Murders On The Orient Express Quotes

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The impossible could not have happened, therefore the impossible must be possible in spite of appearances.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
If you confront anyone who has lied with the truth, he will usually admit it - often out of sheer surprise. It is only necessary to guess right to produce your effect.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
But I know human nature, my friend, and I tell you that, suddenly confronted with the possibility of being tried for murder, the most innocent person will lose his head and do the most absurd things.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
What's wrong with my proposition?" Poirot rose. "If you will forgive me for being personal-I do not like your face, M. Ratchett.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
At the small table, sitting very upright, was one of the ugliest old ladies he had ever seen. It was an ugliness of distinction - it fascinated rather than repelled.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
I like to see an angry Englishman," said Poirot. "They are very amusing. The more emotional they feel the less command they have of language.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
You've a pretty good nerve," said Ratchett. "Will twenty thousand dollars tempt you?" It will not." If you're holding out for more, you won't get it. I know what a thing's worth to me." I, also M. Ratchett." What's wrong with my proposition?" Poirot rose. "If you will forgive me for being personal - I do not like your face, M. Ratchett," he said.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
The body—the cage—is everything of the most respectable—but through the bars, the wild animal looks out.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
I am not one to rely upon the expert procedure. It is the psychology I seek, not the fingerprint or the cigarette ash.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Some of us, in the words of the divine Greta Garbo, want to be alone.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
As you yourself have said, what other explanation can there be?' Poirot stared straight ahead of him. 'That is what I ask myself,' he said. 'That is what I never cease to ask myself.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
You are the patient one, Mademoiselle,' said Poirot to Miss Debenham. She shrugged her shoulders slightly. 'What else can one do?' You are a philosopher, Mademoiselle.' That implies a detached attitude. I think my attitude is more selfish. I have learned to save myself useless emotion.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
How fast you go. You arrive at a conclusion much sooner than I would permit myself to do.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
The impossible cannot have happened, therefore the impossible must be possible in spite of appearances.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
I have learned to save myself useless emotion.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
All around us are people, of all classes, of all nationalities, of all ages. For three days these people, these strangers to one another, are brought together. They sleep and eat under one roof, they cannot get away from each other. At the end of three days they part, they go their several ways, never, perhaps, to see each other again.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
What's wrong with my proposition?" Poirot rose. "If you will forgive me for being personal - I do not like your face.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
I believe, Messieurs, in loyalty---to one's friends and one's family and one's caste.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
The happiness of one man and one woman is the greatest thing in all the world.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Look at what’s happening! No one on these calls wants to own any of this, because it’s so obviously bad! It’s like a reverse Murder on the Orient Express. Everyone wants it dead, nobody wants to stab it!
Ronan Farrow (Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators)
And yet," said Poirot, "suppose an accident-" "Ah, no, my friend-" "From your point of view it would be regrettable, I agree. But nevertheless let us just for one moment suppose it. Then, perhaps, all these here are linked together - by death.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Because, you see, if the man were an invention—a fabrication—how much easier to make him disappear!
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Then there are some minor points that strike me as suggestive - for instance, the position of Mrs. Hubbard's sponge bag, the name of Mrs. Armstrong's mother, the detective methods of Mr. Hardman, the suggestion of Mr. MacQueen that Ratchett himself destroyed the charred note we found, Princess Dragomiroff's Christian name, and a grease spot on a Hungarian passport.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Vi pripadate Ligi naroda? -Ja pripadam cijelom svijetu, madame, reče Poirot dramatično.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
He was at the stage of a meal when one becomes philosophic.
Agatha Christie
Hercule Poirot addressed himself to the task of keeping his moustaches out of the soup.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
You belong to the League of Nations?’ ‘I belong to the world, Madame,’ said Poirot dramatically.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
C’est une femme,” said the chef de train again. “Women are like that. When they are enraged they have great strength.” He nodded so sagely that everyone suspected a personal experience of his own.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
I had always wanted to go on the Orient Express, but that I’d sort of consider it a wasted opportunity if a murder didn’t happen. It’s not that I’m particularly bloodthirsty, it’s just that I have standards
Jenny Lawson (Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things)
It is often by a trivial, even an anecdotal decision, that we direct our activities into a certain channel, and thus determine which of the potential expressions of our individuality become manifest. Usually we know nothing of the ultimate orientation or of the outlet toward which we travel, and the stream sweeps us to a formula of life from which there is no returning. Every decision is like a murder, and our march forward is over the stillborn bodies of all our possible selves that will never be.
René Dubos (Louis Pasteur: Free Lance of Science)
A ridiculous-looking little man. The sort of little man one could never take seriously.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
If you will forgive me for being personal—I do not like your face, M. Ratchett,
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
If you wish to catch a rabbit you put a ferret into the hole, and if the rabbit is there he runs.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
In fact,' said Poirot, 'she stabbed him in the dark, not realising that he was dead already, but somehow deduced that he had a watch in his pyjama pocket, took it out, put back the hands blindly and gave it the requisite dent.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Is no one incapable of murder?
Agatha Christie (Hickory Dickory Death / The Mystery of the Blue Train / A Pocket Full of Rye / Murder on the Orient Express)
Well, you can't go about having blood feuds and stabbing each other like Crosicans or the Mafia," said the Colonel. "Say what you like, trial by jury is a sound system
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
In the words of a best seller, ‘You’ve nothing on me.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
At a small table, sitting very upright, was one of the ugliest old ladies he had ever seen. It was an ugliness of distinction—it fascinated rather than repelled.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
I suppose I saw photos of him in the papers, but I wouldn’t recognize my own mother when a press photographer had done with her.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Coffee, then, Madame. You need some stimulant.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
At a small table, sitting very upright, was one of the ugliest old ladies he had ever seen. It was an ugliness of distinction- it fascinated rather than repelled. She sat very upright. Round her neck was a collar of very large pearls which, improbable though it seemed, were real. Her hands were covered with rings. Her sable coat was pushed back on her shoulders. A very small and expensive black toque was hideously unbecoming to the yellow, toad-like face beneath it.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
About Miss Debenham," he said rather awkwardly. "You can take it from me that she's all right. She's a pukka sahib. "What," asked Dr. Constantine with interest, "does a pukka sahib mean?" "It means," said Poirot, "that Miss Debenham's father and brothers were at the same kind of school as Colonel Arbuthnot was." "Oh!" said Dr. Constantine, disappointed. "Then it has nothing to do with the crime at all." "Exactly," said Poirot.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
You are, I think, a little bit contemptuous of the way I prosecute my inquiries," he said with a twinkle.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
En voiture, Monsieur,’ said the Wagon Lit conductor.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Poirot))
an air of infinite reluctance M. Poirot climbed aboard the train. The conductor climbed after him.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Poirot))
The other two waited respectfully while M. Bouc struggled in mental agony.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
To begin with, you must realize that the threatening letters were in the nature of a blind. They might have been lifted bodily out of an indifferently written American crime novel.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
There is much evil in the world.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
I don’t feel as though I’ve got the heart to eat anything,” and then partook of everything offered her,
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Just exactly what’s up on this train? It seems bughouse to me.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
The little man removed his hat. What an egg-shaped head he had.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Imposibilul nu poate sa se fi intamplat, ca atare imposibilul trebuie sa fie posibil, in ciuda aparentelor.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
I like to see an angry Englishman,’ said Poirot. ‘They are very amusing.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
I’ll break every bone in your damned body, you dirty little whippersnapper,” he said.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
This must be Aleppo. Nothing to see, of course. Just a long, poor-lighted platform with loud furious altercations in Arabic going on somewhere. Two men below her window were talking French.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Poirot))
Poirot's eyes opened. "That is great ferocity," he said. "It is a woman," said the chef de train, speaking for the first time. "Depend upon it, it was a woman. Only a woman would stab like that." Dr. Constantine screwed up his face thoughtfully. "She must have been a very strong woman," he said. "It is not my desire to speak technically-that is only confusing; but I can assure you that two of the blows were delivered with such forces as to drive them through hard belts of bone and muscle." "It was clearly not a scientific crime," said Poirot. "It was most unscientific," returned Dr. Constantine. "The blows seem to have been delivered haphazard and at random. Some have glanced off, doing hardly any damage. It is as though somebody had shut his eyes and then in a frenzy struck blindly again and again." "C'est une femme," said the chef de train again. "Women are like that. When they are enraged they have great strength." He nodded so sagely that everyone suspected a personal experience of his own.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
I told you there was nothing to it,” said Arbuthnot apologetically. “But you know what it is—early hours of the morning—everything very still—the thing had a sinister look—like a detective story. All nonsense, really.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Poirot said "you will find,M.le docteur,if you have much to do with cases of this kind,that they all resemble each other in one thing." "what is that?" I asked curiously "everyone concerned in them has something to hide
Agatha Christie (The Murder of Roger Ackroyd / Murder on the Orient Express / Ten Little Niggers / At Bertram's Hotel / Pieces)
Are you really a detective, then?” “At your service, Madame.” “I thought there were no detectives on the train when it passed through Yugo-Slavia—not until one got to Italy.” “I am not a Yugo-Slavian detective, Madame. I am an international detective.” “You belong to the League of Nations?” “I belong to the world, Madame,” said Poirot dramatically.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Say, gentlemen, this business is getting on my nerves. Murder and the snow and all, and nothing doing. Just hanging about and killing time. I’d like to get busy after someone or something.” “The true Western spirit of hustle,” said Poirot with a smile.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Does a man who commits suicide stab himself in ten—twelve—fifteen places?” he asked. Poirot’s eyes opened. “That is great ferocity,” he said. “It is a woman,” said the chef de train, speaking for the first time. “Depend upon it, it was a woman. Only a woman would stab like that.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Précisément! The body—the cage—is everything of the most respectable—but through the bars, the wild animal looks out.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
If you will forgive me for being personal - I do not like your face
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
He chews the gum which I believe is not done in good circles.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Mr Ratchett wanted to see the world. He was hampered by knowing no languages. I acted more as a courier than a secretary”.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
She was, he judged, the kind of young woman who could take care of herself with perfect ease wherever she went. She had poise and efficiency.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
You will not give away a lady’s secret?
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
If Miss Debenham is innocent, why did she conceal that fact? Why did she tell me that she had never been in America?
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
You’re apt to be done down if you speak nothing but good American.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
M. Ratchett spoke no French.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
The murderer is with us—on the train now….
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
If you will forgive me for being personal—I do not like your face, M. Ratchett,’ Poirot said.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
I don't like the idea of your being a governess at the beck and call of tyrannical mother's and their tiresome brats.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
Madame, the most kind, the most amiable are not always the cleverest.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Already, at twenty-three minutes to one, Ratchett was dead—” “And it was his murderer speaking!” finished M. Bouc impressively. Poirot
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Will you be so kind, Mademoiselle, as to write down your permanent address on this piece of paper?’ She complied. Her writing was clear and legible.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Poirot))
​It was five o’clock on a winter’s morning in Syria.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
What's wrong with my proposition? Poirot rose. If you will forgive me for being personal - I do not like tour face, M. Ratchett, he said.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
Belgian stranger—all
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
white moustache trembling
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
they had embraced each
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
I did not tell you that Helena Andrenyi was Mrs. Armstrong’s sister?
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
But you didn’t like him?” “Shall we put it that I don’t care very much for Americans, sir.” “Have you ever been in America?” “No, sir.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
I have learned to save myself useless emotion
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express / Death on the Nile / The Mirror Cracked / The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Agatha Christie Boxed Set))
sitting very upright, was one of the ugliest old ladies he had ever seen.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
He went out of the compartment and returned a few moments later with a small spirit stove and a pair of curling tongs. "I use them for the moustaches," he said, referring to the latter.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
And most conveniently she leaves her handkerchief behind!” said Poirot. “Exactly as it happens in the books and on the films—and to make things even easier for us it is marked with an initial.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
You are the only patient one Mademoiselle?" Poirot "What can one do?" she said "You are a philosopher, Mademoiselle?" Poirot "That implies a detached attitude. I think my attitude is more selfish. I have learned to save myself useless emotion
Miss Debenahm, Murder on the orient express, Agatha Christie
Ah, yes, I remember reading about that—shocking affair. I don’t think I actually ever came across the fellow, though, of course, I knew of him. Toby Armstrong. Nice fellow. Everybody liked him. He had a very distinguished career. Got the V.C.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
I read a lot of Agatha Christie's that fall of 1938 - maybe all of them. The Hercule Poirots, the Miss Marples. Death on the Nile, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, Murders .. on the links, .. at the vicarage, and.. on the Orient Express. I real them on the subway, at the deli, and in my bed alone. You can make what claims you will about the psychological nuance of Proust or the narrative scope of Tolstoy, but you can't argue that Mrs Christie fails to please. Her books are tremendously satisfying.
Amor Towles (Rules of Civility)
He was a man of between sixty and seventy. From a little distance he had the bland aspect of a philanthropist. His slightly bald head, his domed forehead, the smiling mouth that displayed a very white set of false teeth, all seemed to speak of a benevolent personality. Only the eyes belied this assumption. They were small, deep set and crafty. Not only that. As the man, making some remark to his young companion, glanced across the room, his gaze stopped on Poirot for a moment, and just for that second there was a strange malevolence, and unnatural tensity in the glance. Then
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
and endless inconvenience. But have I not heard you say often that to solve a case a man has only to lie back in his chair and think? Do that. Interview the passengers on the train, view the body, examine what clues there are and then—well, I have faith in you! I am assured that it is no idle boast of yours. Lie back and think—use (as I have heard you say so often) the little grey cells of the mind—and you will know!” He leaned forward, looking affectionately at his friend. “Your faith touches me, my friend,” said Poirot emotionally. “As you say, this cannot be a difficult case. I myself, last night—but we will not speak of that now. In truth, this problem intrigues me. I was reflecting, not half an hour ago, that many hours of boredom lay ahead whilst we are stuck here. And now—a problem lies ready to my hand.” “You accept then?” said M. Bouc eagerly. “C’est entendu. You place the matter in my hands.” “Good—we are all at your service.” “To begin with, I should like a plan of the Istanbul-Calais coach, with a note of the people who occupied the several compartments, and I should also like to see their passports and their tickets.” “Michel will get you those.” The Wagon Lit conductor left the compartment. “What other passengers are there on the train?” asked Poirot. “In this coach Dr. Constantine and I
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
The brutality of the regime knows no bounds. It does not remain neutral towards the people here; it creates beasts in its own image out of ordinary people who might have been neighbors instead. Even more dangerous was the fact that the fundamentals of humanity and the ABCs of life have been eviscerated from the hearts of many people here. State television destroys human compassion, the sort of fundamental empathy that is not contingent upon a political or even a cultural orientation, and through which one human being can relate to another. The al-Dunya channel stirs up hatred, broadcasts fake news and maligns any opposing viewpoint. I wasn't the only one subjected to internet attacks by the security services and the Ba'thists, even if the campaign against me may be fiercer because I come from the Alawite community and have a lot of family connections to them -- because I am a woman and it's supposedly easier to break me with rumors and character assassinations and insults. Some of my actress friends who expressed sympathy for the children of Dar'a and called for an end to the siege of the city were subjected to a campaign of character assassinations and called traitors, then forced to appear on state television in order to clarify their position. Friends who expressed sympathy for the families of the martyrs would get insulted, they would be called traitors and accused of being foreign spies. People became afraid to show even a little bit of sympathy for one another, going against the basic facts of life, the slightest element of what could be called the laws of human nature -- that is, if we indeed agree that sympathy is part of human nature in the first place. Moral and metaphorical murder is being carried out as part of a foolproof plan, idiotic but targeted, stupid yet leaving a mark on people's souls.
Samar Yazbek
She sipped once more.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Poirot))
Encore un peu, Madame.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Poirot))
Summing Up Paul clearly expects his readers to join him in outrage over the sexual behavior he describes in Romans 1: 24-27 as an expression of excessive, self-centered desire. He describes this behavior as an expression of “lusts” (1: 24), as driven by “passions” (1: 26), and as “consumed, or “burning,” “with passion” (1: 27). This is in keeping with the general perception of same-sex relations in the ancient world: that they were driven by insatiable desire, not content with more normal sexual relationships. Jews and Christians opposed to same-sex eroticism show no awareness of the modern notion of sexual orientation. In Romans 1: 24-27, Paul may be alluding to the notorious excesses of a former Roman emperor, Gaius Caligula, whose idolatrous patterns and sexual excesses—including same-sex eroticism—were well known, and whose murder by being stabbed in the genitals markedly echoes Paul’s words in Romans 1: 27: “receiving in their own persons the due penalty for their error.” Paul does not regard sexual desire itself as evil; it is only when desire gets out of control that it becomes lust and leads to sin. Many traditionalist interpreters of this passage focus on the “objective” disorder of same-sex relationships, but when Paul speaks of these behaviors as “lustful,” the focus falls on their excessive nature: out-of-control, self-seeking desire. Modern attempts to differentiate between same-sex orientation and same-sex behavior tend to minimize Paul’s concern with out-of-control lust in this text, focusing instead on the “objective” disorder of same-sex intimacy. Yet this move leaves gay and lesbian Christians with little help in wrestling with their “subjective” sexual orientation, which is in most cases highly resistant to change. Ultimately, Scripture does not sanction a sharp split between sinful acts and the inclination toward sinful acts. If an act is sinful, the inclination to that act is also a manifestation of one’s sinful nature. This calls into question whether the orientation/ behavior dichotomy in many traditionalist approaches to homosexuality is theologically and ethically viable. But if we keep Paul’s focus in Romans 1: 24-27 on out-of-control desire firmly in focus, we will recognize that these concerns may not be reflected in committed gay or lesbian relationships, opening up the possibility that these relationships may not be “lustful” and thus not directly addressed by Paul’s polemic in Romans 1.
James V. Brownson (Bible, Gender, Sexuality)
The contents of Mr. Hardman’s two “grips” were soon examined and passed. They contained perhaps an undue proportion of spirituous liquor. Mr. Hardman winked. “It’s not often they search your grips at the frontiers—not if you fix the conductor. I handed out a wad of Turkish notes right away, and there’s been no trouble so far.” “And at Paris?” Mr. Hardman winked again. “By the time I get to Paris,” he said, “what’s left over of this little lot will go into a bottle labelled hairwash.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
You are a philosopher, Mademoiselle.” “That implies a detached attitude. I think my attitude is more selfish. I have learned to save myself useless emotion.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
What,” asked Dr. Constantine with interest, “does a pukka sahib mean?” “It means,” said Poirot, “that Miss Debenham’s father and brothers were at the same kind of school as Colonel Arbuthnot.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Qui s’excuse s’accuse;
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
He adores his wife. He wants to save her! He tells his lie very well—quite in the grand Seigneur manner, but what else than a lie could it be?
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Whatever people say, there is right, there is wrong. There is nothing in between.' - Hercule Poirot (Murder on the Orient Express)
Agatha Christie
Nikos stared out across the bleached sand, the scattered cacti and rock. “Walk with me a while, Bartolomeo.” We walked together across the hot sand, an arm’s length apart. I’d already lost my orientation, and when I looked around, I found I could not locate the entrance I’d used; I was struck by the irrational fear that I might never be able to find my way out of there. Or that Nikos would murder me. My body could remain undiscovered for decades. “We’ve been friends a lot of years, Bartolomeo.” “Were friends,” I corrected him. “No more?” “I don’t think so, Nikos.” He stopped, turned, and looked at me, his expression steady. If he’d been drinking recently, I couldn’t tell. Everything about him seemed sober and firm. “We’ve both made mistakes. Out of fear, or mistrust. Or perhaps even simple misunderstanding. Whatever the reasons. But is the damage to our friendship irreparable?” I’d thought so, but suddenly I was unsure. Watching him, listening to him, I was unable to detect any dissembling. He seemed sincere. Nikos could be deceptive and manipulative, but I always thought I could see through him. I’d missed it before, although looking back on it, I realized the signs had been there—I just hadn’t recognized them; maybe because I hadn’t wanted to. Now, though, I saw nothing but a sincere effort at reconciliation. “I don’t know,” I finally said. “Honest
Richard Paul Russo (Ship of Fools)
clouded over
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
I like to see an angry Englishman,” said Poirot. “They are very amusing. The more emotional they feel the less command they have of language.” But
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Then,’ said Poirot, ‘having placed my solution before you, I have the honour to retire from the case…
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
In fact you are quite certain of her guilt.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
You must revive
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Graceful phrases fell from his lips in polished French.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
I think, Madame, that your strength is in your will—not in your arm.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
You console me a little, but only a little,’ said Poirot.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
Ugly as sin, but she makes herself felt. You agree?
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
Miss Debenham and MacQueen—will also have seen her. It was, I think, someone with a sense of humour who thoughtfully
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
L’impossible ne peut évidemment pas s’être produit. Cela veut dire, par conséquent, que l’impossible est possible en dépit des apparences.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
Fracture of Human Soul
Murder OrientExpress
The American was succeeded by the pale Englishman with the inexpressive face whom Poirot had already noticed on the day before. He stood waiting very correctly. Poirot motioned to him to sit down. “You are, I understand, the valet of M. Ratchett?” “Yes, sir.” “Your name?” “Edward Henry Masterman.” “Your age?” “Thirty-nine.” “And your home address?” “21 Friar Street, Clerkenwell.” “You have heard that your master has been murdered?” “Yes, sir. A very shocking occurrence.” “Will you now tell me, please,
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
And yet it lends itself to romance, my friend. All around us are people, of all classes, of all nationalities, of all ages. For three days these people, these strangers to one another, are brought together. They sleep and eat under one roof, they cannot get away from each other. At the end of three days they part, they go their several ways, never, perhaps, to see each other again.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
But, after all, why not? And if so--why, if so, that would explain everything.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
Ah, you agree? It has not been done, I think? And yet—it lends itself to romance, my friend. All around us are people, of all classes, of all nationalities, of all ages. For three days these people, these strangers to one another, are brought together. They sleep and eat under one roof, they cannot get away from each other. At the end of three days they part, they go their several ways, never, perhaps, to see each other again.” “And yet,” said Poirot, “suppose an accident—” “Ah no, my friend—” “From your point of view it would be regrettable, I agree. But nevertheless let us just for one moment suppose it. Then, perhaps, all these here are linked together—by death.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
thick,
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
I like to see an angry Englishman,” said Poirot. “They are very amusing. The more emotional they feel the less command they have of language.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Flog this man to death and throw him out in the rubbish heap!
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
rumours, of course, as there always were
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
اثنتي عشر طعنة، يالله! هذا يدل على منتهى القوة والوحشية! فقال كبير الموظفين بالقطار: أظن أن القاتل امرأة، فالنساء هن اللاتي ينتقمن بمثل هذه الفظاعة.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
His interest lay wholly in the crime—swooning middle-aged ladies did not interest him at all.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Les affaires - les affaires"-M. Bauc
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
Women are like that. When they are enraged they have great strength.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
Hercule Poirot se dedică operațiunii de a-și ține mustața departe de supă.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
...there was a good deal going on underneath the quietness.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
When he passed me in the restaurant," he said at last, "I had a curious impression. It was as though a wild animal – an animal savage, but savage! you understand – had passed me by." "And yet he looked altogether of the most respectable." "Précisément! The body – the cage – is everything of the most respectable – but through the bars, the wild animal looks out." "You are fanciful, mon vieux," said M. Bouc. "It may be so. But I could not rid myself of the impression that evil had passed me by very close." (1.2.52-56)
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
If you will forgive me for being personal—I do not like your face, M. Ratchett,” he said.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
doctor’s tone caught Poirot’s attention
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Poirot: My name is Hercule Poirot, you know the name perhaps? American passenger: Why yes, it does seem kind of familiar, only I thought it was some kind of a woman’s dressmaker. Poirot: (exasperated sigh) It is incredible.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
it is a lady’s handkerchief,
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Miss Debenham, whose second name is Hermione,
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
bottom dollar
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Evidence Against Him or Suspicious Circumstances: Pipe-cleaner.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
The Orient Express had started on its three-days’ journey across Europe.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
You are a philosopher mademoiselle. This implies a detached attitude. I think my attitude is more selfish. I have learned to save myself from useless emotion.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
He paused, then added, “I am a detective. My name is Hercule Poirot.” If he expected an effect he did not get one. MacQueen said merely, “Oh, yes?” and waited for him to go on. “You know the name, perhaps.” “Why, it does seem kind of familiar—only I always thought it was a woman’s dressmaker.” Hercule Poirot looked at him with distaste.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
Every traveller on the train seemed to be congregated outside the door.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
We can arrange such facts as we have with order and method.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
This was not a man who had to have information dragged from him.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
This affair advances in a very strange manner.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10))
The true Western spirit of hustle,” said Poirot with a smile.
Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express)
It’s like a reverse Murder on the Orient Express. Everyone wants it dead, nobody wants to stab it!
Ronan Farrow (Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators)