Haunting Of Hill House Quotes

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No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Am I walking toward something I should be running away from?
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream. Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within; it had stood so for eighty years and might stand for eighty more. Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Fear," the doctor said, "is the relinquishment of logic, the willing relinquishing of reasonable patterns. We yield to it or we fight it, but we cannot meet it halfway.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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I am like a small creature swallowed whole by a monster, she thought, and the monster feels my tiny little movements inside.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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To learn what we fear is to learn who we are. Horror defies our boundaries and illuminates our souls.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Journeys end in lovers meeting; I have spent an all but sleepless night, I have told lies and made a fool of myself, and the very air tastes like wine. I have been frightened half out of my foolish wits, but I have somehow earned this joy; I have been waiting for it for so long.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Fear and guilt are sisters;
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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All I could think of when I got a look at the place from the outside was what fun it would be to stand out there and watch it burn down.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Why do people want to talk to each other? I mean, what are the things people always want to find out about other people?
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Fear is the relinquishment of logic, the willing relinquishing of reasonable patterns. We yield to it or we fight it, but we cannot meet it halfway,
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Don't do it, Eleanor told the little girl; insist on your cup of stars; once they have trapped you into being like everyone else you will never see your cup of stars again; don't do it; and the little girl glanced at her, and smiled a little subtle, dimpling, wholly comprehending smile, and shook her head stubbornly at the glass. Brave girl, Eleanor thought; wise, brave girl.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Gossip says she hanged herself from the turret on the tower, but when you have a house like Hill House with a tower and a turret, gossip would hardly allow you to hang yourself anywhere else.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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I think we are only afraid of ourselves," the doctor said slowly. "No," Luke said. "Of seeing ourselves clearly and without disguise.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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It was a house without kindness, never meant to be lived in, not a fit place for people or for love or for hope. Exorcism cannot alter the countenance of a house ; Hill House would stay as it was until it was destroyed.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Don't do it, Eleanor told the little girl; insist on your cup of stars; once they have trapped you into being like everyone else you will never see your cup of stars again
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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God! Whose hand was I holding?
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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No, the menace of the supernatural is that it attacks where modern minds are weakest, where we have abandoned our protective armor of superstition and have no substitute defense.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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You never know what you are going to want until you see it clearly.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Eleanor looked up, surprised; the little girl was sliding back in her chair, sullenly refusing her milk, while her father frowned and her brother giggled and her mother said calmly, 'She wants her cup of stars.' Indeed yes, Eleanor thought; indeed, so do I; a cup of stars, of course. 'Her little cup,' the mother was explaining, smiling apologetically at the waitress, who was thunderstruck at the thought that the mill's good country milk was not rich enough for the little girl. 'It has stars in the bottom, and she always drinks her milk from it at home. She calls it her cup of stars because she can see the stars while she drinks her milk.' The waitress nodded, unconvinced, and the mother told the little girl, 'You'll have your milk from your cup of stars tonight when we get home. But just for now, just to be a very good little girl, will you take a little milk from this glass?' Don't do it, Eleanor told the little girl; insist on your cup of stars; once they have trapped you into being like everyone else you will never see your cup of stars again; don't do it; and the little girl glanced at her, and smiled a little subtle, dimpling, wholly comprehending smile, and shook her head stubbornly at the glass. Brave girl, Eleanor thought; wise, brave girl.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Let him be wise, or let me be blind; don't let me, she hoped concretely, don't let me know too surely what he thinks of me.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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The great art of life is sensation, to feel that we exist, even in pain,” said Lord Byron,
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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It watches," he added suddenly. "The house. It watches every move you make.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Hill House, she thought, You're as hard to get into as heaven.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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I could live there all alone, she thought, slowing the car to look down the winding garden path to the small blue front door with, perfectly, a white cat on the step. No one would ever find me there, either, behind all those roses, and just to make sure I would plant oleanders by the road. I will light a fire in the cool evenings and toast apples at my own hearth. I will raise white cats and sew white curtains for the windows and sometimes come out of my door to go to the store to buy cinnamon and tea and thread. People will come to me to have their fortunes told, and I will brew love potions for sad maidens; I will have a robin...
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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She had taken to wondering lately, during these swift-counted years, what had been done with all those wasted summer days; how could she have spent them so wantonly? I am foolish, she told herself early every summer, I am very foolish; I am grown up now and know the values of things. Nothing is ever really wasted, she believed sensibly, even one's childhood, and then each year, one summer morning, the warm wind would come down the city street where she walked and she would be touched with the little cold thought: I have let more time go by.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Forgiveness is warm. Like a tear on a cheek. Think of that and of me when you stand in the rain. I loved you completely. And you loved me the same. That's all. The rest is confetti. -Nell Crain - The Haunting of Hill House
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Mike Flanagan
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Journeys end in lovers meeting
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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…Silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Materializations are often best produced in rooms where there are books. I cannot think of any time when materialization was in any way hampered by the presence of books.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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To learn what we fear is to learn who we are.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, but some, to dream.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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I am home, she thought, and stopped in wonder at the thought. I am home, I am home, she thought; now to climb.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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She could not remember ever being truly happy in her adult life; her years with her mother had been built up devotedly around small guilts and small reproaches, constant weariness, and unending despair. Without ever wanting to become reserved and shy, she had spent so long alone, with no one to love, that it was difficult for her to talk, even casually, to another person without self-consciousness and an awkward inability to find words.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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He is altogether selfish, she thought in some surprise, the only man I have ever sat and talked to alone, and I am impatient; he is simply not very interesting.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Around her the trees and wild flowers, with that oddly courteous air of natural things suddenly interrupted in their pressing occupations of growing and dying, turned toward her with attention, as though, dull and imperceptive as she was, it was still necessary for them to be gentle to a creation so unfortunate as not to be rooted in the ground, forced to go from one place to another, heart-breakingly mobile.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Tell me something that only I will ever know, was perhaps what she wanted to ask him, or, What will you remember me by? - or even, Nothing of the least importance has ever belonged to me; can you help?
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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We couldn't even hear you, in the night.... No one could. No one lives any nearer than town. No one else will come any nearer than that." "I know," Eleanor said tiredly. "In the night," Mrs. Dudley said, and smiled outright. "In the dark," she said..
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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I am a kind of stray cat, aren’t I?
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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She wants her cup of stars.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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We have grown to trust blindly in our senses of balance and reason, and I can see where the mind might fight wildly to preserve its own familiar stable patterns against all evidence that it was leaning sideways.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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No Human eye can isolate the unhappy coincidence of line and place which suggests evil in the face of a house, and yet somehow a maniac juxtaposition, a badly turned angle, some chance meeting of roof and sky, turned Hill House into a place of despair, more frightening because the face of Hill House seemed awake, with a watchfulness from the blank windows and a touch of glee in the eyebrow of a cornice.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Hill House,not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within; it has stood for eighty years and might stand eighty more. Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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People,” the doctor said sadly, β€œare always so anxious to get things out into the open where they can put a name to them, even a meaningless name, so long as it has something of a scientific ring.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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All I want is to be cherished, she thought, and here I am talking gibberish with a selfish man.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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My dear, how can I make you perceive that there is no danger where there is nothing but love and understanding?
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Almost any house, caught unexpectedly or at an odd angle, can turn a deeply humorous look on a watching person; even a mischievous little chimney, or a dormer like a dimple, can catch up a beholder with a sense of fellowship; but a house arrogant and hating, never off guard, can only be evil.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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When they were silent for a moment the quiet weight of the house pressed down from all around them.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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The house was vile. She shivered and thought, the words coming freely into her mind, Hill House is vile, it is diseased; get away from here at once.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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At my age an hour's reading before bedtime is essential, and I wisely brought Pamela with me. If any of you has trouble sleeping, I will read aloud to you. I never yet knew anyone who could not fall asleep with Richardson being read aloud to him.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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I will not put a name to what has no name,
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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wherever she goes she will only find the same hell she was running away from.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Do you always go where you’re not wanted?” Eleanor smiled placidly. β€œI’ve never been wanted anywhere,” she said.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Well, she asked, how do you gentlemen like living in a haunted house? It's perfectly fine, Luke said, perfectly fine. It gives me an excuse to have a drink in the middle of the night.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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This house, which seemed somehow to have formed itself, flying together into its own powerful pattern under the hands of its builders, fitting itself into its own construction of lines and angles, reared its great head back against the sky without concession to humanity. It was a house without kindness, never meant to be lived in, not a fit place for people or for love or for hope.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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she might never leave the road at all, but just hurry on and on until the wheels of the car were worn to nothing and she had come to the end of the world.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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In delay there lies no plenty.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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insist on your cup of stars
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Insist on your cup of stars. Once they have trapped you into being like everyone else, you will never see your cup of stars again.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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I clear breakfast at ten o'clock. I set on lunch at one. Dinner I set on at six. It's ten o'clock.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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I live a mad, abandoned life, draped in a shawl and going from garret to garret.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Look. There's only one of me, and it's all I've got. I hate seeing myself dissolve and slip and separate so that I'm living in one half, my mind, and I see the other half of me helpless and frantic and driven and I can't stop it, but I know I'm not really going to be hurt and yet time is so long and even a second goes on and on and I could stand any of it if I could only surrender-
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Hill House has an impressive list of tragedies connected with it, but then, most old houses have. People have to live and die somewhere, after all, and a house can hardly stand for eighty years without seeing some of its inhabitants die within its walls.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Nothing,” she said, β€œupsets me more than being hungry; I snarl and snap and burst into tears.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Journeys end in lovers meeting; I have spent an all but sleepless night, I have told lies and made a fool of myself, and the very air tastes like wine.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Eleanor Vance was thirty-two years old when she came to Hill House. The only person in the world she genuinely hated, now that her mother was dead, was her sister. She disliked her brother-in-law and her five-year-old niece, and she had no friends.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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No, she thought, you are not going to catch me so cheaply; I do not understand words and will not accept them in trade for my feelings; this man is a parrot. I will tell him that I can never understand such a thing, that maudlin self-pity does not move directly at my heart; I will not make a fool of myself by encouraging him to mock me. β€œI understand, yes,” she said.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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In the darkness their feet felt that they were going downhill, and each privately and perversely accused the other of taking, deliberately, a path they had followed together once before in happiness.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Perhaps someone had once hoped to lighten the air of the blue room in Hill House with a dainty wallpaper, not seeing how such a hope would evaporate in Hill House, leaving only the faintest hint of its existence, like an almost inaudible echo of sobbing far away...
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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It’s not nice to think of children growing up like mushrooms, in the dark.
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Shirley Jackson
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but a house arrogant and hating, never off guard, can only be evil.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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An Eleanor, she told herself triumphantly, who belongs, who is talking easily, who is sitting by the fire with her friends.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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It was the first genuinely shining day of summer, a time of year which brought Eleanor always to aching memories of her early childhood, when it seemed to be summer all the time; she could not remember a winter before father's death on a cold wet day.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Around her the trees and wildflowers, with that oddly courteous air of natural things suddenly interrupted in their pressing occupations of growing and dying, turned toward her with attention, as though, dull and imperceptive as she was, it was still necessary for them to be gentle to a creation so unfortunate as not to be rooted in the ground, forced to go from one place to another, heart-breakingly mobile.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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I thought for so long that time was like a line, that our moments were laid out like dominoes, and that they fell, one into another and on it went, just days tipping, one into the next, in a long line between the beginning...and the end. But I was wrong. It's not like that at all. Our moments fall around us like rain. Or snow. Or confetti. (Nell Crain, The Haunting of Hill House)
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Mike Flanagan
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She had never driven far alone before. The notion of dividing her lovely journey into miles and hours was silly; she saw it [...] as a passage of moments, each one new, carrying her along with them, taking her down a path of incredible novelty to a new place. The journey itself was her positive action, her destination vague, perhaps nonexistent. [...] Or she might never leave the road at all, but just hurry on and on until the wheels of the car were worn to nothing and she had come to the end of the world.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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He was scrupulous about the use of his title because, his investigations being so utterly unscientific, he hoped to borrow an air of respectability, even scholarly authority, from his education.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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the houses described in Leviticus as β€˜leprous,’ tsaraas, or Homer’s phrase for the underworld: aidao domos, the house of Hades; I need not remind you, I think, that the concept of certain houses as unclean or forbiddenβ€”perhaps sacredβ€”is as old as the mind of man.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Now we are going to have a new noise, Eleanor thought, listening to the inside of her head; it is changing. The pounding had stopped, as though it had proved ineffectual, and there was now a swift movement up and down the hall, as of an animal pacing back and forth with unbelievable impatience, watching first one door and then another, alert for a movement inside, and there was again the little babbling murmur which Eleanor remembered; Am I doing it? She wondered quickly, is that me? And heard the tiny laughter beyond the door, mocking her.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Duty and conscience were, for Theodora, attributes which belonged properly to Girl Scouts.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Nothing irrevocable had yet been spoken, but there was only the barest margin of safety left them; each of them moving delicately along the outskirts of an open question, and, once spoken, such a question - as "Do you love me?" - could never be answered or forgotten.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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She turned her car onto the last stretch of straight drive leading her directly, face to face, to Hill House and, moving without thought, pressed her foot on the brake to stall the car and sat, staring. The house was vile. She shivered and thought, the words coming freely into her mind, Hill House is vile, it is diseased; get away from here at once.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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When I was a child," Theodora said lazily, "'--many years ago,' Doctor, as you put it so tactfully--I was whipped for throwing a brick through a greenhouse roof. I remember I thought about if for a long time, remembering the whipping but remembering also the lovely crash, and after thinking about it very seriously I went out and did it again.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Nothing is ever really wasted, she believed sensibly, even one's childhood, and then each year, one summer morning, the warm wind would come down the city street where she walked and she would be touched with the little cold thought: I have let more time go by.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Each was so bent upon her own despair that escape into darkness was vital, and, containing themselves in that tight, vulnerable, impossible cloak which is fury, they stamped along together, each achingly aware of the other, each determined to be the last to speak.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Almost any house, caught unexpectedly or at an odd angle, can turn a deeply humorous look on a watching person; even a mischievous little chimney, or a dormer like a dimple, can catch up a beholder with a sense of fellowship;
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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On the main street of one village she passed a vast house, pillared and walled, with shutters over the windows and a pair of stone lions guarding the steps, and she thought that perhaps she might live there, dusting the lions each morning and patting their heads good night.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Nothing irrevocable had yet been spoken, but there was only the barest margin of safety left them, each of them moving delicately along the outskirts of an open question, and, once spoken, such a question-as "Do you love me?" -could never be answered or forgotten. They walked slowly, meditating, wondering, and the path sloped down from their feet and they followed, walking side by side in the most extreme intimacy of expectation; their feinting and hesitation done with, they could only await passively for resolution. Each knew, almost within a breath, what the other was thinking and wanting to say; each of them almost wept for the other. They perceived at the same moment the change in the path and each knew then the other's knowledge of it; Theodora took Eleanor's arm and, afraid to stop, they moved on slowly, close together, and ahead of them the path widened and blackened and curved.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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I have a beard,' Dr. Montague said, pleased, and looked around at them with a happy beam. 'My wife,' he told them, 'likes a man to wear a beard. Many women, on the other hand, find a beard distasteful. A clean-shaven man - you'll excuse me, my boy - never looks fully dressed, my wife tells me.' He held out his glass to Luke.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Don't do it, Eleanor told the little girl; insist on your cup of stars; once they have trapped you into being like everyone else you will never see your little cup of stars again; don't do it; and the little girl glanced at her, and smiled a little subtle, dimpling, wholly comprehending smile, and shook her head stubbornly at the glass. Brave girl, Eleanor thought; wise, brave girl.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream. Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within. Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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...Don't be surprised, and I say it darkly, do not be surprised if you lose your Luke in this cause; perhaps Mrs. Dudley has not yet had her own mid morning snack, and she is perfectly capable of a filet de Luke Γ‘ la meuniΓ©re, or perhaps dieppoise, depending upon her mood; if I do not return" -and he shook his finger warningly under the doctor's nose- "I entreat you to regard your lunch with the gravest suspicion." Bowing extravagantly, as befitted one off to slay a giant, he closed the door behind him.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Yes,” he said. β€œI never had a mother, as I told you. Now I find that everyone else has had something that I missed.” He smiled at her. β€œI am entirely selfish,” he said ruefully, β€œand always hoping that someone will tell me to behave, someone will make herself responsible for me and make me be grown-up." He is altogether selfish, she thought in some surprise, the only man I have ever sat and talked to alone, and I am impatient; he is simply not very interesting. "Why don’t you grow up by yourself?” she asked him, and wondered how many peopleβ€”how many womenβ€”had already asked him that.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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It is my second morning in Hill House, and I am unbelievably happy. Journeys end in lovers meeting; I have spent an all but sleepless night, I have told lies and made a fool of myself, and the very air tastes like wine. I have been frightened half out of my foolish wits, but I have somehow earned this joy; I have been waiting for it for so long. Abandoning a lifelong belief that to name happiness is to dissipate it, she smiled at herself in the mirror and told herself silently, You are happy, Eleanor, you have finally been given a part of your measure of happiness. Looking away from her own face in the mirror, she thought blindly, Journeys end in lovers meeting, lovers meeting.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Eleanor found herself unexpectedly admiring her own feet. Theodora dreamed over the fire beyond the tips of her toes, and Eleanor thought with deep satisfaction that her feet were handsome in their red sandals; what a complete and separate thing I am, she thought, going from my red toes to the top of my head, individually an I, possessed of attributes belonging only to me. I have red shoes, she thought-that goes with being Eleanor; I dislike lobster and sleep on my left side and crack my knuckles when I am nervous and save buttons. I am holding a brandy glass which is mine because I am here and I am using it and I have a place in this room. I have red shoes and tomorrow I will wake up and I will still be here. 'I have red shoes,' she said very softly, and Theodora turned and smiled up at her.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Horror is a woman’s genre, and it has been all the way back to the oldest horror novel still widely read today: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, daughter of pioneering feminist author Mary Wollstonecraft. Ann Radcliffe’s gothic novels (The Mysteries of Udolpho, The Italian) made her the highest-paid writer of the late eighteenth century. In the nineteenth century, Mary Elizabeth Braddon and Charlotte Riddell were book-writing machines, turning out sensation novels and ghost stories by the pound. Edith Wharton wrote ghost stories before becoming a novelist of manners, and Vernon Lee (real name Violet Paget) wrote elegant tales of the uncanny that rival anything by Henry James. Three of Daphne du Maurier’s stories became Hitchcock films (Jamaica Inn, Rebecca, The Birds), and Shirley Jackson’s singular horror novel The Haunting of Hill House made her one of the highest-regarded American writers of the twentieth century.
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Grady Hendrix (Paperbacks from Hell: The Twisted History of '70s and '80s Horror Fiction)
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NingΓΊn organismo vivo puede mantenerse cuerdo durante mucho tiempo en unas condiciones de realidad absoluta; incluso las alondras y las chicharras, suponen algunos, sueΓ±an. Hill House, nada cuerda, se alzaba en soledad frente a las colinas, acumulando oscuridad en su interior; llevaba asΓ­ ochenta aΓ±os y asΓ­ podrΓ­a haber seguido otros ochenta aΓ±os mΓ‘s. En su interior, las paredes mantenΓ­an su verticalidad, los ladrillos se entrelazaban limpiamente, los suelos aguantaban firmes y las puertas permanecΓ­an cuidadosamente cerradas; el silencio empujaba incansable contra la madera y la piedra de Hill House, y lo que fuera que caminase allΓ­ dentro, caminaba solo.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)
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Eleanor closed her eyes and sighed, feeling and hearing and smelling the house; a flowering bush beyond the kitchen was heavy with scent, and the water in the brook moved sparkling over the stones. Far away, upstairs, perhaps in the nursery, a little eddy of wind gathered itself and swept along the floor, carrying dust. In the library the iron stairway swayed, and light glittered on the marble eyes of Hugh Crain; Theodora’s yellow shirt hung neat and unstained, Mrs. Dudley was setting the lunch table for five. Hill House watched, arrogant and patient. β€œI won’t go away,” Eleanor said up to the high windows.
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Shirley Jackson (The Haunting of Hill House)