Mansfield Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Mansfield. Here they are! All 100 of them:

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The pleasure of all reading is doubled when one lives with another who shares the same books.
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Katherine Mansfield
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The mind I love must have wild places.
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Katherine Mansfield
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Life seems but a quick succession of busy nothings.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Ah, what happiness it is to be with people who are all happy, to press hands, press cheeks, smile into eyes.
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Katherine Mansfield
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I was quiet, but I was not blind.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Make it a rule of life never to regret and never to look back. Regret is an appalling waste of energy; you can't build on it; it's only good for wallowing in.
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Katherine Mansfield
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We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Selfishness must always be forgiven you know, because there is no hope of a cure.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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A fondness for reading, properly directed, must be an education in itself.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Her own thoughts and reflections were habitually her best companions.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park ($.99 British Classics))
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The mind I love must have wild places, a tangled orchard where dark damsons drop in the heavy grass, an overgrown little wood, the chance of a snake or two, a pool that nobody's fathomed the depth of, and paths threaded with flowers planted by the mind.
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Katherine Mansfield
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What I feel for you can’t be conveyed in phrasal combinations; It either screams out loud or stays painfully silent but I promise β€” it beats words. It beats worlds.
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Katherine Mansfield
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Every moment has its pleasures and its hope.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Let us have the luxury of silence.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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But indeed I would rather have nothing but tea.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Oh! Do not attack me with your watch. A watch is always too fast or too slow. I cannot be dictated to by a watch.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Fanny! You are killing me!" "No man dies of love but on the stage, Mr. Crawford.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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There will be little rubs and disappointments everywhere, and we are all apt to expect too much; but then, if one scheme of happiness fails, human nature turns to another; if the first calculation is wrong, we make a second better: we find comfort somewhere.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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I cannot comprehend the neglect of a family library in such days as these." - Mr. Darcy
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Jane Austen (Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Persuasion)
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I was so anxious to do what is right that I forgot to do what is right.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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I always felt that the great high privilege, relief and comfort of friendship, was that one had to explain nothing
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Katherine Mansfield
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But there certainly are not so many men of large fortune in the world as there are pretty women to deserve them.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery. I quit such odious subjects as soon as I can, impatient to restore everybody not greatly in fault themselves to tolerable comfort, and to have done with all the rest.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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I have no talent for certainty.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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[N]obody minds having what is too good for them.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Of course I love her, but there are as many forms of love as there are moments in time.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Could we change our attitude, we should not only see life differently, but life itself would come to be different. Life would undergo a change of appearance because we ourselves had undergone a change of attitude.
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Katherine Mansfield
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Everybody likes to go their own way–to choose their own time and manner of devotion.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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You have never been curious about me; you never wanted to explore my soul.
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Katherine Mansfield
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I am treating you as my friend, asking you to share my present minuses in the hope that I can ask you to share my future plusses.
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Katherine Mansfield
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I saw myself driving through Eternity in a timeless taxi.
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Katherine Mansfield
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This is not a letter but my arms about you for a brief moment.
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Katherine Mansfield
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Isn't life,' she stammered, 'isn't life--' But what life was she couldn't explain. No matter. He quite understood. 'Isn't it, darling?' said Laurie.
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Katherine Mansfield (The Garden Party and Other Stories)
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I am very strong. Nothing ever fatigues me, but doing what I do not like.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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I adore Life. What do all the fools matter and all the stupidity. They do matter but somehow for me they cannot touch the body of Life. Life is marvellous. I want to be deeply rooted in it - to live - to expand - to breathe in it - to rejoice - to share it. To give and to be asked for Love.
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Katherine Mansfield
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I have made it a rule of my life never to regret and never to look back. Regret is an appalling waste of energy... you can't build on it; it's only good for wallowing in.
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Katherine Mansfield
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You have qualities which I had not before supposed to exist in such a degree in any human creature. You have some touches of the angel in you.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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The mind I love most must have wild places, a tangled orchard where dark damsons drop in the heavy grass, an overgrown little wood, the chance of a snake or two, a pool that nobody fathomed the depth of, and paths threaded with flowers planted by the mind.
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Katherine Mansfield (Katherine Mansfield Notebooks: Complete Edition)
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…but then I am unlike other people I dare say.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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If this man had not twelve thousand a year, he would be a very stupid fellow.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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When we begin to take our failures non-seriously, it means we are ceasing to be afraid of them.
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Katherine Mansfield
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Would you not like to try all sorts of lives - one is so very small - but that is the satisfaction of writing - one can impersonate so many people.
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Katherine Mansfield
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Oh! write, write. Finish it at once. Let there be an end of this suspense. Fix, commit, condemn yourself.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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She was not often invited to join in the conversation of the others, nor did she desire it. Her own thoughts and reflections were habitually her best companions.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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She was feeling, thinking, trembling about everything; agitated, happy, miserable, infinitely obliged, absolutely angry.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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I have such a horror of telegrams that ask me how I am!! I always want to reply dead.
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Katherine Mansfield
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Sitting with her on Sunday evening β€” a wet Sunday evening β€” the very time of all others when if a friend is at hand the heart must be opened, and every thing told…
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Love hasn't got anything to do with the heart, the heart's a disgusting organ, a sort of pump full of blood. Love is primarily concerned with the lungs. People shouldn't say "she's broken my heart" but "she's stifled my lungs." Lungs are the most romantic organs: lovers and artists always contract tuberculosis. It's not a coincidence that Chekhov, Kafka, D.H. Lawrence, Chopin, George Orwell and St Thérèse of Lisieux all died of it; as for Camus, Moravia, Boudard and Katherine Mansfield, would they have written the same books if it werent for TB?
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FrΓ©dΓ©ric Beigbeder (99 francs)
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Great poetry needs no interpreter other than a responsive heart.
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Helen Keller (The Story of My Life: With Her Letters (1887 1901) and a Supplementary Account of Her Education Including Passages from the Reports and Letters of Her Teacher Anne Mansfield Sullivan by John Albert Macy)
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I am a recluse at present & do nothing but write & read & read & write
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Katherine Mansfield (The Collected Letters of Katherine Mansfield: Volume 1: 1903-1917)
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I think of you often. Especially in the evenings, when I am on the balcony and it’s too dark to write or to do anything but wait for the stars. A time I love. One feels half disembodied, sitting like a shadow at the door of one’s being while the dark tide rises. Then comes the moon, marvellously serene, and small stars, very merry for some reason of their own. It is so easy to forget, in a worldly life, to attend to these miracles.
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Katherine Mansfield (The Collected Letters of Katherine Mansfield: Volume 1: 1903-1917)
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It's a terrible thing to be alone -- yes it is -- it is -- but don't lower your mask until you have another mask prepared beneath -- as terrible as you like -- but a mask.
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Katherine Mansfield
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I think it ought not to be set down as certain, that a man must be acceptable to every woman he may happen to like himself.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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You must really begin to harden yourself to the idea of being worth looking at.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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If any one faculty of our nature may be called more wonderful than the rest, I do think it is memory. There seems something more speakingly incomprehensible in the powers, the failures, the inequalities of memory, than in any other of our intelligences. The memory is sometimes so retentive, so serviceable, so obedient; at others, so bewildered and so weak; and at others again, so tyrannic, so beyond control! We are, to be sure, a miracle every way; but our powers of recollecting and of forgetting do seem peculiarly past finding out.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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To be alive and to be a β€˜writer’ is enough.
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Katherine Mansfield (Journal of Katherine Mansfield)
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What is it with me? Am I absolutely nobody, but merely inordinately vain? I do not know…. But I am most fearfully unhappy. That is all. I am so unhappy that I wish I was deadβ€”yet I should be mad to die when I have not yet lived at all.
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Katherine Mansfield
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I imagine I was always writing. Twaddle it was, too. But better far write twaddle or anything, anything, than nothing at all.
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Katherine Mansfield
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I understand Crawford paid you a visit?" "Yes." "And was he attentive?" "Yes, very." "And has your heart changed towards him?" "Yes. Several times. I have - I find that I - I find that-" "Shh. Surely you and I are beyond speaking when words are clearly not enough.... I missed you." "And I you.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Good-humoured, unaffected girls, will not do for a man who has been used to sensible women. They are two distinct orders of being.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Run mad as often as you choose, but do not faint
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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The enthusiasm of a woman's love is even beyond the biographer's.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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I do not pretend to set people right, but I do see that they are often wrong.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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I am conscious of a soul-sense that lifts me above the narrow, cramping circumstances of my life. My physical limitations are forgotten- my world lies upward, the length and the breadth and the sweep of the heavens are mine!
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Helen Keller (The Story of My Life: With Her Letters (1887 1901) and a Supplementary Account of Her Education Including Passages from the Reports and Letters of Her Teacher Anne Mansfield Sullivan by John Albert Macy)
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To sit in the shade on a fine day and look upon verdure is the most perfect refreshment.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Those who have not more must be satisfied with what they have.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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The truth is that every true admirer of the novels cherishes the happy thought that he alone - reading between the lines - has become the secret friend of their author.
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Katherine Mansfield
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Life seems nothing more than a quick succession of busy nothings.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Ach, Tchekov! Why are you dead? Why can’t I talk to you in a big darkish room at late eveningβ€”where the light is green from the waving trees outside? I’d like to write a series of Heavens: that would be one.
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Katherine Mansfield (Journal of Katherine Mansfield)
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We do not look in great cities for our best morality.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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that you seemed almost as fearful of notice and praise as other women were of neglect. (Edmund to Fanny)
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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None but a woman can teach the science of herself.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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It was a gloomy prospect, and all that she could do was to throw a mist over it, and hope when the mist cleared away, she should see something else.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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There is nothing like employment, active indispensable employment, for relieving sorrow. Employment, even melancholy, may dispel melancholy.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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What can you do if you are thirty and, turning the corner of your own street, you are overcome, suddenly, by a feeling of bliss - absolute bliss - as though you'd suddenly swallowed a bright piece of that late afternoon sun and it burned in your bosom, sending out a little shower of sparks into every particle into every finger and toe?...
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Katherine Mansfield (Something Childish But Very Natural (Penguin Great Loves, #13))
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To acknowledge the presence of fear is to give birth to failure.
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Katherine Mansfield
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How beautiful she loked, but there was nobody to see, nobody.
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Katherine Mansfield (The Collected Stories of Katherine Mansfield)
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An engaged woman is always more agreeable than a disengaged. She is satisfied with herself. Her cares are over, and she may exert all her powers of pleasing without suspicion. All is safe with a lady engaged; no harm can be done
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Give a girl an education, and introduce her properly into the world,
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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I can never be important to any one.' 'What is to prevent you?' 'Every thing β€” my situation β€” my foolishness and awkwardness.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Light as feathers the witches fly, The horn of the moon is plain to see; By a firefly under a jonquil flower A goblin toasts a bumble-bee.
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Katherine Mansfield (The Poems of Katherine Mansfield)
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Her mind was all disorder. The past, present, future, every thing was terrible.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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The heavens opened for the sunset to-night. When I had thought the day folded and sealed, came a burst of heavenly bright petals.
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Katherine Mansfield (Journal of Katherine Mansfield)
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Outside the sky is light with stars
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Katherine Mansfield (The Poems of Katherine Mansfield)
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But Shakespeare one gets acquainted with without knowing how. It is a part of an Englishman's constitution. His thoughts and beauties are so spread abroad that one touches them everywhere; one is intimate with him by instinct. No man of any brain can open at a good part of one of his plays without falling into the flow of his meaning immediately.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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For the special thrilling quality of their friendship was in their complete surrender. Like two open cities in the midst of some vast plain their two minds lay open to each other. And it wasn't as if he rode into hers like a conqueror, armed to the eyebrows and seeing nothing but a gay silken flutter--nor did she enter his like a queen walking on soft petals. No, they were eager, serious travellers, absorbed in understanding what was to be seen and discovering what was hidden--making the most of this extraordinary absolute chance which made it possible for him to be utterly truthful to her and for her to be utterly sincere with him.
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Katherine Mansfield (The Collected Stories)
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There is no reason in the world why you should not be important where you are known. You have good sense, and a sweet temper, and I am sure you have a grateful heart, that could never receive kindness without hoping to return it. I do not know any better qualifications for a friend and companion.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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... But he recommended the books which charmed her leisure hours, he encouraged her taste, and corrected her judgment; he made reading useful by talking to her of what she read, and heightened its attraction by judicious praise.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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Fanny spoke her feelings. "Here's harmony!" said she; "here's repose! Here's what may leave all painting and all music behind, and what may tranquillise every care, and lift the heart to rapture! When I look out on such a night as this, I feel as if there could be neither wickedness nor sorrow in the world; and there certainly would be less of both if the sublimity of Nature were more attended to, and people were carried more out of themselves by contemplating such a scene.
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Jane Austen (Mansfield Park)
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I began my studies with eagerness. Before me I saw a new world opening in beauty and light, and I felt within me the capacity to know all things. In the wonderland of Mind I should be as free as another [with sight and hearing]. Its people, scenery, manners, joys, and tragedies should be living tangible interpreters of the real world. The lecture halls seemed filled with the spirit of the great and wise, and I thought the professors were the embodiment of wisdom... But I soon discovered that college was not quite the romantic lyceum I had imagined. Many of the dreams that had delighted my young inexperience became beautifully less and "faded into the light of common day." Gradually I began to find that there were disadvantages in going to college. The one I felt and still feel most is lack of time. I used to have time to think, to reflect, my mind and I. We would sit together of an evening and listen to the inner melodies of the spirit, which one hears only in leisure moments when the words of some loved poet touch a deep, sweet chord in the soul that until then had been silent. But in college there is no time to commune with one's thoughts. One goes to college to learn, it seems, not to think. When one enters the portals of learning, one leaves the dearest pleasures – solitude, books and imagination – outside with the whispering pines. I suppose I ought to find some comfort in the thought that I am laying up treasures for future enjoyment, but I am improvident enough to prefer present joy to hoarding riches against a rainy day.
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Helen Keller (The Story of My Life: With Her Letters (1887 1901) and a Supplementary Account of Her Education Including Passages from the Reports and Letters of Her Teacher Anne Mansfield Sullivan by John Albert Macy)
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I want so to live that I work with my hands and my feeling and my brain. I want a garden, a small house, grass, animals, books, pictures, music. And out of this, the expression of this, I want to be writing (Though I may write about cabmen. That’s no matter.) But warm, eager, living life β€” to be rooted in life β€” to learn, to desire, to feel, to think, to act. This is what I want. And nothing less. That is what I must try for.
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Katherine Mansfield
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There are times when I long to sweep away half the things I am expected to learn; for the overtaxed mind cannot enjoy the treasure it has secured at the greatest cost. ... When one reads hurriedly and nervously, having in mind written tests and examinations, one's brain becomes encumbered with a lot of bric-a-brac for which there seems to be little use. At the present time my mind is so full of heterogeneous matter that I almost despair of ever being able to put it in order. Whenever I enter the region of my mind I feel like the proverbial bull in the china shop. A thousand odds and ends of knowledge come crashing about my head like hailstones, and when I try to escape them, theme goblins and college nixies of all sorts pursue me, until I wish – oh, may I be forgiven the wicked wish! – that I might smash the idols I came to worship.
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Helen Keller (The Story of My Life: With Her Letters (1887 1901) and a Supplementary Account of Her Education Including Passages from the Reports and Letters of Her Teacher Anne Mansfield Sullivan by John Albert Macy)
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Don’t you think the stairs are a good place for reading letters? I do. One is somehow suspended. One is on neutral ground - not in one’s own world nor in a strange one. They are an almost perfect meeting place. Oh Heavens! How stairs do fascinate me when I think of it. Waiting for people - sitting on strange stairs - hearing steps far above, watching the light playing by itself - hearing - far below a door, looking down into a kind of dim brightness, watching someone come up. But I could go on forever. Must put them in a story though! People come out of themselves on stairs - they issue forth, unprotected.
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Katherine Mansfield (Letters and Journals)
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Why does one feel so different at night? Why is it so exciting to be awake when everybody else is asleep? Lateβ€”it is very late! And yet every moment you feel more and more wakeful, as though you were slowly, almost with every breath, waking up into a new, wonderful, far more thrilling and exciting world than the daylight one. And what is this queer sensation that you’re a conspirator? Lightly, stealthily you move about your room. You take something off the dressing-table and put it down again without a sound. And everything, even the bedpost, knows you, responds, shares your secret… You're not very fond of your room by day. You never think about it. You're in and out, the door opens and slams, the cupboard creaks. You sit down on the side of your bed, change your shoes and dash out again. A dive down to the glass, two pins in your hair, powder your nose and off again. But now–it's suddenly dear to you. It's a darling little funny room. It's yours. Oh, what a joy it is to own things! Mine–my own!
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Katherine Mansfield (At the Bay)
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Although Bertha Young was thirty she still had moments like this when she wanted to run instead of walk, to take dancing steps on and off the pavement, to bowl a hoop, to throw something up in the air and catch it again, or to stand still and laugh at - nothing - at nothing, simply. What can you do if you are thirty and, turning the corner of your own street, you are overcome, suddenly by a feeling of bliss - absolute bliss! - as though you'd suddenly swallowed a bright piece of that late afternoon sun and it burned in your bosom, sending out a little shower of sparks into every particle, into every finger and toe?
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Katherine Mansfield
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I’d love to tearfully absorb you in every way and I’d love to play with your hair, read your eyes, feel disarmed in your presence. I’d love to experience a seizure of full-silenced tenderness with you and at the same time dwell on your Dionysian idiosyncrasy of red, slightly heated wine, constant passion and chaos; How can I even imprison this desire into mere letters structured together in order to form a coherent meaning? There is no meaning. Darling! Darling! You can flash β€œmeaning” down the toilet if you wish. Still, I’d love to share a life full of richness with you: Richness not in terms of events, incidents, facts or experiences; but richness in terms of a colourful, adventurous, enthusiastically unraveling life. I’d love to lose all privileges of existence as long as I might have a small chance of walking on water with you.
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Katherine Mansfield (Selected Letters)
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It was my teacher's genius, her quick sympathy, her loving tact which made the first years of my education so beautiful. It was because she seized the right moment to impart knowledge that made it so pleasant and acceptable to me. She realized that a child's mind is like a shallow brook which ripples and dances merrily over the stony course of its education and reflects here a flower, there a bush, yonder a fleecy cloud; and she attempted to guide my mind on its way, knowing that like a brook it should be fed by mountain streams and hidden springs, until it broadened out into a deep river, capable of reflecting in its placid surface, billowy hills, the luminous shadows of trees and the blue heavens, as well as the sweet face of a little flower. Any teacher can take a child to the classroom, but not every teacher can make him learn. He will not work joyously unless he feels that liberty is his, whether he is busy or at rest; he must feel the flush of victory and the heart-sinking of disappointment before he takes with a will the tasks distasteful to him and resolves to dance his way bravely through a dull routine of textbooks. My teacher is so near to me that I scarcely think of myself apart from her. How much of my delight in all beautiful things is innate, and how much is due to her influence, I can never tell. I feel that her being is inseparable from my own, and that the footsteps of my life are in hers. All the best of me belongs to her--there is not a talent, or an aspiration or a joy in me that has not been awakened by her loving touch.
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Helen Keller (The Story of My Life: With Her Letters (1887 1901) and a Supplementary Account of Her Education Including Passages from the Reports and Letters of Her Teacher Anne Mansfield Sullivan by John Albert Macy)
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The difference between Marilyn’s and Jayne’s approach to intellectual pursuits is that Marilyn carried big heavy books around and hung out with brainy people to absorb their intellect, while Jayne really had a thirst for knowledge. Jayne was very proud of the fact that if she like something enough she would commit it to memory. At that time, The Satanic Bible was still in monograph form, and Jayne had pored over those pages until she knew most of it by heart...Marilyn gave me a copy of Stendhal’s On Love, and I still have a copy of Walter Benton’s This is My Beloved, which we bought together on Sunset Boulevard. Marilyn turned me on to itβ€”wanted me to read it and write something in it for her. I got as far as writing her name in it, but I ended up with the book. It meant a lot to me during a particularly dark period in my life after I left L.A. Jayne kept insisting I read The Story of O and I, Jan Cremer. She gave me a dog-eared copy of each. It seems a distinctly feminine trait to want to share books with people they care deeply about.
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Anton Szandor LaVey (The Secret Life of a Satanist: The Authorized Biography of Anton LaVey)
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I could need you in many ways yet I don’t; I love you in many ways. It is peculiar. I need you only in the sense that you need yourself. I don’t expect anything to be mutually intense among us. I somehow like the thought of being the one who is feeling already more than one should. But I need you to believe that you are distinctively refreshing. And uncommon. And intriguing. It is an extreme oddity of mine but I need you to believe that. Call it a form of paranoia; I know that I am feeding your ego right now. Call it self-defense; I am putting in words your uniqueness in an attempt to explain to my own self why is it that I adore you. The truth is: You shine out like the sun shines out and you melt away all my intentions of a fatal, whatsoever, description regarding what is it exactly that you do. There is no exactness. See, it takes suns and miraculous imagery to slightly sketch you in words whereas you probably are as complex as an impressionist painting of impeccable quality. You continually provoke my blatantly awful poetical instincts; that is for sure.
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Katherine Mansfield (Selected Stories)