Female Leadership Quotes

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In the future, there will be no female leaders. There will just be leaders.
Sheryl Sandberg (Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead)
Advice to my younger self: 1 Start where you are with what you have 2 Try not to hurt other people 3 Take more chances 4 If you fail, keep trying
Germany Kent
Say to yourself, I am perfect, the way I am. Say to yourself, I am beautiful the way I am. Say to yourself, those who do not accept me the way I am, do not deserve me in their life.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
His foot bumped into something he feared was a body. He bent to touch it. It was human. A human with a carotid pulse. He picked it up into a cradle. Probably a female, judging by the feathery weight.
John M. Vermillion (Pack's Posse (Simon Pack Book 8))
The representation of women in the society, especially through mass media has been the most delusional act ever done on the grounds of human existence.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
Here are a few important principles to remember with regard to the giving and receiving between males and females. When a male demands, a female reacts; she doesn’t respond. When a male gives, a female responds. When a male commits, a female submits. Nothing is more precious to a female than a committed male. Nothing is no more depressing to a female than an uncommitted male. Here’s the secret, guys: If you want a submitted female, be a committed male. It’s that simple. When a male abuses, a female refuses. Whenever a man abuses a woman, she refuses to respond. When a male shares, a female cares. If you find a man who is willing to share with the woman in his life, you will find a woman who is willing to care for her man. When a male leads, a female follows. When a man carries out his God-given responsibility for leadership, a woman responds by following his lead. Leadership does not mean being bossy, always telling others what to do. No, leadership means going ahead, not putting others in the front. Good leaders lead by example, not by decree. Jesus led by example, and so did Moses, Peter, Paul, and all the other great leaders in the Bible. Leading by example means doing ourselves the things we wish others to do.
Myles Munroe (The Purpose and Power of Love & Marriage)
How dare a person tell a woman, how to dress, how to talk, how to behave! Any being who does that, is no human.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
Women are no sheep. Women are no fragile showpiece to be placed above the fire-place. Women of the thinking society are the builders of nations. Women of the sentient society are the builders of the world.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
To be a jazz freedom fighter is to attempt to galvanize and energize world-weary people into forms of organization with accountable leadership that promote critical exchange and broad reflection. The interplay of individuality and unity is not one of uniformity and unanimity imposed from above but rather of conflict among diverse groupings that reach a dynamic consensus subject to questioning and criticism. As with a soloist in a jazz quartet, quintet or band, individuality is promoted in order to sustain and increase the creative tension with the group--a tension that yields higher levels of performance to achieve the aim of the collective project. This kind of critical and democratic sensibility flies in the face of any policing of borders and boundaries of "blackness", "maleness", "femaleness", or "whiteness".
Cornel West (Race Matters)
You only fix something, when it’s broken. And you - are far from broken.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
All the bloodsheds in human history have been caused by men, not women.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
Oh! What honour for the female sex! It is perfectly obvious that God has special regard for it when all these wretched people who destroyed the whole Kingdom – now recovered and made safe by a woman, something that 5000 men could not have done – and the traitors [have been] exterminated. Before the event they would scarcely have believed this possible.
Christine de Pizan (Ditié de Jehanne d'Arc (Medium Aevum monographs))
A society where feminine beauty is defined not by the human self on genuine intellectual and sentimental grounds, but by a computer software on the grounds of economic interest, is more dead than alive. It is a society of human bodies, not human beings.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
You are not born to follow the society, you are born to inspire it - you are born to teach it - you are born to build it.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
The female brain itself is a highly intuitive emotion-processing machine, which when put to practice in the progress of the society, would do much more than any man can with all his analytical perspectives.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
Perfectionism is a particularly evil lure for women, who, I believe, hold themselves to an even higher standard of performance than do men. There are many reasons why women’s voices and visions are not more widely represented today in creative fields. Some of that exclusion is due to regular old misogyny, but it’s also true that—all too often—women are the ones holding themselves back from participating in the first place. Holding back their ideas, holding back their contributions, holding back their leadership and their talents. Too many women still seem to believe that they are not allowed to put themselves forward at all, until both they and their work are perfect and beyond criticism. Meanwhile, putting forth work that is far from perfect rarely stops men from participating in the global cultural conversation. Just sayin’. And I don’t say this as a criticism of men, by the way. I like that feature in men—their absurd overconfidence, the way they will casually decide, “Well, I’m 41 percent qualified for this task, so give me the job!” Yes, sometimes the results are ridiculous and disastrous, but sometimes, strangely enough, it works—a man who seems not ready for the task, not good enough for the task, somehow grows immediately into his potential through the wild leap of faith itself. I only wish more women would risk these same kinds of wild leaps. But I’ve watched too many women do the opposite. I’ve watched far too many brilliant and gifted female creators say, “I am 99.8 percent qualified for this task, but until I master that last smidgen of ability, I will hold myself back, just to be on the safe side.” Now, I cannot imagine where women ever got the idea that they must be perfect in order to be loved or successful. (Ha ha ha! Just kidding! I can totally imagine: We got it from every single message society has ever sent us! Thanks, all of human history!) But we women must break this habit in ourselves—and we are the only ones who can break it. We must understand that the drive for perfectionism is a corrosive waste of time, because nothing is ever beyond criticism. No matter how many hours you spend attempting to render something flawless, somebody will always be able to find fault with it. (There are people out there who still consider Beethoven’s symphonies a little bit too, you know, loud.) At some point, you really just have to finish your work and release it as is—if only so that you can go on to make other things with a glad and determined heart. Which is the entire point. Or should be.
Elizabeth Gilbert (Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear)
Given the same honor and dignity as men, women can build a much better and more harmonious world.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
I am a scientist who studies the human mind, including the sexual differences in mental faculties, and I am telling you, ten female thinkers can teach humanity lessons equivalent to the teachings of a hundred male thinkers of history.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
Beauty is an illusion.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
Any nation that does not learn to place women on the same pedestal of respect and dignity as men, will never in a thousand years attain greatness.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
Any book that spreads weakness in the heart of one gender, and authoritarianism in the other, must be burnt to ashes.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
O my Courageous Sister! You have to become the beacon of hope for all women around you and then for the whole society.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
Remember, for a society to truly progress we don't need woman or man, we need a fully-fledged human - nothing short of that would do.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
What is assertive in a man can appear abrasive in a woman, and female leaders risk appearing too feminine or not feminine enough.
Barbara Kellerman
Aspiring female leaders risk being liked but not respected, or respected but not liked, in settings that may require individuals to be both in order to succeed.
Barbara Kellerman
Many questions come to mind. How influenced by contemporary religions were many of the scholars who wrote the texts available today? How many scholars have simply assumed that males have always played the dominant role in leadership and creative invention and projected this assumption into their analysis of ancient cultures? Why do so many people educated in this century think of classical Greece as the first major culture when written language was in use and great cities built at least twenty-five centuries before that time? And perhaps most important, why is it continually inferred that the age of the "pagan" religions, the time of the worship of female deities (if mentioned at all), was dark and chaotic, mysterious and evil, without the light of order and reason that supposedly accompanied the later male religions, when it has been archaeologically confirmed that the earliest law, government, medicine, agriculture, architecture, metallurgy, wheeled vehicles, ceramics, textiles and written language were initially developed in societies that worshiped the Goddess? We may find ourselves wondering about the reasons for the lack of easily available information on societies who, for thousands of years, worshiped the ancient Creatress of the Universe.
Merlin Stone (When God Was a Woman)
The world doesn't need a good woman who is meekly obedient to the uncivilized social norms that advocate female inferiority. The world needs those bad women who can think for themselves, to break the primeval norms of the society that consistently drag the human civilization back to the stone-age.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
Gender equality is not a belief, it is not an idea - it is a key element of the society that will define whether we the humans shall march ahead towards glory and advancement, or sink into the abyss of an existential doom.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
For thousands of years, the dumb, uncivilized, stone-age society has reduced women to mere prizes to be won, objects to be shown off, and playthings to be abused and toyed with. Now is the time to stop this primitive madness.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
Customer service has everything to do with consistency, systems, training, and the habits you and your team create.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
Creating a company culture is the first operational step in becoming a bold, brave fempreneur. It creates certainty, a road map and stability.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
The male-dominated systems know they cannot maintain their current power structures if and when the woman is restored to her natural and powerful state as a great leader and co-creator.
Bryant McGill (Voice of Reason)
Listen my dear sister! You only fix something, when it’s broken. And you - are far from broken. Say to yourself, I am perfect, the way I am. Say to yourself, I am beautiful the way I am. Say to yourself, those who do not accept me the way I am, do not deserve me in their life.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
Women of the thinking society are the builders of nations. Women of the sentient society are the builders of the world. And given the same honor and dignity as men, women can build a much better and more harmonious world. Harmony and conflict-solving run in their veins. Whereas men have evolved into more authoritarian creatures.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
Some women think being arrogant, selfish, bitter and looking down on others are qualities of being an Independent, strong, powerful and successful business women. No matter how high you are in life. Never look down on others and never forget humanity.
De philosopher DJ Kyos
I am no feminist. Even though the term "feminism" is founded upon the basic principle of gender equality, it possesses its own fundamental gender bias, which makes it inclined towards the wellbeing of women, over the wellbeing of the whole society. And if history has shown anything, it is that such fundamental biases in time corrupt even the most glorious ideas and give birth to prejudice, bigotry and differentiation.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
For within the very structure of family life, in families that do or did embrace the male religions, are the almost invisibly accepted social customs and life patterns that reflect the one-time strict adherence to the biblical scriptures. Attitudes towards double-standard premarital virginity, double-standard marital fidelity, the sexual autonomy of women, illegitimacy, abortion, contraception, rape, childbirth, the importance of marriage and children to women, the responsibilities and role of women in marriage, women as sex objects, the sexual identification of passivity and aggressiveness, the roles of women and men in work or social situations, women who express their ideas, female leadership, the intellectual activities of women, the economic activities and needs of women and the automatic assumption of the male as breadwinner and protector have all become so deeply ingrained that feelings and values concerning these subjects are often regarded, by both women and men, as natural tendencies or even human instinct.
Merlin Stone (When God Was a Woman)
There’s no degree or certification for being a badass. You can just choose to be one.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
You are not your history. You are the stories you tell yourself.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
What a hundred caring, courageous and conscientious women can achieve in ten years, would take a thousand men a hundred years.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
I was taught that the most hardworking nurse is found at the dirtiest part of the clinical ward.
Israelmore Ayivor (Leaders' Frontpage: Leadership Insights from 21 Martin Luther King Jr. Thoughts)
And so, because business leadership is still so dominated by men, modern workplaces are riddled with these kind of gaps, from doors that are too heavy for the average woman to open with ease, to glass stairs and lobby floors that mean anyone below can see up your skirt, to paving that’s exactly the right size to catch your heels. Small, niggling issues that aren’t the end of the world, granted, but that nevertheless irritate. Then there’s the standard office temperature. The formula to determine standard office temperature was developed in the 1960s around the metabolic resting rate of the average forty-year-old, 70 kg man.1 But a recent study found that ‘the metabolic rate of young adult females performing light office work is significantly lower’ than the standard values for men doing the same type of activity. In fact, the formula may overestimate female metabolic rate by as much as 35%, meaning that current offices are on average five degrees too cold for women. Which leads to the odd sight of female office workers wrapped up in blankets in the New York summer while their male colleagues wander around in summer clothes.2
Caroline Criado Pérez (Invisible Women: Exposing Data Bias in a World Designed for Men)
It’s true that historical memory about female leadership empowered later women like Margery Kempe to preach, teach, and lead. But it’s also true that patriarchal beliefs about the inferiority and impurity of female bodies made it more difficult for women to exercise these spiritual gifts.
Beth Allison Barr (The Making of Biblical Womanhood: How the Subjugation of Women Became Gospel Truth)
Love, compassion, care, listening, communicating—these aren’t secondary skills. They’re of primary importance.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Leadership is not about command and control: that’s for the army.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
If there’s more than one ‘version’ of you, one of them is lying.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
There’s no such thing as “sounding smart”. Smart is either knowing or seeking to know.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
To have swagger, your intention has to outweigh your fear.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
Swagger requires you to let your guard down. If nothing can get in, then nothing can get out.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
When you filter your truth through the lens of approval, you only say things you’ve seen approved of in the past.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
Stop waiting for someone to tell you it’s OK to be yourself. Swagger needs no permission.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
You wouldn't pick up someone else's baggage off the carousel. So why do it in life?
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
When you confess your mess, you invite everyone else to say “ME TOO!” That’s connection.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
Great men know how to control two things; their women and money.
Habeeb Akande
Was Eve’s sin so much greater and more unforgivable than Adam’s that the entire female gender must forever be treated with suspicion and controlling measures?
Alan F. Johnson (How I Changed My Mind about Women in Leadership: Compelling Stories from Prominent Evangelicals)
2. God commanded both male and female to have dominion (v. 27). Both men and women have been given the ability and authority to lead. Leadership is not gender specific.
John C. Maxwell (Maxwell Leadership Bible, Revised and Updated)
If you compromise your integrity and principles on minor issues, it gets easier to make bad choices on the big issues.
Ann Dunwoody (A Higher Standard: Leadership Strategies from America's First Female Four-Star General)
Those who know don’t talk and those who talk don’t know
Ina Johanna Fandrich (Marie Laveau, the Mysterious Voudou Queen: A Study of Powerful Female Leadership in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans)
When you have a strong company culture it will shine through your brand and you can authentically say, “This is what our brand is about.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
Your mission statement outlines why your company exists. It doesn’t have to be all fancy-pants, just a clear statement of what you do.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
Even if you delegate that responsibility, ultimately you are the one responsible for how your brand is portrayed.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
Never take lightly that becoming an employer puts another person’s ability to provide for their life in your hands.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
Train your new employee properly. Sounds so obvious, and yet it often doesn’t happen.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
If attempting to make the world a civilized one, makes you a bad woman in the eyes of the dumb patriarchal society, then, by all means, be it.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
Arise my Sister! Awake my Sister! Start walking in the path of building your own identity!
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
You can't live an extraordinary life with an ordinary mindset.
Hermy L McCabe
When women got into positions of power, they calibrated and recalibrated tenderness and strength, modulating and correcting. Power and love didn't often live side by side. If one came in, the other might go.
Meg Wolitzer (The Female Persuasion)
Since males are expected to lead, this is what you must do to appear manly. Simply taking the initiative is not enough though; you must lead women all the way and keep leading them until the end. If you want a woman, it is up to you to go after her, not the other way around. Leadership in the relationship is the male’s role, like it or not — the same way giving birth is the female’s role. You can debate and argue all night that it is unfair, but it does not make any difference. You should never expect women to lead.
W. Anton (The Manual: What Women Want and How to Give It to Them)
Your mission statement, vision statement, core values, and service standards provide a clear focus for all while keeping your team humble and hungry. It creates that family environment in which your employees enjoy coming to work and dealing with the challenges they face each day.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
Right now, many female activists in their forties, fifties, sixties, seventies, and eighties are gazing thoughtfully into the glowing embers of lesbian culture. For us, this is still an active campfire where we gather and warm ourselves; one which, we hope, will not fade away into forgotten ash, but instead retain hot coals to stoke new fires. Such images of heat and spark have always served to symbolize shifts in leadership; think of that other fire-based metaphor, the passing of the torch - presumably, to a next generation. What does it mean if that next generation is disdainful of the torch, welcomes its dousing, or lacks the data or the will to learn how it was lit and carried forward in the first place?
Bonnie J. Morris (The Disappearing L: Erasure of Lesbian Spaces and Culture)
You might think lunchtime at Willing would be different from other high schools. That everyone would be welcome at any table, united by the knowledge that we, at Willing, are the Elite, the Chosen, stellar across the board. Um.No.Of course not.High school is high school, regardless of how much it costs or how many kids springboard into the Ivies. And nowhere is social status more evident than in the dining room (freshman and sophomores at noon; upperclassmen at one). Because, of course, Willing doesn't have a cafeteria, or even a lunch hall. It has a dining room, complete with oak tables and paneled walls that are covered with plaques going all the way back to 1869, the year Edith Willing Castoe (Edward's aunt) founded the school to "prepare Philadelphia's finest young ladies for Marriage,for Leadership, and for Service to the World." Really. Until the sixties, the school's boastful slogan was "She's a Willing Girl." Almost 150 years, three first ladies, and one attorney general-not to mention the arrival of boys-later, female members of the student body are still called Willing Girls. You'd think someone in the seventies would have objected to that and changed it. But Willing has survived the seventies of two different centuries. They'll probably still be calling us Willing Girls in 2075. It's a school that believes in Tradition, sometimes regardless of how stupid that Tradition is.
Melissa Jensen (The Fine Art of Truth or Dare)
It's important to remember that having a conversation about us (LGBT) without us will usually be a recycling or preconceived ideas and misconceptions. Can you imagine a group of male church leaders discussing the role of women in the church without females present. We would call that misogyny. Or church leadership discussing indigenous issues without ever consulting with indigenous people themselves to get insight into what their life experience is really all about. We would call that white supremacy/racism/elitism. The church has done a great deal of talking about us but rarely has spoken with us. So when church leaders discuss LGBT people, relationships and the community without speaking with or spending time getting to know LGBT people it does beg the question why. What is there to fear? Why the exclusion? Is this another evidence of homophobia? It's time for the church to invite LGBT people into the conversation. For some this is a conversation about their thoughts and beliefs but for us it is about who we are. You can ask questions. What was it like to sit in church and hear the word abomination to describe your orientation. What was it like to get to the point of coming out knowing you might be rejected by those you've loved and a church you've served.? How did you find resolution of your Christian beliefs and your sexuality? In listening you will learn. That's why it's so important to remember. No conversation about us, without us.
Anthony Venn-Brown OAM
Without Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, there'd be no Nelson Mandela. Without Michelle Obama, there'd be no Barack Obama. But no-one is ready for that discussion yet.
Mitta Xinindlu
Jessica Kim was one of them. A damn shame, she was one of those Asian worker-bee types. Always here past midnight. I heard she worked on Christmas. A real numbers whiz." "True, but she wasn't the best fit for client services. At her level, she needed to be a thinker, not a doer. I know this sounds crass, but her clothes never fit. They were a little too baggy for may taste." "Maybe you should have paid her more so she could hire a tailor." Laughter. "Wasn't she already being overpaid anyway, especially for a female associate?" My stomach lurched. I'd heard enough. My sadness vortexed into pure rage as I stomped over to them. "I gave blood, sweat, and tears for this company." I growled and pointed at Robert, my former group director. "You begged me to cover for you if your wife called when you were wining and dining that female client last year." Robert's face reddened. "But you didn't. I'm going through a divorce now." I went down the line to the next asshole. "Shaun, you tried to expense your escapade at a strip club by saying it was my birthday dinner and HR thought I was in on the scam. And Dan, you transposed all those numbers on the deal sheet and I caught them just before they were sent out, remember? You could have been fired for that, especially for showing up to work high. I went above and beyond for you. I saved your ass." Their jaws dropped. No, they weren't going to schmooze their way out of this one. "I know what you're thinking. How dare she say these things to us? She's just bitter because she was let go. Well, it's partly true. I'm bitter because I've wasted seven years of my life at this company that turned around and stabbed me in the back. If I wasn't leadership material, why didn't a female mentor coach me? Oh right, because there aren't any female execs here. But thank you, sincerely, for the wake-up-call. Now I can take my bonuses and severance and do something better with my time rather than covering for you and making you all richer.
Suzanne Park (So We Meet Again)
When the New Testament calls wives to be in subjection to their husbands, there is no hint of female inferiority. That notion is neither explicitly stated or implied. When the idea is wrenched out of Scripture, it is done so by twisted minds. What is called for is a division of labor in the economy of marriage. The role of leadership is assigned to the man and not to the woman.
R.C. Sproul
Female empowerment doesn't need any special training, it only requires we act, do it with conviction, and do it often.
Jane Finette (Unlocked: How Empowered Women Empower Women)
There is only one Body of Christ, one Spirit, one hope, one Lord, one faith, one baptism, one God and Father of all. How can we read Ephesians 4, then separate the gifts listed there into male and female categories? Wouldn't that make us two bodies? Does God gift a women just to teach other women in a female Body of Christ? Or is she part of the one Body? Paul said that in Christ there is neither male nor female, Jew nor Greek, slave nor free. We are all one in Christ Jesus-- one body, not two or three or more.
Loren Cunningham (Why Not Women?: A Fresh Look at Scripture on Women in Missions, Ministry, and Leadership)
he told only the top leadership about this exciting new ministry of “Flirty Fishing,” where the female disciples, the “bait,” would flirt with and often have sex with preferably well-to-do men called “Fish,” as a witnessing technique to gain followers and monetary donations.
Faith Jones (Sex Cult Nun: Growing Up in and Breaking Away from the Secretive Religious Family That Changed My Life)
If we want better and more effective organizations and societies, we first and foremost need to improve the quality of our leaders. Compelling evidence suggests that leadership is more likely to improve if we start drawing more heavily from the female talent pool, especially if we understand that the women most likely to drive positive change look quite different from the typical leaders we have today, irrespective of gender. But even more critically, we must put in place much bigger obstacles for the disproportionate glut of incompetent men who are so adept at becoming leaders, to everyone’s peril.
Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic (Why Do So Many Incompetent Men Become Leaders?: (And How to Fix It))
Kamala Harris is the female representation that we've all been waiting for. She is a good example in showing that women, black women, can lead key countries too.
Mitta Xinindlu
But I have been stressing that there are other underlying species-regularities involved. First, that women leaders do not inspire ‘followership’ chiefly because they are women and not only because of the consequences of those factors noted above ; secondly, even if they want to, women cannot become political leaders because males are strongly predisposed to form and maintain all-male groups, particularly when matters of moment for the community are involved. The suggestion is that a combination of these two factors has been the basis for the hostility and difficulty those females have faced who have aspired to political leadership. This has been the basis of the tradition of female non-involvement in high politics, and not the tradition itself. Cultural forms originally express the underlying ‘genetically programmed behavioural propensities’. In their turn, such cultural forms maintain – as tradition – an enduring solution to the recurrent problem of assigning of leadership and followership roles. In this connection, Margaret Mead writes about ‘zoomorphizing Man’. ‘Culture in the sense of man's species-characteristic method of meeting problems of maintenance, transformation, and transcendance of the past is an abstraction from our observations on particular cultures.’? This is then another way of looking at how broad political patterns may predictably emerge from the more detailed and programmed patterns of different behaviour of males and females. Some females may indeed penetrate some high councils. They become ministers of governments, ambassadors, and so on. A few may receive assignments which are not ‘feminine’ in their implication, such as Golda Meir, former Israeli Foreign Minister, and Barbara Castle, U.K. Secretary of Productivity and Employment. It is important to know what happens to the ‘backroom boys’ under such circumstances. Do they retire to an even more secluded chamber? Does the lady become ‘one of the boys’?
Lionel Tiger (Men in Groups)
Ladies, its not harsh to be assertive nor is it bad to be a boss. You have standards they just need to learn it, if they don't like it thats their loss.
Janna Cachola
Wilhelm Reich in The Sexual Revolution summarized the specific objective reasons for the failure of the Russian communes in the best analysis to date: 1) Confusion of the leadership and evasion of the problem. 2) The laborious task of reconstruction in general given the cultural backwardness of Old Russia, the war, and famine. 3) Lack of theory. The Russian Revolution was the first of its kind. No attempt had been made to deal with emotional-sexual-familial problems in the formulation of basic revolutionary theory. (Or, in our terms, there had been a lack of “consciousness raising” about female/ child oppression and a lack of radical feminist analysis prior to the revolution itself.) 4) The sex-negative psychological structure of the individual, created and reinforced throughout history by the family, hindered the individual's liberation from this very structure. As Reich puts it: It must be remembered that human beings have a tremendous fear of just that kind of life for which they long so much but which is at variance with their own structure. 5) The explosive concrete complexities of sexuality. In the picture that Reich draws of the time, one senses the immense frustration of people trying to liberate themselves without having a well-thought-out ideology to guide them. In the end, that they attempted so much without an adequate preparation made their failure even more extreme: To destroy the balance of sexual polarization without entirely eliminating it was worse than nothing at all.
Shulamith Firestone (The Dialectic of Sex: The Case for Feminist Revolution)
Christiane Taubira is currently doing something remarkable. She is shaking The Table right now. She is cementing a place for all Black Women who want to thrive in places where they're usually not considered. Win or lose, she's an example to me !
Mitta Xinindlu
Until more women become recognized as competent and reliable leaders, assuming roles of leadership will remain an uphill battle. By all means, draw inspiration from Hillary Rodham Clinton, former U.K. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, business executive Carly Fiorina, Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, or Carolyn Lamm (President of the American Bar Association), but remember that the majority of effective female leaders are neither rich nor famous. They’re just competent, devoted, and hard-working people, pretty much like you.
Catherine Huang (The Art of War for Women: Sun Tzu's Ancient Strategies and Wisdom for Winning at Work)
Patronising women is another manoeuvre, an infamous example being then British prime minister David Cameron’s ‘Calm down, dear’ to Labour MP Angela Eagle in 2011.48 In the Inter-Parliamentary Union’s (IPU) 2016 global study on sexism, violence and harassment against female politicians, one MP from a European parliament said ‘if a woman speaks loudly in parliament she is “shushed” with a finger to the lips, as one does with children. That never happens when a man speaks loudly’.49 Another noted that she is ‘constantly asked – even by male colleagues in my own party – if what I want to say is very important, if I could refrain from taking the floor.’ Some tactics are more brazen. Afghan MP Fawzia Koofi told the Guardian that male colleagues use intimidation to frighten female MPs into silence – and when that fails, ‘The leadership cuts our microphones off’.50 Highlighting the hidden gender angle of having a single person (most often a man) in charge of speaking time in parliament, one MP from a country in sub-Saharan Africa (the report only specified regions so the women could remain anonymous) told the IPU that the Speaker had pressured one of her female colleagues for sex. Following her refusal, ‘he had never again given her the floor in parliament’. It doesn’t necessarily even take a sexual snub for a Speaker to refuse women the floor: ‘During my first term in parliament, parliamentary authorities always referred to statements by men and gave priority to men when giving the floor to speakers,’ explained one MP from a country in Asia. The IPU report concluded that sexism, harassment and violence against female politicians was a ‘phenomenon that knew no boundaries and exists to different degrees in every country’. The report found that 66% of female parliamentarians were regularly subjected to misogynistic remarks from their male colleagues, ranging from the degrading (‘you would be even better in a porn movie’) to the threatening (‘she needs to be raped so that she knows what foreigners do’).
Caroline Criado Pérez (Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men)
Transparency is always necessary, even when it may cost you everything you’ve built.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Integrity is critical. Do whatever you can to build and preserve your integrity, and surround yourself with people who require it.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Confidence matters. Figure out what makes you extraordinary and capitalize on it.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Ask directly for help. You want to achieve things, and your mentors can only help if they know you need it.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
It was like a shot in the arm of purpose and passion, a timely reminder of our mission and the value we could bring to the world.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Leadership manifests itself at different times in different ways. And as a leader you need to figure out what role you need to play in each situation.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
We all make mistakes, and life throws us all curveballs. The critical thing is how we deal with them.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Bend don’t break. Being soft is powerful. You don’t need to be “tough” to be an effective leader.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
The things that have helped me grow to be softer have actually made me more powerful.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Know your values. Being true to yourself is a critical part of being a leader.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Being an entrepreneur is not for the faint of heart, but it’s satisfying as hell.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
If there’s one thing you can do to demonstrate, in action, that you’re serious about your start-up, it’s this: quit your day job.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Charlatans are like poisonous mosquitoes dressed as butterflies.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Ambiguity is the enemy. Set clear expectations of whatever deal or relationship you are entering into.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
When leaders become isolated, they stop getting critical feedback.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Being flexible and, more important, empathetic, in business partnerships is essential.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Showing people who you are and being vulnerable is actually a strength.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Be resilient. You will have major setbacks. Know they are coming and don’t let them stop you.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Those with integrity acknowledge their missteps and grow from them.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Recognizing and instilling a culture of dignity matters.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Helping people grow is the surest way to foster loyalty, engagement, and passion.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Inspiration is key. Allow people to have fun, encourage enjoyment, and require growth.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
It’s not just win or lose—the process is what matters.
Victoria Montgomery Brown (Digital Goddess: The Unfiltered Lessons of a Female Entrepreneur)
Some of the evangelical scholars and pastors who are most vocal about male headship and female submission argue that the relationship between husband and wife models the relationship between God the Father and God the Son. Wives follow the leadership of their husbands, just as Jesus follows the leadership of the Father. The marriage hierarchy, like marriage itself, they argue, is embedded in the imago Dei.
Beth Allison Barr (The Making of Biblical Womanhood: How the Subjugation of Women Became Gospel Truth)
Love your swagger haters. They’re a reminder that you have something valuable they don’t.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
When you keep your sh*t real, it’s your true self that achieves, is acknowledged, and celebrated.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
The fear of speaking your truth isn’t cured by having a title. This is a human condition, not a positional one.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
Use facts to fight the demons of insecurity. Facts don't lie. But that voice in your head does.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
Insecurity is rarely about the challenge in front of us. It’s the history of self-doubt that is the killer.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
There’s no bad truth. But there is bad timing.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
Once you start censoring yourself for others, you're giving them to power to decide what, when, where and how much you say.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
No one has a problem with swearing when you tell them how f*cking awesome they are.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
Swagger isn’t just about what you do or say. It’s how you feel about it.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
Having swagger doesn’t mean you’re immune to self-doubt. But it sure as hell dictates what you do with it.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
Being expected to apologize means allowing others to judge your intention.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
Asking for knowledge is often wiser than having it.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
Speaking truth gets a bad rap, usually by those who don’t have to courage to speak it.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
You can't fake confidence. Confidence can only come as a result of competence.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
Every person you think is better or smarter than you is thinking the exact same thing about you right now.
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
My desire for a better world, which treats women and children in a good manner, will not change. So, you may remain in the misjudgemnt of me, it adds nothing to my cause.
Mitta Xinindlu
Being awesome doesn’t guarantee you swagger. Believing it does.  
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
Nowadays, men are acting like women and women like men. Thus, the rise in female presidents in the world.
Mwanandeke Kindembo
Let your successes be your proof and your shit-show moments be your learning.  
Leslie Ehm (Swagger: Unleash Everything You Are and Become Everything You Want)
That afternoon was tranquil at Fort Robinson, everyone in the barracks went their separate ways. Alexa had classes, Blue had ship handling, Jack was helping in the mess hall, Sam had leadership class, and of course, I had therapy.
Jaya Robinson (The Butterfly Effect)
One positive move would be for managers to seek out qualified female candidates to hire and promote. They can also invest more in the recruiting of these female candidates plus their mentoring and helping them get the experience they need. The battle between the stay-at-home moms and the career moms needs to stop. Each group should stop judging each other and causing guilt trips. Those women who have decided to stay at home and raise a family should not be looked down upon by the career women. Career women with families need not feel like the stay-at-home mothers and feminism both are making them feel guilty. Each group needs to be respectful of the other and their contributions. As more women attain senior positions of leadership, things will change. These women will raise the ceiling and the floor. This book was written to encourage women to dream big. It is also hoped that men will do their part to support women in their careers and in the workplace. While many women may not be focused on getting to the top, if more women lean in then conditions for all women will improve. Sheryl Sandberg looks forward to a world where her children and others, both boys and girls, will be able to make the choice of what to do with their lives without obstacles, both internal and external, slowing them down.
Natalie Thompson (Lean In: A Summary of Sheryl Sandberg's Book)
It's important to remember that having a conversation about us (LGBT) without us will usually be a recycling or preconceived ideas and misconceptions. Can you imagine a group of male church leaders discussing the role of women in the church without females present. We would call that misogyny. Or church leadership discussing indigenous issues without ever consulting with indigenous people themselves to get insight into what their life experience is really all about. We would call that white supremacy/racism/elitism. The church has done a great deal of talking about us but rarely has spoken with us. So when church leaders discuss LGBT people, relationships and the community without speaking with or spending time getting to know LGBT people it does beg the question why. What is there to fear? Why the exclusion? Is this another evidence of homophobia? It's time for the church to invite LGBT people into the conversation. For some this is a conversation about their thoughts and beliefs but for us it is about who we are. You can ask questions. What was it like to sit in church and hear the word abomination to describe your orientation. What was it like to get to the point of coming out knowing you might be rejected by those you've loved and a church you've served.? How did you find resolution of your Christian beliefs and your sexuality? In listening you will learn. That's why it's so important to remember. No conversation about us, without us.
Anthony Venn-Brown OAM (A Life of Unlearning - a preacher's struggle with his homosexuality, church and faith)
In the history of the United States, we find that women were regularly preachers on the American frontier. Ironically, Baptists, who in some fundamentalist churches now bar women ministers, had more female preachers than any other denomination. Women pastored almost half of all Baptist churches in the state of Maine in the mid-nineteenth century. This was also the case in almost half of the Baptist churches in Michigan and Wisconsin.
Alan F. Johnson (How I Changed My Mind about Women in Leadership: Compelling Stories from Prominent Evangelicals)
truly believe that the single most important career decision that a woman makes is whether she will have a life partner and who that partner is. I don’t know of one woman in a leadership position whose life partner is not fully—and I mean fully—supportive of her career. No exceptions. And contrary to the popular notion that only unmarried women can make it to the top, the majority of the most successful female business leaders have partners. Of the twenty-eight women who have served as CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, twenty-six were married, one was divorced, and only one had never married.12 Many of these CEOs said they “could not have succeeded without the support of their husbands, helping with the children, the household chores, and showing a willingness to move.”13 Not surprisingly,
Sheryl Sandberg (Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead)
Leadership without service is like trying to breathe without oxygen.
H.L. Balcomb (Cinderella In Focus: "Finding hope when you're feeling a sense of hopelessness!")
Perfect people make for a boring novel
Hermy L McCabe
In the mainstream of evangelicalism, where female senior pastors were often unwelcome, most leaders and laypeople had adopted the conservative Reformed view of gender and had forgotten (or never knew of) women’s leadership in the moral crusades of the nineteenth century, or even their prominence as Bible teachers, relief workers, and missionaries prior to the 1930s.
Molly Worthen (Apostles of Reason: The Crisis of Authority in American Evangelicalism)
Women are the one's holding themselves back from participating in the first place - holding back their ideas, holding back their contributions, holding back their leadership and their talents. Too many women still believe that they're not allowed to put themselves forward at all until both they are their work are perfect and beyond criticism. Meanwhile putting forth work that is far from perfect rarely stops men from participating in the global cultural conversation... I like that feature in men - their absurd over-confidence, the way that they will casually decide "well I'm 41% qualified for this task, so give *me* the job..." sometimes, strangely enough, it works. A man who seems not ready for the task, not good enough for the task, somehow grows immediately into his potential through the wild leap of faith itself. I only wish women would also risk these same kinds of wild leaps, but I've watched too many women do the opposite. I've watched far too many brilliant and gifted female creators say "I am 99.8% qualified for this task, but until I master that last smidgen of ability, I will hold myself back, just to be on the safe side. Now, I cannot imagine where women ever got the idea that they must be perfect in order to be loved or successful. Hahaha! Just kidding! I can totally imagine. We've got it from every single message society has ever sent us. Thanks, all of human history!
Elizabeth Gilbert (Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear)
Women are the one's holding themselves back from participating in the first place - holding back their ideas, holding back their contributions, holding back their leadership and their talents. Too many women still believe that they're not allowed to put themselves forward at all until both they and their work are perfect and beyond criticism. Meanwhile putting forth work that is far from perfect rarely stops men from participating in the global cultural conversation... I like that feature in men - their absurd over-confidence, the way that they will casually decide "well I'm 41% qualified for this task, so give *me* the job..." sometimes, strangely enough, it works. A man who seems not ready for the task, not good enough for the task, somehow grows immediately into his potential through the wild leap of faith itself. I only wish women would also risk these same kinds of wild leaps, but I've watched too many women do the opposite. I've watched far too many brilliant and gifted female creators say "I am 99.8% qualified for this task, but until I master that last smidgen of ability, I will hold myself back, just to be on the safe side. Now, I cannot imagine where women ever got the idea that they must be perfect in order to be loved or successful. Hahaha! Just kidding! I can totally imagine. We've got it from every single message society has ever sent us! Thanks, all of human history!
Elizabeth Gilbert (Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear)
her imperative to “think dialectically”—a maxim drawn from her study of the philosopher G. W. F. Hegel. Because reality is constantly changing, we must constantly detect and analyze the emerging contradictions that are driving this change. And if reality is changing around us, we cannot expect good ideas to hatch within an ivory tower. They instead emerge and develop through daily life and struggle, through collective study and debate among diverse entities, and through trial and error within multiple contexts. Grace often attributes her “having been born female and Chinese” to her sense of being an outsider to mainstream society. Over the past decade she has sharpened this analysis considerably. Reflecting on the limits of her prior encounters with radicalism, Grace fully embraces the feminist critique not only of gender discrimination and inequality but also of the masculinist tendencies that too often come to define a certain brand of movement organizing—one driven by militant posturing, a charismatic form of hierarchical leadership, and a static notion of power seen as a scarce commodity to be acquired and possessed. Grace has struck up a whole new dialogue and built relationships with Asian American activists and intellectuals since the 1998 release of her autobiography, Living for Change. Her reflections on these encounters have reinforced her repeated observation that marginalization serves as a form of liberation. Thus, she has come away impressed with the particular ability of movement-oriented Asian Americans to dissect U.S. society in new ways that transcend the mind-sets of blacks and whites, to draw on their transnational experiences to rethink the nature of the global order, and to enact new propositions free of the constraints and baggage weighing down those embedded in the status quo. Still, Grace’s practical connection to a constantly changing reality for most of her adult life has stemmed from an intimate relationship with the African American community—so much so that informants from the Cointelpro days surmised she was probably Afro-Chinese.3 This connection to black America (and to a lesser degree the pan-African world) has made her a source of intrigue for younger generations grappling with the rising complexities of race and diversity. It has been sustained through both political commitments and personal relationships. Living in Detroit for more than a half century, Grace has developed a stature as one of Motown’s most cherished citizens: penning a weekly column for the city’s largest-circulation black community newspaper; regularly profiled in the mainstream and independent media; frequently receiving awards and honors through no solicitation of her own; constantly visited by students, intellectuals, and activists from around the world; and even speaking on behalf of her friend Rosa Parks after the civil rights icon became too frail for public appearances.
Grace Lee Boggs (The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-First Century)
Despite those risks, hypersexualization is ubiquitous, so visible as to be nearly invisible: it is the water in which girls swim, the air they breathe. Whatever else they might be—athletes, artists, scientists, musicians, newscasters, politicians—they learn that they must, as a female, first and foremost project sex appeal. Consider a report released by Princeton University in 2011 exploring the drop over the previous decade in public leadership positions held by female students. Among the reasons these über-elite young women gave for avoiding such roles was that being qualified was not enough. They needed to be “smart, driven, involved in many different activities (as are men), and, in addition, they are supposed to be pretty, sexy, thin, nice, and friendly.” Or, as one alumna put it, women had to “do everything, do it well, and look ‘hot’ while doing it.
Peggy Orenstein (Girls & Sex: Navigating the Complicated New Landscape)
help meet. But who said anything about what he deserves? You can only realize your womanhood when you are functioning according to your created nature. To covet his role of leadership is to covet something that will not make God, you, or him happy. It is not a question of whether or not you can do a better job than he; it is a matter of doing what you were “designed” to do. If you successfully do the job of leading the family, you will not find satisfaction in it. It is far better that the job be done poorly by your husband than to be done well by you. Your excellence as a help meet to him may very well be God’s plan for improving his leadership role in the family. Your female nature cannot be retrofitted to the male role without permanent damage to the original design.
Debi Pearl (Created to be His Help Meet)
In most part of the world, the notion of leadership is so masculine that most people will struggle to name one famous female business leader.
Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic (Why Do So Many Incompetent Men Become Leaders?: (And How to Fix It))
With this in mind, I’d started a leadership and mentoring program at the White House, inviting twenty sophomore and junior girls from high schools around Greater D.C. to join us for monthly get-togethers that included informal chats, field trips, and sessions on things like financial literacy and choosing a career. We kept the program largely behind closed doors, rather than thrusting these girls into the media fray. We paired each teen with a female mentor who would foster a personal relationship with her, sharing her resources and her life story. Valerie was a mentor. Cris Comerford, the White House’s first female executive chef, was a mentor. Jill Biden was, too, as were a number of senior women from both the East and the West Wing staffs. The students were nominated by their principals or guidance counselors and would stay with us until they graduated. We had girls from military families, girls from immigrant families, a teen mom, a girl who’d lived in a homeless shelter. They were smart, curious young women, all of them. No different from me. No different from my daughters. I watched over time as the girls formed friendships, finding a rapport with one another and with the adults around them. I spent hours talking with them in a big circle, munching popcorn and trading our thoughts about college applications, body image, and boys. No topic was off-limits. We ended up laughing a lot. More than anything, I hoped this was what they’d carry forward into the future—the ease, the sense of community, the encouragement to speak and be heard. My wish for them was the same one I had for Sasha and Malia—that in learning to feel comfortable at the White House, they’d go on to feel comfortable and confident in any room, sitting at any table, raising their voices inside any group.
Michelle Obama (Becoming)
When the book Lean In came out, urging women to step up their leadership in professional life, my initial response was, Oh brother! Women are already doing everything—now we also have to lean in? But all the talk about leaning in got me thinking about women who have had tremendous effects on this world and yet, like so many, haven’t gotten their due. I decided to adopt a hobby: Wherever I was lucky enough to travel, if a shrine dedicated to a female saint was nearby, I would take myself there and make of it what I could. From my grandfather Cassidy’s side of the family, my Catholic heritage goes back more than a thousand years. That is not an easy ship to jump from when the waters get rough, which they have been lately. In turning my eyes toward the women saints, I have found some fun, a lightness to the landscape where questions sprout everywhere—questions such as: So her body hasn’t decomposed? And she did what? With no money? And everybody said, no, no, no to her, but she did it anyway?
Mary Lea Carroll (Saint Everywhere: Travels in Search of the Lady Saints)
An alpha female is beautiful, confident, successful, takes care of herself and is use to leading in all areas of her personal and professional life. She is not going to tolerate half-ass effort, weakness, shy or timid men. She knows her worth, wants a true equal and will not settle for less than she knows she deserves. She has her choice with men and wants a man who has choice with women. The only way to attract an alpha female is to be at the top of your game in all areas of your personal and professional life. Not being intimidated by her beauty and sex appeal, confidence and to continually pass her tests of your strength to demonstrate through your example, that you are worthy. Only then will you exude the vibe and certainty that will make her feel safe and comfortable enough to willingly submit to your leadership of the relationship.
Corey Wayne
I must also underscore the important contribution of Latinas to Hispanic preaching. It is common to see Hispanic women in the púlpito, both in Latin America and in the United States. In part, this is an unlikely by-product of the racism that otherwise tainted missionary endeavors in Latin America and the Caribbean. As missions grew south of the border, missionaries were forced to delegate ministerial duties. Given their initial reticence to entrust pastoral work to locals, male missionaries usually turned to their wives and to single female missionaries. Unwittingly, these women became role models. Church members grew accustomed to female leadership in the local congregation and female presence in the púlpito. This led the second and third generations to appoint women as misioneras (lay preachers) and pastor as (local pastors) even in denominations that traditionally did not ordain women.
Pablo A. Jiménez (Pulpito: An Introduction to Hispanic Preaching)
The summits were about ambitious topics, such as, recently, leadership—leadership being something that everyone now wanted, as if the world could be made up entirely of leaders and no followers, the way children might crave an all-fireman, all-ballerina society.
Meg Wolitzer (The Female Persuasion)
Unapologetic Black Female Leaders think differently. We’re the few, fearless, strong, resilient, and NOT easily intimated Queens. Integrity, perseverance, and confidence run through our veins! We don’t have to cheat, lie, or manipulate to win. We impact, empower, and inspire ALL people for the betterment of the world. Our authenticity is what makes us POWERFUL and EXQUISITE. We are Black Women… The REAL game-changers!
Stephanie Lahart
Female or Male: Army officer's responsibilities, duties and leadership can only be expressed on the War ground. The government and the people of the country have a big role to play in the growth of army's morale. Indian Army will use its full power to protect the sovereignty of our states.
Srinivas Mishra
To compound the innovative nature of the new administration, Eleanor Roosevelt held her own first press conference at the same time that day. She made a rule that only female reporters could attend, which meant that all over the country conservative publishers had to hire their first female reporters. Indeed, because of Eleanor Roosevelt’s weekly press conferences, an entire generation of female journalists got their start.
Doris Kearns Goodwin (Leadership: In Turbulent Times)
It has become fashionable for modern workplaces to relax what are often seen as outmoded relics of a less egalitarian age: out with stuffy hierarchies, in with flat organisational structures. But the problem with the absence of a formal hierarchy is that it doesn’t actually result in an absence of a hierarchy altogether. It just means that the unspoken, implicit, profoundly non-egalitarian structure reasserts itself, with white men at the top and the rest of us fighting for a piece of the small space left for everyone else. Group-discussion approaches like brainstorming, explains female leadership trainer Gayna Williams, are ‘well known to be loaded with challenges for diverse representation’, because already-dominant voices dominate.
Caroline Criado Pérez (Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men)
Joan of Arc had an intuitive grasp of the value of symbolism in leadership. Symbols speak loudly about personal (and corporate) identity and endow what they symbolize with deep meaning. So Joan cut her hair to symbolize the female warrior in the company of men. She wore armor to symbolize her oneness with her soldiers. She had priests lead the troops in processions before battles to symbolize the holiness of their mission. She dictated aggressive letters to demand the surrender of her enemies as well as pleading letters to her countrymen to exhort them to join the cause more fervently. What is a letter if not a symbol of a soul’s thoughts and aspirations put down to paper?
Peter Darcy (The 7 Leadership Virtues of Joan of Arc (Life Changing Classic, Volume 32) (Life-Changing Classic))
Questions and Topics for Discussion This book is written in an oral history format. Why do you think the author chose to structure the book this way? How does this approach affect your reading experience? At one point Daisy says, “I was just supposed to be the inspiration for some man’s great idea….I had absolutely no interest in being somebody else’s muse.” How does her experience of being used by others contribute to the decisions she makes when she joins The Six? Why do you think Billy has such a strong need to control the group, both early on when they are simply the Dunne Brothers and later when they become Daisy Jones & The Six? There are two sets of brothers in The Six: Eddie and Pete Loving, and Billy and Graham Dunne. How do these sibling relationships affect the band? Daisy, Camila, Simone, and Karen are each very different embodiments of female strength and creativity. Who are you most drawn to and why? Billy and Daisy become polarizing figures for the band. Who in the book gravitates more toward Billy’s leadership, and who is more inclined to follow Daisy’s way of doing things? How do these alliances change over time, and how does this dynamic upset the group’s balance? Why do you think Billy and Daisy clash so strongly? What misunderstandings between them are revealed through the “author’s” investigation? What do you think of Camila’s decision to stand by Billy, despite the ways that he has hurt her through his trouble with addiction and wavering faithfulness?
Taylor Jenkins Reid (Daisy Jones & The Six)
Men of all ages must commit to changing the leadership ratios. They can start by actively seeking out qualified female candidates to hire and promote. And if qualified candidates cannot be found, then we need to invest in more recruiting, mentoring, and sponsoring so women can get the necessary experience.
Sheryl Sandberg (Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead)
I experience Mormondom to be a warm and beautiful and well-appointed home in which you suddenly find you're in a Patriarchy Funhouse that features crazy, rippling distortion mirrors built to magnify maleness and diminish femaleness. It's males who sit in the seats of authority, from God in his heaven on down to the leadership in Salt Lake City and out to every spot on the globe where Mormons congregate. It's males we pray to and pray through. It's males that preside at the pulpit. It's males that pray over and pass the sacrament, the tokens of the Lord's supper, and officiate in all other ordinances. It's males (nearly always) whose portriats hang on the walls of our chapels and whose faces appear on the covers of our class manuals. It's males who pronounce every doctrine and policy from church headquarters. It's males we read about in most of the Old Testament, and in ninety-nine percent of the Book of Mormon. (Thank you, Jesus of the New Testament, for being such a radical revolutionary, violating tradition, speaking of and to women, treating them as fully human.)
Carol Lynn Pearson (The Ghost of Eternal Polygamy: Haunting the Hearts and Heaven of Mormon Women and Men)
All businesses begin and end with their company culture.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
The what to do can be taught; the how to do it is not as easy to pass on to someone who simply doesn’t “get it.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
If your culture is how you do business internally, your brand is what people believe about you externally.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
You can’t be “it” for everyone. In fact, if you try to please everyone, you will please no one, especially yourself.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
You’ve got to get your team to not only understand your company brand, but also to understand their personal brand.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
Your company culture is made up of the family rules of your business that establish consistent expectations among all.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
When you create a company culture, you are drawing your lines in the sand for you, first & then for anyone else who does business with you.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
You want how you do business to be consistent among all team members, including partners, management, employees, and even vendors.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
Your company culture is the internal foundation on which everything in your business builds.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
To gain your share of the market, you must show how your company is different and how your culture produces a unique experience for your customers, leaving no room for competition. And that, Bombshell, is your brand.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
Your brand is what your customers and potential customers think about you; your culture is who you say you are and how you do business.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
While a mission statement speaks to why a company exists, a vision statement communicates what you want to accomplish in the future.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
Values are the measuring stick for how you make decisions in business: goal setting, employee conduct, recognition, discipline—everything.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
Treat your employees like you would want to be treated if you were an employee.
Amber Hurdle (The Bombshell Business Woman: How to Become a Bold, Brave, and Successful Female Entrepreneur)
Women are no sheep.
Abhijit Naskar (The Bengal Tigress: A Treatise on Gender Equality (Humanism Series))
I’m glad that this team has a woman for a leader,” Onoria finally said. Regina didn’t quite know how to reply. “I’m fed up with men in charge not knowing what they’re talking about.” Onoria turned towards Regina. “Aren’t you?” “I don’t like people in charge that don’t know what they’re doing, male or female,” Regina said.
Alex Avrio (The Alchemist's Box (Merchant Blades, #1))
Many of the battles these women fought are still relevant. Almost thirty years ago, Antonia Fraser, in her groundbreaking book Boadicea’s Chariot, traced the line of ‘warrior queens’ from the ancient world to the Iron Lady. She identified several tropes of female leadership-the Chaste Syndrome and the Voracity Syndrome, the role of a woman as Holy (Armed) Figurehead or Peacemaker-and traced them from Celtic mythology and the Roman Empire to the female leaders of her own day: Golda Meir, Margaret Thatcher, Indira Gandhi.
Sarah Gristwood (Game of Queens: The Women Who Made Sixteenth-Century Europe)
Tell them about your blog. What is your blog about? Try to narrow it down to a theme. For example, my theme is intentional leadership. Next explain what kinds of things you write about. I think it is best to limit yourself to a handful of categories. The more focused your content, the more readers you will attract. Kate McCulley’s About page on Adventurous Kate’s Solo Female 104 Travel Blog gives a few fun facts about Kate (she has been shipwrecked and once made a pass at Jon Stewart; she quit her job to travel the world), and then dives right into her theme: I am a solo traveler at heart, and one of my goals is to show women that solo travel can be safe, easy, cheap and a lot of fun. Meanwhile, I’m committed to showing you what the lifestyle of a long-term traveler and online entrepreneur is like. Like anyone else in the world, I have good times and bad times, but I promise to show you reality—with honesty and humor.3
Michael Hyatt (Platform: Get Noticed in a Noisy World)
You can't live an extraordinary life with an extraordinary mindset.
H.L. Balcomb
We mature not by age, but by stories.
Hermy L McCabe
You can't lead an extraordinary life with an ordinary mindset.
H.L. Balcomb (Cinderella In Focus: "Finding hope when you're feeling a sense of hopelessness!")
Many people believed that it was Julio Antonio Mella’s oversized ego that motivated him, but others said that he really was sincere and believed that he could bring about significant changes by his demands. There were also a number of female students known for being political radicals, who played an important part in shaping Julio’s life at that time. Rosario Guillauma (Charito) and Sarah Pascual were both close friends of Julio, as well as being fellow travelers. The overt communist cell at the University of Havana continued to grow dramatically under his leadership and many of the university students became active members of the party. Although, during the time he was at the university he was linked to women radicals and was married to Oliva Zaldivar Freyre. However, following his marriage, it was Tina Modotti, a movie star, model, notorious spy and renowned photographer who became the love of his life!
Hank Bracker
like The Rise of the Female Executive: How Women’s Leadership is Accelerating Cultural Change, written by Peninah
Sylvia Becker-Hill (12 Leadership Powers for Successful Women (Instant Insights))
Women face a persistent double bind when it comes to their leadership capabilities—she has a higher chance of being liked if she behaves in a “feminine” way, but she’s probably not respected or seen as a leader. If she operates in a “masculine” way, however, she’s more likely to be called names like “bossy” (or worse) and disliked. What’s alarming is that if a company already has one female executive leader, another woman’s chances of landing one of the organization’s five highest-paid executive positions falls by 51%, research finds.
Ruchika Tulshyan (The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality In the Workplace)
Management is efficiency in climbing the ladder of success; leadership determines whether the ladder is leaning against the right wall.
Jemma Roedel (She Thinks Like a Boss : Leadership: 9 Essential Skills for New Female Leaders in Business and the Workplace. How to Influence Teams Effectively and Combat Imposter Syndrome)
Leaders think and talk about the solutions. Followers think and talk about the problems.” ​— ​Brian Tracy, Canadian-American motivational speaker, and self-development author
Jemma Roedel (She Thinks Like a Boss : Leadership: 9 Essential Skills for New Female Leaders in Business and the Workplace. How to Influence Teams Effectively and Combat Imposter Syndrome)
As leaders you can never tell people that they are empowered, all you can do is to create the environment and give people the skills and tools to enable them to grow. You feel valued for the part that you play and from that you breed loyalty. Loyalty not only to the team, the leadership, but to the organisation as a whole.
Mandy Hickson (An Officer, Not a Gentleman: The Inspirational Journey of a Pioneering Female Fighter Pilot)