Janet Lansbury Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Janet Lansbury. Here they are! All 27 of them:

Once I’ve fulfilled my child’s basic needs, my only responsibility regarding feelings is to accept and acknowledge them.
Janet Lansbury (Elevating Child Care: A Guide To Respectful Parenting)
Toddlers test, and that’s exactly what they are supposed to do. A toddler has failed if he makes life too easy for us.
Janet Lansbury (Elevating Child Care: A Guide To Respectful Parenting)
We all need someone who understands.” - Magda Gerber
Janet Lansbury (Elevating Child Care: A Guide To Respectful Parenting)
People will forget what you said; people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” -Maya Angelou
Janet Lansbury (Elevating Child Care: A Guide To Respectful Parenting)
The most effective leaders lead with confidence, keep their sense of humor, and make it look easy. This
Janet Lansbury (No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame)
A positive goal to strive for when disciplining would be to raise children we not only love, but in whose company we love being.”  – Magda Gerber
Janet Lansbury (No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame)
Einstein once said, “I believe in intuition and inspiration…. At times I feel certain I am right while not knowing the reason.
Janet Lansbury (Elevating Child Care: A Guide To Respectful Parenting)
Eventually, when she knows you mean what you say and she’s unable to rattle you, she’ll settle into a routine of occupying herself when you are busy with the baby.
Janet Lansbury (No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame)
So I’ve made a special effort to accept all my children’s emotions, especially their anger…to let them know that it’s always okay for them to be mad at me. I’m not going anywhere.
Janet Lansbury (Elevating Child Care: A Guide To Respectful Parenting)
remember how hard it was to love my child when she was at her very worst and feel super proud that I did it anyway.
Janet Lansbury (No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame)
It’s always hardest to remember to acknowledge a child in the heat of a difficult moment, but if a child can hear anything during a temper tantrum, it reassures him to hear our recognition of his point-of-view. “You wanted an ice cream cone and I said ‘no’. It’s upsetting not to get what you want.” When a toddler feels understood, he senses the empathy behind our limits and corrections. He still resists, cries, and complains, but at the end of the day, he knows we are with him, always in his corner. These first years will define our relationship for many years to come.
Janet Lansbury (No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame)
One of the most profound lessons I’ve learned since becoming a mom -- reinforced by observing hundreds of other parents and babies interact — is that there is a self-fulfilling prophecy to the way we view our babies: If we believe them to be helpless, dependent, needy (albeit lovely) creatures, their behavior will confirm those beliefs. Alternatively, if we see our infants as capable, intelligent, responsive people ready to participate in life, initiate activity, receive and return our efforts to communicate with them, then we find that they are all of those things.
Janet Lansbury (Elevating Child Care: A Guide To Respectful Parenting)
Imagine driving over a bridge in the dark. If the bridge has no railings, we will drive across it slowly and tentatively. But if we see railings on either side of us, we can drive over the bridge with ease and confidence. This is how a young child feels in regard to limits in his environment. Seeking
Janet Lansbury (No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame)
Gain perspective. Our attitude toward limit-pushing behavior is everything, and our perspective is what defines our attitude. Testing, limit-pushing, defiance and resistance are healthy signs that our toddlers are developing independence and autonomy. If we say “green,” toddlers are almost required to say “blue,” even if green is their favorite color, because if toddlers want what we want, they can’t assert themselves as individuals.
Janet Lansbury (No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame)
With the knowledge that their parents will always help them handle the behaviors they can’t handle themselves, children feel safe to struggle, make mistakes, grow, and learn with confidence.
Janet Lansbury (No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame)
Wouldn’t life be easier for both parents and infants if parents would observe, relax and enjoy what their child is doing, rather than keep teaching what the child is not yet capable of?
Janet Lansbury (Elevating Child Care: A Guide To Respectful Parenting)
When you teach a child something, you take away forever his chance of discovering it for himself.” –Jean Piaget
Janet Lansbury (Elevating Child Care: A Guide To Respectful Parenting)
We’re taught how to how to acquire things, not what to do when we lose them.
Janet Lansbury (Elevating Child Care: A Guide To Respectful Parenting)
Always, always, always encourage your child to express these feelings.
Janet Lansbury (No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame)
He still resists, cries, and complains, but at the end of the day, he knows we are with him, always in his corner. These first years will define our relationship for many years to come.
Janet Lansbury (No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame)
Yes, it is counter-intuitive to refrain from assisting a child!   But when we help a child to do something she might be able to do for herself, we are robbing her of a vital learning experience and ultimately not helping at all.
Janet Lansbury (Elevating Child Care: A Guide To Respectful Parenting)
Sportscasters don’t judge, fix, shame, blame or get emotionally involved. They just keep children safe, observe and state what they see, affording children the open space they need to continue struggling until they either solve the problem or decide to let go and move on to something else: “You’re working very hard on fitting that puzzle piece. You seem frustrated.” “Savannah, you had the bear and now Ally has it. You both want to hold it. Savannah is trying to get it back… Ally, I won’t let you hit.
Janet Lansbury (Elevating Child Care: A Guide To Respectful Parenting)
Curiosity rocks. Don’t discourage it. Our instinct as parents is to say, “Oh no, don’t do that” when our toddler surprises us by suddenly being able to reach or climb onto something ‘out of bounds’. But our children’s abilities are developing daily, and we don’t want to discourage them.  Remembering to say, “Wow, you can reach that now!” or “Look at the leaf you found,” before adding “but this isn’t safe for you to touch (or put in your mouth). I’m going to move it,” encourages our baby to continue following his healthy instinct to explore. Continuing
Janet Lansbury (No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame)
Instead of labeling a child’s action, learn to nip the behavior in the bud by disallowing it nonchalantly. If
Janet Lansbury (No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame)
Boundaries and discipline, when offered non-punitively and in the context of empathy and respect, are gifts we should feel proud of and one of the highest forms of love.
Janet Lansbury (Elevating Child Care: A Guide To Respectful Parenting)
Babies are whole people – sentient, aware, intuitive and communicative. They are natural learners, explorers, and scientists able to test hypotheses, solve problems, and understand language and abstract ideas.
Janet Lansbury (No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame)
Imagine driving over a bridge in the dark. If the bridge has no railings, we will drive across it slowly and tentatively. But if we see railings on either side of us, we can drive over the bridge with ease and confidence. This is how a young child feels in regard to limits in his environment.
Janet Lansbury (No Bad Kids: Toddler Discipline Without Shame)