Macbeth Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Macbeth. Here they are! All 200 of them:

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By the pricking of my thumbs, Something wicked this way comes.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Stars, hide your fires; Let not light see my black and deep desires.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Double, double, toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble!
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Life ... is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Give sorrow words; the grief that does not speak knits up the o-er wrought heart and bids it break.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day, To the last syllable of recorded time; And all our yesterdays have lighted fools The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player, That struts and frets his hour upon the stage, And then is heard no more. It is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Look like the innocent flower, But be the serpent under it.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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What's done cannot be undone.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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...Who could refrain, That had a heart to love, and in that heart Courage to make love known?
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and is heard no more. It is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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False face must hide what the false heart doth know.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Fair is foul, and foul is fair, hover through fog and filthy air.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Where shall we three meet again in thunder, lightning, or in rain? When the hurlyburly 's done, when the battle 's lost and won
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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I dare do all that may become a man; Who dares do more, is none
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Things without all remedy should be without regard: what's done is done.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Come what come may, time and the hour run through the roughest day.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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O, full of scorpions is my mind!
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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All causes shall give way: I am in blood Steppโ€™d in so far that, should I wade no more, Returning were as tedious as go oโ€™er.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Confusion now hath made his masterpiece.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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it provokes the desire, but it takes away the performance
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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My hands are of your color, but I shame to wear a heart so white.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Out, damned spot! out, I say!
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Out, out brief candle, life is but a walking shadow...a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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So fair and foul a day I have not seen.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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The love that follows us sometime is our trouble, which still we thank as love.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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I have no spur To prick the sides of my intent, but only Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself And falls on the other.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Macbeth: If we should fail? Lady Macbeth: We fail? But screw your courage to the sticking place, And we'll not fail.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player, That struts and frets his hour upon the stage, And then is heard no more. It is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Angels are bright still, though the brightest fell. Though all things foul would wear the brows of grace, Yet Grace must still look so.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Macbeth: How does your patient, doctor? Doctor: Not so sick, my lord, as she is troubled with thick-coming fancies that keep her from rest. Macbeth: Cure her of that! Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased, pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, raze out the written troubles of the brain, and with some sweet oblivious antidote cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff which weighs upon her heart. Doctor: Therein the patient must minister to himself.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Methought I heard a voice cry, Sleep no more! Macbeth does murder sleep, - the innocent sleep; Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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What's done, is done
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Stars hide your fires; let not light see my black and deep desires: The eyes wink at the hand; yet let that be which the eye fears, when it is done, to see
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood clean from my hand? No, this my hand will rather the multitudinous seas incarnadine, making the green one red.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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What, you egg?
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Blood will have blood.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Angels are bright still, though the brightest fell.
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William Shakespeare
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And nothing is, but what is not.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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If you can look into the seeds of time, and say which grain will grow and which will not ...
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Your face, my thane, is as a book where men May read strange matters. To beguile the time, Look like the time; bear welcome in your eye, Your hand, your tongue: look like the innocent flower, But be the serpent under't.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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At the word witch, we imagine the horrible old crones from Macbeth. But the cruel trials witches suffered teach us the opposite. Many perished precisely because they were young and beautiful.
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Andrรฉ Breton (Anthology of Black Humor)
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The multiplying villainies of nature do swarm upon him... [from Macbeth]
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Alan Moore (V for Vendetta)
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Still it cried โ€˜Sleep no more!โ€™ to all the house: โ€˜Glamis hath murderโ€™d sleep, and therefore Cawdor shall sleep no more,โ€”Macbeth shall sleep no more!
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Your cause of sorrow must not be measured by his worth, for then it hath no end.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth: Playgoer's Edition)
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I drink to the general joy oโ€™ the whole table." Macbeth
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Receive what cheer you may. The night is long that never finds the day.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him? - Lady Macbeth
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Come, you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts! Unsex me here, And fill me from the crown to the toe top full Of direst cruelty; make thick my blood, Stop up the access and passage to remorse, That no compunctious visitings of nature Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between The effect and it! Come to my womanโ€™s breasts, And take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers, Wherever in your sightless substances You wait on natureโ€™s mischief! Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, That my keen knife see not the wound it makes, Nor Heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry "Hold, hold!
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Nothing in his life became him like the leaving it.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Tis safter to be that which we destroy Than by destruction dwell in doubtful joy.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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There is nothing serious in Mortality
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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My dull brain was wrought with things forgotten.
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William Shakespeare
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Be bloody bold and resolute.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Sometimes when we are labeled, when we are branded our brand becomes our calling.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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MACBETH: Canst thou not minister to a mind diseas'd, Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, Raze out the written troubles of the brain, And with some sweet oblivious antidote Cleanse the stuff'd bosom of the perilous stuff Which weighs upon the heart? DOCTOR: Therein the patient Must minister to himself.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Sleep that knits up the raveled sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labor's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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The grief that does not speak whispers the o'erfraught heart and bids it break.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Unnatural deeds do breed unnatural troubles.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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I go and it is done. The bell invites me. Hear it not, Duncan, for it is a knell that summons thee to heaven or to hell.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Something wicked this way comes
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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A little water clears us of this deed.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Youโ€™re like Lady Macbeth without the murder.โ€ โ€œThank you. You have no idea how much of a compliment that is to me.
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John Corey Whaley (Highly Illogical Behavior)
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When shall we three meet again In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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He shall spurn fate, scorn death, and bear His hopes 'bove wisdom, grace and fear: And you all know, security Is mortals' chiefest enemy.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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My hands are of your colour; but I shame To wear a heart so white.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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What, you egg? [stabs him]
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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She came leaping towards me, like Lady Macbeth coming to get first-hand news from the guest-room.
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P.G. Wodehouse (Joy in the Morning (Jeeves, #8))
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Far away, I could hear them lapping up my brains. Like Macbeth's witches, the three lithe cats surrounded my broken head, slurping up that thick soup inside. The tips of their rough tongues licked the soft folds of my mind. And with each lick my consciousness flickered like a flame and faded away.
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Haruki Murakami (Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman)
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Screw your courage to the sticking-place
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Let every man be master of his time.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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I have supped full with horrors.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Fair is foul, and foul is fair.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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There are always two sides to every story, Kelley. Something I learned playing Richard the Third and Macbeth: if you're playing the 'bad guy', you never really think of yourself as bad. It's just that your motives are often...misunderstood by everyone else.
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Lesley Livingston (Tempestuous (Wondrous Strange, #3))
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But tis strange: And oftentimes, to win us to our harm, the Instruments of Darkness tell us truths, win us with honest trifles, to betray's in deepest consequence.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Alas, poor country, almost afraid to know itself! It cannot be called our mother, but our grave.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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But screw your courage to the sticking place, and we'll not fail.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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He was too spotless to talk of blood and murder like Macbeth, but in the red glare of the fire he no longer looked so angelic. Instead he was handsome the way you think of the devil as handsomeโ€”forbiddingly so.
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M.L. Rio (If We Were Villains)
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thou art the best o' the cut-throats
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Life is a tale, told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Away and mark the time with fairest show, False face must hide what false heart doth know.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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I am settled, and bend up each corporal agent to this terrible feat. Away, and mock the time with fairest show: False face must hide what the false heart doth know.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Naught's had, all's spent, Where our desire is got without content. 'Tis safer to be that which we destroy Than by destruction dwell in doubtful joy.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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In The Gulag Archipelago, for example, Alexander Solzhenitsyn remarks that Shakespeareโ€™s evildoers, Macbeth notably among them, stop short at a mere dozen corpses because they have no ideology.
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Theodore Dalrymple (Our Culture, What's Left of It: The Mandarins and the Masses)
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To beguile the time, look like the time.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Macbeth's self-justifications were feeble โ€“ and his conscience devoured him. Yes, even Iago was a little lamb, too. The imagination and spiritual strength of Shakespeare's evildoers stopped short at a dozen corpses. Ideologyโ€”that is what gives evildoing its long-sought justification and gives the evildoer the necessary steadfastness and determination. That is the social theory which helps to make his acts seem good instead of bad in his own and others' eyes, so that he won't hear reproaches and curses but will receive praise and honors. That was how the agents of the Inquisition fortified their wills: by invoking Christianity; the conquerors of foreign lands, by extolling the grandeur of their Motherland; the colonizers, by civilization; the Nazis, by race; and the Jacobins (early and late), by equality, brotherhood, and the happiness of future generations.... Without evildoers there would have been no Archipelago.
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Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (The Gulag Archipelago 1918โ€“1956 (Abridged))
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Life repeats Shakespearian themes more often than we think. Did Lady Macbeth, Richard III, and King Claudius exist only in the Middle Ages? Shylock wanted to cut a pound of flesh from the body of the merchant of Venice. Is that a fairy tale?
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Varlam Shalamov (Kolyma Tales)
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Out, damned spot! out, I say!โ€”One, two; why, then โ€˜tis time to doโ€™t.โ€”Hell is murky!โ€”Fie, my lord, fie! a soldier, and afeard? What need we fear who knows it, when none can call our power to account?โ€”Yet who would have thought the old man to have so much blood in him? The thane of Fife had a wife; where is she now?โ€”What, will these hands neโ€™er be clean?โ€”No more oโ€™that, my lord, no more oโ€™that: you mar all with this starting. Hereโ€™s the smell of the blood still: all the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand. Oh, oh, oh!
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical, Shakes so my single state of man That function is smothered in surmise, And nothing is but what is not.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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So well thy words become thee as thy wounds;
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Iโ€™m notโ€” Lady Macbeth Lucrezia Borgia Catherine the Great. I am โ€”a woman doing what she has to do. I am โ€”the woman you made me. Elena is at war.
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Don Winslow
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Everybody needs a career manager."- Lady Macbeth
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Robert Lynn Asprin (Myth-ing Persons (Myth Adventures, #5))
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Now and again in these parts you come across people so remarkable that, no matter how much time has passed since you met them, it is impossible to recall them without your heart trembling.
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Nikolai Leskov (Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk)
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Present fears are less than horrible imaginings.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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It was sort of like Macbeth, thought Fat Charlie, an hour later; in fact, if the witches in Macbeth had been four little old ladies and if, instead of stirring cauldrons and intoning dread incantations, they had just welcomed Macbeth in and fed him turkey and rice and peas spread out on white china plates on a red-and-white patterned plastic tablecloth -- not to mention sweet potato pudding and spice cabbage -- and encouraged him to take second helpings, and thirds, and then, when Macbeth had declaimed that nay, he was stuffed nigh unto bursting and on his oath could truly eat no more, the witches had pressed upon him their own special island rice pudding and a large slice of Mrs. Bustamonte's famous pineapple upside-down cake, it would have been exactly like Macbeth.
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Neil Gaiman (Anansi Boys)
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The only sheets I'll ever long for are my own.
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David Hewson (Macbeth)
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What soilders whey-face? The English for so please you. Take thy face hence.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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I felt like I was hobbling, like one oof the old crones from Act I of Macbeth - God knows my hair felt scraggy enough that I must have looked the part.
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P.C. Cast (Divine By Mistake (Partholon, #1))
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Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day, To the last syllable of recorded time; And all our yesterdays have lighted fools The way to dusty death. - Macbeth Act V, Scene V
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Then the liars and swearers are fools, for there are liars and swearers enough to beat the honest men and hang up them.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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What must be done must be done, whatever the price, the cost, the pain. One day we all must walk through fire.
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David Hewson (Macbeth)
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To watch. To wait. To wonder at a world in chaos,' the girl said. 'And hope one day you fools might learn.
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David Hewson (Macbeth)
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Ring the alarum-bell! Blow, wind! come, wrack! At least we'll die with harness on our back.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Infected minds to their deaf pillows will discharge their secrets.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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There's no art to find the mind's construction in the face.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Innocent sleep. Sleep that soothes away all our worries. Sleep that puts each day to rest. Sleep that relieves the weary laborer and heals hurt minds. Sleep, the main course in life's feast, and the most nourishing.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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...just because I don't have on a silly black costume and carry a silly broom and wear a silly black hat, doesn't mean that I'm not a witch. I'm a witch all the time and not just on Halloween.
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E.L. Konigsburg (Jennifer, Hecate, Macbeth, William McKinley, and Me, Elizabeth)
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My war brought me many things; let yours bring you as much. Life is not to be told, call it as loud as you like, it will not tell itself. No one will be much or little except in someone else's mind, so be careful of the minds you get into, and remember Lady Macbeth, who had her mind in her hand. We can't all be as safe as that.
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Djuna Barnes (Nightwood)
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Infirm of purpose! Give me the daggers: the sleeping and the dead are but as pictures: โ€˜tis the eye of childhood that fears a painted devil
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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All the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Be bloody, bold, and resolute. Laugh to scorn The power of man, for none of woman born Shall harm Macbeth.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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The problem with a lot of people who read only literary fiction is that they assume fantasy is just books about orcs and goblins and dragons and wizards and bullshit. And to be fair, a lot of fantasy is about that stuff. The problem with people in fantasy is they believe that literary fiction is just stories about a guy drinking tea and staring out the window at the rain while he thinks about his mother. And the truth is a lot of literary fiction is just that. Like, kind of pointless, angsty, emo, masturbatory bullshit. However, we should not be judged by our lowest common denominators. And also you should not fall prey to the fallacious thinking that literary fiction is literary and all other genres are genre. Literary fiction is a genre, and I will fight to the death anyone who denies this very self-evident truth. So, is there a lot of fantasy that is raw shit out there? Absolutely, absolutely, itโ€™s popcorn reading at best. But you canโ€™t deny that a lot of lit fic is also shit. 85% of everything in the world is shit. We judge by the best. And there is some truly excellent fantasy out there. For example, Midsummer Nightโ€™s Dream; Hamlet with the ghost; Macbeth, ghosts and witches; Iโ€™m also fond of the Odyessey; Most of the Pentateuch in the Old Testament, Gargantua and Pantagruel. Honestly, fantasy existed before lit fic, and if you deny those roots youโ€™re pruning yourself so closely that you canโ€™t help but wither and die.
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Patrick Rothfuss
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ุบุฏุงู‹ุŒ ูˆุบุฏุงู‹ุŒ ูˆุบุฏุงู‹ุŒ ูˆูƒู„ ุบุฏ ูŠุฒุญู ุจู‡ุฐู‡ ุงู„ุฎุทู‰ ุงู„ุญู‚ูŠุฑุฉ ูŠูˆู…ุงู‹ ุฅุซุฑ ูŠูˆู… ุญุชู‰ ุงู„ู…ู‚ุทุน ุงู„ุฃุฎูŠุฑ ู…ู† ุงู„ุฒู…ู† ุงู„ู…ูƒุชูˆุจุŒ ูˆุฅุฐุง ูƒู„ ุฃู…ุงุณูŠู†ุง ู‚ุฏ ุฃู†ุงุฑุช ู„ู„ุญู…ู‚ู‰ ุงู„ู…ุณุงูƒูŠู† ุงู„ุทุฑูŠู‚ ุฅู„ู‰ ุงู„ู…ูˆุช ูˆุงู„ุชุฑุงุจุŒ ุฃู„ุง ุงู†ุทูุฆูŠุŒ ูŠุง ุดู…ุนุฉูˆุฌูŠุฒุฉ! ู…ุง ุงู„ุญูŠุงุฉ ุฅู„ุง ุธู„ ูŠู…ุดูŠุŒ ู…ู…ุซู„ ู…ุณูƒูŠู† ูŠุชุจุฎุชุฑ ูˆูŠุณุชุดูŠุท ุณุงุนุชู‡ ุนู„ู‰ ุงู„ู…ุณุฑุญุŒ ุซู… ู„ุง ูŠุณู…ุนู‡ ุฃุญุฏ: ุฅู†ู‡ุง ุญูƒุงูŠุฉ ูŠุญูƒูŠู‡ุง ู…ุนุชูˆู‡ุŒ ู…ู„ุคู‡ุง ุงู„ุตุฎุจ ูˆุงู„ุนู†ูุŒ ูˆู„ุง ุชุนู†ู‰ ุฃู‰ ุดู‰ุก
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Art thou afeard To be the same in thine own act and valour As thou art in desire? Wouldst thou have that Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life, And live a coward in thine own esteem, Letting 'I dare not' wait upon 'I would,' Like the poor cat i' the adage?
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Macbeth does murder sleep - the innocent sleep, Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labor's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, chief nourisher in life's feast.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Lay on, McDuff, and be damned he who first cries, 'Hold, enough!
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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To beguile the time, look like the time. Bear welcome in your eye, your hand, your tongue.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Those he commands move only in command, Nothing in love: now does he feel his title Hang loose about him, like a giantโ€™s robe Upon a dwarfish thief
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William Shakespeare
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For what are called criminals nowadays are not criminals at all.ย  Starvation, and not sin, is the parent of modern crime.ย  That indeed is the reason why our criminals are, as a class, so absolutely uninteresting from any psychological point of view.ย  They are not marvellous Macbeths and terrible Vautrins.ย  They are merely what ordinary, respectable, commonplace people would be if they had not got enough to eat.ย 
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Oscar Wilde (The Soul of Man under Socialism)
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Who can be wise, amazed, temp'rate, and furious, Loyal and neutral, in a moment? No man.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Fit to govern? No, not fit to live.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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It will have blood they say - blood will have blood.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Banquo: It will rain tonight. First Murderer: Let it come down.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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I 'gin to be aweary of the sun, And wish th' estate o' th' world were now undone.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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When shall we three meet again, in thunder, lightning, or in rain?
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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I dare do all that may become a man who dares do more is none
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Stars, hide your fires; Let not light see my black and deep desires.โ€ โ€”William Shakespeare, Macbeth
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Laura Thalassa (Dark Harmony (The Bargainer, #3))
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Why a should a dream be any less real than this table. Or Macbeth be less real than todayโ€™s newspaper.
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Jorge Luis Borges
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Iโ€™m the worldโ€™s lightest sleeper. On a bad day, I can make Lady Macbeth look like a raging narcoleptic.
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Jodi Taylor (A Trail Through Time (The Chronicles of St Mary's, #4))
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We three just stared. I thought of Macbeth's witches huddled around their cauldron. How now, you secret, black, and midnight hags. What is't you do? A deed without a name. We were as quiet as the gravestones around us.
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Tessa Gratton (Blood Magic (The Blood Journals, #1))
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What hands are here? ha! they pluck out mine eyes! Will all great Neptuneโ€™s ocean wash this blood clean from my hand? No; this my hand will rather the multitudinous seas incarnadine, making the green one red.โ€ โ€œMy hands are of your colour; but I shame to wear a heart so white. A little water clears us of this deed: How easy it is then! Your constancy hath left you unattended.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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The expedition of my violent love outrun the pauser, reason.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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My life is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury. It means nothing.
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David Hewson (Macbeth)
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o, never shall sun that morrow see
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Thy bones are marrowless, thy blood is cold.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Were such things here as we do speak about? Or have we eaten on the insane root That takes the reason prisoner?
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William Shakespeare (The Tragedy of Macbeth. by William Shakespear. to Which Are Added All the Original Songs.)
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... To Sleep, Perchance to Dream...
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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I have almost forgotten the taste of fears: The time has been, my senses would have coolโ€™d to hear a night-shriek; and my fell of hair would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir as life were inโ€™t: I have supt full with horrors; Direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts, cannot once start me.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, / I must not look to have; but, in their stead, / Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath, / Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not" (5.3.25-28).
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Lear, Macbeth. Mercutio โ€“ they live on their own as it were. The newspapers are full of them, if we were only the Shakespeares to see it. Have you ever been in a Police Court? Have you ever watched tradesmen behind their counters? My soul, the secrets walking in the streets! You jostle them at every corner. There's a Polonius in every first-class railway carriage, and as many Juliets as there are boarding-schools. ... How inexhaustibly rich everything is, if you only stick to life.
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Walter de la Mare (The Return)
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What man I dare, I dare. Approach thou like the rugged Russian bear, the armed rhinoceros, or th' Hyrcan tiger; Take any shape but that, and my firm nerves shall never tremble.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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My plenteous joys, Wanton in fulness, seek to hide themselves In drops of sorrow.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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yet do I fear thy nature; It is too full o' the milk of human kindness To catch the nearest way:
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Noughtโ€™s had, allโ€™s spent, where our desire is got without content.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Each new morn New widows howl, new orphans cry, new sorrows Strike heaven on the face, that it resounds As if it felt with Scotland, and yelled out Like syllable of dolor.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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All is the fear, and nothing is the love, as little is the wisdom, where the flight so runs against all reason.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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For when I speak of the banality of evil, I do so only on the strictly factual level, pointing to a phenomenon which stared one in the face at the trial. Eichmann was not Iago and not Macbeth, and nothing would have been farther from his mind than to determine with Richard III 'to prove a villain.' Except for an extraordinary diligence in looking out for his personal advancement, he had no motives at allโ€ฆ He merely, to put the matter colloquially, never realized what he was doingโ€ฆ It was sheer thoughtlessnessโ€”something by no means identical with stupidityโ€”that predisposed him to become one of the greatest criminals of that period. And if this is 'banal' and even funny, if with the best will in the world one cannot extract any diabolical or demonic profundity from Eichmann, this is still far from calling it commonplaceโ€ฆ That such remoteness from reality and such thoughtlessness can wreak more havoc than all the evil instincts taken together which, perhaps, are inherent in manโ€”that was, in fact, the lesson one could learn in Jerusalem.
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Hannah Arendt (Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil)
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I think that the BBCโ€™s attitude toward the show while it was in production was very similar to that which Macbeth had toward murdering peopleโ€”initial doubts, followed by cautious enthusiasm and then greater and greater alarm at the sheer scale of the undertaking and still no end in sight.
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Douglas Adams (The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy #1-5))
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..when someone says "please pray for me," they are not just saying "let's have lunch sometime." They are issuing an invitation into the depths of their lives and their humanity- and often with some urgency. And worry is not a substitute for prayer. Worry is a starting place, but not a staying place. Worry invites me into prayer. As a staying place, worry can be self-indulgent, paralyzing, draining, and controlling. When I take worry into prayer, it doesn't disappear, but it becomes smaller.
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Sybil MacBeth (Praying in Color: Drawing a New Path to God)
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Until i die there will be these moments, moments seeming to rise up out of the ground like Macbeth's witches, when his face will come before me, that face in all its changes, when the exact timbre of his voice and tricks of his speech will nearly burst my ears, when his smell will overpower my nostrils. Sometimes, in the days which are coming--God grant me the grace to live them--in the glare of the grey morning, sour-mouthed, eyelids raw and red, hair tangled and damp from my stormy sleep, facing, over coffee and cigarette smoke, last night's impenetrable, meaningless boy who will shortly rise and vanish like the smoke, I will see Giovanni again, as he was that night, so vivid, so winning, all of the light of that gloomy tunnel trapped around his head.
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James Baldwin
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When the hurlyburly's done, When the battle's lost and won.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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What are you doing sister? / Killing swine.
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William Shakespeare
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ู…ุง ุงู„ุญูŠุงุฉ ุฅู„ุง ุธู„ ูŠู…ุฑ .. ู…ู…ุซู„ ู…ุณูƒูŠู†ุŒ ูŠุชุญุฑูƒุŒ ูˆูŠุณุชุนุฑุถ ู„ุณุงุนุฉ ุนู„ู‰ ุงู„ู…ุณุฑุญ .. ุซู… ู„ุง ุชุนูˆุฏ ู†ุณู…ุนู‡ุ› ุฅู†ู‡ุง ู‚ุตุฉุŒู…ู„ูŠุฆุฉ ุจุงู„ุถุฌูŠุฌุŒ ุจุงู„ุบุถุจุŒ ูŠุฑูˆูŠู‡ุง ุฃุจู„ู‡ุŒ ูˆู„ุง ู…ุนู†ู‰ ู„ู‡ุง.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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There's nothing serious in mortality; All is but toys; renown, and grace, is dead; The wine of life is drawn, and the mere lees Is left this vault to brag of.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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To be thus is nothing, but to be safely thus...
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Things bad begun make strong themselves by ill.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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By the pricking of my thumbs, something wicked this way comes.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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His silver skin laced with his golden blood.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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And I felt comfort. Finally. All I'd wanted for so long was for someone to explain everything that had happened to me in this same way. To label it neatly on a page: this leads to this leads to this. I knew, deep down, it was more complicated than that, but watching Jason, I was hopeful. He took the mess that was Macbeth and fixed it, and I had to wonder if he might, in some small way, be able to do the same for me. So I moved myself closer to him, and I'd been there ever since.
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Sarah Dessen (The Truth About Forever)
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Until I die there will be those moments, moments seeming to rise up out of the ground like Macbeth's witches, when his face will come before me, that face in all its changes, when the exact timbre of his voice and tricks of his speech will nearly burst my ears, when his smell will overpower my nostrils. Sometimes, in the days which are coming--God grant me the grace to live them-- in the glare of the grey morning, sour-mouthed, eyelids raw and red, hair tangled and damp from stormy sleep, facing, over coffee and cigarette smoke, last night's impenetrable, meaningless boy who will shortly rise and vanish like the smoke, I will see Giovanni again, as he was that night, so vivid, so winning, all of the light of that gloomy tunnel trapped around his head.
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James Baldwin (Giovanni's Room)
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And those characters [in a fairy tale] dwell in a moral world, whose laws are as clear as the law of gravity. That too is a great advantage of the folk tale. It is not a failure of imagination to see the sky blue. It is a failure rather to be weary of its being blue- and not to notice how blue it is. And appreciation of the subtler colors of the sky will come later. In the folk tale, good is good and evil is evil, and the former will triumph and later will fail. This is not the result of the imaginative quest. It is rather its principle and foundation. It is what will enable the child later on to understand Macbeth, or Don Quixote, or David Copperfield.
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Anthony M. Esolen (Ten Ways to Destroy the Imagination of Your Child)
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Katerina Lvovna lived a boring life in the rich house of her father-in-law during the five years of marriage to her unaffectionate husband; but, as often happens, no one paid the slightest attention to this boredom of hers.
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Nikolai Leskov (Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk)
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Don Quixote is the best book out there on political theory, followed by Hamlet and Macbeth. There is no better way to understand the tragedy and the comedy of the Mexican political system than Hamlet, Macbeth and Don Quixote. They're much better than any column of political analysis.
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Subcomandante Marcos Laura Castellanos
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You speak as if this is a good world with a little evil in it. Rubbish. It's a hellish one where the best a man can do is put a little sanity back and look after his own.
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David Hewson (Macbeth)
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It's a long ride home with nothing but me for company. I bore myself sometimes. Not often. Just now and again.
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David Hewson (Macbeth)
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The sauce to meat is ceremony; Meeting were bare without it.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Too nice, and yet too true!
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William Shakespeare
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Non v'รจ arte buona a leggere nel volto i disegni della mente.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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I dare do all that may become a man, who dares more is none...
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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That will be ere the set of sun.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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I am one, my liege, Whom the vile blows and buffets of the world Have so incensed that I am reckless what I do to spite the world.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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When shalt thou see thy wholesome days again?
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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To my surprise, I had not just doodled, I had prayed (I drew new shapes and names of each friend and focused on the person whose name stared at me from the paper). I had though OF each person as I drew but not ABOUT each person. I could just sit with them in a variation on stillness. I could hold them in prayer.
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Sybil MacBeth (Praying in Color: Drawing a New Path to God)
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Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player That struts and frets his hour upon the stage And then is heard no more. It is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury Signifying nothing.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Do I dream you? Or you dream me? Or does someone, something bigger than all' - her hands swept the vast constellations above them - 'this beauteous calamity, dream everything we see and more?
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David Hewson (Macbeth)
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I'm happy for you Agastya,you're leaving for a more meaningful context. This place is like a parody, a complete farce, they're trying to build another Cambridge here. At my old University I used to teach Macbeth to my MA English classes in Hindi.English in India is burlesque. But now you'll get out of here to somehow a more real situation. In my time I'd wanted to give this Civil Service exam too, I should have. Now I spend my time writing papers for obscure journals on L. H. Myers and Wyndham Lewis, and teaching Conrad to a bunch of half-wits.
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Upamanyu Chatterjee (English, August: An Indian Story)
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I made myself a glass of chocolate milk using enough syrup for three normal glasses. I also made myself four peanut butter crackers. Then I walked out the living room door to our terrace. The trees were coming! New green was all over ... green so new that it was kissing yellow.
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E.L. Konigsburg (Jennifer, Hecate, Macbeth, William McKinley, and Me, Elizabeth)
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William Shakespeare (baptised 26 April 1564 โ€“ died 23 April 1616) was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon" (or simply "The Bard"). His surviving works consist of 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and several other poems. His plays have been translated into every major living language, and are performed more often than those of any other playwright. Shakespeare was born and raised in Stratford-upon-Avon. At the age of 18 he married Anne Hathaway, who bore him three children: Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith. Between 1585 and 1592 he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part owner of the playing company the Lord Chamberlain's Men, later known as the King's Men. He appears to have retired to Stratford around 1613, where he died three years later. Few records of Shakespeare's private life survive, and there has been considerable speculation about such matters as his sexuality, religious beliefs, and whether the works attributed to him were written by others. Shakespeare produced most of his known work between 1590 and 1613. His early plays were mainly comedies and histories, genres he raised to the peak of sophistication and artistry by the end of the sixteenth century. Next he wrote mainly tragedies until about 1608, including Hamlet, King Lear, and Macbeth, considered some of the finest examples in the English language. In his last phase, he wrote tragicomedies, also known as romances, and collaborated with other playwrights. Many of his plays were published in editions of varying quality and accuracy during his lifetime, and in 1623 two of his former theatrical colleagues published the First Folio, a collected edition of his dramatic works that included all but two of the plays now recognised as Shakespeare's. Shakespeare was a respected poet and playwright in his own day, but his reputation did not rise to its present heights until the nineteenth century. The Romantics, in particular, acclaimed Shakespeare's genius, and the Victorians hero-worshipped Shakespeare with a reverence that George Bernard Shaw called "bardolatry". In the twentieth century, his work was repeatedly adopted and rediscovered by new movements in scholarship and performance. His plays remain highly popular today and are consistently performed and reinterpreted in diverse cultural and political contexts throughout the world. Source: Wikipedia
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
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Thanks for that.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Sorrow and life go hand in hand.
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Susan Fraser King (Lady Macbeth)
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Out, damned spot
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Look here upon this picture, and on this...
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Whither should I fly? I have done no harm. But I remember now (70) I am in this earthly world, where to do harm Is often laudable, to do good sometime
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth (The Modern Shakespeare: The Original Play with a Modern Translation))
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If you can look into the seeds of time (60) And say which grain will grow and which will not, Speak, then, to me, who neither beg nor fear Your favors nor your hate.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth (The Modern Shakespeare: The Original Play with a Modern Translation))
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What sad, short lives humans live! Each life a short pamphlet written by an idiot! Tut-tut, and all that.
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Stephen King (It)
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When I need it, I can call bitterness around me like mail armor, every thought a knot of steel, shielding the tenderness I have learned to hide as a daughter, mother, wife, and queen among warriors.
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Susan Fraser King (Lady Macbeth)
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I was playing Rasputin and what was motivating him was crumpet really, and I was extremely keen on crumpet so I was really rather good as Rasputin. And my next catastrophic failure was Macbeth, who I played in the style of a crumpet-lover, and then when Doctor Who came along, I embraced this lunacy, this cloud-cuckoo-land where people had to be convinced by absolute nonsense. I came from a very religious background, so it was easy for me to believe in something I knew nothing about.
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Tom Baker
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Lady Macduff: [To her son] Sirrah, your father's dead: And What will you do now? How will you live? Son: As birds do, mother. Lady Macduff: What, with worms and flies? Son: With what I get, I mean. and so do they
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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There are really only two ways, it seems to me, in which we can think about our existence here on earth. We either agree with Macbeth that life is nothing more than a โ€œtale told by an idiot,โ€ a purposeless emergence of life-forms including the clever, greedy, selfish, and unfortunately destructive species that we call Homo sapiensโ€”the โ€œevolutionary goof.โ€ Or we believe that, as Pierre Teilhard de Chardin put it, โ€œThere is something afoot in the universe, something that looks like gestation and birth.โ€ In other words, a plan, a purpose to it all.
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Jane Goodall (Reason for Hope: A Spiritual Journey)
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Tomorrow and tomorrow come creeping in and always will. We're fools trapped in a mechanism of our own unconscious making. Shadows strutting and fretting for one brief hour upon a stage, then heard no more. I'll weep an ocean in my heart, if the world would give me time. But not now.
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David Hewson (Macbeth)
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He seemed to be lying on the bed. He could not see very well. Her youthful, rapacious face, with blackened eyebrows, leaned over him as he sprawled there. โ€œโ€˜How about my present?โ€™ she demanded, half wheedling, half menacing. โ€œNever mind that now. To work! Come here. Not a bad mouth. Come here. Come closer. Ah! โ€œNo. No use. Impossible. The will but not the way. The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak. Try again. No. The booze, it must be. See Macbeth. One last try. No, no use. Not this evening, Iโ€™m afraid. โ€œAll right, Dora, donโ€™t you worry. Youโ€™ll get your two quid all right. We arenโ€™t paying by results. โ€œHe made a clumsy gesture. โ€˜Here, give us that bottle. That bottle off the dressing-table.โ€™ โ€œDora brought it. Ah, thatโ€™s better. That at least doesnโ€™t fail.
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George Orwell (Keep the Aspidistra Flying)
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Thrice the brinded cat hath mewโ€™d. Thrice and once the hedge-pig whined. Harpier cries โ€™Tis time, โ€™tis time. Round about the cauldron go; In the poisonโ€™d entrails throw. Toad, that under cold stone Days and nights has thirty-one Swelterโ€™d venom sleeping got, Boil thou first iโ€™ the charmed pot. Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble. Fillet of a fenny snake, In the cauldron boil and bake; Eye of newt and toe of frog, Wool of bat and tongue of dog, Adderโ€™s fork and blind-wormโ€™s sting, Lizardโ€™s leg and owletโ€™s wing, For a charm of powerful trouble, Like a hell-broth boil and bubble. Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf, Witchesโ€™ mummy, maw and gulf Of the ravinโ€™d salt-sea shark, Root of hemlock diggโ€™d iโ€™ the dark, Liver of blaspheming Jew, Gall of goat, and slips of yew Silverโ€™d in the moonโ€™s eclipse, Nose of Turk and Tartarโ€™s lips, Finger of birth-strangled babe Ditch-deliverโ€™d by a drab, Make the gruel thick and slab: Add thereto a tigerโ€™s chaudron, For the ingredients of our cauldron. Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn and cauldron bubble. By the pricking of my thumbs, Something wicked this way comes.
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William Shakespeare
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Ela teria de morrer, mais cedo ou mais tarde. Morta. Mais tarde haveria um tempo para essa palavra. Amanhรฃ, e amanhรฃ, e ainda outro amanhรฃ arrastam-se nessa passada trivial do dia para a noite, da noite para o dia, atรฉ a รบltima sรญlaba do registro dos tempos. E todos os nossos ontens nรฃo fizeram mais que iluminar para os tolos o caminho que leva ao pรณ da morte. Apaga-te, apaga-te, chama breve! A vida nรฃo passa de uma sombra que caminha, um pobre ator que se pavoneia e se aflige sobre o palco - faz isso por uma hora e, depois, nรฃo se escuta mais sua voz. ร‰ uma histรณria contada por um idiota, cheia de som e fรบria e vazia de significado.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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It is also significant that the play opens with the objective presence of supernatural forces. The witches are not the figment of someone elseโ€™s imagination because there is nobody else present to witness them. They are alone, and therefore they stand alone, utterly independent. We are in the real presence of evil, an evil that really exists whether we like it or not, an evil that is not merely the product of our fetid fetishes or our fevered imaginations. In its formal structure, therefore, Macbeth places us unequivocally in a supernatural cosmos, rendering implausible all materialistic interpretations of the playโ€™s intrinsic meaning.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth (Ignatius Critical Editions))
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Maรฑana, y maรฑana, y maรฑana se arrastra con paso mezquino dรญa tras dรญa hasta la sรญlaba final del tiempo escrito, y la luz de todo nuestro ayer guiรณ a los bobos hacia el polvo de la muerte. ยกApรกgate, apรกgate breve llama! La vida es una sombra que camina, un pobre actor que en escena se arrebata y contonea y nunca mรกs se le oye. Es un cuento que cuenta un idiota, lleno de ruido y de furia, que no significa nada.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Son: What is a traitor? Lady Macduff: Why, one that swears and lies. Son: And be all traitors that do so? Lady Macduff: Everyone that does so is a traitor, and must be hanged. Son: Who must hang them? Lady Macduff Why, the honest men. Son: Then the liars and swearers are fools; for there are liars and swearers enow to beat the honest men, and hang up them.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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They met me in the day of success: and I have learned by the perfectest report, they have more in them than mortal knowledge. When I burned in desire to question them further, they made themselves air, into which they vanished. Whiles I stood rapt in the wonder of it, came missives from the king, who all-hailed me 'Thane of Cawdor;' by which title, before, these weird sisters saluted me, and referred me to the coming on of time, with 'Hail, king that shalt be!' This have I thought good to deliver thee, my dearest partner of greatness, that thou mightst not lose the dues of rejoicing, by being ignorant of what greatness is promised thee. Lay it to thy heart, and farewell.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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Since words elude me when I need them most, I learned long ago that I cannot count on QUALITY time with God when I want to pray. I need QUANTITY and regularity. Quality is not something I can predict. My husband, Andy, and I might schedule an elaborate evening out with candles and a gourmet meal, but there is no guarantee that we'll have a wonderful time together -- chopping onions peppers die by side in the kitchen, reading together on the couch, sitting on the front step watching our sons ride bikes, and making plans for our life together.
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Sybil MacBeth (Praying in Color: Drawing a New Path to God)
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If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well It were done quickly: if the assassination Could trammel up the consequence, and catch With his surcease success; that but this blow Might be the be-all and the end-all here, But here, upon this bank and shoal of time, We'ld jump the life to come. But in these cases We still have judgment here; that we but teach Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return To plague the inventor: this even-handed justice Commends the ingredients of our poison'd chalice To our own lips. He's here in double trust; First, as I am his kinsman and his subject, Strong both against the deed; then, as his host, Who should against his murderer shut the door, Not bear the knife myself. Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off; And pity, like a naked new-born babe, Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim, horsed Upon the sightless couriers of the air, Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye, That tears shall drown the wind. I have no spur To prick the sides of my intent, but only Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself And falls on the other.
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William Shakespeare (Macbeth)
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You know, we still have like, half an hour down here. Seems a shame to waste it.โ€ I poked him in the ribs, and he gave an exaggerated wince. โ€œNo way, dude. My days of cellar, mill, and dungeon lovinโ€™ are over. Go castle or go home.โ€ โ€œFair enough,โ€ he said as we interlaced our fingers and headed for the stairs. โ€œBut does it have to be a real castle, or would one of those inflatable bouncy things work?โ€ I laughed. โ€œOh, inflatable castles are totally out of-โ€œ I skidded to a stop on the first step, causing Archer to bump into me. โ€œWhat the heck is that?โ€ I asked, pointing to a dark stain in the nearest corner. โ€œOkay, number one question you donโ€™t want to hear in a creepy cellar,โ€ Archer sad, but I ignored him and stepped off the staircase. The stain bled out from underneath the stone wall, covering maybe a foot of the dirt floor. It looked black and vaguelyโ€ฆsticky. I swallowed my disgust as I knelt down and gingerly touched the blob with one finger. Archer crouched down next to me and reached into his pocket. He pulled out a lighter, and after a few tries, a wavering flame sprung up. We studied my fingertip in the dim glow. โ€œSo thatโ€™s-โ€œ โ€œItโ€™s blood, yeah,โ€ I said, not taking my eyes off my hand. โ€œScary.โ€ โ€œI was gonna go with vile, but scary works.โ€ Archer fished in his pockets again, and this time he produced a paper napkin. I took it from him and gave Lady Macbeth a run for her money in the hand-scrubbing department. But even as I attempted to remove a layer of skin from my finger, something was bugging me. I mean, something other than the fact that Iโ€™d just touched a puddle of blood. โ€œCheck the other corners,โ€ I told Archer. He stood up and moved across the room. I stayed where I was, trying to remember that afternoon Dad and I had sat with the Thorne family grimoire. Weโ€™d looked at dozens of spells, but there had been one- โ€œThereโ€™s blood in every corner,โ€ Archer called from the other side of the cellar. โ€œOr at least thatโ€™s what Iโ€™m guessing it is. Unlike some people, I donโ€™t have the urge to go sticking my fingers in it.
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Rachel Hawkins (Spell Bound (Hex Hall, #3))