โ€œwomb,โ€ itself derived from the word for โ€œmother.โ€ The womb is mother, and in many respects the mother remains the womb, even following birth. In the womb environment, no action or reaction on the developing infantโ€™s part is required for the provision of any of his needs. Life in the womb is surely the prototype of life in the Garden of Eden where nothing can possibly be lacking, nothing has to be worked for. If there is no consciousness โ€” we have not yet eaten of the Tree of Knowledge โ€” there is also no deprivation or anxiety. Except in conditions of extreme poverty unusual in the industrialized world, although not unknown, the nutritional needs and shelter requirements of infants are more or less satisfied. The third prime requirement, a secure, safe and not overly stressed emotional atmosphere, is the one most likely to be disrupted in Western societies. The human infant lacks the capacity to follow or cling to the parent soon after being born, and is neurologically and biochemically underdeveloped in many other ways. The first nine months or so of extrauterine life seem to have been intended by nature as the second part of gestation. The anthropologist Ashley Montagu has called this phase exterogestation, gestation outside the maternal body. During this period, the security of the womb must be provided by the parenting environment. To allow for the maturation of the brain and nervous system that in other species occurs in the uterus, the attachment that was until birth directly physical now needs to be continued on both physical and emotional levels. Physically and psychologically, the parenting environment must contain and hold the infant as securely as she was held in the womb. For the second nine months of gestation, nature does provide a near-substitute for the direct umbilical connection: breast-feeding. Apart from its irreplaceable nutritional value and the immune protection it gives the infant, breast-feeding serves as a transitional stage from unbroken physical attachment to complete separation from the motherโ€™s body. Now outside the matrix of the womb, the infant is nevertheless held close to the warmth of the maternal body from which nourishment continues to flow. Breast-feeding also deepens the motherโ€™s feeling of connectedness to the baby, enhancing the emotionally symbiotic bonding relationship. No doubt the decline of breast-feeding, particularly accelerated in North America, has contributed to the emotional insecurities so prevalent in industrialized countries. Even more than breast-feeding, healthy brain development requires emotional security and warmth in the infantโ€™s environment. This security is more than the love and best possible intentions of the parents. It depends also on a less controllable variable: their freedom from stresses that can undermine their psychological equilibrium. A calm and consistent emotional milieu throughout infancy is an essential requirement for the wiring of the neurophysiological circuits of self-regulation. When interfered with, as it often is in our society, brain development is adversely affected.
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Gabor Matรฉ (Scattered: How Attention Deficit Disorder Originates and What You Can Do About It)
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Meat birds spend their lives in barren shedsโ€”or โ€œbroiler housesโ€โ€”that may hold 50,000 birds and be so crowded it is difficult to see the floor. In these conditions, they are unable to carry out any of their natural behaviors, such as foraging and roosting, and the birds develop psychotic, stress-induced behaviors, such as feather pecking and cannibalism. Often, in order to prevent the birds from pecking each other to death, a hot blade is used to cut off the front part of their beaks, without anesthesia, at birth. This procedure, known as debeaking, can lead to infection, the growth of neurological tumors, or death if the bird doesn't have enough of a beak left to use for drinking or eating.
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Melanie Joy (Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows: An Introduction to Carnism)
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Actually, it is quite natural to human beings to move toward belief in God. As humanities scholar Mark Lilla has written: โ€œTo most humans, curiosity about higher things comes naturally, itโ€™s indifference to them that must be learned.โ€61 Strict secularism holds that people are only physical entities without souls, that when loved ones die they simply cease to exist, that sensations of love and beauty are just neurological-chemical events, that there is no right or wrong outside of what we in our minds determine and choose. Those positions are at the very least deeply counterintuitive for nearly all people, and large swaths of humanity will continue to simply reject them as impossible to believe.
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Timothy J. Keller (Making Sense of God: An Invitation to the Skeptical)
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Beyoncรฉ and Rihanna were pop stars. Pop stars were musical performers whose celebrity had exploded to the point where they could be identified by single words. You could say BEYONCร‰ or RIHANNA to almost anyone anywhere in the industrialized world and it would conjure a vague neurological image of either Beyoncรฉ or Rihanna. Their songs were about the same six subjects of all songs by all pop stars: love, celebrity, fucking, heartbreak, money and buying ugly shit. It was the Twenty-First Century. It was the Internet. Fame was everything. Traditional money had been debased by mass production. Traditional money had ceased to be about an exchange of humiliation for food and shelter. Traditional money had become the equivalent of a fantasy world in which different hunks of vampiric plastic made emphatic arguments about why they should cross the threshold of your home. There was nothing left to buy. Fame was everything because traditional money had failed. Fame was everything because fame was the worldโ€™s last valid currency. Beyoncรฉ and Rihanna were part of a popular entertainment industry which deluged people with images of grotesque success. The unspoken ideology of popular entertainment was that its customers could end up as famous as the performers. They only needed to try hard enough and believe in their dreams. Like all pop stars, Beyoncรฉ and Rihanna existed off the illusion that their fame was a shared experience with their fans. Their fans werenโ€™t consumers. Their fans were fellow travelers on a journey through life. In 2013, this connection between the famous and their fans was fostered on Twitter. Beyoncรฉ and Rihanna were tweeting. Their millions of fans were tweeting back. They too could achieve their dreams. Of course, neither Beyoncรฉ nor Rihanna used Twitter. They had assistants and handlers who packaged their tweets for maximum profit and exposure. Fame could purchase the illusion of being an Internet user without the purchaser ever touching a mobile phone or a computer. That was a difference between the rich and the poor. The poor were doomed to the Internet, which was a wonderful resource for watching shitty television, experiencing angst about other peopleโ€™s salaries, and casting doubt on key tenets of Mormonism and Scientology. If Beyoncรฉ or Rihanna were asked about how to be like them and gave an honest answer, it would have sounded like this: โ€œYou canโ€™t. You wonโ€™t. You are nothing like me. I am a powerful mixture of untamed ambition, early childhood trauma and genetic mystery. I am a portal in the vacuum of space. The formula for my creation is impossible to replicate. The One True God made me and will never make the like again. You are nothing like me.
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Jarett Kobek (I Hate the Internet)
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The traditional hospital practice of excluding parents ignored the importance of attachment relationships as regulators of the childโ€™s emotions, behaviour and physiology. The childโ€™s biological status would be vastly different under the circumstances of parental presence or absence. Her neurochemical output, the electrical activity in her brainโ€™s emotional centres, her heart rate, blood pressure and the serum levels of the various hormones related to stress would all vary significantly. Life is possible only within certain well-defined limits, internal or external. We can no more survive, say, high sugar levels in our bloodstream than we can withstand high levels of radiation emanating from a nuclear explosion. The role of self-regulation, whether emotional or physical, may be likened to that of a thermostat ensuring that the temperature in a home remains constant despite the extremes of weather conditions outside. When the environment becomes too cold, the heating system is switched on. If the air becomes overheated, the air conditioner begins to work. In the animal kingdom, self-regulation is illustrated by the capacity of the warm-blooded creature to exist in a broad range of environments. It can survive more extreme variations of hot and cold without either chilling or overheating than can a coldblooded species. The latter is restricted to a much narrower range of habitats because it does not have the capacity to self-regulate the internal environment. Children and infant animals have virtually no capacity for biological self-regulation; their internal biological statesโ€”heart rates, hormone levels, nervous system activity โ€” depend completely on their relationships with caregiving grown-ups. Emotions such as love, fear or anger serve the needs of protecting the self while maintaining essential relationships with parents and other caregivers. Psychological stress is whatever threatens the young creatureโ€™s perception of a safe relationship with the adults, because any disruption in the relationship will cause turbulence in the internal milieu. Emotional and social relationships remain important biological influences beyond childhood. โ€œIndependent self-regulation may not exist even in adulthood,โ€ Dr. Myron Hofer, then of the Departments of Psychiatry and Neuroscience at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, wrote in 1984. โ€œSocial interactions may continue to play an important role in the everyday regulation of internal biologic systems throughout life.โ€ Our biological response to environmental challenge is profoundly influenced by the context and by the set of relationships that connect us with other human beings. As one prominent researcher has expressed it most aptly, โ€œAdaptation does not occur wholly within the individual.โ€ Human beings as a species did not evolve as solitary creatures but as social animals whose survival was contingent on powerful emotional connections with family and tribe. Social and emotional connections are an integral part of our neurological and chemical makeup. We all know this from the daily experience of dramatic physiological shifts in our bodies as we interact with others. โ€œYouโ€™ve burnt the toast again,โ€ evokes markedly different bodily responses from us, depending on whether it is shouted in anger or said with a smile. When one considers our evolutionary history and the scientific evidence at hand, it is absurd even to imagine that health and disease could ever be understood in isolation from our psychoemotional networks. โ€œThe basic premise is that, like other social animals, human physiologic homeostasis and ultimate health status are influenced not only by the physical environment but also by the social environment.โ€ From such a biopsychosocial perspective, individual biology, psychological functioning and interpersonal and social relationships work together, each influencing the other.
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Gabor Matรฉ (When the Body Says No: The Cost of Hidden Stress)
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timelines register the pain of her loss for the first time. โ€œIโ€™m sorry, honey.โ€ He remembers the day she died, eight weeks ago. She had become almost childlike by that point, her mind gone. He had to feed her, dress her, bathe her. But this was better than the time right before, when she had enough cognitive function left to be aware of her complete confusion. In her lucid moments, she described the feeling as being lost in a dreamlike forestโ€”no identity, no sense of when or where she was. Or alternatively, being absolutely certain she was fifteen years old and still living with her parents in Boulder, and trying to square her foreign surroundings with her sense of place and time and self. She often wondered if this was what her mother felt in her final year. โ€œThis timelineโ€”before my mind started to fractureโ€”was the best of them all. Of my very long life. Do you remember that trip we tookโ€”I think it was during our first life togetherโ€”to see the emperor penguins migrate? Remember how we fell in love with this continent? The way it makes you feel like youโ€™re the only people in the world? Kind of appropriate, no?โ€ She looks off camera, says, โ€œWhat? Donโ€™t be jealous. Youโ€™ll be watching this one day. Youโ€™ll carry the knowledge of every moment we spent together, all one hundred and forty-four years.โ€ She looks back at the camera. โ€œI need to tell you, Barry, that I couldnโ€™t have made it this long without you. I couldnโ€™t have kept trying to stop the inevitable. But weโ€™re stopping today. As you know by now, Iโ€™ve lost the ability to map memory. Like Slade, I used the chair too many times. So I wonโ€™t be going back. And even if you returned to a point on the timeline where my consciousness was young and untraveled, thereโ€™s no guarantee you could convince me to build the chair. And to what end? Weโ€™ve tried everything. Physics, pharmacology, neurology. We even struck out with Slade. Itโ€™s time to admit we failed and let the world get on with destroying itself, which it seems so keen on doing.โ€ Barry sees himself step into the frame and take a seat beside Helena. He puts his arm around her. She snuggles into him, her head on his chest. Such a surreal sensation to now remember that day when she decided to record a message for the Barry who would one day merge into his consciousness. โ€œWe have four years until doomsday.โ€ โ€œFour years, five months, eight days,โ€ Barry-on-the-screen says. โ€œBut whoโ€™s counting?โ€ โ€œWeโ€™re going to spend that time together. You have those memories now. I hope theyโ€™re beautiful.โ€ They are. Before her mind broke completely, they had two good years, which they lived free from the burden of trying to stop the world from remembering. They lived those years simply and quietly. Walks on the icecap to see the Aurora Australis. Games, movies, and cooking down here on the main level. The occasional trip to New Zealandโ€™s South Island or Patagonia. Just being together. A thousand small moments, but enough to have made life worth living. Helena was right. They were the best years of his lives too. โ€œItโ€™s odd,โ€ she says. โ€œYouโ€™re watching this right now, presumably four years from this moment, although Iโ€™m sure youโ€™ll watch it before then to see my face and hear my voice after Iโ€™m gone.โ€ Itโ€™s true. He did. โ€œBut my moment feels just as real to me as yours does to you. Are they both real? Is it only our consciousness that makes it so? I can imagine you sitting there in four years, even though youโ€™re right beside me in this moment, in my moment, and I feel like I can reach through the camera and touch you. I wish I could. Iโ€™ve experienced over two hundred years, and at the end of it all, I think Slade was right. Itโ€™s just a product of our evolution the way we experience reality and time from moment to moment. How we differentiate between past, present, and future. But weโ€™re intelligent enough to be aware of the illusion, even as we live by it, and so,
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Blake Crouch (Recursion)
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What is love" was the most searched phrase on Google in 2012, according to the company. In an attempt to get to the bottom of the question once and for all, the Guardian has gathered writers from the fields of science, literature, religion and philosophy to give their definition of the much-pondered word. ์นดํ†ก โ˜Ž ppt33 โ˜Ž ใ€“ ๋ผ์ธ โ˜Ž pxp32 โ˜Ž ํ™ˆํ”ผ๋Š” ์นœ์ถ”๋กœ ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” The physicist: 'Love is chemistry' Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition like hunger or thirst, only more permanent. We talk about love being blind or unconditional, in the sense that we have no control over it. But then, that is not so surprising since love is basically chemistry. While lust is a temporary passionate sexual desire involving the increased release of chemicals such as testosterone and oestrogen, in true love, or attachment and bonding, the brain can release a whole set of chemicals: pheromones, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, oxytocin and vasopressin. However, from an evolutionary perspective, love can be viewed as a survival tool โ€“ a mechanism we have evolved to promote long-term relationships, mutual defense and parental support of children and to promote feelings of safety and security. ์š”ํž˜๋นˆ๊ตฌ์ž…,์š”ํž˜๋นˆ๊ตฌ๋งค,์š”ํž˜๋นˆํŒ๋งค,์š”ํž˜๋นˆ๊ฐ€๊ฒฉ,์š”ํž˜๋นˆํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,์š”ํž˜๋นˆ๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์š”ํž˜๋นˆ๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์š”ํž˜๋นˆ๋ณต์šฉ๋ฒ•,์š”ํž˜๋นˆ๋ถ€์ž‘์šฉ,์š”ํž˜๋นˆ์ •ํ’ˆ๊ตฌ์ž…,์š”ํž˜๋นˆ์ •ํ’ˆ๊ตฌ๋งค,์š”ํž˜๋นˆ์ •ํ’ˆํŒ๋งค Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. ์•„๋ฌด๋Ÿฐ ๋ง์—†์ด ํ•œ๋ฒˆ๋งŒ ์ฐพ์•„์ฃผ์‹ ๋‹ค๋ฉด ๋’ค๋กœ๋Š” ๊ณ„์† ๋‹จ๊ณจ๋  ๊ทธ๋Ÿฐ ์ž์‹  ์žˆ์Šต๋‹ˆ๋‹ค.์ €ํฌ์ชฝ ์„œ๋น„์Šค๊ฐ€ ์•„๋‹ˆ๋ผ ์ œํ’ˆ์—๋Œ€ํ•ด์„œ ์ž์‹ ์žˆ๋‹ค๋Š”๊ฒ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •,๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •,ํ”„๋ฆด๋ฆฌ์ง€,๋น„๋งฅ์Šค,๋น„๊ทธ์•Œ์—‘์Šค,์— ๋น…์Šค,๋น„๋‹‰์Šค,์„ผํŠธ๋ฆฝ ๋“ฑ ๋งŽ์€ ์ œํ’ˆ ์ทจ๊ธ‰ํ•ฉ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค ํ™•์‹คํ•œ ์ œํ’ˆ๋งŒ ์ทจ๊ธ‰ํ•˜๋Š”๊ณณ์ด๋ผ ์–ธ์ œ๋“  ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works. We're here to put a dent in the universe. Otherwise why else even be here? The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle. Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn't matter to me ... Going to bed at night saying we've done something wonderful... that's what matters to me. I want to put a ding in the universe. Quality is more important than quantity. One home run is better than two doubles. Remembering that I'll be dead soon is the most important tool I've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. The philosopher: 'Love is a passionate commitment' The answer remains elusive in part because love is not one thing. Love for parents, partners, children, country, neighbor, God and so on all have different qualities. Each has its variants โ€“ blind, one-sided, tragic, steadfast, fickle, reciprocated, misguided, and unconditional. At its best, however, all love is a kind a passionate commitment that we nurture and develop, even though it usually arrives in our lives unbidden. That's why it is more than just a powerful feeling. Without the commitment, it is mere infatuation. Without the passion, it is mere dedication. Without nurturing, even the best can wither and die. The romantic novelist: 'Love drives all great stories' What love is depends on where you are in relation to it. Secure in it, it can feel as mundane and necessary as air โ€“ you exist within it, almost unnoticing. Deprived of it, it can feel like an obsession; all consuming, a physical pain. Love is the driver for all great stories: not just romantic love, but the love of parent for child, for family, for country. It is the point before consummation of it that fascinates: what separates you from love, the obstacles that stand in its way. It is usually at those points that love is everything.
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์š”;ํž˜๋นˆ๊ฐ€๊ฒฉ cia2.co.to ์นดํ†ก:ppt33 ์š”ํž˜๋นˆํ›„๊ธฐ ์š”ํž˜๋นˆ๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์š”ํž˜๋นˆ๋ณต์šฉ๋ฒ• ์š”ํž˜๋นˆ๋ถ€์ž‘์šฉ ์š”ํž˜๋นˆํšจ๊ณผ
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What is love" was the most searched phrase on Google in 2012, according to the company. In an attempt to get to the bottom of the question once and for all, the Guardian has gathered writers from the fields of science, literature, religion and philosophy to give their definition of the much-pondered word. ์นดํ†กโ–บppt33โ—„ ใ€“ ๋ผ์ธโ–บpxp32โ—„ ํ™ˆํ”ผ๋Š” ์นœ์ถ”๋กœ ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” ๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •ํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •๋ณต์šฉ๋ฒ•,๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •์ฒ˜๋ฐฉ The physicist: 'Love is chemistry' Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition like hunger or thirst, only more permanent. We talk about love being blind or unconditional, in the sense that we have no control over it. But then, that is not so surprising since love is basically chemistry. While lust is a temporary passionate sexual desire involving the increased release of chemicals such as testosterone and oestrogen, in true love, or attachment and bonding, the brain can release a whole set of chemicals: pheromones, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, oxytocin and vasopressin. However, from an evolutionary perspective, love can be viewed as a survival tool โ€“ a mechanism we have evolved to promote long-term relationships, mutual defense and parental support of children and to promote feelings of safety and security. The philosopher: 'Love is a passionate commitment' The answer remains elusive in part because love is not one thing. Love for parents, partners, children, country, neighbor, God and so on all have different qualities. Each has its variants โ€“ blind, one-sided, tragic, steadfast, fickle, reciprocated, misguided, and unconditional. At its best, however, all love is a kind a passionate commitment that we nurture and develop, even though it usually arrives in our lives unbidden. That's why it is more than just a powerful feeling. Without the commitment, it is mere infatuation. Without the passion, it is mere dedication. Without nurturing, even the best can wither and die. The romantic novelist: 'Love drives all great stories' What love is depends on where you are in relation to it. Secure in it, it can feel as mundane and necessary as air โ€“ you exist within it, almost unnoticing. Deprived of it, it can feel like an obsession; all consuming, a physical pain. Love is the driver for all great stories: not just romantic love, but the love of parent for child, for family, for country. It is the point before consummation of it that fascinates: what separates you from love, the obstacles that stand in its way. It is usually at those points that love is everything. The nun: 'Love is free yet binds us' Love is more easily experienced than defined. As a theological virtue, by which we love God above all things, it seems remote until we encounter it enfleshed, so to say, in the life of another โ€“ in acts of kindness, generosity and self-sacrifice. Love's the one thing that can never hurt anyone, although it may cost dearly. The paradox of love is that it is supremely free yet attaches us with bonds stronger than death. It cannot be bought or sold; there is nothing it cannot face; love is life's greatest blessing.
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๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •์ฒ˜๋ฐฉ via2.co.to ์นดํ†ก:ppt33 ๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •ํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ ๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• ๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• ๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •๋ณต์šฉ๋ฒ• ๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •๋ถ€์ž‘์šฉ
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In my own periods of darkness, in the underworld of the soul, I find myself frequently overcome and amazed by the ability of people to befriend each other, to love their intimate partners and parents and children, and to do what they must do to keep the machinery of the world running. I knew a man, injured and disabled by a car accident, who was employed by a local utility. For years after the crash he worked side by side with another man, who for his part suffered with a degenerative neurological disease. They cooperated while repairing the lines, each making up for the otherโ€™s inadequacy. This sort of everyday heroism is the rule, I believe, rather than the exception. Most individuals are dealing with one or more serious health problems while going productively and uncomplainingly about their business. If anyone is fortunate enough to be in a rare period of grace and health, personally, then he or she typically has at least one close family member in crisis. Yet people prevail and continue to do difficult and effortful tasks to hold themselves and their families and society together. To me this is miraculousโ€”so much so that a dumbfounded gratitude is the only appropriate response. There are so many ways that things can fall apart, or fail to work altogether, and it is always wounded people who are holding it together. They deserve some genuine and heartfelt admiration for that. Itโ€™s an ongoing miracle of fortitude and perseverance
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Jordan B. Peterson (12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos)
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Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition like hunger or thirst, only more permanent.
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claris yetunde ramsin
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The physicist: 'Love is chemistry' ์นดํ†กโ˜›ppt33โ˜š ใ€“ ๋ผ์ธโ˜›pxp32โ˜š ํ™ˆํ”ผ๋Š” ์นœ์ถ”๋กœ ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition like hunger or thirst, only more permanent. We talk about love being blind or unconditional, in the sense that we have no control over it. But then, that is not so surprising since love is basically chemistry. While lust is a temporary passionate sexual desire involving the increased release of chemicals such as testosterone and oestrogen, in true love, or attachment and bonding, the brain can release a whole set of chemicals: pheromones, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, oxytocin and vasopressin. However, from an evolutionary perspective, love can be viewed as a survival tool โ€“ a mechanism we have evolved to promote long-term relationships, mutual defense and parental support of children and to promote feelings of safety and security. ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํŒ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค,ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๋ณต์šฉ๋ฒ•,ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๋ถ€์ž‘์šฉ,ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„,ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ์ž…์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ,ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํŒ๋งค์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ,ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํšจ๊ณผ ๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •ํŒ๋งค,๋น„์•„๊ทธ๋ผํŒ๋งค,์‹œ์•Œ๋ฆฌ์ŠคํŒ๋งค,๋ ˆ๋น„ํŠธ๋ผํŒ๋งค,๋น„๋‹‰์ŠคํŒ๋งค,๊ณจ๋“œ๋“œ๋ž˜๊ณคํŒ๋งค,์•„์ด์ฝ”์ŠคํŒ๋งค,์š”ํž˜๋นˆํŒ๋งค The philosopher: 'Love is a passionate commitment' The answer remains elusive in part because love is not one thing. Love for parents, partners, children, country, neighbor, God and so on all have different qualities. Each has its variants โ€“ blind, one-sided, tragic, steadfast, fickle, reciprocated, misguided, and unconditional. At its best, however, all love is a kind a passionate commitment that we nurture and develop, even though it usually arrives in our lives unbidden. That's why it is more than just a powerful feeling. Without the commitment, it is mere infatuation. Without the passion, it is mere dedication. Without nurturing, even the best can wither and die. but, it seems that I cannot see through its true meaning forever... Maybe, I do not just โ€œabsorbโ€ your love; but because the love overpowers me and I am unable to dispute and refuse it... Do you know? Itโ€™s you who light up my life! And I stubbornly believe that such love can only be experienced once in my life.
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ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ via2.co.to ์นดํ†ก:ppt33 ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๋ณต์šฉ๋ฒ• ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๋ถ€์ž‘์šฉ
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The paradigm for our relationships is formed from our earliest experiences and is actually hardwired into our neurological and emotional network.
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Sharon Salzberg (Real Love: The Art of Mindful Connection)
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Companionate love is neurologically different from passionate love. Passionate love always spikes early, then fades away, while companionate love is less intense but grows over time. And, whereas passionate love lights up the brainโ€™s pleasure centers, companionate love is associated with the regions having to do with long-term bonding and relationships.
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Aziz Ansari (Modern Romance)
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A growth hormone is secreted from your baby's brain every time you lovingly touch and nurture her, boosting her physical, mental & neurological development
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aidie London: Seffie Wells, MSc (How To Support Your Newborn Baby's Development: A Step-by Step guide from pregnancy throughout your babys first year (Support your baby's development & growth Book 1) Kindle Edition)
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The marvelous interplay of various brain circuits creates our instinctual reality of the daily life.
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Abhijit Naskar (Love Sutra: The Neuroscientific Manual of Love)
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A man who wakes up to a pair of double D breasts of his wife every morning, is neurologically destined to get used to them, regardless of their size. This is called โ€œHabituationโ€. But this process of habituation does not say anything about the love and care between two persons in a committed relationship. Love is not the primeval surge of libidinal lust that a person receives when meeting a suitable partner for the first time. Love in the truest sense of the term is born much later in a relationship, when both sides get to the know the truest selves of each other. And when love is born out of the pyre of commitment and attachment, it is no longer about having sex, it is about making love and becoming one with each other in every manner possible.
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Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
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Read this mental healing and strengthening book to your beloved grandpa/grandma and strengthen your family bonding in Christ. Help them to find their way in this life. Help them from being lost in the mind and ways through dementia. If your grandparents can still read, bless them with this salvation from Alzheimers healing book as a gift from you. Tell grandma she is your best friend and anounce to grumpy grandpa that he is your good and inspiring friend whom you love so dearly. This Holy Spirit breathed book allows you to feel strongly that parenting does not stop at all. When you have old grandparents, you are a parent at any age through your love for them.
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Stellah Mupanduki (Grandma/Grandpa Be Healed from Alzheimer's Disease: Salvation from Neurological Disseases)
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Rejection piggybacks on physical pain pathways in the brain. MRI studies show that the same areas of the brain become activated when we experience rejection as when we experience physical pain. This is why rejection hurts so much (neurologically speaking). In fact our brains respond so similarly to rejection and physical pain that Tylenol reduces the emotional pain rejection elicits. In a study testing the hypothesis that rejection mimics physical pain, researchers gave some participants acetaminophen (Tylenol) before asking them to recall a painful rejection experience. The people who received Tylenol reported significantly less emotional pain than subjects who took a sugar pill.1 Strange
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Lysa TerKeurst (Uninvited: Living Loved When You Feel Less Than, Left Out, and Lonely)
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Neurologically, OBEs are a form of bodily illusion arising from a temporary dissociation of visual and proprioceptive representationsโ€”normally these are coordinated, so that one views the world, including oneโ€™s body, from the perspective of oneโ€™s own eyes, oneโ€™s head. OBEs, as Henrik Ehrsson and his fellow researchers in Stockholm have elegantly shown, can be produced experimentally, by using simple equipmentโ€”video goggles, mannequins, rubber arms, and so onโ€”to confuse oneโ€™s visual input and oneโ€™s proprioceptive input and create an uncanny sense of disembodiedness.
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Oliver Sacks (Everything in Its Place: First Loves and Last Tales)
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Embracing paradox helped me discover that religion is a neurological disorder for which faith is the only cure.
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Frank Schaeffer (Why I am an Atheist Who Believes in God: How to give love, create beauty and find peace)
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In fact, there is mounting neurological evidence that a personโ€™s mental representation of God significantly affects their quality of life, for better or for worse. For example, itโ€™s a neurological fact that people who have a loving mental representation of God tend to have a greater capacity to think objectively about controversial matters and to make rational decisions than do people who have a threatening mental representation of God.
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Gergory A. Boyd (Cross Vision: How the Crucifixion of Jesus Makes Sense of Old Testament Violence)
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Developing the courage to think negatively allows us to look at ourselves as we really are. There is a remarkable consistency in peopleโ€™s coping styles across the many diseases we have considered: the repression of anger, the denial of vulnerability, the โ€œcompensatory hyperindependence.โ€ No one chooses these traits deliberately or develops them consciously. Negative thinking helps us to understand just what the conditions were in our lives and how these traits were shaped by our perceptions of our environment. Emotionally draining family relationships have been identified as risk factors in virtually every category of major illness, from degenerative neurological conditions to cancer and autoimmune disease. The purpose is not to blame parents or previous generations or spouses but to enable us to discard beliefs that have proved dangerous to our health. โ€œThe power of negative thinkingโ€ requires the removal of rose-coloured glasses. Not blame of others but owning responsibility for oneโ€™s relationships is the key. It is no small matter to ask people with newly diagnosed illness to begin to examine their relationships as a way of understanding their disease. For people unused to expressing their feelings and unaccustomed to recognizing their emotional needs, it is extemely challenging to find the confidence and the words to approach their loved ones both compassionately and assertively. The difficulty is all the greater at the point when they have become more vulnerable and more dependent than ever on others for support. There is no easy answer to this dilemma but leaving it unresolved will continue to create ongoing sources of stress that will, in turn, generate more illness. No matter what the patient may attempt to do for himself, the psychological load he carries cannot be eased without a clear-headed, compassionate appraisal of the most important relationships in his life. โ€œMost of our tensions and frustrations stem from compulsive needs to act the role of someone we are not,โ€ wrote Hans Selye. The power of negative thinking requires the strength to accept that we are not as strong as we would like to believe. Our insistently strong self-image was generated to hide a weakness โ€” the relative weakness of the child. Our fragility is nothing to be ashamed of. A person can be strong and still need help, can be powerful in some areas of life and helpless and confused in others. We cannot do all that we thought we could. As many people with illness realize, sometimes too late, the attempt to live up to a self-image of strength and invulnerability generated stress and disrupted their internal harmony.
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Gabor Matรฉ (When the Body Says No: The Cost of Hidden Stress)
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The course of our lives is precisely as Saint Augustine indicated: our hearts will never rest, nor are they meant to rest, until they rest in God. This precious restlessness is mediated by and manifested through our physical being, through the combined minute strugglings of the cells of our brains and bodies as they seek harmony and balance in their endless adjustment to circumstances. Our fundamental disease, then, is at once a precise neurological phenomenon and a most precious gift from God. It is not a sign of something wrong, but of something more profoundly right than we could ever dream of. It is no problem to be solved, no pathology to be treated, no disease to be cured. It is our true treasure, the most precious thing we have. It is Godโ€™s song of love in our soul. Moreover,
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Gerald G. May (Addiction and Grace: Love and Spirituality in the Healing of Addictions)
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A personโ€™s affinity towards his or her own religious beliefs, has the same neurological qualities as of his or her emotional affinity towards the romantic partner. In fact the symptoms that follow the early euphoric phase of romantic love are often seen in religious people when their beloved religious faith is challenged.
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Abhijit Naskar (In Search of Divinity: Journey to The Kingdom of Conscience)
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Through the sacred verses filled with violence and self-righteousness, the minds of the angry individuals find a way to get rid of all their misery. At that unstable state of consciousness, they are drawn to the description of the Holy War. They visualize a glimmer of hope. They feel absolutely immersed in it. Finally when they emerge as holy warriors, they are no longer humans, from the emotional perspective. They emerge as wild beasts, neurologically almost unable to feel human emotions, like empathy, love, kindness and compassion. Consequently the whole world faces the wrath of the most primitive of all human elements in the name of Godโ€™s judgment.
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Abhijit Naskar (In Search of Divinity: Journey to The Kingdom of Conscience (Neurotheology Series))
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Memory is the coherence of life, that possesses all your emotions, and ambitions. Without it, your joyous as well as agonizing experiences of life wonโ€™t have any significance to you whatsoever.
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Abhijit Naskar (What is Mind?)
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Pathology can indeed evoke experiences of Absolute Godliness, but not all God experiences are caused by pathology. They can also occur due to disturbance in the geomagnetic field of our planet, consumption of psychedelics, excruciatingly extreme level of stress during a near- death situation, or ultimately through a natural and healthy procedure of meditation or/and prayer.
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Abhijit Naskar (Love, God & Neurons: Memoir of a scientist who found himself by getting lost)
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โ€‹I wanted to present Neuroscience to people in a way that would diminish their differences.
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Abhijit Naskar (Love, God & Neurons: Memoir of a scientist who found himself by getting lost)
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Why is sexual abuse so devastating to the developing psyche? Recurrent sexual trauma, especially at the hands of a parent or other trusted loved one, is emotional terrorism of the highest orderโ€”so psychologically annihilating it has been called "soul murder." The overwhelming fear, pain, and excitement it engenders can cause serious and lasting damage to the child's emotional, neurological, and physiological development. The child's immature brain and central nervous system simply cannot process such repeated overstimulation, so the body's whole emotional-response system gets thrown out of whackโ€”which can lead to problems with impulse control and self-mutilation.
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Marilee Strong (A Bright Red Scream: Self-Mutilation and the Language of Pain)
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She hoped I would send her some of my papers on neurology, โ€œof which Iโ€™ll understand not one word, but will glow with loving pride at my ridiculous, brilliant and altogether delightful nephew.
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Oliver Sacks (On the Move: A Life)
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Why Itโ€™s Good to Take in the Good Given the negativity bias of the brain, it takes an active effort to internalize positive experiences and heal negative ones. When you tilt toward whatโ€™s positive, youโ€™re actually righting a neurological imbalance. And youโ€™re giving yourself today the caring and encouragement you should have received as a child, but perhaps didnโ€™t get in full measure. Focusing on what is wholesome and then taking it in naturally increases the positive emotions flowing through your mind each day. Emotions have global effects since they organize the brain as a whole. Consequently, positive feelings have far-reaching benefits, including a stronger immune system (Frederickson 2000) and a cardiovascular system that is less reactive to stress (Frederickson and Levenson 1998). They lift your mood; increase optimism, resilience, and resourcefulness; and help counteract the effects of painful experiences, including trauma (Frederickson 2001; Frederickson et al. 2000). Itโ€™s a positive cycle: good feelings today increase the likelihood of good feelings tomorrow.
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Rick Hanson (Buddha's Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love, and Wisdom)
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Religion is not a book, it is a neurological sentiment.
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Abhijit Naskar (Biopsy of Religions: Neuroanalysis Towards Universal Tolerance)
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The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle. ์นดํ†กโ˜›ppt33โ˜š ใ€“ ๋ผ์ธโ˜›pxp32โ˜š ํ™ˆํ”ผ๋Š” ์นœ์ถ”๋กœ ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn't matter to me ... Going to bed at night saying we've done something wonderful... that's what matters to me. ์— ๋น…์ŠคํŒ๋งค,์— ๋น…์ŠคํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,์— ๋น…์Šค๊ฐ€๊ฒฉ,์— ๋น…์Šค๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์— ๋น…์Šค๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์— ๋น…์Šค์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„,์— ๋น…์Šคํšจ๊ณผ,์— ๋น…์ŠคํŒ๋งค์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ,์— ๋น…์Šค๊ฐ€๊ฒฉ I want to put a ding in the universe. ์•„๋ฌด๋Ÿฐ ๋ง์—†์ด ํ•œ๋ฒˆ๋งŒ ์ฐพ์•„์ฃผ์‹ ๋‹ค๋ฉด ๋’ค๋กœ๋Š” ๊ณ„์† ๋‹จ๊ณจ๋  ๊ทธ๋Ÿฐ ์ž์‹  ์žˆ์Šต๋‹ˆ๋‹ค.์ €ํฌ์ชฝ ์„œ๋น„์Šค๊ฐ€ ์•„๋‹ˆ๋ผ ์ œํ’ˆ์—๋Œ€ํ•ด์„œ ์ž์‹ ์žˆ๋‹ค๋Š”๊ฒ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •,๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •,ํ”„๋ฆด๋ฆฌ์ง€,๋น„๋งฅ์Šค,๋น„๊ทธ์•Œ์—‘์Šค,์— ๋น…์Šค,๋น„๋‹‰์Šค,์„ผํŠธ๋ฆฝ ๋“ฑ ๋งŽ์€ ์ œํ’ˆ ์ทจ๊ธ‰ํ•ฉ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค ํ™•์‹คํ•œ ์ œํ’ˆ๋งŒ ์ทจ๊ธ‰ํ•˜๋Š”๊ณณ์ด๋ผ ์–ธ์ œ๋“  ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” ๋น„์•„๊ทธ๋ผ์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„,์‹œ์•Œ๋ฆฌ์Šค์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„,๋น„๋‹‰์Šค์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„,์„ผํŠธ๋ฆฝ์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„,๋น„์•„๊ทธ๋ผ์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„,์‹œ์•Œ๋ฆฌ์Šค์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„,๋ ˆ๋น„ํŠธ๋ผ์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„ Quality is more important than quantity. One home run is better than two doubles. Remembering that I'll be dead soon is the most important tool I've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. When I do well in the exam, I will show my paper to my parents, they are so happy to see me do well in the exam. I want to be happy all the time. But I have put so much pressure on myself. One day, my parents tell me that they donโ€™t care how I do well in the exam, they just want me to be happy. I know I should relax myself and be happy. The physicist: 'Love is chemistry' Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition like hunger or thirst, only more permanent. We talk about love being blind or unconditional, in the sense that we have no control over it. But then, that is not so surprising since love is basically chemistry. While lust is a temporary passionate sexual desire involving the increased release of chemicals such as testosterone and oestrogen, in true love, or attachment and bonding, the brain can release a whole set of chemicals: pheromones, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, oxytocin and vasopressin. However, from an evolutionary perspective, love can be viewed as a survival tool โ€“ a mechanism we have evolved to promote long-term relationships, mutual defense and parental support of children and to promote feelings of safety and security.
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์— ๋น…์ŠคํŒ๋งค via2.co.to ์นดํ†ก:ppt33 ์— ๋น…์ŠคํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ ์— ๋น…์ŠคํŒ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค ์— ๋น…์Šค๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• ์— ๋น…์Šค๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• ์— ๋น…์Šค๋ณต์šฉ๋ฒ•
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The physicist: 'Love is chemistry' ์นดํ†กโ˜Žppt33โ˜Ž ใ€“ ๋ผ์ธโ˜Žpxp32โ˜Ž ํ™ˆํ”ผ๋Š” ์นœ์ถ”๋กœ ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition like hunger or thirst, only more permanent. We talk about love being blind or unconditional, in the sense that we have no control over it. But then, that is not so surprising since love is basically chemistry. While lust is a temporary passionate sexual desire involving the increased release of chemicals such as testosterone and oestrogen, in true love, or attachment and bonding, the brain can release a whole set of chemicals: pheromones, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, oxytocin and vasopressin. However, from an evolutionary perspective, love can be viewed as a survival tool โ€“ a mechanism we have evolved to promote long-term relationships, mutual defense and parental support of children and to promote feelings of safety and security. ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธํŒ๋งค,ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ๊ฐ€๊ฒฉ,ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธํŒ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค,ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ๋ณต์šฉ๋ฒ•,ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ๋ถ€์ž‘์šฉ,ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ์•ฝํšจ Stay hungry, stay foolish. ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๋น„๋‹‰์Šค๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์„ผํŠธ๋ฆฝ๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์— ๋น…์Šค๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์„ผ๋”๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๋น„์•„๊ทธ๋ผ๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์‹œ์•Œ๋ฆฌ์Šค๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๋ ˆ๋น„ํŠธ๋ผ๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower. Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works. We're here to put a dent in the universe. Otherwise why else even be here? The philosopher: 'Love is a passionate commitment' The answer remains elusive in part because love is not one thing. Love for parents, partners, children, country, neighbor, God and so on all have different qualities. Each has its variants โ€“ blind, one-sided, tragic, steadfast, fickle, reciprocated, misguided, and unconditional. At its best, however, all love is a kind a passionate commitment that we nurture and develop, even though it usually arrives in our lives unbidden. That's why it is more than just a powerful feeling. Without the commitment, it is mere infatuation. Without the passion, it is mere dedication. Without nurturing, even the best can wither and die. The romantic novelist: 'Love drives all great stories' What love is depends on where you are in relation to it. Secure in it, it can feel as mundane and necessary as air โ€“ you exist within it, almost unnoticing. Deprived of it, it can feel like an obsession; all consuming, a physical pain. Love is the driver for all great stories: not just romantic love, but the love of parent for child, for family, for country. It is the point before consummation of it that fascinates: what separates you from love, the obstacles that stand in its way. It is usually at those points that love is everything.
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ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธํŒ๋งค via2.co.to ์นดํ†ก:ppt33 ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธํŒ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ๋ณต์šฉ๋ฒ• ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„
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The physicist: 'Love is chemistry' ์นดํ†กโ˜›ppt33โ˜š ใ€“ ๋ผ์ธโ˜›pxp32โ˜š ํ™ˆํ”ผ๋Š” ์นœ์ถ”๋กœ ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition like hunger or thirst, only more permanent. We talk about love being blind or unconditional, in the sense that we have no control over it. But then, that is not so surprising since love is basically chemistry. While lust is a temporary passionate sexual desire involving the increased release of chemicals such as testosterone and oestrogen, in true love, or attachment and bonding, the brain can release a whole set of chemicals: pheromones, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, oxytocin and vasopressin. However, from an evolutionary perspective, love can be viewed as a survival tool โ€“ a mechanism we have evolved to promote long-term relationships, mutual defense and parental support of children and to promote feelings of safety and security. ๋น„๋งฅ์ŠคํŒ๋งค,๋น„๋งฅ์Šค๊ฐ€๊ฒฉ,๋น„๋งฅ์ŠคํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,๋น„๋งฅ์Šค๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๋น„๋งฅ์Šค๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๋น„๋งฅ์Šค๋ณต์šฉ๋ฒ•,๋น„๋งฅ์Šค๋ถ€์ž‘์šฉ,๋น„๋งฅ์Šค์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„,๋น„๋งฅ์Šค๊ตฌ๋งค The philosopher: 'Love is a passionate commitment' ์•„๋ฌด๋Ÿฐ ๋ง์—†์ด ํ•œ๋ฒˆ๋งŒ ์ฐพ์•„์ฃผ์‹ ๋‹ค๋ฉด ๋’ค๋กœ๋Š” ๊ณ„์† ๋‹จ๊ณจ๋  ๊ทธ๋Ÿฐ ์ž์‹  ์žˆ์Šต๋‹ˆ๋‹ค.์ €ํฌ์ชฝ ์„œ๋น„์Šค๊ฐ€ ์•„๋‹ˆ๋ผ ์ œํ’ˆ์—๋Œ€ํ•ด์„œ ์ž์‹ ์žˆ๋‹ค๋Š”๊ฒ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •,๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •,ํ”„๋ฆด๋ฆฌ์ง€,๋น„๋งฅ์Šค,๋น„๊ทธ์•Œ์—‘์Šค,์— ๋น…์Šค,๋น„๋‹‰์Šค,์„ผํŠธ๋ฆฝ ๋“ฑ ๋งŽ์€ ์ œํ’ˆ ์ทจ๊ธ‰ํ•ฉ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค ํ™•์‹คํ•œ ์ œํ’ˆ๋งŒ ์ทจ๊ธ‰ํ•˜๋Š”๊ณณ์ด๋ผ ์–ธ์ œ๋“  ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” The answer remains elusive in part because love is not one thing. Love for parents, partners, children, country, neighbor, God and so on all have different qualities. Each has its variants โ€“ blind, one-sided, tragic, steadfast, fickle, reciprocated, misguided, and unconditional. At its best, however, all love is a kind a passionate commitment that we nurture and develop, even though it usually arrives in our lives unbidden. That's why it is more than just a powerful feeling. Without the commitment, it is mere infatuation. Without the passion, it is mere dedication. Without nurturing, even the best can wither and die. ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๋น„์•„๊ทธ๋ผ๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์‹œ์•Œ๋ฆฌ์Šค๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๋ ˆ๋น„ํŠธ๋ผ๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๋น„๋‹‰์Šค๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์„ผํŠธ๋ฆฝ๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์— ๋น…์Šค๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์„ผ๋”๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works. We're here to put a dent in the universe. Otherwise why else even be here? The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle. Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn't matter to me ... Going to bed at night saying we've done something wonderful... that's what matters to me.
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๋น„๋งฅ์Šค๊ฐ€๊ฒฉ via2.co.to ์นดํ†ก:ppt33 ๋น„๋งฅ์ŠคํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ ๋น„๋งฅ์Šค๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• ๋น„๋งฅ์Šค๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• ๋น„๋งฅ์Šค๋ณต์šฉ๋ฒ• ๋น„๋งฅ์Šค๋ถ€์ž‘์šฉ ๋น„๋งฅ์Šค์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„
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I feel, the love that Osho talks about, maybe is a kind of pure love beyond the mundane world, which is full of divinity and caritas, and overflows with Buddhist allegorical words and gestures, ์นดํ†กโ˜Žppt33โ˜Ž ใ€“ ๋ผ์ธโ˜Žpxp32โ˜Ž ํ™ˆํ”ผ๋Š” ์นœ์ถ”๋กœ ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” but, it seems that I cannot see through its true meaning forever... ์šฐ์„  ํด๋ฆญํ•ด์„œ ๊ฐ์‚ฌ๋“œ๋ฆฝ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค.ํด๋ฆญํ•œ๋งŒํผ ์ œํ’ˆ๋„ ์‹ค๋ง๋“œ๋ฆฌ์ง€ ์•Š์Šต๋‹ˆ๋‹ค.์ •ํ’ˆ์ง„ํ’ˆ์œผ๋กœ ํ™•์‹คํ•œ ์•ฝํšจ๋ฅผ ๋ณด์—ฌ๋“œ๋ฆฌ๋Š”๊ณณ์ž…๋‹ˆ๋‹ค ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •,๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •,ํ”„๋ฆด๋ฆฌ์ง€,๋น„๋งฅ์Šค,๋น„๊ทธ์•Œ์—‘์Šค,์— ๋น…์Šค,๋น„๋‹‰์Šค,์„ผํŠธ๋ฆฝ ๋“ฑ ๋งŽ์€ ์ œํ’ˆ ์ทจ๊ธ‰ํ•ฉ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค ์›ํ•˜์‹ ๋ถ„๋“ค ์ง€๋‚˜๊ฐ€์ง€ ๋งˆ์‹œ๊ณ  ์—ฐ๋ฝ ์ฃผ์‹œ๊ตฌ์š”,์ตœ์„ ์„ ๋‹คํ•ด ๋‹จ๊ณจ๋‹˜์œผ๋กœ ๋ชจ์…”๋“œ๋ฆฌ๊ฒ ์Šต๋‹ˆ๋‹ค Maybe, I do not just โ€œabsorbโ€ your love; but because the love overpowers me and I am unable to dispute and refuse it... ์—ฌ์ž์ตœ์Œ์ œํŒ๋งค,์—ฌ์ž์ตœ์Œ์ œํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,์—ฌ์ž์ตœ์Œ์ œ๊ตฌ๋งค,์—ฌ์ž์ตœ์Œ์ œ๊ตฌ์ž…,์—ฌ์ž์ตœ์Œ์ œํŒ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค,์—ฌ์ž์ตœ์Œ์ œ๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์—ฌ์ž์ตœ์Œ์ œํŒ๋งค์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ,์—ฌ์ž์ตœ์Œ์ œ๊ตฌ๋งค์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ Do you know? Itโ€™s you who light up my life! And I stubbornly believe that such love can only be experienced once in my life. Because of love, we wonโ€™t be lonely anymore; because of yearning, we taste more loneliness. The physicist: 'Love is chemistry' Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition like hunger or thirst, only more permanent. We talk about love being blind or unconditional, in the sense that we have no control over it. But then, that is not so surprising since love is basically chemistry. While lust is a temporary passionate sexual desire involving the increased release of chemicals such as testosterone and oestrogen, in true love, or attachment and bonding, the brain can release a whole set of chemicals: pheromones, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, oxytocin and vasopressin. However, from an evolutionary perspective, love can be viewed as a survival tool โ€“ a mechanism we have evolved to promote long-term relationships, mutual defense and parental support of children and to promote feelings of safety and security. The philosopher: 'Love is a passionate commitment' The answer remains elusive in part because love is not one thing. Love for parents, partners, children, country, neighbor, God and so on all have different qualities. Each has its variants โ€“ blind, one-sided, tragic, steadfast, fickle, reciprocated, misguided, and unconditional. At its best, however, all love is a kind a passionate commitment that we nurture and develop, even though it usually arrives in our lives unbidden. That's why it is more than just a powerful feeling. Without the commitment, it is mere infatuation. Without the passion, it is mere dedication. Without nurturing, even the best can wither and die.
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์—ฌ์ž์ตœ์Œ์ œํŒ๋งค via2.co.to ์นดํ†ก:ppt33 ์—ฌ์ž์ตœ์Œ์ œ๊ฐ€๊ฒฉ ์—ฌ์ž์ตœ์Œ์ œ๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• ์—ฌ์ž์ตœ์Œ์ œ๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• ์—ฌ์ž์ตœ์Œ์ œ๋ณต์šฉ๋ฒ• ์—ฌ์ž์ตœ์Œ์ œ์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„ ์—ฌ์ž์ตœ์Œ์ œํ›„๊ธฐ
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The physicist: 'Love is chemistry' ์นดํ†กโ˜Žppt33โ˜Ž ใ€“ ๋ผ์ธโ˜Žpxp32โ˜Ž ํ™ˆํ”ผ๋Š” ์นœ์ถ”๋กœ ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” ๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •์ฒ˜๋ฐฉ,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •ํŒ๋งค,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •ํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๋ณต์šฉ๋ฒ•,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๋ถ€์ž‘์šฉ,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •์•ฝํšจ,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๊ตฌ์ž…์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ ์ŠคํŽ˜๋‹ˆ์‰ฌํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,๋ฐ”์˜ค๋ฉ”์ดํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,์•„ํ”„๋กœ๋“œํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,์š”ํž˜๋นˆํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,๋น„์•„๊ทธ๋ผํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,์‹œ์•Œ๋ฆฌ์ŠคํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition like hunger or thirst, only more permanent. We talk about love being blind or unconditional, in the sense that we have no control over it. But then, that is not so surprising since love is basically chemistry. While lust is a temporary passionate sexual desire involving the increased release of chemicals such as testosterone and oestrogen, in true love, or attachment and bonding, the brain can release a whole set of chemicals: pheromones, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, oxytocin and vasopressin. However, from an evolutionary perspective, love can be viewed as a survival tool โ€“ a mechanism we have evolved to promote long-term relationships, mutual defense and parental support of children and to promote feelings of safety and security. Stay hungry, stay foolish. Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower. Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works. We're here to put a dent in the universe. Otherwise why else even be here? The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle. Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn't matter to me ... Going to bed at night saying we've done something wonderful... that's what matters to me. I want to put a ding in the universe. Quality is more important than quantity. One home run is better than two doubles. Remembering that I'll be dead soon is the most important tool I've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. When I do well in the exam, I will show my paper to my parents, they are so happy to see me do well in the exam. I want to be happy all the time. But I have put so much pressure on myself. One day, my parents tell me that they donโ€™t care how I do well in the exam, they just want me to be happy. I know I should relax myself and be happy.
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๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •ํŒ๋งค via2.co.to ์นดํ†ก:ppt33 ๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •ํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ ๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๊ฐ€๊ฒฉ ๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„ ๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •ํŒ๋งค์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ
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What is love" was the most searched phrase on Google in 2012, according to the company. In an attempt to get to the bottom of the question once and for all, the Guardian has gathered writers from the fields of science, literature, religion and philosophy to give their definition of the much-pondered word. ์นดํ†กโ˜Žppt33โ˜Ž ใ€“ ๋ผ์ธโ˜Žpxp32โ˜Ž ํ™ˆํ”ผ๋Š” ์นœ์ถ”๋กœ ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธํŒ๋งค,ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ๊ฐ€๊ฒฉ,ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ๊ตฌ์ž…์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ,ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ๊ตฌ๋งค์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ,ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธํŒ๋งค์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ,ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„,ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ๋ณต์šฉ๋ฒ• ์ฒœ์—ฐ์ •๋ ฅ์ œ๊ตฌ์ž…,๋‚จ์„ฑ์ •๋ ฅ์ œ๊ตฌ์ž…,์ •๋ ฅ์ œ๊ตฌ์ž…,๋ฐœ๊ธฐ์ œ๊ตฌ์ž…,๋‚จ์„ฑ๋ฐœ๊ธฐ์ œ๊ตฌ์ž…,๊ฐ•๋ ฅ๋ฐœ๊ธฐ์ œ๊ตฌ์ž… The physicist: 'Love is chemistry' Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition like hunger or thirst, only more permanent. We talk about love being blind or unconditional, in the sense that we have no control over it. But then, that is not so surprising since love is basically chemistry. While lust is a temporary passionate sexual desire involving the increased release of chemicals such as testosterone and oestrogen, in true love, or attachment and bonding, the brain can release a whole set of chemicals: pheromones, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, oxytocin and vasopressin. However, from an evolutionary perspective, love can be viewed as a survival tool โ€“ a mechanism we have evolved to promote long-term relationships, mutual defense and parental support of children and to promote feelings of safety and security. Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works. We're here to put a dent in the universe. Otherwise why else even be here? The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle. Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn't matter to me ... Going to bed at night saying we've done something wonderful... that's what matters to me.
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ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธํŒ๋งค via2.co.to ์นดํ†ก:ppt33 ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• ํŒŒ์›Œ์ด๋ ‰ํŠธ์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„
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Nowadays, more and more middle-aged people are suffering from insomnia, as life for the middle-aged is stressful indeed. For one thing, as they are the backbones of their companies, they have plenty of things to do at work. And they usually have to work overtime. For another, they have to take great responsibilities at home, for their aged parents need to be supported and their little children need to be brought up. That's why they don't have enough time to have a good rest. ์นดํ†กโ˜›ppt33โ˜š ใ€“ ๋ผ์ธโ˜›pxp32โ˜š ํ™ˆํ”ผ๋Š” ์นœ์ถ”๋กœ ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” ๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •ํŒ๋งค,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •ํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๊ตฌ์ž…์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๊ตฌ๋งค์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๋ณต์šฉ๋ฒ• ๋น„์•„๊ทธ๋ผ์•ฝํšจ,์‹œ์•Œ๋ฆฌ์Šค์•ฝํšจ,ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •์•ฝํšจ,์— ๋น…์Šค์•ฝํšจ,๋น„๋งฅ์Šค์•ฝํšจ,๋„ค๋…ธ๋งˆ์ •์•ฝํšจ,ํ”„๋ฆด๋ฆฌ์ง€์•ฝํšจ,์š”ํž˜๋น„์•ฝํšจ I have a dream. When I grow up, I want to be an actor. Being an actor can play many roles and experience different lifestyles. It is so cool. Whatโ€™s more, I can make a lot of money and then travel around the world. I have passion in performance and have joined many dramas. I hope someday I can realize my dream. The physicist: 'Love is chemistry' Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition like hunger or thirst, only more permanent. We talk about love being blind or unconditional, in the sense that we have no control over it. But then, that is not so surprising since love is basically chemistry. While lust is a temporary passionate sexual desire involving the increased release of chemicals such as testosterone and oestrogen, in true love, or attachment and bonding, the brain can release a whole set of chemicals: pheromones, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, oxytocin and vasopressin. However, from an evolutionary perspective, love can be viewed as a survival tool โ€“ a mechanism we have evolved to promote long-term relationships, mutual defense and parental support of children and to promote feelings of safety and security. The philosopher: 'Love is a passionate commitment' The answer remains elusive in part because love is not one thing. Love for parents, partners, children, country, neighbor, God and so on all have different qualities. Each has its variants โ€“ blind, one-sided, tragic, steadfast, fickle, reciprocated, misguided, and unconditional. At its best, however, all love is a kind a passionate commitment that we nurture and develop, even though it usually arrives in our lives unbidden. That's why it is more than just a powerful feeling. Without the commitment, it is mere infatuation. Without the passion, it is mere dedication. Without nurturing, even the best can wither and die. The romantic novelist: 'Love drives all great stories
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๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •ํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ via2.co.to ์นดํ†ก:ppt33 ๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๊ฐ€๊ฒฉ ๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •ํšจ๊ณผ ๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •ํ›„๊ธฐ ๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๊ตฌ์ž…์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ ๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๊ตฌ๋งค์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ
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The physicist: 'Love is chemistry' ์นดํ†กโ˜›ppt33โ˜š ใ€“ ๋ผ์ธโ˜›pxp32โ˜š ํ™ˆํ”ผ๋Š” ์นœ์ถ”๋กœ ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition like hunger or thirst, only more permanent. We talk about love being blind or unconditional, in the sense that we have no control over it. But then, that is not so surprising since love is basically chemistry. While lust is a temporary passionate sexual desire involving the increased release of chemicals such as testosterone and oestrogen, in true love, or attachment and bonding, the brain can release a whole set of chemicals: pheromones, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, oxytocin and vasopressin. However, from an evolutionary perspective, love can be viewed as a survival tool โ€“ a mechanism we have evolved to promote long-term relationships, mutual defense and parental support of children and to promote feelings of safety and security. ์— ๋น…์ŠคํŒ๋งค,์— ๋น…์ŠคํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,์— ๋น…์Šค๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์— ๋น…์Šค๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,์— ๋น…์Šค์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„,์— ๋น…์Šค๊ตฌ์ž…์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ,์— ๋น…์Šค๊ตฌ๋งค์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ,์— ๋น…์ŠคํŒ๋งค์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ The philosopher: 'Love is a passionate commitment' The answer remains elusive in part because love is not one thing. Love for parents, partners, children, country, neighbor, God and so on all have different qualities. Each has its variants โ€“ blind, one-sided, tragic, steadfast, fickle, reciprocated, misguided, and unconditional. At its best, however, all love is a kind a passionate commitment that we nurture and develop, even though it usually arrives in our lives unbidden. That's why it is more than just a powerful feeling. Without the commitment, it is mere infatuation. Without the passion, it is mere dedication. Without nurturing, even the best can wither and die. The romantic novelist: 'Love drives all great stories' What love is depends on where you are in relation to it. Secure in it, it can feel as mundane and necessary as air โ€“ you exist within it, almost unnoticing. Deprived of it, it can feel like an obsession; all consuming, a physical pain. Love is the driver for all great stories: not just romantic love, but the love of parent for child, for family, for country. It is the point before consummation of it that fascinates: what separates you from love, the obstacles that stand in its way. It is usually at those points that love is everything.
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์— ๋น…์Šค๊ตฌ์ž…์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ via2.co.to ์นดํ†ก:ppt33 ์— ๋น…์Šค๊ตฌ๋งค์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ ์— ๋น…์ŠคํŒ๋งค์‚ฌ์ดํŠธ ์— ๋น…์Šค์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„ ์— ๋น…์Šค๊ฐ€๊ฒฉ
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The physicist: 'Love is chemistry' ์นดํ†กโ–บppt33โ—„ ใ€“ ๋ผ์ธโ–บpxp32โ—„ ํ™ˆํ”ผ๋Š” ์นœ์ถ”๋กœ ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition like hunger or thirst, only more permanent. We talk about love being blind or unconditional, in the sense that we have no control over it. But then, that is not so surprising since love is basically chemistry. While lust is a temporary passionate sexual desire involving the increased release of chemicals such as testosterone and oestrogen, in true love, or attachment and bonding, the brain can release a whole set of chemicals: pheromones, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, oxytocin and vasopressin. However, from an evolutionary perspective, love can be viewed as a survival tool โ€“ a mechanism we have evolved to promote long-term relationships, mutual defense and parental support of children and to promote feelings of safety and security. ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํŒ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค,ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํŒ๋งค,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •ํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •ํŒ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•,๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„ The philosopher: 'Love is a passionate commitment' The answer remains elusive in part because love is not one thing. Love for parents, partners, children, country, neighbor, God and so on all have different qualities. Each has its variants โ€“ blind, one-sided, tragic, steadfast, fickle, reciprocated, misguided, and unconditional. At its best, however, all love is a kind a passionate commitment that we nurture and develop, even though it usually arrives in our lives unbidden. That's why it is more than just a powerful feeling. Without the commitment, it is mere infatuation. Without the passion, it is mere dedication. Without nurturing, even the best can wither and die. love everyone who walks into our life.It must be fate to get acquainted in a huge crowd of people... I feel, the love that Osho talks about, maybe is a kind of pure love beyond the mundane world, which is full of divinity and caritas, and overflows with Buddhist allegorical words and gestures, but, it seems that I cannot see through its true meaning forever... The romantic novelist: 'Love drives all great stories' What love is depends on where you are in relation to it. Secure in it, it can feel as mundane and necessary as air โ€“ you exist within it, almost unnoticing. Deprived of it, it can feel like an obsession; all consuming, a physical pain. Love is the driver for all great stories: not just romantic love, but the love of parent for child, for family, for country. It is the point before consummation of it that fascinates: what separates you from love, the obstacles that stand in its way. It is usually at those points that love is everything. The nun: 'Love is free yet binds us' Love is more easily experienced than defined. As a theological virtue, by which we love God above all things, it seems remote until we encounter it enfleshed, so to say, in the life of another โ€“ in acts of kindness, generosity and self-sacrifice. Love's the one thing that can never hurt anyone, although it may cost dearly. The paradox of love is that it is supremely free yet attaches us with bonds stronger than death. It cannot be bought or sold; there is nothing it cannot face; love is life's greatest blessing.
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ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํŒ๋งค via2.co.to ์นดํ†ก:ppt33 ๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •ํŒ๋งค ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ ๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •ํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• ๊ตฌ๊ตฌ์ •๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•
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Once you uncover your storyline, I encourage you to take these two steps: First, walk through the original drama, but give it a new ending. Change the story, and you change your energetic systemโ€”and your neurology. Second, rewrite the characters. In your life play, replace the needy mom with a giving, kind one. Instead of an alcoholic, absent dad, give yourself a super-supportive one. Your workplace dramas will shift as your internal script does. Having rewritten your story, you can formulate an intention for attracting and maintaining supportive work relationships. After all, success really does depend on being open to serving others and receiving help in return. Design an intention with your long-term heartโ€™s desires, not just the next step, in mind.
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Cyndi Dale (Energetic Boundaries: How to Stay Protected and Connected in Work, Love, and Life)
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There are six categories of misperceptions that lead us astray and damage our emotional borders. These involve issues of (1) unworthiness, (2) unlovability, (3) undeservedness, (4) lack of value, (5) being bad or evil, and (6) powerlessness. Energetically, these undeveloped beliefs lock into our brains and run our neurological chemistry, creating havoc in our emotional energetic boundary. They attract people and situations that reinforce the immature belief rather than inviting growth and change. Having one of these beliefs imprinted on our emotional boundary is like wearing a sign that broadcasts a lie about ourselves.
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Cyndi Dale (Energetic Boundaries: How to Stay Protected and Connected in Work, Love, and Life)
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Thereโ€™s another level at which attention operates, this has to do with leadership, I argue that leaders need three kinds of focus, to be really effective, the first is an inner focus, let me tell you about a case thatโ€™s actually from the annals of neurology, there was a corporate lawyer, who unfortunately had a small prefrontal brain tumour, it was discovered early, operated successfully, after the surgery though it was a very puzzling picture, because he was absolutely as smart as he had been before, a very high IQ, no problem with attention or memory, but he couldnโ€™t do his job anymore, he couldnโ€™t do any job, in fact he ended up out of work, his wife left him, he lost his home, heโ€™s living in his brother spare bedroom and in despair he went to see a famous neurologist named Antonio Damasio. Damasio specialized in the circuitry between the prefrontal area which is where we consciously pay attention to what matters now, where we make decisions, where we learn and the emotional centers in the midbrain, particularly the amygdala, which is our radar for danger, it triggers our strong emotions. They had cut the connection between the prefrontal area and emotional centers and Damasio at first was puzzled, he realized that this fellow on every neurological test was perfectly fine but something was wrong, then he got a clue, he asked the lawyer when should we have our next appointment and he realized the lawyer could give him the rational pros and cons of every hour for the next two weeks, but he didnโ€™t know which is best. And Damasio says when weโ€™re making a decision any decision, when to have the next appointment, should I leave my job for another one, what strategy should we follow, going into the future, should I marry this fellow compared to all the other fellows, those are decisions that require we draw on our entire life experience and the circuitry that collects that life experience is very base brain, itโ€™s very ancient in the brain, and it has no direct connection to the part of the brain that thinks in words, it has very rich connectivity to the gastro- intestinal tract, to the gut, so we get a gut feeling, feels right, doesnโ€™t feel right. Damasio calls them somatic markers, itโ€™s a language of the body and the ability to tune into this is extremely important because this is valuable data too - they did a study of Californian entrepreneurs and asked them โ€œhow do you make your decisions?โ€, these are people who built a business from nothing to hundreds of millions or billions of dollars, and they more or less said the same strategy โ€œI am a voracious gatherer of information, I want to see the numbers, but if it doesnโ€™t feel right, I wonโ€™t go ahead with the dealโ€. Theyโ€™re tuning into the gut feeling. I know someone, I grew up in farm region of California, the Central Valley and my high school had a rival high school in the next town and I met someone who went to the other high school, he was not a good student, he almost failed, came close to not graduating high school, he went to a two-year college, a community college, found his way into film, which he loved and got into a film school, in film school his student project caught the eye of a director, who asked him to become an assistant and he did so well at that the director arranged for him to direct his own film, someone elseโ€™s script, he did so well at that they let him direct a script that he had written and that film did surprisingly well, so the studio that financed that film said if you want to do another one, we will back you. And he, however, hated the way the studio edited the film, he felt he was a creative artist and they had butchered his art. He said I am gonna do the film on my own, Iโ€™m gonna finance it myself, everyone in the film business that he knew said this is a huge mistake, you shouldnโ€™t do this, but he went ahead, then he ran out of money, had to go to eleven banks before he could get a loan, he managed to finish the film, you may have seen
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Daniel Goleman
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Its not that people want to get hurt again. Its that they want to master a situation where they felt helpless. "Repetition compulsion" Maybe this time, the unconscious imagines, I can go back and heal that wound from long ago, by engaging with somebody familiar- but new. The truth is that they reopen the wounds and feel even more inadequate and unlovable." "He may be resistant to acknowledging it now, but I welcome his resistance because resistance is a clue to where the crux of the work lies; it signals what a therapist needs to pay attention to." "Conversion disorder: this is a condition in which a person's anxiety is "converted" into a neurologic conditions such as paralysis, balance issues, incontinence, deafness, tremors, or seizures." "People with conversion disorder aren't faking it- thatโ€™s called factitious disorder. People with factitious disorder have a need to be thought of as sick and intentionally go to great lengths to appear ill." "Interestingly, conversion disorder tends to be more prevalent in cultures with strict rules and few opportunities for emotional expression." "Ultracrepidarianism, which means "the habit of giving opinions and advice on matters outside of one's knowledge or competence" "Every decision they make is based on two things: fear and love. Therapy strives to teach you how to tell the two apart." "if you are talking that much, you cant be listening" and its variant, you have two ears and one mouth; there's a reason for that ratio)" "To feel better now, anytime, anywhere, within seconds" Why are we essentially outsourcing the thing that defines uses people? Was it that people couldnโ€™t tolerate being alone or that they couldnโ€™t tolerate being with other people?" "The four ultimate concerns are death, isolation, freedom, and meaningless" "Flooded: meaning one person is in overdrive, and when people feel flooded is best to wait a beat. The person needs a few minutes for his nervous system to reset before he can take anything in." "Developmental stage models: Freud, Jung, Erikson, Piaget and Maslow
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Lori Gottlieb
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์นดํ†กโ˜›ppt33โ˜š ใ€“ ๋ผ์ธโ˜›pxp32โ˜š ํ™ˆํ”ผ๋Š” ์นœ์ถ”๋กœ ์—ฐ๋ฝ์ฃผ์„ธ์š” #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ์ž… #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ๋งค #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํŒ๋งค #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •์ฒ˜๋ฐฉ #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ฐ€๊ฒฉ #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํ›„๊ธฐ #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •์ •ํ’ˆ๊ตฌ์ž… #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •์ •ํ’ˆ๊ตฌ๋งค #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •์ •ํ’ˆํŒ๋งค #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ์ž…ํ•˜๋Š”๊ณณ #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ๋งคํ•˜๋Š”๊ณณ #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํŒ๋งคํ•˜๋Š”๊ณณ #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •์•ฝํšจ #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํšจ๊ณผ #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํšจ๋Šฅ #ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •์ง€์†์‹œ๊ฐ„ What is love" was the most searched phrase on Google in 2012, according to the company. In an attempt to get to the bottom of the question once and for all, the Guardian has gathered writers from the fields of science, literature, religion and philosophy to give their definition of the much-pondered word. Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works. We're here to put a dent in the universe. Otherwise why else even be here? The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle. Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn't matter to me ... Going to bed at night saying we've done something wonderful... that's what matters to me. The physicist: 'Love is chemistry' Biologically, love is a powerful neurological condition like hunger or thirst, only more permanent. We talk about love being blind or unconditional, in the sense that we have no control over it. But then, that is not so surprising since love is basically chemistry. While lust is a temporary passionate sexual desire involving the increased release of chemicals such as testosterone and oestrogen, in true love, or attachment and bonding, the brain can release a whole set of chemicals: pheromones, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, oxytocin and vasopressin. However, from an evolutionary perspective, love can be viewed as a survival tool โ€“ a mechanism we have evolved to promote long-term relationships, mutual defense and parental support of children and to promote feelings of safety and security. The philosopher: 'Love is a passionate commitment
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ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํŒ๋งค ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ์ž…๋ฐฉ๋ฒ• via3.co.to ์นดํ†ก:ppt33 ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํŒŒ๋Š”๊ณณ ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •ํšจ๊ณผ ํŒ”ํŒ”์ •๊ตฌ๋งค๋ฐฉ๋ฒ•