Dune Muad'dib Quotes

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Deep in the human unconscious is a pervasive need for a logical universe that makes sense. But the real universe is always one step beyond logic.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
What do you despise? By this are you truly known.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
There is no escape—we pay for the violence of our ancestors.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
There should be a science of discontent. People need hard times to develop psychic muscles. -- Muad'Dib
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
Empires do not suffer emptiness of purpose at the time of their creation. It is when they have become established that aims are lost and replaced by vague ritual. -Words of Muad'dib by Princess Irulan.
Frank Herbert (Dune Messiah (Dune Chronicles, #2))
Muad'Dib learned rapidly because his first training was in how to learn. And the first lesson of all was the basic trust that he could learn. It's shocking to find how many people do not believe they can learn, and how many more believe learning to be difficult. Muad'Dib knew that every experience carries its lesson.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
The problem of leadership is inevitably: Who will play God?" Muad'Dib
Frank Herbert (God Emperor of Dune (Dune #4))
Many have marked the speed with which Muad'Dib learned the necessities of Arrakis. The Bene Gesserit, of course, know the basis of this speed. For the others, we can say that Muad'Dib learned rapidly because his first training was in how to learn. And the first lesson of all was the basic trust that he could learn. It is shocking to find how many people do not believe they can learn, and how many more believe learning to be difficult. Muad'Dib knew that every experience carries its lesson.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
There was a man so wise, He jumped into A sandy place And burnt out both his eyes! And when he knew his eyes were gone, He offered no complaint. He summoned up a vision And made himself a saint. -Children's Verse from History of Muad'dib
Frank Herbert (Dune Messiah (Dune Chronicles, #2))
Abandon certainty! That's life's deepest command. That's what life's all about. We're a probe into the unknown, into the uncertain. Why can't you hear Muad'Dib? If certainty is knowing absolutely an absolute future, then that's only death disguised! Such a future becomes now!
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune #3))
You who have defeated us say to yourselves that Babylon is fallen and its works have been overturned. I say to you still that man remains on trial, each man in his own dock. Each man is a little war.
Frank Herbert
My brother comes now," Alia said. "Even an Emperor may tremble before Muad'Dib, for he has the strength of righteousness and heaven smiles upon him.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
You can’t stop a mental epidemic. It leaps from person to person across parsecs. It’s overwhelmingly contagious. It strikes at the unprotected side, in the place where we lodge the fragments of other such plagues. Who can stop such a thing? Muad’dib hasn’t the antidote. The thing has roots in chaos. Can orders reach there?
Frank Herbert (Dune Messiah (Dune Chronicles, #2))
Once more the drama begins.' — The Emperor Paul Muad'dib on his ascension to the Lion Throne.
Frank Herbert (Dune Messiah (Dune Chronicles, #2))
There should be a science of discontent. People need hard times and oppression to develop psychic muscles. --from "Collected Sayings of Muad'Dib" by the Princess Irulan
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
Even an Emperor may tremble before Muad’Dib, for he has the strength of righteousness and heaven smiles upon him.
Frank Herbert (Dune)
There exists no separation between gods and men; one blends softly casual into the other. —Proverbs of Muad’Dib
Frank Herbert (Dune Messiah (Dune Chronicles, #2))
I realize that humans cannot bear very much reality. Most lives are a flight from selfhood. Most prefer the truths of the stable. You stick your heads into the stanchions and munch contentedly until you die. Others use you for their purposes. Not once do you live outside the stable to lift your head and be your own creature. Muad'Dib came to tell you about that. Without understanding his message, you cannot revere him!
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune #3))
There is no measuring Muad'Dib's motives by ordinary standards. In the moment of his triumph, he saw the death prepared for him, yet he accepted the treachery. Can you say he did this out of a sense of justice? Whose justice, then? Remember, we speak now of the Muad'Dib who ordered battle drums made from his enemies' skins, the Muad'Dib who denied the conventions of his ducal past with a wave of the hand, saying merely: 'I am the Kwisatz Haderach. That is reason enough.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
You, Priest in your mufti, you are a chaplain to the self-satisfied. I come not to challenge Muad'Dib but to challenge you! Is your religion real when it costs you nothing and carries no risk? Is your religion real when you fatten upon it? Is your religion real when you commit atrocities in its name? Whence comes your downward degeneration from the original revelation? Answer me, Priest!
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune #3))
It is said of Muad’Dib that once when he saw a weed trying to grow between two rocks, he moved one of the rocks. Later, when the weed was seen to be flourishing, he covered it with the remaining rock. “That was its fate,” he explained.
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))
Prophecy and prescience—How can they be put to the test in the face of the unanswered question? Consider: How much is actual prediction of the “wave form” (as Muad’Dib referred to his vision-image) and how much is the prophet shaping the future to fit the prophecy? What of the harmonics inherent in the act of prophecy? Does the prophet see the future or does he see a line of weakness, a fault or cleavage that he may shatter with words or decisions as a diamond-cutter shatters his gem with a blow of a knife?
Frank Herbert (Dune)
They'll call me Muad'Dib, 'The One Who Points the Way'.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
Muad’Dib must always be that inner outrage against the complacently powerful, against the charlatans and the dogmatic fanatics. It is that inner outrage which must have its say because Muad’Dib taught us one thing above all others: that humans can endure only in a fraternity of social justice.
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))
The universe is just there; that’s the only way a Fedaykin can view it and remain the master of his senses. The universe neither threatens nor promises. It holds things beyond our sway: the fall of a meteor, the eruption of a spiceblow, growing old and dying. These are the realities of this universe and they must be faced regardless of how you feel about them. You cannot fend off such realities with words. They will come at you in their own wordless way and then, then you will understand what is meant by “life and death.” Understanding this, you will be filled with joy. —MUAD’DIB TO HIS FEDAYKIN
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))
How do we approach the study of Muad’Dib’s father? A man of surpassing warmth and surprising coldness was the Duke Leto Atreides. Yet, many facts open the way to this Duke: his abiding love for his Bene Gesserit lady; the dreams he held for his son; the devotion with which men served him. You see him there—a man snared by Destiny, a lonely figure with his light dimmed behind the glory of his son. Still, one must ask: What is the son but an extension of the father?
Frank Herbert (Dune)
I come only to ask a simple question. Is Muad'Dib's death to be followed by the moral suicide of all men? Is that the inevitable aftermath of a Messiah?
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune #3))
She didn’t like the fact that people of both sietch and graben referred to Muad’Dib as Him.
Frank Herbert (Dune)
Yes. They’ll call me…Muad’Dib, ‘The One Who Points the Way.’ Yes…that’s what they’ll call me.” And
Frank Herbert (Dune)
Leto spoke the truth: Muad’Dib had changed all that. Stilgar felt lost.
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))
Muad'dib rules everywhere," he said. "Arrakis is not my destination," she insisted. "Arrakis is the destination of everyone," he said.
Frank Herbert (Dune Messiah (Dune Chronicles, #2))
Dios creó Arrakis para probar a los fieles. De La sabiduría de Muad’Dib, por la princesa Irulan
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
Muad’Dib: “If a child, an untrained person, an ignorant person, or an insane person incites trouble, it is the fault of authority for not predicting and preventing that trouble.” O.C.
Frank Herbert (Dune)
You know the myth of the Great Spice Hoard? Yes, I know about that story, too. A majordomo brought it to me one day to amuse me. The story says there is a hoard of melange, a gigantic hoard, big as a great mountain. The hoard is concealed in the depths of a distant planet. It is not Arrakis, that planet. It is not Dune. The spice was hidden there long ago, even before the First Empire and the Spacing Guild. The story says Paul-Muad’Dib went there and lives yet beside the hoard, kept alive by it, waiting. The majordomo did not understand why the story disturbed me.
Frank Herbert (God Emperor of Dune (Dune Chronicles, #4))
I will tell you a thing about your new name,” Stilgar said. “The choice pleases us. Muad’Dib is wise in the ways of the desert. Muad’Dib creates his own water. Muad’Dib hides from the sun and travels in the cool night. Muad’Dib is fruitful and multiplies over the land. Muad’Dib we call ‘instructor-of-boys.’ That is a powerful base on which to build your life, Paul-Muad’Dib, who is Usul among us. We welcome you.” Stilgar
Frank Herbert (Dune)
And again he remembered the vision of fanatic legions following the green and black banner of the Atreides, pillaging and burning across the universe in the name of their prophet Muad’Dib. That must not happen, he told himself.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
How do you call among you the little mouse, the mouse that jumps?” Paul asked, remembering the pop-hop of motion at Tuono Basin. He illustrated with one hand. A chuckle sounded through the troop. “We call that one muad’dib,” Stilgar said. Jessica
Frank Herbert (Dune)
Is that the name you wish, Muad’Dib?” Stilgar asked. “I am an Atreides,” Paul whispered, and then louder: “It’s not right that I give up entirely the name my father gave me. Could I be known among you as Paul-Muad’Dib?” “You are Paul-Muad’Dib,” Stilgar said. And
Frank Herbert (Dune)
Many have remarked the speed with which Muad’Dib learned the necessities of Arrakis. The Bene Gesserit, of course, know the basis of this speed. For the others, we can say that Muad’Dib learned rapidly because his first training was in how to learn. And the first lesson of all was the basic trust that he could learn. It is shocking to find how many people do not believe they can learn, and how many more believe learning to be difficult. Muad’Dib knew that every experience carries its lesson. —FROM “THE HUMANITY OF MUAD’DIB” BY THE PRINCESS IRULAN
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
we can say that Muad’Dib learned rapidly because his first training was in how to learn. And the first lesson of all was the basic trust that he could learn. It is shocking to find how many people do not believe they can learn, and how many more believe learning to be difficult. Muad
Frank Herbert (Dune)
The flesh surrenders itself, he thought. Eternity takes back its own. Our bodies stirred these waters briefly, danced with a certain intoxication before the love of life and self, dealt with a few strange ideas, then submitted to the instruments of Time. What can we say of this? I occurred. I am not... yet, I occurred.
Frank Herbert (Dune Messiah (Dune, #2))
For the others, we can say that Muad’Dib learned rapidly because his first training was in how to learn. And the first lesson of all was the basic trust that he could learn. It is shocking to find how many people do not believe they can learn, and how many more believe learning to be difficult. Muad’Dib knew that every experience carries its lesson.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
For the others, we can say that Muad’Dib learned rapidly because his first training was in how to learn. And the first lesson of all was the basic trust that he could learn. It is shocking to find how many people do not believe they can learn, and how many more believe learning to be difficult. Muad’Dib knew that every experience carries its lesson. —
Frank Herbert (Dune)
The spirit of Muad’Dib is more than words, more than the letter of the Law which arises in his name. Muad’Dib must always be that inner outrage against the complacently powerful, against the charlatans and the dogmatic fanatics. It is that inner outrage which must have its say because Muad’Dib taught us one thing above all others: that humans can endure only in a fraternity of social justice.
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))
Muad’dib’s Jihad was less than an eye-blink in this larger movement. The Bene Gesserit swimming in this tide, that corporate entity trading in genes, was trapped in the torrent as he was. Visions of a falling moon must be measured against other legends, other visions in a universe where even the seemingly eternal stars waned, flickered, died . . . What mattered a single moon in such a universe? Far
Frank Herbert (Dune Messiah (Dune Chronicles, #2))
Atrocity is recognized as such by victim and perpetrator alike, by all who learn about it at whatever remove. Atrocity has no excuses, no mitigating argument. Atrocity never balances or rectifies the past. Atrocity merely arms the future for more atrocity. It is self-perpetuating upon itself—a barbarous form of incest. Whoever commits atrocity also commits those future atrocities thus bred. —THE APOCRYPHA OF MUAD’DIB
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))
Paul swallowed. He felt that he played a part already played over countless times in his mind…yet…there were differences. He could see himself perched on a dizzying summit, having experienced much and possessed of a profound store of knowledge, but all around him was abyss. And again he remembered the vision of fanatic legions following the green and black banner of the Atreides, pillaging and burning across the universe in the name of their prophet Muad’Dib. That must not happen, he told himself.
Frank Herbert (Dune)
The convoluted wording of legalisms grew up around the necessity to hide from ourselves the violence we intend toward each other. Between depriving a man of one hour from his life and depriving him of his life there exists only a difference of degree. You have done violence to him, consumed his energy. Elaborate euphemisms may conceal your intent to kill, but behind any use of power over another the ultimate assumption remains: “I feed on your energy.” —ADDENDA TO ORDERS IN COUNCIL THE EMPEROR PAUL MUAD’DIB
Frank Herbert (Dune Messiah (Dune Chronicles, #2))
Many forces sought control of the Atreides twins and, when the death of Leto was announced, this movement of plot and counterplot was amplified. Note the relative motivations: the Sisterhood feared Alia, an adult Abomination, but still wanted those genetic characteristics carried by the Atreides. The Church hierarchy of Auquaf and Hajj saw only the power implicit in control of Muad'Dib's heir. CHOAM wanted a doorway to the wealth of Dune. Farad'n and his Sardaukar sought a return to glory for House Corrino. The Spacing Guild feared the equation Arrakis=melange; without the spice they could not navigate. Jessica wished to repair what her disobedience to the Bene Gesserit had created. Few thought to ask the twins what their plans might be, until it was too late. -The Book of Kreos
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))
Muad’Dib could indeed see the Future, but you must understand the limits of this power. Think of sight. You have eyes, yet cannot see without light. If you are on the floor of a valley, you cannot see beyond your valley. Just so, Muad’Dib could not always choose to look across the mysterious terrain. He tells us that a single obscure decision of prophecy, perhaps the choice of one word over another, could change the entire aspect of the future. He tells us “The vision of time is broad, but when you pass through it, time becomes a narrow door.” And always, he fought the temptation to choose a clear, safe course, warning “That path leads ever down into stagnation.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
People always expect the worst of the rich and powerful, Sire. It is said one can always tell an aristocrat: he reveals only those of his vices which will make him popular.
Frank Herbert (Dune Messiah (Dune, #2))
Either we abandon the long-honored Theory of Relativity, or we cease to believe that we can engage in continued accurate prediction of the future. Indeed, knowing the future raises a host of questions which cannot be answered under conventional assumptions unless one first projects an Observer outside of Time and, second, nullifies all movement. If you accept the Theory of Relativity, it can be shown that Time and the Observer must stand still in relationship to each or inaccuracies will intervene. This would seem to say that it is impossible to engage in accurate prediction of the future. How, then, do we explain the continued seeking after this visionary goal by respected scientists? How, then, do we explain Muad’Dib? —LECTURES ON PRESCIENCE BY HARQ AL-ADA
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))
we can say that Muad’Dib learned rapidly because his first training was in how to learn. And the first lesson of all was the basic trust that he could learn. It is shocking to find how many people do not believe they can learn, and how many more believe learning to be difficult. Muad’Dib knew that every experience carries its lesson.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
On that first day when Muad’Dib rode through the streets of Arrakeen with his family, some of the people along the way recalled the legends and the prophecy and they ventured to shout: “Mahdi!” But their shout was more a question than a statement, for as yet they could only hope he was the one foretold as the Lisan al-Gaib, the Voice from the Outer World. Their attention was focused, too, on the mother, because they had heard she was a Bene Gesserit and it was obvious to them that she was like the other Lisan al-Gaib.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
It is shocking to find how many people do not believe they can learn, and how many more believe learning to be difficult. Muad’Dib
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
Many have remarked the speed with which Muad’Dib learned the necessities of Arrakis. The Bene Gesserit, of course, know the basis of this speed. For the others, we can say that Muad’Dib learned rapidly because his first training was in how to learn. And the first lesson of all was the basic trust that he could learn. It is shocking to find how many people do not believe they can learn, and how many more believe learning to be difficult. Muad’Dib knew that every experience carries its lesson.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
And the first lesson of all was the basic trust that he could learn. It is shocking to find how many people do not believe they can learn, and how many more believe learning to be difficult. Muad’Dib knew that every experience carries its lesson.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
Así habló Santa Alia del Cuchillo: «La Reverenda Madre debe combinar las artes de seducción de una cortesana con la intocable majestad de una diosa virgen, manteniendo estos atributos en tensión tanto tiempo como subsistan los poderes de su juventud. Pues una vez se hayan ido belleza y juventud, descubrirá que el lugar intermedio ocupado antes por la tensión se ha convertido en una fuente de astucia y de recursos infinitos.» De «Muad’Dib,
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
The concept of progress acts as a protective mechanism to shield us from the terrors of the future. —FROM “COLLECTED SAYINGS OF MUAD’DIB
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
Para los demás, diremos que Muad’Dib aprendió rápidamente porque la primera enseñanza que recibió fue la certeza básica de que podía aprender. Es horrible pensar cómo tanta gente cree que no puede aprender, y cómo más gente aún cree que el aprender es difícil. Muad’Dib sabía que cada experiencia lleva en sí misma su lección.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
How often it is that the angry man rages denial of what his inner self is telling him. —FROM “COLLECTED SAYINGS OF MUAD’DIB
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
And … someday … Deep in the human unconscious is a pervasive need for a logical universe that makes sense. But the real universe is always one step beyond logic. —from “The Sayings of Muad’Dib” by the Princess Irulan
Frank Herbert (Dune: The Gateway Collection (Dune Chronicles #1-6))
beginning is the time for taking the most delicate care that the balances are correct. This every sister of the Bene Gesserit knows. To begin your study of the life of Muad’Dib, then, take care that you first place him in his time: born in the 57th year of the Padishah Emperor, Shaddam IV. And take the most special care that you locate Muad’Dib in his place: the planet Arrakis. Do not be deceived by the fact that he was born on Caladan and lived his first fifteen years there. Arrakis, the planet known as Dune, is forever his place. —FROM “MANUAL OF MUAD’DIB” BY THE PRINCESS IRULAN
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
Empires do not suffer emptiness of purpose at the time of their creation. It is when they have become established that aims are lost and replaced by vague ritual. —WORDS OF MUAD’DIB BY PRINCESS IRULAN
Frank Herbert (Dune Messiah (Dune Chronicles, #2))
To attempt an understanding of Muad’Dib without understanding his mortal enemies, the Harkonnens, is to attempt seeing Truth without knowing Falsehood. It is the attempt to see the Light without knowing Darkness. It cannot be. —FROM “MANUAL OF MUAD’DIB” BY THE PRINCESS IRULAN
Frank Herbert (Dune)
He thought: Jessica, mother of Muad’Dib and grandmother of these royal twins, returns to our planet today. Why does she end her self-imposed exile at this time? Why does she leave the softness and security of Caladan for the dangers of Arrakis?
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))
He was warrior and mystic, ogre and saint, the fox and the innocent, chivalrous, ruthless, less than a god, more than a man. There is no measuring Muad’Dib’s motives by ordinary standards. In the moment of his triumph, he saw the death prepared for him, yet he accepted the treachery.
Frank Herbert (Dune)
Para los demás, diremos que Muad’Dib aprendió rápidamente porque lo primero que le enseñaron fueron los fundamentos del aprendizaje. Y la primera lección, la certeza de que podía aprender. Es perturbador descubrir que mucha gente cree que no puede aprender, y que más gente aún cree que aprender es difícil.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
When law and duty are one, united by religion, you never become fully conscious, fully aware of yourself. You are always a little less than an individual. —FROM “MUAD’DIB: THE NINETY-NINE WONDERS OF THE UNIVERSE” BY THE PRINCESS IRULAN
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
Existe un límite a la fuerza que hasta los más poderosos pueden aplicar sin destruirse a sí mismos. Calcular dicho límite es el auténtico arte de gobernar. El mal uso del poder es un pecado fatal. La ley no puede ser un instrumento de venganza, nunca un rehén y tampoco un refugio contra los mártires que ha creado. Uno no puede amenazar a un individuo y librarse de las consecuencias. Muad’Dib sobre la ley, Comentarios de Stilgar
Frank Herbert (El mesías de Dune (Dune, # 2))
Muad’Dib: “If a child, an untrained person, an ignorant person, or an insane person incites trouble, it is the fault of authority for not predicting and preventing that trouble.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
Muad’Dib knew that every experience carries its lesson.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
My father once told me that respect for the truth comes close to being the basis for all morality. “Something cannot emerge from nothing,” he said. This is profound thinking if you understand how unstable “the truth” can be. —FROM “CONVERSATIONS WITH MUAD’DIB” BY THE PRINCESS IRULAN
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
The problem of leadership is inevitably: Who will play God? —MUAD’DIB, FROM THE ORAL HISTORY
Frank Herbert (God Emperor of Dune (Dune, #4))
I will tell you a thing about your new name,” Stilgar said. “The choice pleases us. Muad’Dib is wise in the ways of the desert. Muad’Dib creates his own water. Muad’Dib hides from the sun and travels in the cool night. Muad’Dib is fruitful and multiplies over the land. Muad’Dib we call ‘instructor-of-boys.’ That is a powerful base on which to build your life, Paul-Muad’Dib, who is Usul among us. We welcome you.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
What do you despise? By this are you truly known. —FROM “MANUAL OF MUAD’DIB” BY THE PRINCESS IRULAN
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
Remember, we speak now of the Muad’Dib who ordered battle drums made from his enemies’ skins, the Muad’Dib who denied the conventions of his ducal past with a wave of the hand, saying merely: “I am the Kwisatz Haderach. That is reason enough.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
Among the dangerous leaders of human history, my father sometimes mentioned General George S. Patton because of his charismatic qualities—but more often his example was President John F. Kennedy. Around Kennedy, a myth of kingship had formed, and of Camelot. The handsome young president’s followers did not question him and would have gone virtually anywhere he led them. This danger seems obvious to us now in the cases of such men as Adolf Hitler, whose powerful magnetism led his nation into ruination. It is less obvious, however, with men who are not deranged or evil in and of themselves—such as Kennedy, or the fictional Paul Muad’Dib, whose danger lay in the religious myth structure around him and what people did in his name.
Frank Herbert (Dune Messiah (Dune Chronicles, #2))
How often it is that the angry man rages denial of what his inner self is telling him. —FROM “COLLECTED SAYINGS OF MUAD’DIB” BY THE PRINCESS IRULAN
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
Deep in the human unconscious is a pervasive need for a logical universe that makes sense. But the real universe is always one step beyond logic. —FROM “THE SAYINGS OF MUAD’DIB” BY THE PRINCESS IRULAN
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
we can say that Muad’Dib learned rapidly because his first training was in how to learn. And the first lesson of all was the basic trust that he could learn. It is shocking to find how many people do not believe they can learn, and how many more believe learning to be difficult.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
The Fremen were supreme in that quality the ancients called “spannungsbogen”—which is the self-imposed delay between desire for a thing and the act of reaching out to grasp that thing. —FROM “THE WISDOM OF MUAD’DIB” BY THE PRINCESS IRULAN
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
Do you wrestle with dreams? Do you contend with shadows? Do you move in a kind of sleep? Time has slipped away. Your life is stolen. You tarried with trifles, Victim of your folly. —DIRGE FOR JAMIS ON THE FUNERAL PLAIN, FROM “SONGS OF MUAD’DIB” BY THE PRINCESS IRULAN
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
«Arrakis enseña la actitud del cuchillo... cortar lo que es incompleto y decir: Ahora ya está completo porque acaba aquí» De Frases escogidas de Muad'Dib, por la Princesa Irulan.
Frank Herbert
I give you Muad’Dib’s words! He said, ‘I’m going to rub your faces in things you try to avoid. I don’t find it strange that all you want to believe is only that which comforts you. How else do humans invent the traps which betray us into mediocrity? How else do we define cowardice?’ That’s what Muad’Dib told you!
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))
It is said of Muad’Dib that once when he saw a weed trying to grow between two rocks, he moved one of the rocks. Later, when the weed was seen to be flourishing, he covered it with the remaining rock. “That was its fate,” he explained. —THE COMMENTARIES
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))
Paul strode through the main entrance with Gurney Halleck and Stilgar a pace behind. Their escort fanned out into the Great Hall, straightening the place and clearing an area for Muad’Dib. One squad began investigating that no sly trap had been planted here.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
El universo está simplemente allí; esa es la única forma en que un Fedaykin puede imaginarlo y permanecer dueño de sus sentidos. El universo ni amenaza ni promete. Contiene cosas más allá de nuestro dominio: la caída de un meteoro, la erupción de una masa de especia, cosas que crecen y mueren. Esas son las realidades de este universo y deben afrontarse independientemente de lo que uno sienta por ellas. Uno no puede apartarlas de su lado. Se precipitarán contra uno a su silenciosa manera y entonces, solo entonces, uno comprenderá lo que significan «vida y muerte». Y al comprenderlo, uno se sentirá colmado de alegría. Muad'Dib a sus Fedaykin
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))
God created Arrakis to train the faithful. —FROM “THE WISDOM OF MUAD’DIB” BY THE PRINCESS IRULAN
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
There exists a limit to the force even the most powerful may apply without destroying themselves. Judging this limit is the true artistry of government. Misuse of power is the fatal sin. The law cannot be a tool of vengeance, never a hostage, nor a fortification against the martyrs it has created. You cannot threaten any individual and escape the consequences. —MUAD’DIB ON LAW FROM THE STILGAR COMMENTARY
Frank Herbert (Dune Messiah (Dune Chronicles, #2))
Atrocity never balances or rectifies the past. Atrocity merely arms the future for more atrocity. It is self-perpetuating upon itself—a barbarous form of incest. Whoever commits atrocity also commits those future atrocities thus bred. —THE APOCRYPHA OF MUAD’DIB
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))
There is probably no more terrible instant of enlightenment than the one in which you discover your father is a man—with human flesh. —FROM “COLLECTED SAYINGS OF MUAD’DIB” BY THE PRINCESS IRULAN
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
He nodded. “Yes. They’ll call me…Muad’Dib, ‘The One Who Points the Way.’ Yes…that’s what they’ll call me.” And he closed his eyes, thinking: Now, my father, I can mourn you. And he felt the tears coursing down his cheeks.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
For the others, we can say that Muad’Dib learned rapidly because his first training was in how to learn.
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
When your actions describe a system of evil consequences, you should be judged by those consequences and not by your explanations. It is thus we should judge Muad'Dib.
Frank Herbert (Dune Messiah (Dune, #2))
When law and duty are one, united by religion, you never become fully conscious, fully aware of yourself. You are always a little less than an individual. -From "Muad'Dib: The Ninety-Nine Wonders of the Universe" by The Princess Irulan
Frank Herbert (Dune (Dune, #1))
Muad'Dib gave us a particular kind of knowledge about prophetic insight, about the behaviour which surrounds such insight and its influence upon events whcih are seen to be "on line." (That is, events which are set to occur in a related system which the prophet reveals and interprets.) As has been noted elsewhere, such insight operates as a peculiar trap for the prophet himself. He can become the victim of what he knows — which is a relatively common human failing.
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))
Muad'Dib gave us a particular kind of knowledge about prophetic insight, about the behaviour which surrounds such insight and its influence upon events which are seen to be "on line." (That is, events which are set to occur in a related system which the prophet reveals and interprets.) As has been noted elsewhere, such insight operates as a peculiar trap for the prophet himself. He can become the victim of what he knows — which is a relatively common human failing.
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))
Debería existir una ciencia del descontento. La gente necesita tiempos difíciles y de opresión para desarrollar sus músculos físicos. · —De Frases escogidas de Muad’Dib, por la princesa Irulan
Frank Herbert (Dune)
Holding pens. You sell sandtrout and worms off-planet.” “It was Muad’Dib’s suggestion!” “I know. But none of your worms or sandtrout survive for long away from Dune.” “Not yet,” Muriz said. “But someday . . .” “Not in ten thousand years,” Leto said.
Frank Herbert (Children of Dune (Dune, #3))