Kemper Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Kemper. Here they are! All 67 of them:

[Talking about Monte Rissell] ...and like Ed Kemper he was able to convince the psychiatrist he was making excellent progress while he was actually killing human beings. This is kind of a sick version of the old joke about how many psychiatrists it takes to change a light bulb. The answer being, just one, but only if the light bulb wants to change.
John E. Douglas (Mind Hunter: Inside the FBI's Elite Serial Crime Unit)
It's all now you see. Yesterday won't be over until tomorrow and tomorrow began ten thousand years ago. For every Southern boy fourteen years old, not once but whenever he wants it, there is the instant when it's still not yet two o'clock on that July afternoon in 1863, the brigades are in position behind the rail fence, the guns are laid and ready in the woods and the furled flags are already loosened to break out and Pickett himself with his long oiled ringlets and his hat in one hand probably and his sword in the other looking up the hill waiting for Longstreet to give the word and it's all in the balance, it hasn't happened yet, it hasn't even begun yet, it not only hasn't begun yet but there is still time for it not to begin against that position and those circumstances which made more men than Garnett and Kemper and Armistead and Wilcox look grave yet it's going to begin, we all know that, we have come too far with too much at stake and that moment doesn't need even a fourteen-year-old boy to think This time. Maybe this time with all this much to lose than all this much to gain: Pennsylvania, Maryland, the world, the golden dome of Washington itself to crown with desperate and unbelievable victory the desperate gamble, the cast made two years ago; or to anyone who ever sailed a skiff under a quilt sail, the moment in 1492 when somebody thought This is it: the absolute edge of no return, to turn back now and make home or sail irrevocably on and either find land or plunge over the world's roaring rim.
William Faulkner (Intruder in the Dust)
I do love irony. It’s so…complicated and coincidental.
Cassandra Kemper (The Madder Woman (Madder #2))
Money is a servant to politicians and the country. But, if the politicians and the country become the servant of the money, the politicians has failed.
Oliver Kemper
The Foundation of Freedom is Unity
Oliver Kemper
Maybe this was, in fact, the very definition of intimacy: acting with another person the way you did when you were alone.
Kemper Donovan (The Decent Proposal)
OVER MY MANY YEARS OF OBSERVING AND INTERACTING WITH SERIAL KILLERS, I’VE found that a large percentage of them are abnormally fixated on their mothers—usually negatively, like Kemper; sometimes positively; or a confused mix of both, like McGowan.
John E. Douglas (The Killer Across the Table)
My favorite feature is my red hair. Why wouldn't it be? It sets me apart from other people who don't have red hair, and it instantly bonds me with people who do. Experts often say that redheads are an endangered species - but experts say a lot of things. My own hasty scans of sidewalks and shopping malls show plenty of us out and about. Maybe the experts are just saying that because they are jealous of all the redheads - and the only revenge they know is to claim that we will all die.
Ellie Kemper (My Squirrel Days)
All were dissected or decapitated or sexually assaulted after death. He cut leg meat from two of his victims into a macaroni casserole he prepared and ate. Kemper bludgeoned his mother with a hammer as she slept. He sawed off her head, had sex with her corpse, and carved out her larynx and shoved it down the garbage disposal.
Stephen G. Michaud (The Evil That Men Do: FBI Profiler Roy Hazelwood's Journey into the Minds of Sexual Predators)
SOMETIMES, THINGS DIDN’T NEED TO BE BIGGER, THEY ONLY NEED TO BECOME BETTER.
Oliver Kemper
That's it. New rule: no more flirting during the zombie apocalypse
Alison Kemper
I’m a threat to anything that hurts Wonderland, including indifference.
Cassandra Kemper (The Madder Woman (Madder #2))
You know…it always seems obvious to outsiders when someone is doing something wrong, but when your mind is in the midst of evil, it is easy to be manipulated by crueller instincts.
Cassandra Kemper (The Madder Woman (Madder #2))
I’m a sixteen-year-old unlicensed, inexperienced driver with a reanimated corpse blocking my view. Crazy is the only way I can drive.
Alison Kemper (Donna of the Dead)
If I can face a street full of rabid zombies, I can tell a boy I like him. Right?
Alison Kemper (Donna of the Dead)
Thank you, Deke. You are very good to me.” “I know,” he smirks. “Can I get back in your bed now?
Alison Kemper (Donna of the Dead)
S’up?” he asks. My voice rattles when I answer. “N-not much. You know, reanimated corpses chasing me on a cruise ship. Same old.
Alison Kemper (Donna of the Dead)
If they ever turn, let them chase me for a while. It’s always been a fantasy of mine to be chased by zombie cheerleaders.
Alison Kemper (Donna of the Dead)
Officer Kemper is dark, scary and unpredictable. I don’t understand how it’s possible for someone to go from tasing and handcuffing you in order to force sexual acts, to spooning you and bringing you eggs. It was basically breakfast in bed, and now I have a cage on my cock.
Nyla K. (Distorted (Alabaster Penitentiary, #1))
It’s all now you see. Yesterday wont be over until tomorrow and tomorrow began ten thousand years ago. For every Southern boy fourteen years old, not once but whenever he wants it, there is the instant when it’s still not yet two oclock on that July afternoon in 1863, the brigades are in position behind the rail fence, the guns are laid and ready in the woods and the furled flags are already loosened to break out and Pickett himself with his long oiled ringlets and his hat in one hand probably and his sword in the other looking up the hill waiting for Longstreet to give the word and it’s all in the balance, it hasn’t happened yet, it hasn’t even begun yet, it not only hasn’t begun yet but there is still time for it not to begin against that position and those circumstances which made more men than Garnett and Kemper and Armstead and Wilcox look grave yet it’s going to begin, we all know that, we have come too far with too much at stake and that moment doesn’t need even a fourteen-year-old boy to think This time. Maybe this time with all this much to lose and all this much to gain: Pennsylvania, Maryland, the world, the golden dome of Washington itself to crown with desperate and unbelievable victory the desperate gamble, the cast made two years ago; or to anyone who ever sailed even a skiff under a quilt sail, the moment in 1492 when somebody thought This is it: the absolute edge of no return, to turn back now and make home or sail irrevocably on and either find land or plunge over the world’s roaring rim.
William Faulkner (Intruder in the Dust)
Stockpiling serial-killer lore is a rite of passage for guys in their twenties who want to seem dark and edgy. I was precisely the kind of dork who, in my twenties, would do anything to seem dark and edgy. And there I was, all through the flannel nineties, rattling off minutiae about Henry Lee Lucas and Carl Panzram and Edmund Kemper.
Michelle McNamara (I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer)
You can take that needle out of my leg now. I'd like to pull up my pants.
Alison Kemper (Dead Over Heels)
Das Fundament der Freiheit ist die Einheit
Oliver Kemper
What’s the point of doing what you’re told if you have no choice in the matter?
Cassandra Kemper (The Madder Hatter (Madder #1))
Done is better than pending
Bitsy Kemper
If there is no case to take care of, then you will take care to create a case to take care of. Otherwise your system becomes useless.
Oliver Kemper
Geld ist ein Diener der Politik und des Landes. Wird aber die Politik und das Land zum Diener des Geldes, hat die Politik versagt.
Oliver Kemper
Some people think they can barge in and give you their opinion even though you didn't ask for it.
Ellie Kemper (My Squirrel Days)
One of my great hobbies in life is feeling sorry for myself. Nothing makes me feel more alive than when I suspect I have been wronged. Oh, the energy!
Ellie Kemper (My Squirrel Days)
At the time of that headshot, I was twenty-three years old, but I looked both fourteen and eighty-seven.
Ellie Kemper (author)
I knew that I needed to quiet my mind; lucky for me, there is no place to quiet your mind like the northernmost edge of Manhattan's Times Square.
Ellie Kemper (My Squirrel Days)
Plans, schedules, and structure make me feel secure in a world that - let's just say it - is going straight to hell.
Ellie Kemper (My Squirrel Days)
You’ve got a lame hand.' This was the clinical term for my condition. 'I’m not really sure why,' the doctor concluded. I looked at this man and I realized that I, too, could have been a doctor.
Ellie Kemper (My Squirrel Days)
I do not understand how you know you only have one life if you have never died, because if you have never died, then you cannot possibly know if you would go on living a second life, or go on living no more lives.
Cassandra Kemper (The Madder Woman (Madder #2))
My roommate in college was from Yemen, and whenever anyone said anything nice to her she'd tell them they have beautiful eyes. The idea is whatever beauty you see is actually coming from you rather than the thing itself. Like the beauty is in the perception, not the thing.
Kemper Donovan
What we wanted was not the facts so much as what guys like Kemper were thinking and feeling as they planned and executed their crimes. We wanted to know what motivated them, what techniques they used, and how they regarded each assault or murder afterward. We wanted to know how and where the fantasy began, what the most emotionally satisfying parts of the crime were, and whether torture and the suffering of the victim were important components for them. In other words: What were the distinctions between the “practical” aspects of successfully committing the crime and the “emotional” reasons for doing it.
John E. Douglas (The Killer Across the Table)
To murder freedom…well, that’s to murder my time. And no one should have the right to kill anyone else’s time.
Cassandra Kemper (The Madder Hatter (Madder #1))
Change happens a lot more than you acknowledge...
Cassandra Kemper (The Madder Hatter (Madder #1))
Chapter 1: The making of the Co-Ed Killer
Jack Rosewood (Edmund Kemper: The True Story of The Co-ed Killer (True Crime by Evil Killers #2))
Edmond Kemper had a horrible temper. He cut off young girls heads and took them home to bed. Edmond
Jack Rosewood (True Crime Boxed Set: True Crime by Evil Killers Collection (True Crime by Evil Killers #1-4))
The alienation born of the failure to connect was the worst sort of loneliness there was, much uglier than simply lamenting a person's absence.
Kemper Donovan (The Decent Proposal)
Living in a diverse world—or leading a diverse work force—is more than a mental construct, a memorized list of cultural differences, or a willingness to be tolerant. It’s about examining how well we function at the margins and interfaces of life, where divergent ways of being and believing meet and collide. (Kemper
Mark E. Mendenhall (Global Leadership: Research, Practice, and Development)
You’re a one-man, ass-kicking retribution machine.” Kemper
Brian Andrews (Tier One (Tier One #1))
Whale music had a weight to it, a ponderous, profound theme. The deeper notes resonated in his tissue and filled him with sweet nostalgia. A stuttering creak swept through—the slow rocking of a porch swing, a patio door caught in a summer draft. Then, the soft groan of settling into freshly laundered sheets for a long, long sleep.
Erinn L. Kemper (The Song)
Mess tray in hand, he walked the line. Baked beans, mac and cheese, chicken strips, pickled beets, mushy peas. Comfort food from the freezer or a can. Three weeks since they’d seen any fresh produce. Two weeks since they’d brought in relief staff.
Erinn L. Kemper (The Song)
That's one thing that amazes me about society. That is, that you can do damn near anything and nobody's gonna say anything or notice.
Margaret Cheney (The Co-Ed Killer: A Study of the Murders, Mutilations, and Matricide of Edmund Kemper III)
But they will not be, primarily because the most salient characteristic of the victim-prone person is the conviction that he or she is watched over and protected by the Sun, the Moon, the Wind Goddess, and St. Christopher; and, in short, that it could never happen to him or to her.
Margaret Cheney (The Co-Ed Killer: A Study of the Murders, Mutilations, and Matricide of Edmund Kemper III)
Now that he knew what real heartbreak was, it felt not only cheap but disrespectful to fabricate such emotions, only to resolve them a mere hour or so later. - The Decent Proposal
Kemper Donovan
That Guy," she warned him, "is a real weirdo. And you're taking a chance leaving him with your parents. You might be surprised to wake up some morning to learn they have been killed.
Margaret Cheney (The Co-Ed Killer: A Study of the Murders, Mutilations, and Matricide of Edmund Kemper III)
Kemper?
David Baldacci (A Gambling Man (Archer, #2))
Something about the movies lets you forget where you are and go into a whole different world. You just float, and time goes by without you hardly even knowing it. You forget. I forget about the boy and the girl next to us. I forget about Uncle Leone’s shooting and Bobby Kennedy’s killing. I forget about Kemper and his plan to flood our valley. I even forget about the war. Just for a while.
Bill Rivers (Last Summer Boys)
Kemper astutely explains how the highly integrated music industry created, developed, and eventually abandoned the Monkees." -- Library Journal "A keenly incisive---and, at times, refreshingly objective and even-handed---analysis of the entertainment machinery of the era, and the manner in which radio, television, and other areas worked together to manufacture The Monkees seemingly out of thin air." -- Musoscribe "I spent the entire summer of 1987 on the road opening up for The Monkees, and I didn't learn 1% as much about them as I learned from this thorough and remarkable book by Tom Kemper." -- "Weird Al" Yankovic "The Monkees gets into the vast machinery that goes on behind the scenes of producing perfect pop - still relevant today even if the names and corporations have changed - and does it with a lot of fun." -- Chris Shiflett, Foo Fighters "Kemper's book clarifies so much that is misunderstood in the Monkees story." -- Susanna Hoffs, The Bangles "A knowledgeable and incisive portrait of the popular music industry." -- Paul Hirsch, Northwestern University "Fascinating and witty . . .The book is full of interesting insights . . . [and] Kemper is impressive in unpacking particular songs . . . a fresh and engaging take on an oft-told story." ― Shindig! " Valuable, interesting, well-argued, and built on a pile of documented evidence. " - Psychobabble "Belittled at the time of their creation in the mid-Sixties, as made-for-TV Help-era Beatles clones, The Monkees' music has stood the test of time, and then some. Tom Kemper suggests, in his excellent book, that the initial snobbery surrounding the group, at least in elevated critical circles, came about because of the rise of a new rock culture based on authenticity, individual expression and idealism." - Pick of the Week, Choice "Kemper helps us understand what it is that continues to make the Monkees phenomenon 'compelling, fascinating and divisive." - The Spectator
Tom Kemper
I owe it to the fake Kemper, who I’m now accepting in my mind as a sort of Tyler Durden-type imaginary friend. If Edward Norton can pull it off in Fight Club, then it’s a good enough rationalization for me. Plus, his was Brad Pitt, so ya know. Pretty awesome. But I’d take Officer Kemper over Brad any day. Sorry not sorry.
Nyla K. (Distorted (Alabaster Penitentiary, #1))
His new reading also included Sinclair Lewis’s 1935 novel It Can’t Happen Here, about a fascistic demagogue who gets elected president on a platform of fear, resentment, nationalism, and a promise to make America great again. “A
Steve Kemper (Our Man In Tokyo: An American Ambassador and the Countdown to Pearl Harbor)
This was Grew’s usual practical plea not to kill off the good for the sake of the perfect.
Steve Kemper (Our Man In Tokyo: An American Ambassador and the Countdown to Pearl Harbor)
Sometimes it’s just about feeling comfortable in your own pants.
Ellie Kemper (My Squirrel Days)
Japanese paranoia stemmed partly from xenophobia rooted in racism. This combination wasn’t peculiar to Japan, as the Nazis were demonstrating in Germany. In the United States, the 1924 Exclusion Act remained in force, prohibiting all immigration from Asia. Some Western states didn’t think the Exclusion Act went far enough, because it hadn’t gotten rid of the Japanese who had immigrated before the United States slammed the door. Xenophobes argued that these immigrants were now breeding more Japanese, who were recognized, outrageously, as American citizens under the Fourteenth Amendment. Farmers in California and Arizona were especially hostile. Even before the Exclusion Act, these states had passed Alien Land Laws severely restricting the property rights of Japanese. Then in 1934 a group of farmers in Arizona’s Salt River Valley began agitating to kick Japanese farmers out, alleging that they had flooded into the region and were depriving farmland from deserving whites who were already hurting from the Depression. They also demanded that white landowners stop leasing acreage to Japanese farmers. The white farmers and their supporters held rallies and parades, blaring their message of exclusion. In the fall of that year, night riders began a campaign of terrorism. They dynamited irrigation canals used by Japanese farmers and threw dynamite bombs at their homes and barns. The leaders of the Japanese community tried to point out that only 700 Japanese lived in the valley and most had been there for more than twenty years. Three hundred fifty of them were American citizens, and only 125 worked in agriculture, mostly for American farmers. Facts made no impression on the white farmers’ racist resentments. Some local officials exploited the bigotry for political gain. The Japanese government protested all this. Hull didn’t want a few farmers to cause an international incident and pushed the governor of Arizona to fix the problem. The governor blamed the terrorism on communist agitators. Dynamite bombs continued to explode on Japanese farms through the fall of 1934. The local and state police maintained a perfect record—not a single arrest. In early February 1935 the Arizona legislature began considering a bill that would forbid Japanese immigrants from owning or leasing land. If they managed to grow anything, it could be confiscated. Any white farmer who leased to a Japanese would be abetting a crime. (Japan had similar laws against foreigners owning farmland.) American leaders and newspapers quickly condemned the proposed law as shameful, but farmers in Arizona remained enthusiastic. Japanese papers covered the controversy as well. One fascist group, wearing uniforms featuring skulls and waving a big skull flag, protested several times at the US embassy in Tokyo. Patriotic societies began pressuring Hirota to stand up for Japan’s honor. He and Japan’s representatives in Washington asked the American government to do something. Arizona politicians got word that if the bill passed, millions of dollars in New Deal money might go elsewhere. Nevertheless, on March 19 the Arizona senate passed the bill. On March 21 the state house of representatives, inspired more by fears of evaporating federal aid than by racial tolerance, let the bill die. The incident left a bad taste all around.
Steve Kemper (Our Man In Tokyo: An American Ambassador and the Countdown to Pearl Harbor)
My best friend and I used to play a game sometimes...we'd divide everyone we knew into two categories based on the way they related to a single qualifying factor. It was a way to make sweeping generalizations that were wildly inaccurate, but invariably amusing to pronounce. For instance, people fall into two categories, those who listen to music to 'put' them in a certain mood, and those who listen to music because they're already 'in' a certain mood.
Kemper Donovan (The Decent Proposal)
Executing Ted Bundy cost the state of Florida seven or eight million dollars, money that could have been better invested in building a criminal forensic institution devoted to the research and study of people like Bundy, Kemper, Gacy, Berkowitz and Dahmer, who have hideously violated society’s trust. Criminologists have long ago agreed that the death penalty has never deterred violent criminals. It only satisfies the families of the victims and the general desire of society for revenge.
Gary Lequipe (50 SERIAL KILLERS: Bloody protagonists of history's worst murder sprees)
Like Sally Hawkins with the creature of water, I seemed to have developed a crush on something that wasn't exactly a person, but was definitely smarter than a fish.
Ellie Kemper (My Squirrel Days)
There is no greater punishment than shame', I recalled from either an old Buddhist text or something my high school indoor soccer coach said once.
Ellie Kemper
Have you ever noticed that when God closes a door, he opens a window? Neither have I. But I have noticed that timing and luck sometimes line up in such a way that you can catch a break.
Ellie Kemper (My Squirrel Days)
HAVE GUN, WILL TRAVEL, western adventure. BROADCAST HISTORY: (Originated on TV: Sept. 14, 1957–Sept. 21, 1963, CBS.) Radio: Nov. 23, 1958–Nov. 27, 1960, CBS. 30m, Sundays at 6. Multiple sponsorship. CAST: John Dehner as Paladin, soldier of fortune, western knight errant, gunfighter. Ben Wright as Heyboy, the Oriental who worked at the Carlton Hotel in San Francisco, where Paladin lived. Virginia Gregg as Missy Wong, Heyboy’s girlfriend. Virginia Gregg also in many leading dramatic roles. Supporting players from Hollywood’s Radio Row, most of the same personnel listed for Gunsmoke. ANNOUNCER: Hugh Douglas. PRODUCER-DIRECTOR: Frank Paris. CREATORS-WRITERS: Herb Meadow and Sam Rolfe. WRITERS: Gene Roddenberry, John Dawson, Marian Clark, etc. SOUND EFFECTS: Ray Kemper, Tom Hanley. Have Gun, Will Travel was an oddity: the only significant radio show that originated on television. Beginning as a TV series for Richard Boone, Have Gun leaped immediately into the top ten and gained such an enthusiastic following that CBS decided to add it to the fading radio chain.
John Dunning (On the Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio)
The point is, sometimes it's good to be in charge. But also, sometimes it's less stressful not to have to do all that work.
Ellie Kemper (My Squirrel Days)
... Being a Mom is hard, but trying to remain rational while hungry is even harder.
Ellie Kemper (author) (My Squirrel Days)
Dollars to donuts you’re looking at ODs there,” said Kemper, pointing to some young people getting out of cars and heading to one of the gravesites. “Over eighty thousand people in America this year alone,” she added. “More than died in Vietnam and the wars in the Middle East combined. And far more than die in traffic accidents or by guns, and it’s only getting worse. Next year we’ll probably be looking at over a hundred thousand dead. The opioid crisis is actually responsible for the life expectancy in this country starting to go down. Can you wrap your head around that? Nearly a half million dead since 2000. Drug overdoses are the leading cause of death for Americans under age fifty. We had a recent study done at DEA. Life insurance companies value a human life at about five million bucks. Using that number and other factors, our people projected the economic loss to the country each year due to the opioid crisis at about a hundred billion dollars. A third of the population is on medication for pain. And they’re not getting addicted on street corners. They’re getting addicted at their doctors’ offices.” “From prescription painkillers.
David Baldacci (The Fallen (Amos Decker, #4))
I knew that you catch more flies with honey, and so I was ready to be a one-woman army of bees.
Ellie Kemper (My Squirrel Days)