Java Properties Quotes

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The properties of an object are automatically exposed, whereas the variables in a closure are automatically hidden.
David Herman (Effective JavaScript: 68 Specific Ways to Harness the Power of JavaScript)
Generative testing is an approach to testing software that was made popular by the QuickCheck library. Originally written in Haskell and since ported to several other programming languages (Ruby, Python, C, C++, Objective-C, Smalltalk, Java, JavaScript, Erlang, Scala, Clojure...), the QuickCheck library allows the developer to separate test logic from the generation of test cases. This means that, as developers, we can spend less time instructing the compiler how to test our code, and focus instead on what properties we expect our code to have.
Anonymous
A bean is a Java class that exposes properties, by following a simple naming convention for the getter and setter methods
Anonymous
Function expressions and variables declared inside a function without using var become global properties.
Cody Lindley (JavaScript Enlightenment: From Library User to JavaScript Developer)
The other form (called for in) enumerates the property names (or keys) of an object. On each iteration, another property name string from the object is assigned to the variable.
Douglas Crockford (JavaScript: The Good Parts: The Good Parts)
The try statement executes a block and catches any exceptions that were thrown by the block. The catch clause defines a new variable that will receive the exception object. The throw statement raises an exception. If the throw statement is in a try block, then control goes to the catch clause. Otherwise, the function invocation is abandoned, and control goes to the catch clause of the try in the calling function. The expression is usually an object literal containing a name property and a message property. The catcher of the exception can use that information to determine what to do.
Douglas Crockford (JavaScript: The Good Parts: The Good Parts)
A property value can be any JavaScript value except for undefined.
Douglas Crockford (JavaScript: The Good Parts: The Good Parts)
Names A name is a letter optionally followed by one or more letters, digits, or underbars. A name cannot be one of these reserved words: abstract boolean break byte case catch char class const continue debugger default delete do double else enum export extends false final finally float for function goto if implements import in instanceof int interface long native new null package private protected public return short static super switch synchronized this throw throws transient true try typeof var volatile void while with Most of the reserved words in this list are not used in the language. The list does not include some words that should have been reserved but were not, such as undefined, NaN, and Infinity. It is not permitted to name a variable or parameter with a reserved word. Worse, it is not permitted to use a reserved word as the name of an object property in an object literal or following a dot in a refinement. Names are used for statements, variables, parameters, property names, operators, and labels.
Douglas Crockford (JavaScript: The Good Parts: The Good Parts)
Values of type string, number, and Boolean are not objects, and though the language doesn’t complain if you try to set new properties on them, it doesn’t actually store those properties. As mentioned earlier, such values are immutable and cannot be changed. But these types do have built-in properties. Every string value has a number of methods.
Marijn Haverbeke (Eloquent JavaScript: A Modern Introduction to Programming)
A prototype is another object that is used as a fallback source of properties. When an object gets a request for a property that it does not have, its prototype will be searched for the property, then the prototype’s prototype, and so on. So who is the prototype of that empty object? It is the great ancestral prototype, the entity behind almost all objects, Object.prototype.
Marijn Haverbeke (Eloquent JavaScript: A Modern Introduction to Programming)
the constructor always has a prototype property. More
Eric Freeman (Head First JavaScript Programming: A Brain-Friendly Guide)
Math is not a constructor, or even a function. It’s an object. As you know, Math is a built-in object that you can use to do things like get the value of pi (with Math.PI) or generate a random number (with Math.random). Think of Math as just like an object literal that has a bunch of useful properties and methods in it, built-in for you to use whenever you write JavaScript code. It just happens to have a capital first letter to let you know that it’s built-in to JavaScript.
Eric Freeman (Head First JavaScript Programming: A Brain-Friendly Guide)
If you change any property in the prototype, it affects all the objects that inherit from that prototype, unless that object has overridden that property.
Eric Freeman (Head First JavaScript Programming: A Brain-Friendly Guide)
The hasOwnProperty method returns true if a property is defined in an object instance. If it’s not, but you can access that property, then you can assume the property must be defined in the object’s prototype.
Eric Freeman (Head First JavaScript Programming: A Brain-Friendly Guide)
methods in objects are properties too. They just happen to have a function assigned to them.
Eric Freeman (Head First JavaScript Programming: A Brain-Friendly Guide)
When you declare any kind of global variable or define a global function, it is stored as a property in the window object. So
Eric Freeman (Head First JavaScript Programming: A Brain-Friendly Guide)
You can extend your object at any time with new properties. To do this you just specify the new property and give it a value. For
Eric Freeman (Head First JavaScript Programming: A Brain-Friendly Guide)
When you delete a property, you’re not just deleting the value of the property, you’re deleting the property itself. And, if you try to use fido.dogYears after deleting it, it will evaluate to undefined.
Eric Freeman (Head First JavaScript Programming: A Brain-Friendly Guide)
Using a method to change a property is another example of encapsulation whereby we can often improve the maintainability and extensibility of code by letting an object worry about how it gets things done. It’s
Eric Freeman (Head First JavaScript Programming: A Brain-Friendly Guide)
By lexical scope we mean that JavaScript’s rules for scoping are based purely on the structure of your code (not on some dynamic runtime properties). This means you can determine where a variable is defined by simply examining your code’s structure. Also
Eric Freeman (Head First JavaScript Programming: A Brain-Friendly Guide)
So, we recommend specifying the width and height in the tag attributes, and not setting those properties in CSS unless you really mean to scale the canvas.
Eric Freeman (Head First HTML5 Programming: Building Web Apps with JavaScript)
In Brave’s case, the risk might be that the billion tokens it issued are treated like long-term investments, hoarded by investors who withhold them from circulation. In that case, the BATs’ value won’t accurately reflect the market for user attention. A critical mass of use, not holding, is needed. Brave’s model included a token-issuance strategy for dealing with that challenge. It set aside a 300 million–strong “user growth pool” to attract new users. There’s a plan, for example, to deliver a small amount of BATs to the integrated Brave wallet whenever there’s a unique new download of the browser. In this way, the token is designed as a tool to bootstrap adoption, to foster network effects. “Early on we saw this as something that would allow us to stake users with initial grants,” says Brave CEO Brendan Eich. The strategy was shaped by Eich’s decades in Silicon Valley, where the veteran engineer created the ubiquitous Web programming language JavaScript in the nineties and later went on to co-found browser developer Mozilla. Over time, he realized that venture capitalists were reluctant to fund the marketing cost of acquiring users and that tapping new equity or debt to do so was dilutive to the founders’ and early investors’ ownership stakes. “But with a token, it can be disbursed to users without credit consequences,” he adds, arguing that by contrast to a dollar’s worth of equity or debt, “the BAT is a social credit currency; it doesn’t have this inflationary property.
Michael J. Casey (The Truth Machine: The Blockchain and the Future of Everything)
Properties not found directly on u are looked up in u’s prototype. Accessing u.checkPassword, for example, retrieves a method stored in User.prototype.
David Herman (Effective JavaScript: 68 Specific Ways to Harness the Power of JavaScript)
In principle it's possible to leave out all empty parentheses in calls to functions defined in Java or Scala 2. However, it's still recommended to write the empty parentheses when the invoked method represents more than a property of its receiver object. For instance, empty parentheses are appropriate if the method performs I/O, writes reassignable variables (vars), or reads vars other than the receiver's fields, either directly or indirectly by using mutable objects. That way, the parameter list acts as a visual clue that some interesting computation is triggered by the call.
Martin Odersky (Programming in Scala Fifth Edition: Updated for Scala 3.0)
Window is the global object. It may seem a little weird, but the window object acts as your global environment, so the names of any properties or methods from window are resolved even if you don’t prepend them with window. In addition, any global variables you define are also put into the window namespace, so you can reference them as window.myvariable.
Eric Freeman (Head First HTML5 Programming: Building Web Apps with JavaScript)
once we start thinking of communism as a principle of morality rather than just a question of property ownership, it becomes clear that this sort of morality is almost always at play to some degree in any transaction—even commerce. If one is on sociable terms with someone, it’s hard to completely ignore their situation. Merchants often reduce prices for the needy. This is one of the main reasons why shopkeepers in poor neighborhoods are almost never of the same ethnic group as their customers; it would be almost impossible for a merchant who grew up in the neighborhood to make money, as they would be under constant pressure to give financial breaks, or at least easy credit terms, to their impoverished relatives and school chums. The opposite is true as well. An anthropologist who lived for some time in rural Java once told me that she measured her linguistic abilities by how well she could bargain at the local bazaar. It frustrated her that she could never get it down to a price as low as local people seemed to pay. “Well,” a Javanese friend finally had to explain, “they charge rich Javanese people more, too.
David Graeber (Debt: The First 5,000 Years)