Fixed Mindset Quotes

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In the fixed mindset, everything is about the outcome. If you fail—or if you’re not the best—it’s all been wasted. The growth mindset allows people to value what they’re doing regardless of the outcome . They’re tackling problems, charting new courses, working on important issues. Maybe they haven’t found the cure for cancer, but the search was deeply meaningful.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
After seven experiments with hundreds of children, we had some of the clearest findings I’ve ever seen: Praising children’s intelligence harms their motivation and it harms their performance. How can that be? Don’t children love to be praised? Yes, children love praise. And they especially love to be praised for their intelligence and talent. It really does give them a boost, a special glow—but only for the moment. The minute they hit a snag, their confidence goes out the window and their motivation hits rock bottom. If success means they’re smart, then failure means they’re dumb. That’s the fixed mindset.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
People can have two different mindsets, she says. Those with a “fixed mindset” believe that their talents and abilities are carved in stone. Those with a “growth mindset” believe that their talents and abilities can be developed. Fixed mindsets see every encounter as a test of their worthiness. Growth mindsets see the same encounters as opportunities to improve.
Daniel H. Pink (Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us)
Becoming is better than being.” The fixed mindset does not allow people the luxury of becoming. They have to already be.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
Believing that your qualities are carved in stone—the fixed mindset—creates an urgency to prove yourself over and over.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
Any fool can break something, criticise someone and tear things apart. It takes a far more skilled, wise and kind soul to build something, nurture someone, fix things and help others thrive over time.
Rasheed Ogunlaru
Many growth-minded people didn’t even plan to go to the top. They got there as a result of doing what they love. It’s ironic: The top is where the fixed-mindset people hunger to be, but it’s where many growth-minded people arrive as a by-product of their enthusiasm for what they do.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
What on earth would make someone a nonlearner? Everyone is born with an intense drive to learn. Infants stretch their skills daily. Not just ordinary skills, but the most difficult tasks of a lifetime, like learning to walk and talk. They never decide it’s too hard or not worth the effort. Babies don’t worry about making mistakes or humiliating themselves. They walk, they fall, they get up. They just barge forward. What could put an end to this exuberant learning? The fixed mindset. As soon as children become able to evaluate themselves, some of them become afraid of challenges. They become afraid of not being smart. I have studied thousands of people from preschoolers on, and it’s breathtaking how many reject an opportunity to learn.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
Fixed mindset leaders will quickly contaminate an organisation by killing growth and creativity, as well as promoting incompetence based on their likeness. This cycle will be replicated unless shareholders intervene ruthlessly
Peter F Gallagher
When people with the fixed mindset opt for success over growth, what are they really trying to prove? That they’re special. Even superior.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
The parent who praises a child’s accomplishment by saying, ‘You studied hard!’ promotes a growth mindset. The parent who says, ‘Look at your A, son! You’re a genius!’ promotes a fixed mindset.
Susan David (Emotional Agility: Get Unstuck, Embrace Change and Thrive in Work and Life)
Children—and adults—who have a growth mindset are much more successful than those who have a fixed mindset about themselves and the world.
Jane Goodall (The Book of Hope: A Survival Guide for Trying Times)
In the fixed mindset, setbacks label you.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
Another way people with the fixed mindset try to repair their self-esteem after a failure is by assigning blame or making excuses.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
Actually, people with the fixed mindset expect ability to show up on its own, before any learning takes place.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
A fixed mindset about ability leads to pessimistic explanations of adversity, and that, in turn, leads to both giving up on challenges and avoiding them in the first place. In contrast, a growth mindset leads to optimistic ways of explaining adversity, and that, in turn, leads to perseverance and seeking out new challenges that will ultimately make you even stronger.
Angela Duckworth (Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance)
Enlightenment begins when you change your mindset - from a blaming mindset to blessing mindset, from a negative mindset to positive mindset, from fixed mindset to growth mind set, from linear mindset to exponential mindset.
Amit Ray (Walking the Path of Compassion)
What allowed me to take that first step, to choose growth and risk rejection? In the fixed mindset, I had needed my blame and bitterness. It made me feel more righteous, powerful, and whole than thinking I was at fault. The growth mindset allowed me to give up the blame and move on. The growth mindset gave me a mother.
Carol S. Dweck
There was a saying in the 1960s that went: “Becoming is better than being.” The fixed mindset does not allow people the luxury of becoming. They have to already be.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
And this is part of the fixed mindset. Effort is for those who don’t have the ability.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
In fact, every word and action can send a message. It tells children—or students, or athletes—how to think about themselves. It can be a fixed-mindset message that says: You have permanent traits and I’m judging them. Or it can be a growth-mindset message that says: You are a developing person and I am interested in your development.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
When you enter a mindset, you enter a new world. In one world--the world of fixed traits--success is about proving you're smart or talented. Validating yourself. In the other--the world of changing qualities--it's about stretching yourself to learn something new. Developing yourself.
Carol S. Dweck
Fixed mindset worries in the nest and the growth mindset dances on the edge.
Amit Ray (Mindfulness Living in the Moment - Living in the Breath)
Mindfulness gives freedom from negative and fixed mindset to positive and growth mindset.
Amit Ray (Mindfulness Living in the Moment - Living in the Breath)
Just because some people can do something with little or no training, it doesn’t mean that others can’t do it (and sometimes do it even better) with training. This is so important, because many, many people with the fixed mindset think that someone’s early performance tells you all you need to know about their talent and their future.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
the fixed-mindset premise that great geniuses do not need great teams. They just need little helpers to carry out their brilliant ideas.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
We ought to relentlessly ignore excuses, especially those we are told by ourselves.
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
I saw a meme the other day with a picture of Marilyn Manson and Robin Williams. It said about the former, this isn’t the face of depression, and about the latter, this is. This really struck a chord and it’s been on my mind since then. As someone who has continuously dipped in and out of chronic depression and anxiety for close to three decades now, and I’ve never previously spoken about the subject, I finally thought it was time I did. These days it’s trendy for people to think they’re cool and understanding about mental illness, posting memes and such to indicate so. But the reality is far different to that. It seems most people think if they publicly display such understanding then perhaps a friend will come to them, open up, and calmly discuss their problems. This will not happen. For someone in that seemingly hopeless void of depression and anxiety the last thing they are likely to do is acknowledge it, let alone talk about it. Even if broached by a friend they will probably deny there is a problem and feel even more distanced from the rest of the world. So nobody can do anything to help, right? No. If right now you suspect one of your friends is suffering like this then you’re probably right. If right now you think that none of your friends are suffering like this then you’re probably wrong. By all means make your public affirmations of understanding, but at least take on board that an attempt to connect on this subject by someone you care about could well be cryptic and indirect. When we hear of celebrities who suffered and finally took their own lives the message tends to be that so many close friends had no idea. This is woeful, but it’s also great, right? Because by not knowing there was a problem there is no burden of responsibility on anyone else. This is another huge misconception, that by acknowledging an indirect attempt to connect on such a complex issue that somehow you are accepting responsibility to fix it. This is not the case. You don’t have to find a solution. Maybe just listen. Many times over the years I’ve seen people recoil when they suspect that perhaps that is the direct a conversation is about to turn, and they desperately scramble for anything that can immediately change the subject. By acknowledging you’ve heard and understood doesn’t mean you are picking up their burden and carrying it for them. Anyway, I’ve said my piece. And please don’t think this is me reaching out for help. If this was my current mindset the last thing I’d ever do is write something like this, let alone share it.
R.D. Ronald
The scientific research is very clear that experiencing trauma without control can be debilitating. But I also worry about people who cruise through life, friction-free, for a long, long time before encountering their first real failure. They have so little practice falling and getting up again. They have so many reasons to stick with a fixed mindset. I see a lot of invisibly vulnerable high-achievers stumble in young adulthood and struggle to get up again. I call them the “fragile perfects.” Sometimes I meet fragile perfects in my office after a midterm or a final. Very quickly, it becomes clear that these bright and wonderful people know how to succeed but not how to fail.
Angela Duckworth (Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance)
Om meditation eliminates rigid and fixed views about the world. It creates a spacious, flexible and open views about the world.
Amit Ray (Mindfulness Meditation for Corporate Leadership and Management)
Entrepreneurs don’t usually fail from circumstance, they fail from what I call entrepreneurial rigidity—a fixed mindset and unwillingness to change the business model.
Richie Norton
In fact, in the fixed mindset, adolescence is one big test. Am I smart or dumb? Am I good-looking or ugly? Am I cool or nerdy? Am I a winner or a loser? And in the fixed mindset, a loser is forever.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
What's more, it's not as though the fixed mindset wants to leave gracefully. If the fixed mindset has been controlling your internal monologue, it can say some pretty strong thing to you...The fixed mindset once offered you a refuge from that very feeling, and it offers it to you again. Don't take it.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
A few modern philosophers … assert that an individual’s intelligence is a fixed quantity, a quantity which cannot be increased. We must protest and react against this brutal pessimism.… With practice, training, and above all, method, we manage to increase our attention, our memory, our judgment and literally to become more intelligent than we were before.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
What are the consequences of thinking that your intelligence or personality is something you can develop, as opposed to something that is a fixed, deep-seated trait?
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
There were two meanings to ability, not one: a fixed ability that needs to be proven, and a changeable ability that can be developed through learning
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
This low-effort syndrome is often seen as a way that adolescents assert their independence from adults, but it is also a way that students with the fixed mindset protect themselves. They view the adults as saying, “Now we will measure you and see what you’ve got.” And they are answering, “No you won’t.” John Holt, the great educator, says that these are the games all human beings play when others are sitting in judgment of them.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
In this age of quick fixes and microwave mindsets, most of us want what we want, and we want it right now, whether it is instant download speed, instant riches, or an Oompa-Loompa, but just as you can’t force the farm to produce a harvest, you can’t force your seed of potential to grow until it is ripe and ready.
Derek Rydall (Emergence: The End of Self Improvement)
The true aim of personal change is to turn our minds away from miracle cures and quick fixes, and adopt a long-term strategy. Habit change isn’t a sprint; it’s a marathon. The right mindset is to wake up tomorrow almost exactly the same person, except for one small change—a small change that you can replicate every day until you don’t notice it anymore, at which point it’s time to plan another small change
Jeremy Dean (Making Habits, Breaking Habits: Why We Do Things, Why We Don't, and How to Make Any Change Stick)
To the fixed-mindset person, intelligence and skill are seen as a sum game. Either you can do math or you can’t. You’re artistic or you’re not. You have what it takes to sell or to be a great speaker or you don’t. Not surprisingly, Dweck found that people who have a fixed mindset are more likely to rate high on the impostor scale.
Valerie Young (The Secret Thoughts of Successful Women: Why Capable People Suffer from the Impostor Syndrome and How to Thrive in Spite of It)
a fixed ability that needs to be proven, and a changeable ability that can be developed through learning.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
the major factor in whether people achieve expertise “is not some fixed prior ability, but purposeful engagement.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
Make no mistake, no one has ever become great by mistake.
Mokokoma Mokhonoana
Beware of success. It can knock you into a fixed mindset: "I won because I have talent. Therefore I will keep winning." Success can infect a team or it can infect an individual.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
On the whole, people with a fixed mindset prefer effortless success, since that’s the best way to prove their talent.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
However, lurking behind that self-esteem of the fixed mindset is a simple question: If you’re somebody when you’re successful, what are you when you’re unsuccessful?
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
As a New York Times article points out, failure has been transformed from an action (I failed) to an identity (I am a failure). This is especially true in the fixed mindset.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
fixed mindset makes you concerned with how you’ll be judged; the growth mindset makes you concerned with improving.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
studies show that people are terrible at estimating their abilities. Recently, we set out to see who is most likely to do this. Sure, we found that people greatly misestimated their performance and their ability. But it was those with the fixed mindset who accounted for almost all the inaccuracy. The people with the growth mindset were amazingly accurate. When you think about it, this makes sense. If, like those with the growth mindset, you believe you can develop yourself, then you’re open to accurate information about your current abilities, even if it’s unflattering.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
A child will pick up negative experiences as easily as positive experiences. They can even pick up our feelings and attitudes, for example, when we drop something and get frustrated with ourselves (as opposed to forgiving ourselves) or if we have a fixed mind-set that we are bad at drawing (as opposed to a growth mind-set where we might show that we can always keep improving our skills).
Simone Davies (The Montessori Toddler: A Parent's Guide to Raising a Curious and Responsible Human Being)
As Morgan McCall, in his book High Flyers, points out, “Unfortunately, people often like the things that work against their growth.… People like to use their strengths … to achieve quick, dramatic results, even if … they aren’t developing the new skills they will need later on. People like to believe they are as good as everyone says … and not take their weaknesses as seriously as they might. People don’t like to hear bad news or get criticism.… There is tremendous risk … in leaving what one does well to attempt to master something new.” And the fixed mindset makes it seem all that much riskier.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
The idea of trying and still failing—of leaving yourself without excuses—is the worst fear within the fixed mindset, and it haunted and paralyzed her. She had even stopped bringing her violin to her lesson!
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
Ironically, it is therefore often the highly gifted and talented students, who receive a lot of praise, who are more in danger of developing a fixed mindset and getting stuck. Having been praised for what they are (talented and gifted) rather than for what they do, they tend to focus on keeping this impression intact, rather than exposing themselves to new challenges and the possibility of learning from failure.
Sönke Ahrens (How to Take Smart Notes: One Simple Technique to Boost Writing, Learning and Thinking – for Students, Academics and Nonfiction Book Writers)
People with a fixed mindset were only interested when the feedback reflected on their ability. Their brain waves showed them paying close attention when they were told whether their answers were right or wrong.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
Like my sixth-grade teacher, Mrs. Wilson, these teachers preached and practiced the fixed mindset. In their classrooms, the students who started the year in the high-ability group ended the year there, and those who started the year in the low-ability group ended the year there. But some teachers preached and practiced a growth mindset. They focused on the idea that all children could develop their skills, and in their classrooms a weird thing happened. It didn’t matter whether students started the year in the high- or the low-ability group. Both groups ended the year way up high. It’s a powerful experience to see these findings.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
So in the fixed mindset, both positive and negative labels can mess with your mind. When you’re given a positive label, you’re afraid of losing it, and when you’re hit with a negative label, you’re afraid of deserving it.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
Praise is closely connected to how kids view their intelligence. If they are constantly praised for being naturally smart, talented, or gifted (sound familiar?), they develop what is called a “fixed” mind-set (their intelligence is fixed and they have it).
Jessica Joelle Alexander (The Danish Way of Parenting: What the Happiest People in the World Know About Raising Confident, Capable Kids)
The idea that one evaluation can measure you forever is what creates the urgency for those with the fixed mindset. That’s why they must succeed perfectly and immediately. Who can afford the luxury of trying to grow when everything is on the line right now?
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
It turns out that even believing you are smart—one of the fixed mindset messages—is damaging, as students with this fixed mindset are less willing to try more challenging work or subjects because they are afraid of slipping up and no longer being seen as smart.
Jo Boaler (Mathematical Mindsets: Unleashing Students' Potential through Creative Math, Inspiring Messages and Innovative Teaching)
There are so many ways the fixed mindset creates groupthink. Leaders are seen as gods who never err. A group invests itself with special talents and powers. Leaders, to bolster their ego, suppress dissent. Or workers, seeking validation from leaders, fall into line behind them.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
Ethan’s parents constantly told him how brainy he was. “You’re so smart! You can do anything, Ethan. We are so proud of you, they would say every time he sailed through a math test. Or a spelling test. Or any test. With the best of intentions, they consistently tethered Ethan’s accomplishment to some innate characteristic of his intellectual prowess. Researchers call this “appealing to fixed mindsets.” The parents had no idea that this form of praise was toxic.   Little Ethan quickly learned that any academic achievement that required no effort was the behavior that defined his gift. When he hit junior high school, he ran into subjects that did require effort. He could no longer sail through, and, for the first time, he started making mistakes. But he did not see these errors as opportunities for improvement. After all, he was smart because he could mysteriously grasp things quickly. And if he could no longer grasp things quickly, what did that imply? That he was no longer smart. Since he didn’t know the ingredients making him successful, he didn’t know what to do when he failed. You don’t have to hit that brick wall very often before you get discouraged, then depressed. Quite simply, Ethan quit trying. His grades collapsed. What happens when you say, ‘You’re so smart’   Research shows that Ethan’s unfortunate story is typical of kids regularly praised for some fixed characteristic. If you praise your child this way, three things are statistically likely to happen:   First, your child will begin to perceive mistakes as failures. Because you told her that success was due to some static ability over which she had no control, she will start to think of failure (such as a bad grade) as a static thing, too—now perceived as a lack of ability. Successes are thought of as gifts rather than the governable product of effort.   Second, perhaps as a reaction to the first, she will become more concerned with looking smart than with actually learning something. (Though Ethan was intelligent, he was more preoccupied with breezing through and appearing smart to the people who mattered to him. He developed little regard for learning.)   Third, she will be less willing to confront the reasons behind any deficiencies, less willing to make an effort. Such kids have a difficult time admitting errors. There is simply too much at stake for failure.       What to say instead: ‘You really worked hard’   What should Ethan’s parents have done? Research shows a simple solution. Rather than praising him for being smart, they should have praised him for working hard. On the successful completion of a test, they should not have said,“I’m so proud of you. You’re so smart. They should have said, “I’m so proud of you. You must have really studied hard”. This appeals to controllable effort rather than to unchangeable talent. It’s called “growth mindset” praise.
John Medina (Brain Rules for Baby: How to Raise a Smart and Happy Child from Zero to Five)
Fixed mindset people need approval and external validation as a means of reinforcing their internal sense of their fixed traits. Failure is therefore to be feared because it ‘reveals’ the underlying fixed truth of who they are and so could shatter that person’s identity and sense of value.
Andrew Leedham (Unstoppable Self Confidence: How to create the indestructible, natural confidence of the 1% who achieve their goals, create success on demand and live life on their terms)
...in the fixed mindset, you don’t take control of your abilities and your motivation. You look for your talent to carry you through, and when it doesn’t, well then, what else could you have done? You are not a work in progress, you’re a finished product. And finished products have to protect themselves, lament, and blame. Everything but take charge.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
Groupthink can also happen when a fixed-mindset leader punishes dissent. People may not stop thinking critically, but they stop speaking up.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
fixed ability that needs to be proven, and a changeable ability that can be developed through learning. That
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
Suddenly we realized that there were two meanings to ability, not one: a fixed ability that needs to be proven, and a changeable ability that can be developed through learning.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
You can't lead an empowered life with a defeated mindset. Work on the mindset first. Fix the inside before you try to fix the outside. Change always begins within.
Akiroq Brost
Believing that your qualities are carved in stone—the fixed mindset—creates an urgency to prove yourself over and over. If you have only a certain amount of intelligence, a certain personality, and a certain moral character—well, then you’d better prove that you have a healthy dose of them. It simply wouldn’t do to look or feel deficient in these most basic characteristics.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
Remember how hard it is for people with the fixed mindset to forgive? Part of it is that they feel branded by a rejection or breakup. But another part is that if they forgive the partner, if they see him or her as a decent person, then they have to shoulder more of the blame themselves: If my partner’s a good guy, then I must be a bad guy. I must be the person who was at fault.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
For a Truth to be a Truth it must be moving. In other words, our understanding of this ‘Truth’ expanding and widening with our own personal experiences and philosophizing. A Truth cannot be a fixed definition. For once it is enshrined in that definition, it’s static―the mind is closed. It then becomes indoctrination, a mindset and a belief: the cause of separation and even wars.
Suzanne Donald
In summary, people who believe in fixed traits feel an urgency to succeed, and when they do, they may feel more than pride. They may feel a sense of superiority, since success means that their fixed traits are better than other people’s. However, lurking behind that self-esteem of the fixed mindset is a simple question: If you’re somebody when you’re successful, what are you when you’re unsuccessful?
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
After identifying when you’re having fixed mindset thoughts, Dweck suggests the next steps are to recognize that you have a choice in how you interpret the challenge, setbacks, or criticism; then “talk back” to the fixed voice with a growth mindset voice. Examples she gives are, “If I don’t try, I automatically fail”; “Others who succeeded before me had passion and put forth effort”; and, “If I don’t take responsibility, I can’t fix it.
Walker Deibel (Buy Then Build: How Acquisition Entrepreneurs Outsmart the Startup Game)
Skills you dislike are often a fertile hunting ground for fixed mindsets that are still hiding and could possibly be challenged. What are some ways you could potentially pursue the disliked skill that would utilize your core strengths and interests? You don’t have to commit to doing anything; this is just a thought exercise. For example, someone who is into chemistry but not into cooking could start thinking about the chemistry aspects of cooking.
Alice Boyes (The Anxiety Toolkit: Strategies for Fine-Tuning Your Mind and Moving Past Your Stuck Points)
If you keep experiencing the same things, your mind keeps its same patterns. Same inputs, same responses. Your brain, which was once curious and growing, gets fixed into deep habits. Your values and opinions harden and resist change. You really learn only when you’re surprised. If you’re not surprised, then everything is fitting into your existing thought patterns. So to get smarter, you need to get surprised, think in new ways, and deeply understand different perspectives. With effort, you could do this from the comfort of home. But the most effective way to shake things up is to move across the world. Pick a place that’s most unlike what you know, and go. This keeps you in a learning mindset. Previously mindless habits, like buying groceries, now keep your mind open, alert, and noticing new things. New arrivals in a culture often notice what the locals don’t. (Fish don’t know they’re in water.)
Derek Sivers (Hell Yeah or No: what's worth doing)
If you ask me, too many men have a fixed mindset about sex. They believe they're pretty much born instinctively knowing everything they need to know, and if they have to seek any kind of outside knowledge, that's somehow a form of failure. I never bought into that. I fumbled through things when I was a teenager like everyone else, but once I grew up, I wanted to really learn how to do it right. So I did what I'd do for anything else - I took lessons from an expert.
Lynn Red (Bad Boys and Billionaires (The Naughty List Romance Bundles #1))
The biggest problem in AFRICA, is the government/public service leaders ensure that the education system teaches them WHAT to think and NOT HOW TO THINK. IT embeds a Fixed Mindest of Learned Helplessness. We can ReThink Resilience and psycap to transform the people, but the leaders won't be too happy when the voters can think beyond learned helplessness and a go beyond a liming culture 2000 years out of date. We need to Rethink Education and culture in the digital age.
Tony Dovale
I no longer believe that character formation is mostly an individual task, or is achieved on a person-by-person basis. I no longer believe that character building is like going to the gym: You do your exercises and you build up your honesty, courage, integrity, and grit. I now think good character is a by-product of giving yourself away. You love things that are worthy of love. You surrender to a community or cause, make promises to other people, build a thick jungle of loving attachments, lose yourself in the daily act of serving others as they lose themselves in the daily acts of serving you. Character is a good thing to have, and there’s a lot to be learned on the road to character. But there’s a better thing to have—moral joy. And that serenity arrives as you come closer to embodying perfect love. Furthermore, I no longer believe that the cultural and moral structures of our society are fine, and all we have to do is fix ourselves individually. Over the past few years, as a result of personal, national, and global events, I have become radicalized. I now think the rampant individualism of our current culture is a catastrophe. The emphasis on self—individual success, self-fulfillment, individual freedom, self-actualization—is a catastrophe. I now think that living a good life requires a much vaster transformation. It’s not enough to work on your own weaknesses. The whole cultural paradigm has to shift from the mindset of hyper-individualism to the relational mindset of the second mountain.
David Brooks
The fixed mindset limits achievement. It fills people’s minds with interfering thoughts, it makes effort disagreeable, and it leads to inferior learning strategies. What’s more, it makes other people into judges instead of allies. Whether we’re talking about Darwin or college students, important achievements require a clear focus, all-out effort, and a bottomless trunk full of strategies. Plus allies in learning. This is what the growth mindset gives people, and that’s why it helps their abilities grow and bear fruit.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
When you enter a mindset, you enter a new world. In one world—the world of fixed traits—success is about proving you’re smart or talented. Validating yourself. In the other—the world of changing qualities—it’s about stretching yourself to learn something new. Developing yourself.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
Many growth-minded people didn't even plan to go to the top They got there as a result of doing what they love. It's ironic: The top is where the fixed-mindset people hunger to be, but it's where many growth-minded people arrive as a by-product of their enthusiasm for what they do.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
When you enter a mindset, you enter a new world. In one world—the world of fixed traits—success is about proving you’re smart or talented. Validating yourself. In the other—the world of changing qualities—it’s about stretching yourself to learn something new. Developing yourself. In
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
You don’t need solutions. You don’t need to move on from your grief. You need someone to see your grief, to acknowledge it. You need someone to hold your hands whole you stand there in blinking horror, staring at the hole that was your life. Some things cannot be fixed. They can only be carried.
Megan Devine (It's Ok That You're Not Ok, On Grief And Grieving, Mindset Carol Dweck, The Art of Happiness 10th Anniversary 4 Books Collection Set)
What are the consequences of thinking that your intelligence or personality is something you can develop, as opposed to something that is a fixed, deep-seated trait? Let’s first look in on the age-old, fiercely waged debate about human nature and then return to the question of what these beliefs mean for you.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
It can take forever for a willing underachieving to reverse his underachievement and become an achiever. There are about a handful of reasons for this. His empowerment needs for which he needs help with, his basic needs according to his age, his mental language and skills he must master typically slows down the process of reversal.
Asuni LadyZeal
Most things that are true are simple. To lose weight, eat less than you burn. To reduce stress, find a job you love. To resolve conflict, be patient and peaceful. These are very, very simple in that they are complete concepts that take no more than a sentence to say. They are not, however, easy, because they must be applied consistently.
Vironika Tugaleva (The Love Mindset)
All underachieving persons need help. All. No underachieving adult or child can reverse his underachievement by himself. With resilience and an inner locus of control, an underachiever can try though, but it wouldn't be as effective as getting help. Without help, an underachieving person would literally get little results compared to the effort put in.
Asuni LadyZeal
These are the three false assumptions of the monkey mind-set. As long as I am certain, as long as I am perfect, and as long as others are okay I will be safe, able to relax, and happy. Each of these assumptions overestimates the threat and underestimates our ability to cope. Each of them treats the perception of threat as accurate, a problem to be fixed.
Jennifer Shannon (Don't Feed the Monkey Mind: How to Stop the Cycle of Anxiety, Fear, and Worry (How to Stop the Cycle of the Anxiety, Fear, and Worry))
In a longitudinal study of college students, freshmen were evaluated for fixed mindsets or growth mindsets and then followed across their four years of enrollment. When the students with fixed mindsets encountered academic challenges such as daunting projects or low grades, they gave up, while the students with growth mindsets responded by working harder or trying new strategies. Rather than strengthening their skills and toughening their resolve, four years of college left the students with fixed mindsets feeling less confident. The feelings they most associated with school were distress, shame, and upset. Those with growth mindsets performed better in school overall and, at graduation time, they reported feeling confident, determined, enthusiastic, inspired, and strong.
Meg Jay (The Defining Decade: Why Your Twenties Matter--And How to Make the Most of Them Now)
The true aim of personal change is to turn our minds away from miracle cures and quick fixes, and adopt a long-term strategy. Habit change isn’t a sprint; it’s a marathon. The right mindset is to wake up tomorrow almost exactly the same person, except for one small change—a small change that you can replicate every day until you don’t notice it anymore, at which point it’s time to plan another small change . . .
Jeremy Dean (Making Habits, Breaking Habits: Why We Do Things, Why We Don't, and How to Make Any Change Stick)
There is no difference in the objective compatibility between those couples who are unhappy and those who are happy.' Hudson found that couple who feel 'content and warmth in their relationship' don't believe having compatible personalities is the issue. On the contrary, they believe it was their attitude that made the relationship work. The strength of the relationship does not depend on how alike they are, more their willingness to adapt and build a bank of warmth and affection that helps buffer the annoyance of their differences. This supports the concept of the development of compatibility, having a growth mindset('I believe I can change') rather than a fixed mindset ('This is how I am'). Having an attitude of growth means going through difficulties and seeing them as an opportunity to know each other better and bolster the relationship through the resolution of the conflict.
Julia Samuel (This Too Shall Pass: Stories of Change, Crisis and Hopeful Beginnings)
Imagine that you start with the assumption that we live in a world of limited possibilities. You have a fixed mindset, a belief you cannot change. You’re limiting yourself. Nothing you do ultimately matters. You will never be good enough. If you begin with that scarcity mindset, why even get out of bed? Life would feel pointless. Nothing you do would matter. Life would be gray and empty. Many depressed people have a scarcity mindset, believing nothing matters and the world is one of limited possibilities. Now, imagine you believe that the world is abundant. The world is one of endless resources and unlimited potential. What you do matters. Your choices matter. You matter. Each day is a new day full of infinite possibilities. How would you act if you knew that anything you wanted to do was possible? Would you live differently if you believed that you were abundant and full of potential? Why
Mike Cernovich (Gorilla Mindset)
Just because there’s no one living on a planet does not mean it’s yours for the taking. Do you not see how dangerous that mindset is? Do you not think that treating the galaxy as if it is something to be endlessly used will always, always end in tragedy? You think you’ve broken the cycle. You haven’t. You’re in a less violent period of the exact same cycle, and you don’t see it. And the line of what you find to be justifiable cause is going to keep slipping and slipping until you end up right back where you started. You haven’t fixed anything. You put a stamp and a permit and a shiny coat of paint on an idea that has been fundamentally damaged from day one. You engaged in bloody theft and you called it progress, and no matter how much better you think you’ve made things, no matter how good your intentions are, that will always be the root of the GC. You cannot divorce any of what you do from that. Ever.
Becky Chambers (The Galaxy, and the Ground Within (Wayfarers, #4))
Believing that your qualities are carved in stone—the fixed mindset—creates an urgency to prove yourself over and over. If you have only a certain amount of intelligence, a certain personality, and a certain moral character—well, then you’d better prove that you have a healthy dose of them. It simply wouldn’t do to look or feel deficient in these most basic characteristics. Some of us are trained in this mindset from an early age. Even as a child, I was focused on being smart, but the fixed mindset was really stamped in by Mrs. Wilson, my sixth-grade teacher. Unlike Alfred Binet, she believed that people’s IQ scores told the whole story of who they were. We were seated around the room in IQ order, and only the highest-IQ students could be trusted to carry the flag, clap the erasers, or take a note to the principal. Aside from the daily stomachaches she provoked with her judgmental stance, she was creating a mindset in which everyone in the class had one consuming goal—look smart, don’t look dumb. Who cared about or enjoyed learning when our whole being was at stake every time she gave us a test or called on us in class?
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
Is there another way to judge potential? NASA thought so. When they were soliciting applications for astronauts, they rejected people with pure histories of success and instead selected people who had had significant failures and bounced back from them. Jack Welch, the celebrated CEO of General Electric, chose executives on the basis of “runway,” their capacity for growth. And remember Marina Semyonova, the famed ballet teacher, who chose the students who were energized by criticism. They were all rejecting the idea of fixed ability and selecting instead for mindset.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
Dweck’s work with children revealed two mindsets in action—a “growth” mindset that generally thinks big and seeks growth and a “fixed” mindset that places artificial limits and avoids failure. Growth-minded students, as she calls them, employ better learning strategies, experience less helplessness, exhibit more positive effort, and achieve more in the classroom than their fixed-minded peers. They are less likely to place limits on their lives and more likely to reach for their potential. Dweck points out that mindsets can and do change. Like any other habit, you set your mind to it until the right mindset becomes routine.
Gary Keller (The ONE Thing: The Surprisingly Simple Truth Behind Extraordinary Results)
Replace Negative Character Labels Negative character labels are an even more serious problem than fixed mindsets. Examples of negative character labels include “I’m selfish,” “I’m needy,” “I’m unlovable,” “I’m weak,” “I’m defective,” “I’m incompetent,” and “I’m worthless.” Such an uplifting list! Those negative beliefs sound quite dramatic when written down on the page, and sometimes people don’t realize that they hold those beliefs about themselves. If your immediate reaction is to say, “Oh, I don’t think any of those things about myself” or “Only someone who was super depressed would think those things,” then take an extra second to make sure you’re not even partially buying into these types of thoughts about yourself. It might be that you believe a negative character label only 20% of the time, but even that can still be an issue. There are two types of negative character labels. Both can be changed. One type is very stable. For example, you believe you are incompetent, and you have never believed anything else, not even when you are in a positive mood. The other type is the type that goes up and down with your mood, anxiety, and stress. When your mood is low, you believe the negative character label much more strongly than when your mood is positive. If your negative character label changes due to transient things like your mood, anxiety, or stress, this can help you start to see that the belief is a product of these things rather than true.
Alice Boyes (The Anxiety Toolkit: Strategies for Fine-Tuning Your Mind and Moving Past Your Stuck Points)
When facing a problem The First Step is stopping Stop letting where you are at Be the mindset that determines how far you can get Yeah, you’ve been cut plus stabbed in the back But use a suture Fix your eyes on a time in the future Wrap your hands round the straps of your boots Or your bow aimed by you A well-trained archer after success a target much larger You are not a problem You are THEE Problem Solver The Second Step Remember where you were Experience has knit the sack, your quiver So set a goal, get your arrow, let it go And when you grow Tell them, Oh . . . I understand Your story Might be the sword in her hand Tell him, You are me. Tell of how you used to be the epitome of POV-erty But now you know the best way out undoubtedly is PO-etry
T.L. Sanders (kNew: The Poetic Screenplay)
The fixed- and growth-mindset groups started with the same ability, but as time went on the growth-mindset groups clearly outperformed the fixed-mindset ones. And this difference became ever larger the longer the groups worked. Once again, those with the growth mindset profited from their mistakes and feedback far more than the fixed-mindset people. But what was even more interesting was how the groups functioned. The members of the growth-mindset groups were much more likely to state their honest opinions and openly express their disagreements as they communicated about their management decisions. Everyone was part of the learning process. For the fixed-mindset groups—with their concern about who was smart or dumb or their anxiety about disapproval for their ideas—that open, productive discussion did not happen. Instead, it was more like groupthink.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
an individual task, or is achieved on a person-by-person basis. I no longer believe that character building is like going to the gym: You do your exercises and you build up your honesty, courage, integrity, and grit. I now think good character is a by-product of giving yourself away. You love things that are worthy of love. You surrender to a community or cause, make promises to other people, build a thick jungle of loving attachments, lose yourself in the daily act of serving others as they lose themselves in the daily acts of serving you. Character is a good thing to have, and there’s a lot to be learned on the road to character. But there’s a better thing to have—moral joy. And that serenity arrives as you come closer to embodying perfect love. Furthermore, I no longer believe that the cultural and moral structures of our society are fine, and all we have to do is fix ourselves individually. Over the past few years, as a result of personal, national, and global events, I have become radicalized. I now think the rampant individualism of our current culture is a catastrophe. The emphasis on self—individual success, self-fulfillment, individual freedom, self-actualization—is a catastrophe. I now think that living a good life requires a much vaster transformation. It’s not enough to work on your own weaknesses. The whole cultural paradigm has to shift from the mindset of hyper-individualism to the relational mindset of the second mountain.
David Brooks (The Second Mountain: The Quest for a Moral Life)
CONGRUENCE Have you ever felt stuck? Maybe you haven’t recruited anyone in a while, and you just can’t seem to break the streak of no success. This causes you to not feel like picking up the phone and getting any more rejection. You don’t feel like talking about the business that day, so you don’t. Can you relate? This is critical for you to always remember. You cannot avoid rejection. Ninety percent of people are always going to tell you that your business is not for them. You have to go through the no’s to get to the yeses. There is no other way around it. You may not like making calls and accepting no’s, but you will like the results and income you will get by doing it consistently enough. Bank on it. So here’s what happens to everyone, myself included. You have a bad day, where everyone says no. You wake up the next day and you just cannot get yourself to make some calls. The whole day goes by and you did nothing to grow your business. The next day, you have a nagging little feeling of guilt about doing nothing the day before, so you start to internalize it. You question whether you know what you are doing. Does the business work? Is it worth the effort? You know the answer is yes, so you don’t quit — but you also do no activity. The next day, that little guilt feeling has mushroomed even bigger. And as time goes on, the guilt turns into self-loathing. You get down on yourself for not performing like you know you could and should. You begin to beat yourself up and even compare yourself to others. Sadly, this can become a downward spiral that is self-inflicted and hard to break out of. Without being wise enough to seek direct help from an upline expert, some people never recover. Instead of fixing their mindset and bringing their goals and the actions back into alignment — getting congruent — they quit the business. These are the blamers who walk the Earth claiming the business didn’t work. No! They stopped working! Don’t be a blamer. Be congruent. Make your activity match up with your WHY in the business. Pick up the phone and snap back into action. Don’t allow yourself to be depressed, because it is a form of depression. Your upline can help you snap out of it. How
Brian Carruthers (Building an Empire:The Most Complete Blueprint to Building a Massive Network Marketing Business)
The experience led Dweck to develop the idea of two contrasting mindsets that shape our attitudes to our own and others’ abilities. People with a ‘growth mindset’, as she called it, like the positive pupils above, see their intellectual ability as something that can be developed through effort, learning and practice, while people with a ‘fixed mindset’ believe they were born with a certain amount of brains and talent and nothing they can do will change that. Growth mindset people are the more go-getting bunch. Faced with problems, they engage and persevere. Failure isn’t permanent, it’s success not just yet. Using electroencephalograms (EEGs) scientists found more brain activity relating to error adjustments among college students with a growth mindset than among their peers with a fixed mindset.7 Growth-minded people also showed better accuracy after mistakes.
Dave Stitt (Deep and deliberate delegation: A new art for unleashing talent and winning back time)
Dweck believes that children’s mindsets are profoundly affected by how we praise them. What should be praised is not just success and signs of intelligence, but the application of the learning process – the effort, perseverance, strategizing, and resulting improvements. This fosters motivation and a sense for how success can be achieved. If we praise only successful results and other signs of intelligence, we may give the child a temporary confidence boost, but we may unwittingly be fostering a fixed mindset. The result is greater fragility, and a dependence on constant validation.
Dave Stitt (Deep and deliberate delegation: A new art for unleashing talent and winning back time)
Ultimately, changing America for good will start with changing our mindset, the one that arbitrarily—and foolishly, we can now see—picked the age of eighteen for flipping the switch that turns education and growth from a public responsibility into a private one,
Will Bunch (After the Ivory Tower Falls: How College Broke the American Dream and Blew Up Our Politics—and How to Fix It)
I changed it because of my work. One day my doctoral student, Mary Bandura, and I were trying to understand why some students were so caught up in proving their ability, while others could just let go and learn. Suddenly we realized that there were two meanings to ability, not one: a fixed ability that needs to be proven, and a changeable ability that can be developed through learning.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset - Updated Edition: Changing The Way You think To Fulfil Your Potential)
When you enter a mindset, you enter a new world. In one world—the world of fixed traits—success is about proving you’re smart or
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset - Updated Edition: Changing The Way You think To Fulfil Your Potential)
You see, because parents contribute to their children's underachievement, many teachers “Judge, Lecture and Compete” with them as a way of working on the case. Instead of this, you should Support, mentor and Partner. The idea is to Support not judge. Mentor not Lecture and Partner not Compete. Judging parents wouldn’t get you anywhere especially if those parents are underachievers themselves. Instead look out for ways to support them say by providing the needed information for them to do better. Instead of lecturing them it is better to mentor them –plus you would automatically gain a position as a mentor instead of a critic and they would look up to you as such and lastly, remember, these children are theirs so don’t compete with them on that, instead partner with them concerning these students. In Medical School, there is said to be a protocol taught to nurses and doctors and other relevant hospital personnel to deal with upset persons. It contains 6 steps or ideas , you should look into the protocol and come up with something similar. What better place is there to learn how upset persons who usually are the cause of their problems are than the hospital
Asuni LadyZeal
Are Class Captains and School Prefects managers or leaders? Schools miss it when they assign a student to discipline other students. Class captains and school prefects are leaders not managers. A Leader is on A MISSION not on A DUTY. And being a leader goes beyond expecting compliance from others, which is what managers do. If your school assigns prefect to enforce compliance in any way you are doing it all wrong. For one, seeking compliance from anyone is complicated and it comes with a position that "demands" respect and thus you are putting such children at a risk of being hated by their peers. Prefect should be examples not authority figures, plus they should be trained to act like leaders should, if you also don't train them, you are doing it too wrong. Here are some of those "things" you should train your prefect: 1. Active listening 2. How to help their peers and other students find meaning in learning 3. How to make others students wellbeing and safety their priority. 4. How to inspire others and lead by example. Charity begins from school too. Your prefects can learn people skills that can guarantee their future right from your school. Your prefects should be assets to your school because of what they can learn to do now to become better in future not because of what they can do for your school now, which obviously is very little.
Asuni LadyZeal
Many of the issues you have with your some of your students are not a reflection of how qualified you are as a teacher but more about how qualified you are as a leader and manager. Many students hide their pain behind school work. Many Students are too confused to pay attention to what you are teaching. And they are not confused about what you are teaching cos they aren't even listening to you. Their mind is far away. Far away from all of the things you try to make them see. Like someone in a trance. So your problem is not you and your qualifications. The problem is you and your professionalism on the job. A professional teacher knows when students are having real time issues that didn't start from school. He knows when they came to school with them. And when they left it all at home. He knows that even when school is the problem, the problem is usually bigger than school. He knows that until the student gets his acts together, not much progress would happen. In school and in other places. Plus he knows that whatever he does to help the student must be sustainable. Or the student would go right one day And wrong the next. Then may be wrong, wrong, wrong for a while again before going right again. Worse, right may never happen. The will of the child is more important than the school of the child. Even though the choice of school can shape the will. The art of teaching is way beyond the writings on the board and the notes in the bags. It is more about working on the mind and the shaping of destinies.
Asuni LadyZeal
Two things must be considered JUST BEFORE teaching students who are doing below their potentials - the content to be taught and the students' mindset. And two other things that must be considered LONG BEFORE they are taught are their motivation to learn and level of attainment.
Asuni LadyZeal
Many underachieving students truly want to bridge the gap between their current achievement and their desired achievement. But desire alone is not enough to do so, their effort at times even may not be enough and hence they tend to shut down too soon, or never at all, trudging along. Like an athlete, many run like their lives depends on it but without an exact idea of what success is and how much it entails to get there. They, unconsciously or even consciously have lost their spice and winning now FEELS harder- a proof that our past choices can either make or mar our future.
Asuni LadyZeal
We need industrious people in the education sector. The job is beyond the four walls of a classroom. Teaching itself is an empire. In it is the job of a healer, a doctor, a businessman, a researcher, a visionary, an accountant, an auditor, a leader, a manager, a designer...the list is so long, it scares the typical teacher.
Asuni LadyZeal
The first job or duty of a parent is to provide the emotional needs of a child, the second is to provide the learning needs of the child and the last job is the motivational needs of the child. If as a parent you don't get these three duties right, you wouldn't get every other duty (inbetween) right
Asuni LadyZeal
Underachieving students usually have personal issues that are affecting their achievements in school that they use as excuses for giving up on their potential or as justifications for their behaviours.
Asuni LadyZeal
It usually takes at least one person who knows what to do and how and is willing to go all the way with an underachieving person to reverse their underachievement.
Asuni LadyZeal
All underachievers know they need help. All! But many of them don't want help - they know how much they need it yet they want it not. It's further proves that they are underachievers. Underachievers stay underachievers by choice. If a person or child behaves like an underachiever, he is. If a person or child performs like underachiever would, he is an underachiever. If such a person or child performs below his potentials, no doubt he is an underachiever.
Asuni LadyZeal
Teach your children to Smile when doing Tasks they consider hard. Many times, children would cry when they are asked to do a task they feel is hard. They would frown, sulk, begin to feign hunger or wee-wee. If you have been wondering what a FIXED MINDSET looks like, That's a FIXED MINDSET. Reversing a fixed mindset is about CHANGING EMOTIONS. It is changing a child's state of mind CONCERNING the SPECIFIC task to be learnt. It is changing his state DURING learning. It is changing the child's Perspective ABOUT LEARNING generally. Teach them to JUST SMILE! or even SING while they learn or practice "HARD" tasks. Keep them SMILING even when the task is so hard they want to CRY. Explain that a PERSON cannot excel at a thing he doesn't like. Explain that in life those who succeed AS A RULE, first had to be HAPPY and GRATEFUL for the opportunity to TRY. TEACH them that sadness and anger at the things they don't know makes what they don't know HARDER.
Asuni LadyZeal
You are responsible for any underachieving person in your Care Their failure? That's on you. Their success? That's on you. Their day to day life is on you...except if you don't WANT that! Then, It's okay to LET THEM BE. If you choose to do the work however, you are not ALLOWED to blink let alone STOP. You are practically in a RELATIONSHIP with an underachieving child, husband, wife or friend that entails you GETTING USED. And yes you may need some USING yourself. That's where it hurts. Underachieving Persons are everywhere and all over because it takes SUSTAINABLE work to get to them. Your work isn't to do everything and anything for them. Far from it. They are doing poorer than expected ONLY because they CONSCIOUSLY OR UNCONSCIOUSLY choose to. So they would BLEED you dry and tire you out until you can get them to CHOOSE to FLY instead of SINK in their real or imagined PAIN. Your efforts should be to EVOKE emotions that make them make the BEAUTIFUL CHOICE to negate the OLD CHOICE. FOR THIS, all you need is an AGREEMENT. Get them to AGREE in the presence of a witness. Consider the SKILLS they need to LEARN. Provided REQUIRED resources. GIVE them enough time to COME THROUGH. The AGREEMENT is the MOST IMPORTANT. A solid AGREEMENT. If you have the capacity to get them to AGREE you have made more progress than you ever will forcing a change in their attitudes by using CONTROL tactics. It's why sitting them down works. It's why providing guidance works. It's why punishment doesn't...especially if it doesn't elicit a SOLID AGREEMENT. Without an AGREEMENT all your effort may come to waste or still their achievement will be lower than expected. Well, a miracle could happen. Say they make the choice on their own. Or as a result of a divine encounter. And Yes, they aren't foolish. Just people who have sworn to be mediocre...unconsciously or unconsciously!
Asuni LadyZeal
1 Minute Wisdom for Lightworkers in 2021 They will first ridicule you for your independent thinking and observation. Then they will collude, and censor, you for being troublesome and delusional. Then they will attack and slander you to defend their pre-programmed beliefs and ideologies. Then they will lie, in the hope that your different perceptions, have no truth. Then they will ignore you, in the hope that your messages will soon die off. Yet…because of their fixed mindset, they will seldom fully awaken to the “canary in the mine”, until it’s TOO LATE. And then they will shun you in an effort to avoid being reminded, how short-sighted, and delusional, they were. Forgive them – for they are still too unconscious to awaken from their dream. But keep your light shining bright to illuminate the path, just in case, some do awaken from their dark slumber.
Tony Dovale
The biggest problem in AFRICA, is the government/public service leaders ensure that the education system teaches people WHAT to think, and NOT HOW TO THINK. It embeds a Fixed Mindest of Learned Helplessness. We can ReThink Resilience and psycap to transform the people, but the leaders won't be too happy when the voters can think beyond learned helplessness and a go beyond a limiting culture 2000 years out of date. We need to Rethink Education and culture in the digital age.
Tony Dovale
people achieve expertise “is not some fixed prior ability, but purposeful engagement.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
.. they assume that intelligence is a pre-ordained trait, [...], their perceived destiny, which flows from another belief, that the poor are to blame for their condition. Poverty is the proof of deficiencies, including an intellect that is "fixed". Dweck's research challenges this belief. She shows that when children think that their intellectual abilities can improve, they are more likely to work hard. And working hard allows the brain to "grow" by strengthening its neural connections. [...] This makes struggle a good thing. Not a sign of stupidity, but a path to intellect. At Hershey, the growth mindset can be reduced to one word. Yet. The school wants its children to go from saying, 'I'm not good at math." to saying, 'I'm not good at math yet." The 'Yet' puts them on a continuum where mistakes are embraced rather than shunned. Students are taught about the growth mindset, using it as a crutch when they stumble. In math class, they can be heard telling one another, 'Wait, don't get frustrated, we can feel our brains growing.
Andrea Elliott (Invisible Child: Poverty, Survival & Hope in an American City)
When you have a fixed-mindset, then you see your brain as if it's a machine. When you have a growth-mindset, then you understand your brain as if it's a growing tree.
Jennifer Fraser (The Bullied Brain: Heal Your Scars and Restore Your Health)
We know from our studies that people with the fixed mindset do not admit and correct their deficiencies.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
comparing a “fixed” versus “growth” mindset. A fixed mindset assumes that whatever we are—a certain composite of personality, intelligence, abilities—is a given. Every new challenge becomes a moment where you simply prove yourself again and again as being that particular person (dumb, smart, winning, losing, etc.). A growth mindset, conversely, imagines that we are not static creatures. We can change, and we do. We flex and grow, fall back, or bounce forward. But we are not simply the aggregate of whatever we have been.
Kate Bowler (Good Enough: 40ish Devotionals for a Life of Imperfection)
In short when people believe in fixed traits, they are always in danger of being measured by failure. It can define them in a permanent way. Smart or talented as they may be, this mindset seems to rob them of their coping resources.
Andrew Leedham (Unstoppable Self Confidence: How to create the indestructible, natural confidence of the 1% who achieve their goals, create success on demand and live life on their terms)
The reality is that most people have an inner fixed-mindset pessimist in them right alongside their inner growth-mindset optimist. Recognizing this is important because it’s easy to make the mistake of changing what we say without changing our body language, facial expressions, and behavior. So what should we do? A good first step is to watch for mismatches between our words and actions. When we slip up—and we will—we can simply acknowledge that it’s hard to move away from a fixed, pessimistic view of the world. One of Carol’s colleagues, Susan Mackie, works with CEOs and encourages them to give names to their inner fixed-mindset characters. Then they can say things like “Oops. I guess I brought Controlling Claire to the meeting today. Let me try that again.” Or: “Overwhelmed Olivia is struggling to deal with all the competing demands, can you help me think this through?” Ultimately, adopting a gritty perspective involves recognizing that people get better at things—they grow.
Angela Duckworth (Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance)
We're not here to fix our pain, but to tend to it
Megan Devine (It's Ok That You're Not Ok, On Grief And Grieving, Mindset Carol Dweck, The Art of Happiness 10th Anniversary 4 Books Collection Set)
People with a fixed mindset believe they are born naturally gifted at doing some things, but incapable of others. This black-and-white way of thinking often obstructs their development. Failure is a disaster to a person with fixed mindset. When it happens, they will bury their heads in the sand or blame others.
Ash Ali
An organization might embody a fixed mindset, conveying that employees either 'have it' or they don't: We called this a 'culture of genius.' Or it might embody more of a growth mindset, conveying that people can grow and improve with effort, good strategies, and good mentoring: We call this a 'culture of development.
Carol S. Dweck
Through her breakthrough research, Carol Dweck has given us a defense to a fixed-mindset while promoting its antithesis: growth. Never praise talent or ability, either for yourself or for a child. Instead, praise the process-principle. Praise improvements, habits, growth, and efforts. Praise how far you’ve come, and one day, you’ll praise your results.
M.J. DeMarco (UNSCRIPTED: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Entrepreneurship)
Applying the science of resilience can help all kids thrive; it just requires switching our mind-set. Instead of using interventions and a “fix the kid” mentality, we teach children protective factors so they can maintain strength in uncertain, challenging times and become their personal best.
Michele Borba (Thrivers)
The fixed mindset, plus stereotyping, plus women’s trust in other people’s assessments of them: All of these contribute to the gender gap in math and science.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
We asked people, ranging from grade schoolers to young adults, “When do you feel smart?” The differences were striking. People with the fixed mindset said: “It’s when I don’t make any mistakes.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
A growth mindset or a fixed mindset is a function of a person's motivation. A person's motivation shapes what and how he thinks, which in turn tells on his mindset.
Asuni LadyZeal
people with the fixed mindset have to nurse their confidence and protect
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset - Updated Edition: Changing The Way You think To Fulfil Your Potential)
nothing is a bigger hindrance to personal growth than having a “fixed mindset.” Those who fear and avoid feedback because it might damage their cherished positive self-image might feel better in the short term, but will quickly fall behind in actual performance
Sönke Ahrens (How to Take Smart Notes: One Simple Technique to Boost Writing, Learning and Thinking – for Students, Academics and Nonfiction Book Writers)
One of Dweck’s studies showed that children’s mindsets, which had come from the type of praise given by parents, were developed by the time they were three years old. In their study, Dweck and her colleagues found that the praise given to children fourteen to thirty-eight months old predicted the mindsets they had when the children were seven to eight.13 The damaging praise given by parents was the kind that instills the idea of fixed ability. When children are told they are smart, they at first think that is good, but when they mess up on something, they decide they are not smart, and they keep evaluating themselves against that fixed idea.
Jo Boaler (Limitless Mind: Learn, Lead, and Live Without Barriers)
If a problem repeats itself in your life – fix it. If you don’t invest time today to buy back time tomorrow the same habit will repeat forever.
Allison Graham (Take Back Your Weekends: Stress Less. Do More. Be Happier.)
The top is where the fixed-mindset people hunger to be, but it’s where many growth-minded people arrive as a by-product of their enthusiasm for what they do.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
Contrary to popular belief, like your mindset, motivation is not fixed. No one has a set level of motivation. And when people say they are unmotivated, it’s not completely true. They could have a high level of motivation to stay in bed and watch television.
Jim Kwik (Limitless: Upgrade Your Brain, Learn Anything Faster, and Unlock Your Exceptional Life)
few modern philosophers…assert that an individual’s intelligence is a fixed quantity, a quantity which cannot be increased. We must protest and react against this brutal pessimism….With practice, training, and above all, method, we manage to increase our attention, our memory, our judgment and literally to become more intelligent than we were before.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
A growth mindset guarantees that a person sees work as fun, no matter how hard that work is.
Asuni LadyZeal
Fine tuning children's thoughts is one way to empower them to work on their mind, feel and behave better
Asuni LadyZeal
The fixed mindset stands in the way of development and change. The growth mindset is a starting point for change,
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
At the same time, scientists are learning that people have more capacity for lifelong learning and brain development than they ever thought. Of course, each person has a unique genetic endowment. People may start with different temperaments and different aptitudes, but it is clear that experience, training, and personal effort take them the rest of the way. Robert Sternberg, the present-day guru of intelligence, writes that the major factor in whether people achieve expertise “is not some fixed prior ability, but purposeful engagement.” Or, as his forerunner Binet recognized, it’s not always the people who start out the smartest who end up the smartest.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
Those who have a growth mindset agree that: “You can always substantially change how intelligent you are.” Later, we looked at who said yes to the English course. Students with the growth mindset said an emphatic yes. But those with the fixed mindset were not very interested. Believing that success is about learning, students with the growth mindset seized the chance. But those with the fixed mindset didn’t want to expose their deficiencies. Instead, to feel smart in the short run, they were willing to put their college careers at risk. This is how the fixed mindset makes people into nonlearners.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
You can even see the difference in people’s brain waves. People with both mindsets came into our brain-wave lab at Columbia. As they answered hard questions and got feedback, we were curious about when their brain waves would show them to be interested and attentive. People with a fixed mindset were only interested when the feedback reflected on their ability. Their brain waves showed them paying close attention when they were told whether their answers were right or wrong. But when they were presented with information that could help them learn, there was no sign of interest. Even when they’d gotten an answer wrong, they were not interested in learning what the right answer was. Only people with a growth mindset paid close attention to information that could stretch their knowledge. Only for them was learning a priority.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
I use examples of people who made it to the top to show how far the growth mindset can take you: Believing talents can be developed allows people to fulfill their potential. However, this point is crucial: The growth mindset does allow people to love what they’re doing—and to continue to love it in the face of difficulties. The growth-minded athletes, CEOs, musicians, or scientists all loved what they did, whereas many of the fixed-minded ones did not. Many growth-minded people didn’t even plan to go to the top. They got there as a result of doing what they love. It’s ironic: The top is where the fixed-mindset people hunger to be, but it’s where many growth-minded people arrive as a by-product of their enthusiasm for what they do. This point is also crucial. In the fixed mindset, everything is about the outcome. If you fail—or if you’re not the best—it’s all been wasted. The growth mindset allows people to value what they’re doing regardless of the outcome. They’re tackling problems, charting new courses, working on important issues. Maybe they haven’t found the cure for cancer, but the search was deeply meaningful.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
Here’s what this means: Just because some people can do something with little or no training, it doesn’t mean that others can’t do it (and sometimes do it even better) with training. This is so important, because many, many people with the fixed mindset think that someone’s early performance tells you all you need to know about their talent and their future.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
What’s great about research is that you can ask these kinds of questions and then go get the answers. So we conducted studies with hundreds of students, mostly early adolescents. We first gave each student a set of ten fairly difficult problems from a nonverbal IQ test. They mostly did pretty well on these, and when they finished we praised them. We praised some of the students for their ability. They were told: “Wow, you got [say] eight right. That’s a really good score. You must be smart at this.” They were in the Adam Guettel you’re-so-talented position. We praised other students for their effort: “Wow, you got [say] eight right. That’s a really good score. You must have worked really hard.” They were not made to feel that they had some special gift; they were praised for doing what it takes to succeed. Both groups were exactly equal to begin with. But right after the praise, they began to differ. As we feared, the ability praise pushed students right into the fixed mindset, and they showed all the signs of it, too: When we gave them a choice, they rejected a challenging new task that they could learn from. They didn’t want to do anything that could expose their flaws and call into question their talent.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
We then looked at the students’ performance. After the experience with difficulty, the performance of the ability-praised students plummeted, even when we gave them some more of the easier problems. Losing faith in their ability, they were doing worse than when they started. The effort kids showed better and better performance. They had used the hard problems to sharpen their skills, so that when they returned to the easier ones, they were way ahead. Would you believe that almost 40 percent of the ability-praised students lied about their scores? And always in one direction. In the fixed mindset, imperfections are shameful—especially if you’re talented—so they lied them away. So telling children they’re smart, in the end, made them feel dumber and act dumber, but claim they were smarter. I don’t think this is what we’re aiming for when we put positive labels—“gifted,” “talented,” “brilliant”—on people. We don’t mean to rob them of their zest for challenge and their recipes for success. But that’s the danger.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
No one knows about negative ability labels like members of stereotyped groups. For example, African Americans know about being stereotyped as lower in intelligence. And women know about being stereotyped as bad at math and science. But I’m not sure even they know how creepy these stereotypes are. Research by Claude Steele and Joshua Aronson shows that even checking a box to indicate your race or sex can trigger the stereotype in your mind and lower your test score. Almost anything that reminds you that you’re black or female before taking a test in the subject you’re supposed to be bad at will lower your test score—a lot. In many of their studies, blacks are equal to whites in their performance, and females are equal to males, when no stereotype is evoked. But just put more males in the room with a female before a math test, and down goes the female’s score. This doesn’t happen to everybody, however. It mainly happens to people who are in a fixed mindset. It’s when people are thinking in terms of fixed traits that the stereotypes get to them. Negative stereotypes say: “You and your group are permanently inferior.” Only people in the fixed mindset resonate to this message.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
Many females have a problem not only with stereotypes, but with other people’s opinions of them in general. They trust them too much... This vulnerability afflicts many of the most able, high-achieving females. Why should this be? When they’re little, these girls are often so perfect, and they delight in everyone’s telling them so. They’re so well behaved, they’re so cute, they’re so helpful, and they’re so precocious. Girls learn to trust people’s estimates of them. “Gee, everyone’s so nice to me; if they criticize me, it must be true.” Even females at the top universities in the country say that other people’s opinions are a good way to know their abilities. Boys are constantly being scolded and punished. When we observed in grade school classrooms, we saw that boys got eight times more criticism than girls for their conduct. Boys are also constantly calling each other slobs and morons. The evaluations lose a lot of their power. Even when women reach the pinnacle of success, other people’s attitudes can get them... The fixed mindset, plus stereotyping, plus women’s trust in people’s assessments: I think we can begin to understand why there’s a gender gap in math and science. That gap is painfully evident in the world of high tech. Julie Lynch, a budding techie, was already writing computer code when she was in junior high school. Her father and two brothers worked in technology, and she loved it, too. Then her computer programming teacher criticized her. She had written a computer program and the program ran just fine, but he didn’t like a shortcut she had taken. Her interest evaporated. Instead, she went on to study recreation and public relations. Math and science need to be made more hospitable places for women. And women need all the growth mindset they can get to take their rightful places in these fields.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
Bullying is about judging. It’s about establishing who is more worthy or important. The more powerful kids judge the less powerful kids. They judge them to be less valuable human beings, and they rub their faces in it on a daily basis. And it’s clear what the bullies get out of it. Like the boys in Sheri Levy’s study, they get a boost in self-esteem. It’s not that bullies are low in self-esteem, but judging and demeaning others can give them a self-esteem rush. Bullies also gain social status from their actions. Others may look up to them and judge them to be cool, powerful, or funny. Or may fear them. Either way, they’ve upped their standing. There’s a big dose of fixed-mindset thinking in the bullies: Some people are superior and some are inferior. And the bullies are the judges. Eric Harris, one of the Columbine shooters, was their perfect target. He had a chest deformity, he was short, he was a computer geek, and he was an outsider, not from Colorado. They judged him mercilessly. When we hear about acts of school violence, we usually think it’s only bad kids from bad homes who could ever take matters into their own hands. But it’s startling how quickly average, everyday kids with a fixed mindset think about violent revenge. In our study, the students with the growth mindset were not as prone to see the bullying as a reflection of who they were. Instead, they saw it as a psychological problem of the bullies, a way for the bullies to gain status or charge their self-esteem: “I’d think that the reason he is bothering me is probably that he has problems at home or at school with his grades.” Or “They need to get a life—not just feel good if they make me feel bad.” Their plan was often designed to educate the bullies: “I would really actually talk to them. I would ask them questions (why are they saying all of these things and why are they doing all of this to me).” Or “Confront the person and discuss the issue; I would feel like trying to help them see they are not funny.” The students with the growth mindset also strongly agreed that: “I would want to forgive them eventually” and “My number one goal would be to help them become better people.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
Brooks hasn’t given up. He still wants to change people. He wants to wake up the world to the problem of bullying, and he wants to reach victims and turn them off their violent fantasies. So he’s worked for the filmmaker Michael Moore on Bowling for Columbine and he’s set up an innovative website where bullied kids can communicate with each other and learn that the answer isn’t to kill. “It’s to use your mind and make things better.” Brooks, like me, does not see the shooters as people who are a world apart from everyone else. His friend Dylan Klebold, he says, was once a regular kid from a fine home with loving, involved parents. In fact, he warns, “We can just sit back and call the shooters ‘sick monsters, completely different from us.’ … Or we can accept that there are more Erics and Dylans out there, who are slowly being driven … down the same path.” Even if a victim doesn’t have a fixed mindset to begin with, prolonged bullying can instill it. Especially if others stand by and do nothing, or even join in. Victims say that when they’re taunted and demeaned and no one comes to their defense, they start to believe they deserve it. They start to judge themselves and to think that they are inferior. Bullies judge. Victims take it in. Sometimes it remains inside and can lead to depression and suicide. Sometimes it explodes into violence.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
This caveat applies to teachers, too! In one study, we taught students a math lesson spiced up with some math history, namely, stories about great mathematicians. For half of the students, we talked about the mathematicians as geniuses who easily came up with their math discoveries. This alone propelled students into a fixed mindset. It sent the message: There are some people who are born smart in math and everything is easy for them. Then there are the rest of you. For the other half of the students, we talked about the mathematicians as people who became passionate about math and ended up making great discoveries. This brought students into a growth mindset. The message was: Skills and achievement come through commitment and effort. It’s amazing how kids sniff out these messages from our innocent remarks.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success)
Sweetie – look, I get it. I’ve read those books too. You have Stockholm Syndrome. He’s an asshole and you refuse to leave him. We can fix that mindset of yours though, first by giving you a haircut. That’s how all girls find their identities again after a really bad relationship. Haven’t you seen the movies? You’re not doomed, just a little frumpy.
Ian Kirkpatrick (Dead End Drive)
In several studies, we probed the way people with a fixed mindset dealt with information they were receiving. We found that they put a very strong evaluation on each and every piece of information. Something good led to a very strong positive label and something bad led to a very strong negative label. People with a growth mindset are also constantly monitoring what’s going on, but their internal monologue is not about judging themselves and others in this way. Certainly they’re sensitive to positive and negative information, but they’re attuned to its implications for learning and constructive action: What can I learn from this?
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
When people hold on to a fixed mindset, it’s often for a reason. At some point in their lives it served a good purpose for them. It told them who they were or who they wanted to be (a smart, talented child) and it told them how to be that (perform well). In this way, it provided a formula for self-esteem and a path to love and respect from others. The idea that they are worthy and will be loved is crucial for children, and—if a child is unsure about being valued or loved—the fixed mindset appears to offer a simple, straightforward route to this. Psychologists Karen Horney and Carl Rogers, working in the mid-1900s, both proposed theories of children’s emotional development. They believed that when young children feel insecure about being accepted by their parents, they experience great anxiety. They feel lost and alone in a complicated world. Since they’re only a few years old, they can’t simply reject their parents and say, “I think I’ll go it alone.” They have to find a way to feel safe and to win their parents over. Both Horney and Rogers proposed that children do this by creating or imagining other “selves,” ones that their parents might like better. These new selves are what they think the parents are looking for and what may win them the parents’ acceptance. Often, these steps are good adjustments to the family situation at the time, bringing the child some security and hope. The problem is that this new self—this all-competent, strong, good self that they now try to be—is likely to be a fixed-mindset self. Over time, the fixed traits may come to be the person’s sense of who they are, and validating these traits may come to be the main source of their self-esteem. Mindset change asks people to give this up. As you can imagine, it’s not easy to just let go of something that has felt like your “self” for many years and that has given you your route to self-esteem. And it’s especially not easy to replace it with a mindset that tells you to embrace all the things that have felt threatening: challenge, struggle, criticism, setbacks.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
People in a fixed mindset often run away from their problems. If their life is flawed, then they’re flawed. It’s easier to make believe everything’s all right.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
Thriving on the Sure Thing Clearly, people with the growth mindset thrive when they’re stretching themselves. When do people with the fixed mindset thrive? When things are safely within their grasp. If things get too challenging—when they’re not feeling smart or talented—they lose interest.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
invite you to continue your journey with an open heart and an open mind. Your resistance will, without a doubt, pipe up. She’ll tell you that nothing in these pages will make a difference, that this will just be another book you spent money on and did nothing with, or that there’s no fixing lazy. Well, guess what? Your resistance is a liar. Okay, maybe that was a bit harsh. She’s not a liar, per se, but she’s a frightened child who would be much happier staying in the cluttered world that is her life. She knows how this life works. She knows what to expect. She knows it’s safe. If you start clearing things out and making space for some magic, you’re going to rock her world. And even if you know for certain that life on the other side of clutter is so much sweeter, she’ll need convincing. More than that, she’ll need evidence that you’ll take her hand and keep her safe as you go.
Kerri Richardson (From Clutter to Clarity: Clean Up Your Mindset to Clear Out Your Clutter)
We cannot fix trauma. For a whole culture built upon “fixing” kids and “being the one” for every kid, this isn’t an easy thing to hear. But I’ll repeat: We’re not in the business of fixing kids. To say that we are, implies that they are something to be fixed. That’s just not true. This mindset can lead to savior syndrome,52 which can have you believing you must “save” them all. Instead, I focus on the significant role of teachers in mitigating trauma.
Jody Carrington (Teachers These Days: Stories and Strategies for Reconnection)
When you think about all of the things we use soldier mindset for, it becomes obvious why the frequently proposed fixes for it are futile. Such fixes typically involve words like “teaching” or “training,” as in: We need to teach students about cognitive biases. We need to train people in critical thinking. We need to educate people in reason and logic.
Julia Galef (The Scout Mindset: The Perils of Defensive Thinking and How to Be Right More Often)
When you find that you’re talking about doing something more than actually doing it, pause and inquire why. Are you talking about it in an effort to get yourself pumped up to do it, or are you talking about it to get a temporary fix—that excitement of sharing what you’re going to do? You know, the whole “I’ll start my diet on Monday” mentality. I call this L.I.P.S.—Living in Pursuit syndrome.
Kerri Richardson (From Clutter to Clarity: Clean Up Your Mindset to Clear Out Your Clutter)
Studies indicate that another gift of self-compassion is that it fosters a growth rather than a fixed mindset.
Kristin Neff (Fierce Self-Compassion: How Women Can Harness Kindness to Speak Up, Claim Their Power, and Thrive)
training, and personal effort take them the rest of the way. Robert Sternberg, the present-day guru of intelligence, writes that the major factor in whether people achieve expertise “is not some fixed prior ability, but purposeful engagement.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
When we (temporarily) put people in a fixed mindset, with its focus on permanent traits, they quickly fear challenge and devalue effort.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
In career choices, identity foreclosure often begins when adults ask kids: what do you want to be when you grow up? Pondering that question can foster a fixed mindset about work and self. “I think it’s one of the most useless questions an adult can ask a child,” Michelle Obama writes. “What do you want to be when you grow up? As if growing up is finite. As if at some point you become something and that’s the end.
Adam M. Grant (Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don't Know)
Every one of us has a journey to take. It starts by accepting that we all have both mindsets. Then we learn to recognize what triggers our fixed mindset. Failures? Criticism? Deadlines? Disagreements? And we come to understand what happens to us when our fixed-mindset “persona” is triggered. Who is this persona? What’s its name? What does it make us think, feel, and do? How does it affect those around us? Importantly, we can gradually learn to remain in a growth-mindset place despite the triggers, as we educate our persona and invite it to join us on our growth-mindset journey. Ideally, we will learn more and more about how we can help others on their journey, too.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
The Soul-Hole (Note: The icons in TSH do not necessarily match with their intended formal meanings, they are merely frosting. Also, there are no footnotes to explain the text as there are multiple interpretations–like the proverphorical layer cake. Enjoy the cuisine. If it gets tedious its meant to. (Once dedicated to certains who want to stuff their pie holes on a diet of fattening sweet nothings). The Soul–Hole It was a soul It had a goal— (It had a notion–to fill its whole) Its desire was—to fill its hle It “dug” wholeheartedly its soul hole 5 To fill its soul and solely occupy the whole It tried all things to feed its hole— All sort O’ wants stuffed it–its black h●le The more it ❽ the more it famished— Ate its soul—all the more ravished 10 It thought it best Take More not less— Spaded it in–the meaningless Every shovel made Its hle got deep twice laid— 15 Struck it poor it did–its dirt well paid ◷ne scoop forward tw◑ depths deep Length doubles t◒◒—its emptying sØul–it keeps On the w(h)◎le, it went whole hog, To burrow its hole–this groundhog went agog— Furrowed it deep—to slop its façade The more it strode to trench its hole— A thimbleful empty⨟ no (front) end load (–Pssst! Its as if it got bit by a pire of soul— Yea, a soulpire sucked its swhoule dry— 25 Leaving 2wö more empty holes) It filled but missed It labored in bliss Found it it—it abyssed In dread and fearh it stoked its hole 30 With joyous tear it looped its knot whole Broke its soil with useless toil All–to–make it—it–assoiled Other: “do it have a h ◙ le in its •ead?—? It needs to fill its head h⌻le–like a hole in its head (—Fill ⎌ its h
Douglas M. Laurent
Many of these comparison companies operated on what Collins calls a “genius with a thousand helpers” model. Instead of building an extraordinary management team like the good-to-great companies, they operated on the fixed-mindset premise that great geniuses do not need great teams. They just need little helpers to carry out their brilliant ideas.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset - Updated Edition: Changing The Way You think To Fulfil Your Potential)
To determine a company’s mindset, we asked a diverse sample of employees at each organization how much they agreed with statements like these: When it comes to being successful, this company seems to believe that people have a certain amount of talent, and they can’t really do much to change it (fixed mindset). This company values natural intelligence and business talent more than any other characteristics (also fixed mindset). This company genuinely values the personal development and growth of its employees (growth mindset).
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
What currently prevents your dreams from becoming reality is buried trauma keeping you trapped in your past, shutting down your confidence and imagination. Sure, trauma occurs as major, life-altering events. But more often, “trauma” is planted in minor incidents and conversations that limit your view of who you are and what you can do, creating a fixed mindset.
Benjamin P. Hardy (Personality Isn't Permanent: Break Free from Self-Limiting Beliefs and Rewrite Your Story)
For in the world of the fixed mindset, there is no way to become an Eagle. If you were a true Eagle, you would have aced the test and been hailed as an Eagle at once.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset - Updated Edition: Changing The Way You think To Fulfil Your Potential)
The Protean Alternative I have stressed the pervasiveness and danger of cultism, but that does not mean it must dominate our future. We are capable of alternatives—even antidotes—that stem from the very structure of the human mind. One such alternative is what I call the protean self, a view of the self as always in process; as being many-sided rather than monolithic, and resilient rather than fixed.
Robert Jay Lifton (Losing Reality: On Cults, Cultism, and the Mindset of Political and Religious Zealotry)
Donald Trump is a special kind of cultist. He is in no way totalistic—his beliefs can be remarkably fluid—nor is he the leader of a sealed-off cultic community. Rather, his cultism is inseparable from his solipsistic reality. That solipsism emanates only from the self and what the self requires, which makes him the most bizarre and persistent would-be owner of reality. And in his way he has created a community of zealous believers who are geographically dispersed. A considerable portion of his base can be understood as cultist, as followers of a guru who is teacher, guide, and master. From my studies of cults and cultlike behavior, I recognize this aspect of Trump’s relationship to his followers. It is evident at his large-crowd events, which began as campaign rallies but have continued to take place during his presidency. There is a ritual quality to the chants he has led such as “Lock her up!” and “Build that wall!” The latter chant is followed by the guru’s question “And who will pay for it?,” then the crowd’s answer, “Mexico!” The chants and responses are less about policy than they are assertions of guru-disciple ties. The chants are rituals that generate “high states”—or what can even be called experiences of transcendence—in disciples. The back-and-forth brings them closer to the guru and enables them to share his claim to omnipotence and his sacred aura. Trump does not directly express an apocalyptic narrative, but his presence has an apocalyptic aura. He tells us that, as not only a “genius” but a “very stable genius,” he alone can “fix” the terrible problems of our society. To be sure these are bizarre expressions of his extreme grandiosity, but also of a man who would be a savior to a disintegrating world.
Robert Jay Lifton (Losing Reality: On Cults, Cultism, and the Mindset of Political and Religious Zealotry)
Suddenly we realized that there were two meanings to ability, not one: a fixed ability that needs to be proven, and a changeable ability that can be developed through learning. That’s how the mindsets were born. I knew instantly which one I had. I realized why I’d always been so concerned about mistakes and failures. And I recognized for the first time that I had a choice.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
Is there another way to judge potential? NASA thought so. When they were soliciting applications for astronauts, they rejected people with pure histories of success and instead selected people who had had significant failures and bounced back from them. Jack Welch, the celebrated CEO of General Electric, chose executives on the basis of “runway,” their capacity for growth. And remember Marina Semyonova, the famed ballet teacher, who chose the students who were energized by criticism. They were all rejecting the idea of fixed ability and selecting instead for mindset. Proving
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: The New Psychology Of Success)
A fixed mindset causes people to fear failure; they don’t want to try anything that might damage their current sense of ability and intelligence. Their self-worth and identity are wrapped up in not making a mistake, so they gravitate to fail-safe activities. People with growth mindsets, on the other hand, seek out challenges and activities that expand their abilities. The fixed mindset seeks sameness and validation; the growth mindset seeks learning and adaptation.
David Sturt (Great Work: How to Make a Difference People Love)
What to say instead: “You really worked hard” What should Ethan’s parents have done? Research reveals a simple solution. Rather than praising him for being smart, they should have praised him for working hard. On the successful completion of a test, they should not have said, “I’m so proud of you. You’re such a bright kid.” That appeals to a fixed, uncontrollable intellectual trait. It’s called “fixed mindset” praise. His parents should have said, “I’m so proud of you. You must have studied a lot.” This appeals to controllable effort. It’s called “growth mindset” praise.
John Medina (Brain Rules for Baby: How to Raise a Smart and Happy Child from Zero to Five)
If you have a growth mind-set, then you use your failures to improve. If you have a fixed mind-set, you may never fail, but neither do you learn or grow.
Peter Bregman (18 Minutes: Find Your Focus, Master Distraction, and Get the Right Things Done)
If they’re forced into a challenge they don’t feel prepared for, they may even engage in what psychologists call “self-handicapping”: deliberately doing things that will hamper their performance in order to give themselves an excuse for not doing well. Self-handicapping can be fairly spectacular: in one study, men deliberately chose performance-inhibiting drugs when facing a task they didn’t expect to do well on.7 “Instead of studying,” writes the psychologist Edward Hirt, “a student goes to a movie the night before an exam. If he performs poorly, he can attribute his failure to a lack of studying rather than to a lack of ability or intelligence. On the other hand, if he does well on the exam, he may conclude that he has exceptional ability, because he was able to perform well without studying.”8 Writers who don’t produce copy—or leave it so long that they couldn’t possibly produce something good—are giving themselves the perfect excuse for not succeeding. “Work finally begins,” says Alain de Botton, “when the fear of doing nothing exceeds the fear of doing it badly.” For people with an extremely fixed mind-set, that tipping point quite often never happens. They fear nothing so much as finding out that they never had what it takes.
Megan McArdle (The Up Side of Down: Why Failing Well Is the Key to Success)
Fixed mindset is not amenable to change and growth.dogmatic,opinionated.Solution:Allow God and Gods.Let this mind that was in christ...
Ikechukwu Joseph (Bible Faith Nuggets Series Box Set)
Falko Rheinberg, a German researcher, studied teachers demonstrating the fixed and growth mindsets. The achievements level of fixed mindset teachers remained unchanged. But under the direction of a growth mindset teacher, both low- and high-achieving students excelled by the end of the year.
2 Minute Insight (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success…In 15 Minutes – The Optimist’s Summary of Carol Dweck’s Best Selling Book)
there are countless reasons to adopt and practice a growth mindset instead of a fixed mindset, and such development is not only hugely desirable, it is within our grasp in all areas of our lives.
2 Minute Insight (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success…In 15 Minutes – The Optimist’s Summary of Carol Dweck’s Best Selling Book)
A fixed mindset is defined as a limiting belief that hinders performance and asserts that personality, ability and talent levels are permanent. In contrast, a growth mindset offers unlimited potential.
2 Minute Insight (Mindset: The New Psychology of Success…In 15 Minutes – The Optimist’s Summary of Carol Dweck’s Best Selling Book)
Fixed mindset. If I have to work hard, it makes me feel like I’m not smart. Growth mindset. The harder I work, the better I get.
Matt Anderson (Fearless Referrals: Boost Your Confidence, Break Down Doors, and Build a Powerful Client List)
But those with the fixed mindset didn’t want to expose their deficiencies. Instead, to feel smart in the short run, they
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
Fixed mind-set individuals dread any sort of failure because to them it’s a negative reflection on their abilities, which are immutable. Because of this, they devote a lot of effort to trying to look smart and avoiding looking stupid—they won’t engage in situations where they can fail, especially publicly.
Rajat Paharia (Loyalty 3.0: How to Revolutionize Customer and Employee Engagement with Big Data and Gamification)
The human mind is a messy place with few clear distinctions. You probably have a complex mix of both fixed and growth mindsets. I do. Untangling your mindsets can be a challenge. The good news is that you can change the fixed mindsets that you might discover lurking in your own theories about the nature of musical talent.
Jonathan Harnum (The Practice of Practice)
Praise is also not helpful, because it supports the idea of "fixed mindset" or intelligence (Dweck, 2006). More effective is corrective and supportive timely feedback and the encouragement for effort.
Gayle Gregory (The Motivated Brain: Improving Student Attention, Engagement, and Perseverance)
Robert Sternberg, the present-day guru of intelligence, writes that the major factor in whether people achieve expertise “is not some fixed prior ability, but purposeful engagement.” Or, as his forerunner Binet recognized, it’s not always the people who start out the smartest who end up the smartest.
Carol S. Dweck (Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential)
While the people with fixed mindsets let their intelligence and talent define them, the growth mindset oriented people know that with hard work and practice, they can be good at anything.
Timo Kiander (Work Smarter Not Harder: 18 Productivity Tips That Boost Your Work Day Performance)
Take a moment and read that again…do you believe it? If work is a team sport, then you are dependent upon others for your success. You cannot perform at a high level alone. However, in many organizations a “hero mentality” abounds in which individuals wait to step in and save the day. In those organizations, I tend to see a short-term focus in which firefighting becomes the norm and long-range fire prevention is overlooked. In extreme situations, it's not just firefighting that occurs, but arson, where individuals actually create a crisis in order to be the hero. Those who save the day are then rewarded with other “problem areas to fix” or other recognition that serves to perpetuate the individual mindset. A culture of silos and barriers to collective success abounds! …short-term focus where firefighting becomes the norm and fire prevention tactics are overlooked. In extreme situations it's not just firefighting…it's arson. While this solo mindset may deliver results in the short term, burnout occurs when the self-imposed demands become too great. Team members may become complacent, sitting back and saying to themselves, “Why bother? She will just do it herself anyway.
Morag Barrett (Cultivate: The Power of Winning Relationships)
Teachers greatly influence how students perceive and approach struggle in the mathematics classroom. Even young students can learn to value struggle as an expected and natural part of learning, as demonstrated by the class motto of one first-grade math class: If you are not struggling, you are not learning. Teachers must accept that struggle is important to students' learning of mathematics, convey this message to students, and provide time for them to try to work through their uncertainties. Unfortunately, this may not be enough, since some students will still simply shut down in the face of frustration, proclaim, 'I don't know,' and give up. Dweck (2006) has shown that students with a fixed mindset--that is, those who believe that intelligence (especially math ability) is an innate trait--are more likely to give up when they encounter difficulties because they believe that learning mathematics should come naturally. By contrast, students with a growth mindset--that is, those who believe that intelligence can be developed through effort--are likely to persevere through a struggle because they see challenging work as an opportunity to learn and grow.
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All)
The Confidence Cycle is also a reminder of how important a growth mindset is. We become good at something, and confident at doing it, by practising it, and not because we were born with a special gift or disposition. Our abilities and skills aren’t fixed – we become experts in, or competent at, the things we practise.
Matt Lewis (Overcome Anxiety: A Self Help Toolkit for Anxiety Relief and Panic Attacks)
evangelicalism instills a “fix-it” attitude into theories about marriage, about sex lives, about everything involving sexual identity. We need to remove ourselves from this mindset—people are not things to be fixed. Similarly,
Dianna E. Anderson (Damaged Goods: New Perspectives on Christian Purity)
You’ve probably heard the expression, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” That phrase definitely was not coined by someone dedicated to personal growth. If that has been your mind-set in the past, then I suggest you develop a questioner’s mind-set instead and replace the popular phrase with the following questions: • If it ain’t broke, how can we make it better? • If it ain’t broke, when is it likely to break in the future? • If it ain’t broke, how long will it serve as the world changes? People
John C. Maxwell (The 15 Invaluable Laws of Growth: Live Them and Reach Your Potential)
All of this demonstrates how work is becoming more of a mindset than a fixed place, time of day, or location.
Jeanne Meister (The Future Workplace Experience: 10 Rules For Mastering Disruption in Recruiting and Engaging Employees)