Jeremiah Burroughs Quotes

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Christian contentment is that sweet, inward, quiet, gracious frame of spirit, which freely submits to and delights in God's wise and fatherly disposal in every condition.
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Jeremiah Burroughs
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Be sure of your call to every business you go about. Though it is the least business, be sure of your call to it; then, whatever you meet with, you may quiet your heart with this: I know I am where God would have me. Nothing in the world will quiet the heart so much as this: when I meet with any cross, I know I am where God would have me, in my place and calling; I am about the work that God has set me.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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You may think you find peace in Christ when you have no outward troubles, but is Christ your peace when the Assyrian comes into the land, when the enemy comes?...Jesus Christ would be peace to the soul when the enemy comes into the city, and into your houses.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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[E]very comfort that the saints have in this world is an earnest penny to them of those eternal mercies that the Lord has provided for them.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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Thus, a godly man wonders at his cross that it is not more, a wicked man wonders his cross is so much:
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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If you would get a contented life, do not grasp too much of the world, do not take in more of the business of the world than God calls you to.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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If I become content by having my desire satisfied, that is only self-love; but when I am contented with the hand of God and am willing to be at His disposal, that comes from my love to God.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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In a clock, stop but one wheel and you stop every wheel, because they are dependent upon one other. So when God has ordered a thing for the present to be thus and thus, how do you know how many things depend upon this thing? God may have some work to do twenty years hence that depends on this passage of providence that falls out this day or this week.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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Christian, how did you enjoy comfort before? Was the creature anything to you but a conduit, a pipe, that conveyed God's goodness to you? 'The pipe is cut off,' says God, 'come to me, the fountain, and drink immediately.' Though the beams are taken away, yet the sun remains the same in the firmament as ever it was.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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Now this is a mystery to a carnal heart. They can see no such thing; perhaps they think God loves them when he prospers them and makes them rich, but they think God loves them not when he afflicts them. That is a mystery, but grace instructs men in that mystery, grace enables men to see love in the very frown of God's face, and so come to receive contentment.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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Oh, that we could but convince men and women that murmuring spirit is a greater evil than any affliction, whatever the affliction!
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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It’s certain that the thing a man’s heart is most taken with and set upon is his God.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (A Treatise On Earthly-Mindedness (Vintage Puritan))
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to be well skilled in the mystery of Christian contentment is the duty, glory, and excellence of a Christian.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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My brethren, the reason why you do not have contentment in the things of the world is not that you do not have enough of them. The reason is that they are not things proportional to that immortal soul of yours that is capable of God Himself.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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When [the saints] perform actions to God, then the soul says: 'Oh! that I could do what pleases God!' When they come to suffer any cross: 'Oh, that what God does might please me!' I labour to do what pleases God, and I labour that what God does shall please me: here is a Christian indeed, who shall endeavour both these. It is but one side of a Christian to endeavour to do what pleases God; you must as well endeavour to be pleased with what God does, and so you will come to be a complete Christian when you can do both, and that is the first thing in the excellence of this grace of contentment.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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One drop of the sweetness of heaven is enough to take away all the sourness and bitterness of all the afflictions in the world.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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Temptations will no more prevail over a contented man, than a dart that is thrown against a brazen wall.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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Note this, I beseech you: in active obedience we worship God by doing what pleases God, but by passive obedience we do as well worship God by being pleased with what God does.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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the disorders of your hearts, and their sinful workings are as words before God.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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I beseech you to consider that God does not deal by you as you deal with him.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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A noble heart is a thankful heart that loves to acknowledge whenever it has received any mercy.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (Contentment, Prosperity, and God’s Glory)
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I am discontented because I have not these things which God never yet promised me, and therefore I sin much against the Gospel, and against the grace of faith.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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In active obedience, we worship God by doing what pleases God; but by passive obedience, we do as well worship God by being pleased with what God does.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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It is but one side of a Christian to endeavour to do what pleases God; you must as well endeavour to be pleased with what God does.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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...there is more good in contentment, than there is in the thing that you would fain have to cure your discontent...
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Jeremiah Burroughs
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You can never make a ship go steady by propping it outside; you know there must be ballast within the ship to make it go steady. So there is nothing outside us that can keep our hearts in a steady, constant way, but grace within the soul.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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As in a tree, there is more sap in an Arm of the tree, than in a little sprig; but the sprig hath the same sap for kind that the Arm of the tree hath, and it all comes from the same root. So though there be more venom in some gross, crying sins, than in some others; yet there is no sin but hath the same sap, and the same venom, for the kind, that every sin hath, that the worst sin hath.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Evil of Evils: The Exceeding Sinfulness of Sin (Puritan Writings))
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Thou hast gone on in all thy life hitherto, ever since thou wast born, in a continual opposition to God Himself, unto the infinite Lord, the eternal first being of all the world; thy life hath been nothing but enmity to this God: thou hast as directly opposed, and striven against, and resisted Him, as ever man did oppose, and resist, and strive with another man, and this thou hast done in the whole course of thy life: certainly there is more in this to humble a man than anything that can be spoken to shew him the evil of sin.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Evil of Evils: The Exceeding Sinfulness of Sin (Puritan Writings))
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In a clock, stop but one wheel and you stop every wheel, because they are dependent upon one another. So when God has ordered a thing for the present to be thus and thus, how do you know how many things depend upon this thing? God may have some work to do twenty years hence that depends on this passage of providence that falls out this day or this week.
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Jeremiah Burroughs
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It is a special part of the divine worship that we owe to God, to be content in a Christian way, as has been shown to you.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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the Lord does not so much look at the work that is done, as at the faithfulness of our hearts in doing it.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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Here lies the bottom and root of all contentment, when there is an evenness and proportion between our hearts and our circumstances.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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So be satisfied and quiet, be contented with your contentment. I lack certain things that others have, but blessed be God, I have a contented heart which others have not.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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Indeed, our afflictions may be heavy, and we cry out, Oh, we cannot bear them, we cannot bear such an affliction. Though you cannot tell how to bear it with your own strength, yet how can you tell what you will do with the strength of Jesus Christ? You say you cannot bear it? So you think that Christ could not bear it? But if Christ could bear it why may you not come to bear it? You will say, Can I have the strength of Christ? Yes, it is made over to you by faith: the Scripture says that the Lord is our strength, God himself is our strength, and Christ is our strength. There are many Scriptures to that effect, that Christ's strength is yours, made over to you, so that you may be able to bear whatever lies upon you,
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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But if I have once overcome my heart, and am contented through the grace of God in my heart, then this makes me content not only in one particular but in general, whatever befalls me.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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when the heart of a man has nothing to do, but to be busy about creature-comforts, every little thing troubles him; but when the heart is taken up with the weighty things of eternity, with the great things of eternal life, the things of here below that disquieted it before are things now of no consequence to him in comparison with the other-how things fall out here is not much regarded by him, if the one thing that is necessary is provided for.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment (Puritan Paperbacks))
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My brethren, the reason why you have not got contentment in the things of the world is not because you have not got enough of them-that is not the reason-but the reason is, because they are not things proportionable to that immortal soul of yours that is capable of God himself.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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Do not think, Oh, that I were delivered from all these afflictions and troubles here in this world! If you were, then you would have more ease yourself, but this is a way of honoring God, and manifesting the excellence of grace here, when you are in this conflict of temptation, which God shall not have from you in Heaven.
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Jeremiah Burroughs
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I find that the same Hebrew word which signifies to lodge, to abide, signifies to murmur. They use one word for both, for murmuring is a disorder that lodges in men; where it gets in once it lodges, abides and continues, and therefore, that we may dislodge it and get it out, we will labor to show what are the further reasonings of a discontented heart.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment (Puritan Paperbacks))
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But have you ever tried this way, husband and wife? Have you ever got alone and said, 'Come, Oh let us go and humble our souls before God together, let us go into our chamber and humble our souls before God for our sin, by which we have abused those mercies that God has taken away from us, and we have provoked God against us. Oh let us charge ourselves with our sin, and be humbled before the Lord together.'? Have you tried such a way as this? Oh you would find that the cloud would be taken away, and the sun would shine in upon you, and you would have a great deal more contentment than ever you had.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment (Puritan Paperbacks))
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A godly man in the midst of the waves and storms that he meets with can see the glory of heaven before him and so contents himself. One drop of the sweetness of heaven is enough to take away all the sourness and bitterness of all the afflictions in the world. We know that one drop of sourness, or one drop of gall will make bitter a great deal of it; but if you put a spoonful of gall into a cup of sugar, it will embitter that. Now it is otherwise in heaven: one drop of sweetness will sweeten a great deal of sour affliction, but a great deal of sourness and gall will not embitter a soul who sees the glory of heaven that is to come.
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Jeremiah Burroughs
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Now I say that a heart that has no grace, and is not instructed in this mystery of contentment, knows of no way to get contentment, but to have his possessions raised up to his desires; but the Christian has another way to contentment, that is, he can bring his desires down to his possessions, and so he attains his contentment....The world is infinitely deceived in thinking that contentment lies in having more than we already have. Here lies the bottom and root of all contentment, when there is an evenness and proportion between our hearts and our circumstances. That is why many godly men who are in low position live more sweet and comfortable lives than those who are richer.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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this was the excellency of the Grace of God in the Apostle, that he was fit for any condition;
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Jeremiah Burroughs (Four Useful Discourses)
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It's better to fill a Childs Belly than his Eye.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (Four Useful Discourses)
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If you pour a pail full of water on the floor of your house, it makes a great show, but if you throw it into the sea, there is no sign of it. So, afflictions considered in themselves, we think are very great, but let them be considered with the sea of god’s mercies we enjoy, and then they are not so much, they are nothing in comparison.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment: Annotated)
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that the strong beams of the sun of prosperity upon many men make them to be leprous.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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contentment is an inward, quiet, gracious frame of spirit-the whole soul, judgment, thoughts, will, affections and all are satisfied and quiet.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment (Puritan Paperbacks))
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a chief way and help to keep comfort and contentment in our hearts, is to make good interpretations of Gods dealing towards us.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (Four Useful Discourses)
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It is said of Pompey, that when he was to carry grain to Rome in time of dearth, he was in a great deal of danger by storms at sea, but, says he, β€˜We must go on; it is necessary that Rome should be relieved, but it is not necessary that we should live.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment: Annotated)
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I find a sufficiency of satisfaction in my own heart, through the grace of Christ that is in me. Though I have not outward comforts and worldly conveniences to supply my necessities, yet I have a sufficient portion between Christ and my soul abundantly to satisfy me in every condition.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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It is contrary to the worship that is in contentedness.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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Without me you can do nothing.
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Jeremiah Burroughs
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Psalm 106:24, 25: 'Yea, they despised the pleasant land, they believed not his word; but murmured in their tents, and hearkened not unto the voice of the Lord. Therefore he lifted up his hand against them to overthrow them in the wilderness.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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The truth is, it is more obedience to submit to God in a low calling than to submit to Him in a higher calling. For it is sheer obedience, mere obedience, that makes you go on in a low calling; but there may be much self-love that makes men go on in a higher calling. For there are riches, credit, and account in the world; and rewards come in by that, which do not in the other.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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There is a compound of grace in contentment: there is faith, and there is humility, and love, and there is patience, and there is wisdom, and there is hope; almost all graces are compounded. [...] In one action that you do you may exercise one grace especially, but in contentment you exercise a great many graces at once.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment)
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Every Christian should say: β€˜Have I wealth now? I should prepare for poverty. Have I health now? I should prepare for sickness.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment: Annotated)
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to be well skilled in the mystery of Christian contentment is the duty, glory and excellence of a Christian.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment (Puritan Paperbacks))
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This is the rhetoric of the Spirit of God' he said, 'to extenuate evil things, and to amplify good things: if a cross comes to make the cross but little, but if there is a mercy to make the mercy great.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment (Puritan Paperbacks))
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I look upon the creature and see what it suffers to be useful to me. Thus, the brute beasts must die, must be roasted in the fire, and boiled, must come on to the plate, be hacked all in pieces, must be chewed in the mouth, and in the stomach turned to that which is loathsome, if one should behold it; and all to nourish me, to be useful to my body, and shall not I be willing to be made anything for God, for his service? What an abundance of alterations the creature undergoes to be made useful to me, to preserve me! Then, if God will do so with me for his use, as he subjects the creatures to me for my use, why should I not reset contented? If God will take away my wealth, and make me poor, if God will take away life, hack me to pieces, put me in prison-whatever he does, yet I shall not suffer more for God than the creature does for me. And surely I am infinitely more bound to God than the creature is to me, and there is not so much distance between me and the creature, as between me and God!
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment (Puritan Paperbacks))
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It is likewise useful for men and women of wealth to go to poor people's houses and see how they live, to go to hospitals, and to see the wounds of soldiers and others, and to see the lamentable condition that people live in who live in some alms-houses, and what poor fare they have, and what straits they are put to. You hear sometimes of them, but if you went to see them it would not only stir up charity in yourselves towards them, but stir up thankfulness in your hearts towards God, it would be a special means to help you against any discontent. You would go away and see cause to bless God and say, 'If I were in such a condition as they are in what should I do? How could I bear it? And yet what reason is there that God so orders and disposes of things that they should be so low in their conditions and I so high? I know no reason but free grace: God will have mercy upon whom he will have mercy.' These are good considerations for the furtherance of contentment.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment (Puritan Paperbacks))
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once was a great merchant and trader-his name was Zeno-and it happened once that he suffered shipwreck, and he said, 'I never made a better voyage and sailed better than at the time that I suffered shipwreck.' Now this was a strange saying that he had never made a better voyage! It would be a strange paradox to you who are seamen, to say that it is a good voyage, when you suffer shipwreck. But he meant because he got so much good by it; God was pleased to bless it so far to him that he gained much to his soul by it, so much soul-riches that he made account that it was the best voyage that ever he had. Truly, sometimes it is so, yes, to you who are godly; I make no question but you find it so, that your worst voyages have proved your best. When you have met with the greatest crosses in a voyage, God has been pleased to turn them to a greater good to you, in some other way. It is true, we may desire crosses that they may be turned to other advantages; but when God in his providence so orders things, that you meet with bad voyages, you may expect that God will turn them to a greater good, and I do not doubt but that those who have been exercised in the ways of godliness any long time have abundant experiences, which they have gained by them.
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment (Puritan Paperbacks))
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when ministers only tell men that God will work good out of their afflictions, they hear them speak, and think they speak like good men, but they feel little or no good; they feel nothing but pain. But when we cannot only say to you that God has said he will work good out of your afflictions, but we can say to you, that you yourselves have found it so by experience, that God has made former afflictions to be great benefits to you, and that you would not have been without them, or without the good that came by them for a world, such experiences will exceedingly quiet the heart and bring it to contentment. Therefore think thus with yourself: Lord, why may not this affliction work as great a good upon me as afflictions have done before?
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment (Puritan Paperbacks))
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The consideration of the abundance of mercies that God bestows and we enjoy. It is a saying of Luther: 'The sea of God's mercies should swallow up all our particular afflictions.' Name any affliction that is upon you: there is a sea of mercy to swallow I up. If you pour a pailful of water on the floor of your house, it make a great show, but if you throw it into the sea, there is no sign of it. So, afflictions considered in themselves, we think are very great, but let them be considered with the sea of god's mercies we enjoy, and then they are not so much, they are nothing in comparison
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Jeremiah Burroughs (The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment (Puritan Paperbacks))
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Clearly a mark of the in-breaking kingdom is the relief of suffering. As the Christmas hymn β€œJoy to the World” reminds us, Jesus β€œcomes to make his blessings known far as the curse is found.” Relief of suffering is a good and necessary thing. This in fact is where history is going; in the new heavens and earth there will be no crying or pain (Revelation 21:4). So when we seek to bring relief from suffering now, we are keeping in step with God’s plan of redemption. As the Puritan Jeremiah Burroughs said, contentment is β€œnot opposed to all lawful seeking for help in different circumstances, nor endeavoring simply to be delivered out of present afflictions by the use of lawful means.”1 I believe medications can certainly be one of those lawful means. There is nothing inherently wrong with seeking relief from present suffering.
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Michael R. Emlet (Descriptions and Prescriptions: A Biblical Perspective on Psychiatric Diagnoses and Medications (Helping the Helpers))
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Jeremiah Burroughs decΓ­a: Β«QuΓ© estΓΊpido es esto: que por no tener lo que quiero, no disfruto lo que tengo. Hay
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HΓ©ctor Salcedo (Finanzas bΓ­blicas: Cambia tΓΊ y cambiarΓ‘n tus finanzas)