Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde Quotes

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Quiet minds cannot be perplexed or frightened but go on in fortune or misfortune at their own private pace, like a clock during a thunderstorm.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
If he be Mr. Hyde" he had thought, "I shall be Mr. Seek.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
If I am the chief of sinners, I am the chief of sufferers also.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
It is one thing to mortify curiosity, another to conquer it.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
You put me through hell. On purpose. Made me suffer. And there’s no end in sight. I don’t know what the fuck you’re doing, ace, but this Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde shit ain’t cutting it with me.
Sylvia Day (Reflected in You (Crossfire, #2))
You must suffer me to go my own dark way.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I learned to recognise the thorough and primitive duality of man; I saw that, of the two natures that contended in the field of my consciousness, even if I could rightly be said to be either, it was only because I was radically both.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
With every day, and from both sides of my intelligence, the moral and the intellectual, I thus drew steadily nearer to the truth, by whose partial discovery I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck: that man is not truly one, but truly two.
Robert Louis Stevenson (L'estrany cas del Dr. Jekyll i Mr. Hyde)
I sat in the sun on a bench; the animal within me licking the chops of memory; the spiritual side a little drowsed, promising subsequent penitence, but not yet moved to begin.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
All human beings, as we meet them, are commingled out of good and evil: and Edward Hyde, alone, in the ranks of mankind, was pure evil.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
There comes an end to all things; the most capacious measure is filled at last; and this brief condescension to evil finally destroyed the balance of my soul.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
You start a question, and it's like starting a stone. You sit quietly on the top of a hill; and away the stone goes, starting others...
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
She had an evil face, smoothed by hypocrisy; but her manners were excellent.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Jekyll had more than a father's interest; Hyde had more than a son's indifference.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I incline to Cain's heresy," he used to say quaintly: "I let my brother go to the devil in his own way.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Here then, as I lay down the pen and proceed to seal up my confession, I bring the life of that unhappy Henry Jekyll to an end.
Robert Louis Stevenson (L'estrany cas del Dr. Jekyll i Mr. Hyde)
The less I understood of this farrago, the less I was in a position to judge of its importance.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
The secret to a happiness is a small ego. And a big wallet. Good wine helps, too. But that's not really a secret, is it?
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Some day...after I am dead, you may perhaps come to learn the right and wrong of this. I cannot tell you.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
O my poor old Harry Jekyll, if ever I read Satan's signature upon a face, it is on that of your new friend.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I sometimes think if we knew all, we should be more glad to get away.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I have been made to learn that the doom and burden of our life is bound forever on man’s shoulders; and when the attempt is made to cast it off, it but returns upon us with more unfamiliar and more awful pressure.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
It was for one minute that I saw him, but the hair stood upon my head like quills. Sir, if that was my master, why had he a mask upon his face?
Robert Louis Stevenson (L'estrany cas del Dr. Jekyll i Mr. Hyde)
His affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Good and evil are so close as to be chained together in the soul.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I feel as though whenever I create something, my Mr. Hyde wakes up in the middle of the night and starts thrashing it. I sometimes love it the next morning, but other times it is an abomination.
Criss Jami (Killosophy)
To cast in it with Hyde was to die a thousand interests and aspirations.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I don't know what the fuck you think you're doing, ace, but this Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde shit ain't cutting it with me.
Sylvia Day (Reflected in You (Crossfire, #2))
Strange as my circumstances were, the terms of this debate are as old and commonplace as man; much the same inducements and alarms cast the die for any tempted and trembling sinner; and it fell out with me, as it falls with so vast a majority of my fellows, that I chose the better part and was found wanting in the strength to keep to it.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
That child of Hell had nothing human; nothing lived in him but fear and hatred.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I have lost confidence in myself.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I slept after the prostration of the day, with a stringent and profound slumber which not even the nightmares that wrung me could avail to break.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
After all, I reflected, I was like my neighbours; and then I smiled, comparing myself with other men, comparing my active goodwill with the lazy cruelty of their neglect.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
about as emotional as a bagpipe.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
I had learned to dwell with pleasure as a beloved daydream on the thought of the separation of these elements. If each I told myself could be housed in separate identities life would be relieved of all that was unbearable the unjust might go his way delivered from the aspirations and remorse of his more upright twin and the just could walk steadfastly and securely on his upward path doing the good things in which he found his pleasure and no longer exposed to disgrace and penitence by the hands of this extraneous evil.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity;
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde[Illustrated])
The most racking pangs succeeded: a grinding in the bones, deadly nausea, and a horror of the spirit that cannot be exceeded at the hour of birth or death. Then these agonies began swiftly to subside, and I came to myself as if out of a great sickness. There was something strange in my sensations, something indescribably sweet. I felt younger, lighter, happier in body; within I was conscious of a heady recklessness, a current of disordered sensual images running like a millrace in my fancy, a solution of the bonds of obligation, an unknown but innocent freedom of the soul. I knew myself, at the first breath of this new life, to be more wicked, tenfold more wicked, sold a slave to my original evil and the thought, in that moment, braced and delighted me like wine.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
O God!' I screamed, and 'O God!' again and again; for there before my eyes--pale and shaken, and half fainting, and groping before him with his hands, like a man restored from death--there stood Henry Jekyll!
Robert Louis Stevenson (L'estrany cas del Dr. Jekyll i Mr. Hyde)
It was the curse of mankind that these incongruous faggots were thus bound togetherthat in the agonised womb of consciousness these polar twins should be continuously struggling. How then were they dissociated
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I began to perceive more deeply than it has ever yet been stated, the trembling immateriality, the mistlike transience, of this seemingly so solid body in which we walk attired.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
On the stage Tristen bent over the piano, his fingers swift and sure, his blond hair gleaming under the spotlight. I glanced around at the audience, watching their faces, gratified that they were as captivated as I was by the dark, thunderous song that Tristen conjured.
Beth Fantaskey (Jekel Loves Hyde)
Scared by the thought , brooded awhile on his own past, groping in all the corners of memory, lest by chance some jack-in-the-box of an old iniquity, should leap to light there.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I feel very strongly about putting questions; it partakes too much of the style of the day of judgement. You start a question, and it's like starting a stone. You sit quietly on the top of a hill; and away the stone goes, starting others; and presently some bland old bird (the last you would have thought of) is knocked on the head in his own back garden, and the family have to change their name. No, sir, I make it a rule of mine: the more it looks like Queer Street, the less I ask.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I feel very strongly about putting questions; it partakes too much of the style of the day of judgment.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
It was no longer the fear of the gallows, it was the horror of being Hyde that racked me.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
He recollected his courage.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
This was the shocking thing; that the slime of the pit seemed to utter cries and voices; that the amorphous dust gesticulated and sinned; that what was dead, and had no shape, should usurp the offices of life. And this again, that that insurgent horror was knit to him closer than a wife, closer than an eye; lay caged in his flesh, where he heard it mutter and felt it struggle to be born; and at every hour of weakness, and in the confidence of slumber, prevailed against him, and deposed him out of life.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Do you know Poole," he said, looking up, "that you and I are about to place ourselves in a position of some peril?
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
قد ينجح المرء في كبح جماح فضوله،ولكن ذلك لايعني قهره والانتصار عليه
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Black mail I suppose; an honest man paying through the nose for some of the capers of his youth. Black Mail House is what I call the place with the door, in consequence.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
She was born under the sign of Gemini. And that stands for the good and evil twin. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde both hiding and residing inside her heart. Her good twin was not bad at all. But her evil twin was even better, and showed up to be way too fatal!
Ana Claudia Antunes (Mysterious Murder of Marilyn Monroe)
If he be Mr. Hyde," he had thought, "I shall be Mr. Seek.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
Men have before hired bravos to transact their crimes, while their own person and reputation say under shelter.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
No, sir. I make it a rule of mine: The more it looks like Queer Street, the less I ask.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
...with a strong strong glow of courage, drank off the potion.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
As I looked there came, I thought a change - he seemed to swell - his face became suddenly black and the features seemed to melt and alter...
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
The last I think; for, O poor old Harry Jekyll, if ever I read Satan's signature upon a face, it is on that of your new friend.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
He is not easy to describe. There is something wrong with his appearance; something displeasing, something downright detestable. I never saw a man I so disliked, and yet I scarce know why. He must be deformed somewhere; he gives a strong feeling of deformity, although I couldn’t specify the point. He’s an extraordinary-looking man, and yet I really can name nothing out of the way. No sir; I can make no hand of it; I can’t describe him. And it’s not want of memory; for I declare I can see him this moment.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Tales of Terror)
Under the strain of this continually impending doom and by the sleeplessness to which I now condemned myself, ay, even beyond what I had thought possible to man, I became, in my own person, a creature eaten up and emptied by fever, languidly weak both in body and mind, and solely occupied by one thought: the horror of my other self.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I was still cursed with my duality of purpose.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Tales of Terror)
With every day, and from both sides of my intelligence, the moral and the intellectual, I thus drew steadily nearer to that truth, by whose partial discovery I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck: that man is not truly one, but truly two.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
A moment before I had been safe of all men's respect, wealthy, beloved - the cloth laying for me in the dining room at home; and now I was the common quarry of mankind, hunted, houseless, a known murderer, thrall to the gallows.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
The door, indeed, stood open as before; but the windows were still shuttered, the chimneys breathed no stain into the bright air, there sounded abroad none of that low stir (perhaps audible rather to the ear of the spirit than to the ear of the flesh) by which a house announces and betrays its human lodgers.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
There was something strange in my sensations, indescribably new and incredibly sweet. I knew myself, at the first breath of this new life, to be tenfold more wicked and the thought delighted me like wine.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
تحت السماء الواسعة المرصعة بالنجوم احفر لي قبرا، ودعني أرقد.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I was slowly losing hold of my original and better self, and becoming slowly incorporated with my second and worse.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Hyde?" repeated Lanyon.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
He was wild when he was young; a long while ago to be sure; but in the law of God, there is no statute of limitations. Ay, it must be that; the ghost of some old sin, the cancer of some concealed disgrace: punishment coming, PEDE CLAUDO, years after memory has forgotten and self-love condoned the fault.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
The fog still slept on the wing above the drowned city, where the lamps glimmered like carbuncles; and through the muffle and smother of these fallen clouds, the procession of the town's life was still rolling in through the great arteries with a sound as of a mighty wind.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
...That insurgent horror was knit to him closer than a wife, closer than an eye lay caged in his flesh, where he heard it mutter and felt it struggle to be born; and at every hour of weakness, and in the confidence of slumber, prevailed against him, and deposed him out of life.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
... Man is not truly one, but truly two... even if I could rightly be said to be either, it was only because I was radically both...
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
It offended him both as a lawyer and as a lover of the sane and customary sides of life, to whom the fanciful was the immodest.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
in the man's rich silence after the expense and strain of gaiety.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
God bless me, the man seems hardly human! Something troglodytic, shall we say?
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
Both sides of me were in dead earnest.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
The last, I think; for, O my poor old Harry Jekyll, if ever I read Satan's signature upon a face, it is on that of your new friend.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
This, as I take it, was because all human beings, as we meet them, are commingled out of good and evil: and Edward Hyde, alone in the ranks of mankind, was pure evil.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
The bargain might appear unequal; but there was still another consideration in the scales; for while Jekyll would suffer smartingly in the fires of abstinence, Hyde would be not even conscious of all that he had lost.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde[Illustrated])
Instantly the spirit of hell awoke in me and raged. With a transport of glee, I mauled the unresisting body, tasting delight from every blow; and it was not till weariness had begun to succeed, that I was suddenly, in the top fit of my delirium, struck through the heart by a cold thrill of terror.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Tales of Terror)
You start a question, and it's like starting a stone. You sit quietly on the top of a hill; and away the stone goes, starting others; and presently some bland old bird (the last you would have thought of) is knocked on the head in his own back garden and the family have to change their name. No sir, I make it a rule of mine: the more it looks like Queer Street, the less I ask.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
but I was still cursed with my duality of purpose; and as the first edge of my penitence wore off, the lower side of me, so long indulged, so recently chained down, began to growl for licence.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I swear to God I will never set eyes on him again. I bind my honour to you that I am done with him in this world. It is all at an end. And indeed he does not want my help; you do not know him as I do; he is safe, he is quite safe; mark my words, he will never more be heard of. ~Jekyll
Robert Louis Stevenson (Der seltsame Fall des Dr. Jekyll und Mr. Hyde)
I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck: that man is not truly one, but truly two. I say two, because the state of my own knowledge does not pass beyond that point. Others will follow, others will outstrip me on the same lines; and I hazard the guess that man will be ultimately known for a mere polity of multifarious, incongruous and independent denizens. I, for my part, from the nature of my life, advanced infallibly in one direction and in one direction only. It was on the moral side, and in my own person, that I learned to recognise the thorough and primitive duality of man; I saw that, of the two natures that contended in the field of my consciousness, even if I could rightly be said to be either, it was only because I was radically both; and from an early date, even before the course of my scientific discoveries had begun to suggest the most naked possibility of such a miracle, I had learned to dwell with pleasure, as a beloved daydream, on the thought of the separation of these elements. If each, I told myself, could be housed in separate identities, life would be relieved of all that was unbearable; the unjust might go his way, delivered from the aspirations and remorse of his more upright twin; and the just could walk steadfastly and securely on his upward path, doing the good things in which he found his pleasure, and no longer exposed to disgrace and penitence by the hands of this extraneous evil. It was the curse of mankind that these incongruous faggots were thus bound together—that in the agonised womb of consciousness, these polar twins should be continuously struggling. How, then were they dissociated?
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
And in every one of us, there's a war going on. It's a civil war. I don't care who you are, I don't care where you live, there is a civil war going on in your life. And every time you set out to be good, there's something pulling on you, telling you to be evil. It's going on in your life. Every time you set out to love, something keeps pulling on you, trying to get you to hate. Every time you set out to be kind and say nice things about people, something is pulling on you to be jealous and envious and to spread evil gossip about them. There's a civil war going on. There is a schizophrenia, as the psychologists or the psychiatrists would call it, going on within all of us. And there are times that all of us know somehow that there is a Mr. Hyde and a Dr. Jekyll in us...There's a tension at the heart of human nature. And whenever we set out to dream our dreams and to build our temples, we must be honest enough to recognize it.
Martin Luther King Jr. (The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr.)
No fue difícil de convertirse en Mr Hyde pero eso fue difícil de convertirse en Dr Jekyll otra vez. El bien y la maldad luchaban en mi cuerpo humano. Tuve que tomar una decisión.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Sin embargo, una cosa es mortificar la propia curiosidad y otra es vencerla
Robert Louis Stevenson (Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The)
I felt no repugnance- I knew I was wicked, ten times more wicked, and that thought both braced and delighted me.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Illustrated Edition)
Musisz pozwolić mi odejść w ciemność własną drogą.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Przekleństwo ludzkości polega więc na tym, że dwie sprzeczne natury są ze sobą na wieki złączone; że w otchłani dręczonego sumienia muszą toczyć tragiczne, niekończące się boje.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Nella maggior parte degli uomini, le ragioni del bene e del male che dividono e insieme compongono la duplice natura dell'uomo.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I was driven to reflect deeply and inveterately on that hard law of life, which lies at the root of religion and is one of the most plentiful springs of distress. Though so profound a double-dealer, I was in no sense a hypocrite; both sides of me were in dead earnest; I was no more myself when I laid aside restraint and plunged in shame, than when I laboured, in the eye of day, at the futherance of knowledge or the relief of sorrow and suffering.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Tales of Terror)
Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary and yet somehow lovable.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Beyond love, beyond unrequited love, perhaps even beyond any other passion known to humanity, deep, deep in the depths of the turgid, clinging, swamplike pit of despair that lies dormant within every soul, lurks JEALOUSY. Jealousy, that most demeaning and debilitating of emotions. Jealousy, which can double the strength of the love upon which it is based, but whilst doubling it, warp and pervert it, untill it is no longer recognizable as the thing of beauty it once was. Jealous love is no more like true love than Mr Hyde was like Dr Jekyll or a stagnant swamp is like a freshwater lake.
Ben Elton (Stark)
It was thus rather the exacting nature of my aspirations than any particular degradation in my faults, that made me what I was, and, with even a deeper trench than in the majority of men, severed in me those provinces of good and ill which divide and compound man's dual nature.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
Hosts loved to detain the dry lawyer, when the light-hearted and loose-tongued had already their foot on the threshold; they liked to sit a while in his unobtrusive company, practising for solitude, sobering their minds in the man's rich silence after the expense and strain of gaiety.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
First, because I have been made to learn that the doom and burthen of our life is bound for ever on man's shoulders, and when the attempt is made to cast it off, it but returns upon us with more unfamiliar and more awful pressure.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
You start a question, and it’s like starting a stone. You sit quietly on the top of a hill; and away the stone goes, starting others; and presently some bland old bird (the last you would have thought of) is knocked on the head in his own back-garden and the family have to change their name.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Half an hour from now, when I shall again and for ever reindue that hated personality, I know how I shall sit shuddering and weeping in my chair, or continue, with the most strained and fear-struck ecstasy of listening, to pace up and down this room (my last earthly refuge) and give ear to every sound of menace. Will Hyde die upon the scaffold? or will he find the courage to release himself at the last moment? God knows; I am careless; this is my true hour of death, and what is to follow concerns another than myself. Here, then, as I lay down the pen, and proceed to seal up my confession, I bring the life of that unhappy Henry Jekyll to an end.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
He put the glass to his lips and drank at one gulp. A cry followed; he reeled, staggered, clutched at the table and held on, staring with injected eyes, gasping with open mouth; and as I looked there came, I thought, a change—he seemed to swell—his face became suddenly black and the features seemed to melt and alter—and the next moment, I had sprung to my feet and leaped back against the wall, my arms raised to shield me from that prodigy, my mind submerged in terror. "O
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
Between Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Between the Jacob I like and the one who annoys the hell out of me.
Stephenie Meyer
Don't you know Poole, you and I are about to place ourselves in a position of some peril?
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Tales of Terror)
A man cannot destroy the savage in him by denying its impulses. The only way to get rid of a temptation is to yield to it.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde / Juggernaut)
His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
If he be Mr Hyde," he had thought, "I shall be Mr Seek.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Utterson became so used to the unvarying character of these reports, that he fell off little by little in the frequency of his visits.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Kara nadciąga pede claudo*, lata po tym jak umarła pamięć o winie, a miłość własna dokonała przebaczenia. *pede claudo (łac.) - cichym krokiem
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
If he be Mr. Hyde,” he had thought, “I shall be Mr. Seek.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
the more it looks like Queer Street, the less I ask." "A
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
If he be Mr. Hyde," he had thought, "Then I shall be Mr. Seek.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
If he be Mr. Hyde,” he had thought, “I shall be Mr. Seek.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
If he be Mr. Hyde," he had thought, "I shall be Mr. Seek." And
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Illustrated))
I thought it was madness," he said, as he replaced the obnoxious paper in the safe, "and now I begin to fear it is disgrace.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
Jestem człowiekiem, który straszliwie zgrzeszył, ale też odkupił swą winę nie mniej straszliwym cierpieniem.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
That child of hell wasn't human. Nothing lived in him but fear and hatred.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Illustrated Edition)
(...) brzemię życia musi przytłaczać ludzkie barki, kiedy zaś człowiek próbuje je zrzucić, brzemię powraca w innej, obcej formie i powoduje udrękę nie do zniesienia.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
We are three very old friends, Lanyon; we shall not live to make others.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
remark;
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
Well, life has been pleasant; I liked it; yes, sir, I used to like it. I sometimes think if we knew all, we should be more glad to get away.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
all human beings, as we meet them, are commingled out of good and evil: and
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
Che lo volessi o no, ero omai confinato nella parte migliore della mia esistenza. Quanto godetti di questo pensiero!
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Even as good shone upon the countenance of the one, evil was written broadly and plainly on the face of the other.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
No sir, I make it a rule of mine: the more it looks like Queer Street, the less I ask.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Yes,” he thought; “he is a doctor, he must know his own state and that his days are counted; and the knowledge is more than he can bear.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
L'uomo sarà infine conosciuto come un conglomerato di svariate entità, incoerenti e indipendenti l'una dall'altra.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Jekyll provava moltopiù che l'interesse di un padre; Hyde molto meno che l'indifferenza di un figlio.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
[T]he doom and burthen of our life is bound for ever on man’s shoulders, and when the attempt is made to cast it off, it but returns upon us with more unfamiliar and more awful pressure.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
A man cannot destroy the savage in him by denying its impulses. The only way to get rid of a temptation is to yield to it. –Robert Louis Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
Penelope Douglas (Hideaway (Devil's Night, #2))
In the bottle the acids were long ago resolved; the imperial dye had softened with time, as the colour grows richer in stained windows; and the glow of hot autumn afternoons on hillside vineyards, was ready to be set free and to disperse the fogs of London.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
but that in case of Dr. Jekyll's "disappearance or unexplained absence for any period exceeding three calendar months," the said Edward Hyde should step into the said Henry Jekyll's shoes without further delay and free from any burthen or obligation beyond the payment of a few small sums to the members of the doctor's household
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Tales of Terror)
You must suffer me to go my own dark way. I have brought on myself a punishment and a danger that I cannot name. If I am the chief of sinners, I am the chief of sufferers also. I could not think that this earth contained a place for sufferings and terrors so unmanning;
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Bridget is Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Two sides of herself, always arguing. She is tired of the fight, the constant struggle between a muddied version of good and evil, where right feels wrong and wrong feels really good.
Siobhan Vivian (The List)
The dismal quarter of Soho seen under these changing glimpses, with its muddy ways, and slatternly passengers, and its lamps, which had never been extinguished or had been kindled afresh to combat this mournful reinvasion of darkness, seemed, in the lawyer's eyes, like a district of some city in a nightmare.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
It was on the moral side, and in my own person, that I learned to recognise the thorough and primitive duality of man; I saw that, of the two natures that contended in the field of my consciousness, even if I could rightly be said to be either, it was only because I was radically both; and from an early date, even before the course of my scientific discoveries had begun to suggest the most naked possibility of such a miracle, I had learned to dwell with pleasure, as a beloved daydream, on the thought of the separation of these elements. If each, I told myself, could be housed in separate identities, life would be relieved of all that was unbearable; the unjust might go his way, delivered from the aspirations and remorse of his more upright twin; and the just could walk steadfastly and securely on his upward path, doing the good things in which he found his pleasure, and no longer exposed to disgrace and penitence by the hands of this extraneous evil. It was the curse of mankind that these incongruous faggots were thus bound together—that in the agonised womb of consciousness, these polar twins should be continuously struggling. How, then were they dissociated?
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
The thoughts of his mind, besides, were of the gloomiest dye; and when he glanced at the companion of his drive, he was conscious of some touch of that terror of the law and the law’s officers, which may at times assail the most honest.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
The famed author Robert Lewis Stevenson declared that he'd trained his Brownies to be writers. As he slept, they would whisper fantastic plots in his ear -- for example, the strange case of Dr. Jekyll and the diabolical Mr. Hyde, and that episode in "Olalla" when a young man from an old Spanish family bites his sister's hand.
Jorge Luis Borges (The Book of Imaginary Beings)
I incline to Cain's heresy,' he used to say quaintly: 'I let my brother go to the devil in his own way.' In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
He is not easy to describe. There is something wrong with his appearance; something displeasing, something downright detestable. I never saw a man I so disliked, and yet I scarce know why. He must be deformed somewhere; he gives a strong feeling of deformity, although I couldn't specify the point. He's an extraordinary-looking man, and yet I really can name nothing out of the way. No, sir; I can make no hand of it; I can't describe him. And it's not want of memory; for I declare I can see him this moment.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Me provoca gran aversión hacer preguntas: tienen mucho de la fatalidad del juicio final. Se pone en marcha una pregunta y es como si se empujara una piedra. Uno está sentado tranquilamente en lo alto de su monte, y allá va la piedra, arrastrando a otras en su movimiento, y a lo mejor, un pobre infeliz, el que uno menos podía imaginar, recibe el golpe en la cabeza, en su propio jardín, y su familia tiene que cambiar de apellido. No, señor; para mí ya es una regla: cuanto más extraño parece un asunto, menos preguntas.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I sat in the sun on a bench; the animal within me licking the chops of memory; the spiritual side a little drowsed, promising subsequent penitence, but not yet moved to begin. After all, I reflected, I was like my neighbours; and then I smiled, comparing myself with other men, comparing my active good-will with the lazy cruelty of their neglect. And
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
He was wild when he was young; a long while ago to be sure; but in the law of God, there is no statute of limitations.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde & Other Stories)
God knows; I am careless; this is my true hour of death, and what is to follow concerns someone other than myself.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde & Weir of Hermiston)
To flee was more than I could find courage for; but I registered a vow of unsleeping circumspection.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Tales of Terror)
Old and young, we are all on our last cruise.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Complete Stories of Robert Louis Stevenson: Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Nineteen Other Tales)
I let my brother go to the devil in his own way.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde with the Merry Men & Other Stories)
I love my sins like other people.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde / Juggernaut)
conclusions:
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
course. "This
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
topic,
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
E accadde a me come accade a tanta parte dei miei simili, di scegliere la parte migliore e di non avere la forza necessaria a tenerla invita.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
It was the curse of mankind that these incongruous faggots were thus bound together—that in the agonised womb of consciousness, these polar twins should be continuously struggling.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
he, “with a very odd story.” “Indeed?” said Mr. Utterson, with a slight change
Robert Louis Stevenson (Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
idiosyncratic,
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
subjective
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
subjective disturbance
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
curiosity,
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
incipient
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
foul play,
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
Changed?
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
inveterately
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
chemists
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
drug
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
The existence of a man is so small a thing to take, so mighty a thing to employ!
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
is one thing to mortify curiosity, another to conquer it;
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
todo pecador tembloroso, en la hora de la tentación, se encuentra frente a las mismas adulaciones y a los mismos miedos, y luego éstos tiran los dados por él.
Robert Louis Stevenson (El extraño caso del Dr. Jekyll y Mr. Hyde)
stature. There
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
substituted,
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
Mr. Hyde was pale and dwarfish, he gave an impression of deformity without any nameable malformation, he had a displeasing smile, he had borne himself to the lawyer with a sort of murderous mixture of timidity and boldness, and he spoke with a husky, whispering and somewhat broken voice; all these were points against him, but not all of these together could explain the hitherto unknown disgust, loathing and fear with which Mr. Utterson regarded him.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
Chociaż niewątpliwie dwulicowy, nie byłem obłudnikiem. Obie moje połowy postępowały najzupełniej szczerze. Byłem sobą, gdy zerwawszy tamy, nurzałem się w brudzie. Ale byłem też sobą, gdy w jasnym świetle dnia pracowałem nad postępami nauki lub niosłem ulgę cierpieniom i nędzy.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
You start a question, and it's like starting a stone. You sit quietly on the top of a hill; and away the stone goes, starting others; and presently some bland old bird (the last you would have thought of) is knocked on the head in his own back garden and the family have to change their name.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
STORY OF THE DOOR Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary and yet somehow lovable. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste, something
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
And this again, that that insurgent horror was knit to him closer than a wife, closer than an eye; lay caged in his flesh, where he heard it mutter and felt it struggle to be born; and at every hour of weakness, and in the confidence of slumber, prevailed against him, and deposed him out of life.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Che quell'orrore insorgente fosse legato a lui più di una moglie, fosse più intimo di un occhio; che giacesse rinchiuso nella sua carne, dove lo sentiva ululare e lottare per venire alla luce; e che nei momenti di debolezza e quando si abbandonava al sonno lo dominasse e lo escludesse dalla vita.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer's way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer's way. His friends were those of his own blood, or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
have observed that when I wore the semblance of Edward Hyde, none could come near to me at first without a visible misgiving of the flesh. This, as I take it, was because all human beings, as we meet them, are commingled out of good and evil: and Edward Hyde, alone in the ranks of mankind, was pure evil.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Her eyes took hold upon mine and clung there, and bound us together like the joining of hands; and the moments we thus stood face to face, drinking each other in, were sacramental and the wedding of souls.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Tales of Terror)
The drug had no discriminating action; it was neither diabolical nor divine; it but shook the doors of the prisonhouse of my disposition; and like the captives of Philippi, that which stood within ran forth.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
Well, sir, the two ran into one another naturally enough at the corner; and then came the horrible part of the thing; for the man trampled calmly over the child's body and left her screaming on the ground. It sounds nothing to hear, but it was hellish to see. It wasn't like a man; it was like some damned Juggernaut.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
But time began at last to obliterate the freshness of my alarm; the praises of conscience began to grow into a thing of course; I began to be tortured with throes and longings, as of Hyde struggling after freedom; and at last, in an hour of moral weakness, I once again compounded and swallowed the transforming draught.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I crossed the yard, wherein the constellations looked down upon me, I could have thought, with wonder, the first creature of that sort that their unsleeping vigilance had yet disclosed to them; I stole through the corridors, a stranger in my own house; and coming to my room, I saw for the first time the appearance of Edward Hyde.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
The figure in these two phases haunted the lawyer all night: and if at any time he dozed over, it was but to see it glide more stealthily through sleeping houses, or move the more swiftly and still the more swiftly, even to dizziness, through wider labyrinths of lamp-lighted city, and at every street corner crush a child and leave her screaming.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
There were several books on a shelf; one lay beside the tea things open, and Utterson was amazed to find it a copy of a pious work, for which Jekyll had several times expressed a great esteem, annotated, in his own hand with startling blasphemies. Next,
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde)
Often she would lock herself in her room and sitting before the mirror, apply the makeup of John Barrymore, Barrymore of The Sea Beast or of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Seeing these gruesome images in the mirror she would being to rave. "Who am I?" she would say. "What am I?
Henry Miller (Crazy Cock)
This, too, was myself. It seemed natural and human. In my eyes it bore a livelier image of the spirit, it seemed more express and single, than the imperfect and divided countenance I had been hitherto accustomed to call mine. And in so far I was doubtless right. I have observed that when I wore the semblance of Edward Hyde, none could come near to me at first without a visible misgiving of the flesh. This, as I take it, was because all human beings, as we meet them, are commingled out of good and evil: and Edward Hyde, alone in the ranks of mankind, was pure evil.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
It was on the moral side, and in my own person, that I learned to recognise the thorough and primitive duality of man; I saw that, of the two natures that contended in the field of my consciousness, even if I could rightly be said to be either, it was only because I was radically both;
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
He is not easy to describe. There is something wrong with his appearance; something displeasing, something down-right detestable. I never saw a man I so disliked, and yet I scarce know why. He must be deformed somewhere; he gives a strong feeling of deformity, although I couldn’t specify the point.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I do not suppose that, when a drunkard reasons with himself upon his vice, he is once out of five hundred times affected by the dangers that he runs through his brutish, physical insensibility; neither had I, long as I had considered my position, made enough allowance for the complete moral insensibility and insensate readiness to evil, which were the leading characters of Edward Hyde. Yet it was by these that I was punished. My devil had been long caged, he came out roaring.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Like no other particle on earth, the morphine molecule seemed to possess heaven and hell. It allowed for modern surgery, saving and improving too many lives to count. It stunted and ended too many lives to count with addiction and overdose. Discussing it, you could invoke some of humankind’s greatest cultural creations and deepest questions: Faust, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, discussions on the fundamental nature of man and human behavior, of free will and slavery, of God and evolution. Studying the molecule you naturally wandered into questions like, Can mankind achieve happiness without pain? Would that happiness even be worth it? Can we have it all?
Sam Quinones (Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic)
To cast in my lot with Jekyll, was to die to those appetites which I had long secretly indulged and had of late begun to pamper. To cast it in with Hyde, was to die to a thousand interests and aspirations, and to become, at a blow and forever, despised and friendless. The bargain might appear unequal; but there was still another consideration in the scales; for while Jekyll would suffer smartingly in the fires of abstinence, Hyde would be not even conscious of all that he had lost. Strange as my circumstances were, the terms of this debate are as old and commonplace as man; much the same inducements and alarms cast the die for any tempted and trembling sinner; and it fell out with me, as it falls with so vast a majority of my fellows, that I chose the better part and was found wanting in the strength to keep to it.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Staram się unikać zadawania pytań, które zbyt mocno przywodzą na myśl dzień sądu ostatecznego. Pytanie jest jak kamień wywołujący lawinę. Siedzisz spokojnie na szczycie wzgórza, a kamień spada w dół, poruszając inne, i wreszcie jakiś niepozorny dziadyga, o którym nawet przez moment nie myślałeś, dostaje w łeb w swoim ogródku za domem, i cała szanowana dotąd rodzina musi szybko zmieniać nazwisko. O nie, mój drogi, stworzyłem własne prawo: im niezwyklejsza wydaje się sprawa, tym mniej o nią pytam.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
With every day, and from both sides of my intelligence, the moral and the intellectual, I thus drew steadily nearer to that truth, by whose partial discovery I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck: that man is not truly one, but truly two. I say two, because the state of my own knowledge does not pass beyond that point. Others will follow, others will outstrip me on the same lines; and I hazard the guess that man will be ultimately known for a mere polity of multifarious, incongruous and independent denizens.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
That evening Mr. Utterson came home to his bachelor house in sombre spirits and sat down to dinner without relish. It was his custom of a Sunday, when this meal was over, to sit close by the fire, a volume of some dry divinity on his reading-desk, until the clock of the neighbouring church rang out the hour of twelve, when he would go soberly and gratefully to bed. On this night, however, as soon as the cloth was taken away, he took up a candle and went into his business-room. There he opened his safe, took from the most private part of it a document endorsed on the envelope as Dr. Jekyll’s Will, and sat down with a clouded brow to study its contents. The will was holograph, for Mr. Utterson, though he took charge of it now that
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Zła cząstka natury, wyzwolona obecnie i sprawująca władzę była cieleśnie słabsza i gorzej rozwinięta niż dobra, którą odtrąciłem. Zarazem jednak mniej utrudziła się i wyczerpała, gdyż dotychczas dziewięć dziesiątych życia poświęcałem przecież pracy, cnocie i świadomemu, poddanemu rygorom obowiązku działaniu. Dlatego właśnie Edward Hyde był znacznie niższy, szczuplejszy i młodszy niż Henryk Jekyll. Jedną twarz rozjaśniał blask wewnętrznego światła, na drugiej mroki zła wyryły głębokie piętno. Ponadto zło (mimo wszystko słabsze w człowieku niż dobro) zniekształciło i jak gdyby okaleczyło całą postać swojego wcielenia.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
If each, I told myself, could be housed in separate identities, life would be relieved of all that was unbearable; the unjust might go his way, delivered from the aspirations and remorse of his more upright twin; and the just could walk steadfastly and securely on his upward path, doing the good things in which he found his pleasure, and no longer exposed to disgrace and penitence by the hands of this extraneous evil. It was the curse of mankind that these incongruous faggots were thus bound together—that in the agonised womb of consciousness, these polar twins should be continuously struggling. How, then were they dissociated?
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
I feel very strongly about putting questions; it partakes too much of the style of the day of judgment. You start a question, and it’s like starting a stone. You sit quietly on the top of a hill; and away the stone goes, starting others; and presently some bland old bird (the last you would have thought of) is knocked on the head in his own back garden and the family have to change their name. No sir, I make it a rule of mine: the more it looks like Queer Street, the less I ask.” “A
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
He is not easy to describe. There is something wrong with his appearance; something displeasing, something down-right detestable. I never saw a man I so disliked, and yet I scarce know why. He must be deformed somewhere; he gives a strong feeling of deformity, although I couldn’t specify the point. He’s an extraordinary looking man, and yet I really can name nothing out of the way. No, sir; I can make no hand of it; I can’t describe him. And it’s not want of memory; for I declare I can see him this moment.” Mr.
Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
It was by this time about nine in the morning, and the first fog of the season. A great chocolate-colored pall lowered over heaven, but the wind was continually charging and routing these embattled vapors; so that as the cab crawled from street to street, Mr. Utterson beheld a marvelous number of degrees and hues of twilight; for here it would be dark like the black end of evening; and there would be a glow of a rich, lurid brown, like the light of some strange conflagration; and here for a moment, the fog would be quite broken up and a haggard shaft of daylight would glance in between the swirling wreaths. The dismal quarter of Soho seen under these changing glimpses, with its muddy ways, and slatternly passengers, and its lamps, which had never been extinguished or had been kindled afresh to combat this mournful reinvasion of darkness, seemed, in the lawyer's eyes, like a district of some city in a nightmare.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
He thanked me with a smiling nod, measured out a few minims of the red tincture and added one of the powders. The mixture, which was at first of a reddish hue, began, in proportion as the crystals melted, to brighten in colour, to effervesce audibly, and to throw off small fumes of vapour. Suddenly and at the same moment, the ebullition ceased and the compound changed to a dark purple, which faded again more slowly to a watery green. My visitor, who had watched these metamorphoses with a keen eye, smiled, set down the glass upon the table, and then turned and looked upon me with an air of scrutiny. "And now," said he, "to settle what remains. Will you be wise? will you be guided? will you suffer me to take this glass in my hand and to go forth from your house without further parley? or has the greed of curiosity too much command of you? Think before you answer, for it shall be done as you decide. As you decide, you shall be left as you were before, and neither richer nor wiser, unless the sense of service rendered to a man in mortal distress may be counted as a kind of riches of the soul. Or, if you shall so prefer to choose, a new province of knowledge and new avenues to fame and power shall be laid open to you, here, in this room, upon the instant; and your sight shall be blasted by a prodigy to stagger the unbelief of Satan.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)
Men have before hired bravos to transact their crimes, while their own person and reputation sat under shelter. I was the first that ever did so for his pleasures. I was the first that could plod in the public eye with a load of genial respectability, and in a moment, like a schoolboy, strip off these lendings and spring headlong into the sea of liberty. But for me, in my impenetrable mantle, the safety was complete. Think of it-I did not even exist! Let me but escape into my laboratory door, give me but a second or two to mix and swallow the draught that I had always standing ready; and whatever he had done, Edward Hyde would pass away like the stain of breath upon a mirror; and there in his stead, quietly at home, trimming the midnight lamp in his study, a man who could afford to laugh at suspicion, would be Henry Jekyll. The pleasures which I made haste to seek in my disguise were, as I have said, undignified; I would scarce use a harder term. But in the hands of Edward Hyde, they soon began to turn toward the monstrous. When I would come back from these excursions, I was often plunged into a kind of wonder at my vicarious depravity. This familiar that I called out of my own soul, and sent forth alone to do his good pleasure, was a being inherently malign and villainous; his every act and thought centered on self; drinking pleasure with bestial avidity from any degree of torture to another; relentless like a man of stone. Henry Jekyll stood at times aghast before the acts of Edward Hyde; but the situation was apart from ordinary laws, and insidiously relaxed the grasp of conscience. It was Hyde, after all, and Hyde alone, that was guilty. Jekyll was no worse; he woke again to his good qualities seemingly unimpaired; he would even make haste, where it was possible, to undo the evil done by Hyde. And thus his conscience slumbered.
Robert Louis Stevenson (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde)