Dopamine Quotes

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Nothing captures the biological argument better than the famous New Age slogan: ‘Happiness begins within.’ Money, social status, plastic surgery, beautiful houses, powerful positions – none of these will bring you happiness. Lasting happiness comes only from serotonin, dopamine and oxytocin.
Yuval Noah Harari (Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind)
That's what falling in love really amounted to, your brain on drugs. Adrenaline and dopamine, oxytocin and serotonin. Chemical insanity, celebrated by poets.
Tess Gerritsen (Last to Die (Rizzoli & Isles, #10))
Evolution has no foresight. Complex machinery develops its own agendas. Brains — cheat. Feedback loops evolve to promote stable heartbeats and then stumble upon the temptation of rhythm and music. The rush evoked by fractal imagery, the algorithms used for habitat selection, metastasize into art. Thrills that once had to be earned in increments of fitness can now be had from pointless introspection. Aesthetics rise unbidden from a trillion dopamine receptors, and the system moves beyond modeling the organism. It begins to model the very process of modeling. It consumes evermore computational resources, bogs itself down with endless recursion and irrelevant simulations. Like the parasitic DNA that accretes in every natural genome, it persists and proliferates and produces nothing but itself. Metaprocesses bloom like cancer, and awaken, and call themselves I.
Peter Watts (Blindsight (Firefall, #1))
The paradox is that hedonism, the pursuit of pleasure for it's own sake, leads to anhedonia. Which is the inability to enjoy pleasure of any kind.
Anna Lembke (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
Lessons of the balance. 1. The relentless pursuit of pleasure and avoidance of pain, leads to pain. 2. Recovery begins with abstinence 3. Abstinence rests the brains reward pathway and with it our capacity to take joy and simpler pleasures. 4. Self-binding creates literal and metacognitive space between desire and consumption, a modern necessity in our dopamine overloaded world. 5. Medications can restore homeostasis, but consider what we lose by medicating away our pain. 6. Pressing on the pain side, resets our balance to the side of pleasure. 7. Beware of getting addicted to pain. 8. Radical honesty promotes awareness, enhances intimacy and fosters a plenty mindset. 9. Prosocial shame affirms that we belong to the human tribe. 10. Instead of running away from the world, we can find escape by immersing ourselves in it.
Anna Lembke (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
From dopamine’s point of view, having things is uninteresting. It’s only getting things that matters. If you live under a bridge, dopamine makes you want a tent. If you live in a tent, dopamine makes you want a house. If you live in the most expensive mansion in the world, dopamine makes you want a castle on the moon. Dopamine has no standard for good, and seeks no finish line. The dopamine circuits in the brain can be stimulated only by the possibility of whatever is shiny and new, never mind how perfect things are at the moment. The dopamine motto is “More.
Daniel Z. Lieberman (The Molecule of More: How a Single Chemical in Your Brain Drives Love, Sex, and Creativity―and Will Determine the Fate of the Human Race)
During times of physical separation, when touching and caressing is impossible, a deep, longing, almost a hunger, for the beloved can set in. We are used to thinking of this longing as only psychological, but it's actually physical. The brain is virtually in a drug-withdrawal state. During a separation, motivation for reunion can reach a fever pitch in the brain. Activities such as caressing, kissing, gazing, hugging, and orgasm can replenish the chemical bond of love and trust in the brain. The oxytocin-dopamine rush once again suppresses anxiety and skepticism and reinforces the love circuits in the brain. From an experiment we also know that oxytocin is naturally released in the brain after a twenty-second hug from a partner- sealing the bond between huggers and triggering the brain's trust circuits.
Louann Brizendine (The Female Brain)
Trick #3—excitement is not the same thing as fulfillment
Thibaut Meurisse (Dopamine Detox : A Short Guide to Remove Distractions and Get Your Brain to Do Hard Things (Productivity Series Book 1))
but we have reached the point now where even the most sublime experience of Nature on Earth has devolved into just one more means to an end to getting likes on social media. People are dancing with the possibility of death just to steal a little dopamine rush to the brain which will wear off in a few seconds anyway and for a status update which will be buried by the algorithm after just 24 hours due to a lack of relevance.
Chad A. Haag (Hermeneutical Death: The Technological Destruction of Subjectivity)
Nothing speeds brain atrophy more than being immobilized in the same environment: the monotony undermines our dopamine and attentional systems crucial to our brain plasticity.
Norman Doidge
After three of four years of schooling, the nucleus basalis, which forms sharp memories in the brain, falls into disuse and decays. This is the part of the brain that makes learning so effortless for small children, and it is always activated in undomesticated humans. But neuroplasticity research has shown that damage to the nucleus basalis can be reversed by reintroducing activities involving highly focused attention, which results in massive increases in production of acetylcholine and dopamine. Using new skills under conditions of intense focus rewires billions of neural connections and reactivates the nucleus basalis. Loss of function in this part of the brain is not a natural stage of development--we are supposed to retain and even increase it throughout our lives. Until very recently in human history, we did.
Tyson Yunkaporta (Sand Talk: How Indigenous Thinking Can Save the World)
What I always think about, I told him, are experiments that show that animals in captivity would rather have to search for their food than have it given to them. Seeking is the lever that tips our dopamine gush.
Michelle McNamara (I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer)
Here’s my point. The world is working against you. There will always be someone trying to grab your attention. As such, you have two choices. You can protect your focus by building habits and systems, or you can remain unprepared and let anyone distract you from the important things you should be doing with your time.
Thibaut Meurisse (Dopamine Detox : A Short Guide to Remove Distractions and Get Your Brain to Do Hard Things (Productivity Series Book 1))
That's nice that she's so happy, I think. It's nice that anyone is capable of happiness, really. It's amazing that the human body can produce the neurochemicals required to feel joy. I am disappointed to have been served so little of those chemicals- but I am glad nonetheless that this old woman has enough dopamine, and oxytocin, and whatever else she needs to sustain that smile - despite the fact that her husband is dead, her teeth are probably fake, and all human life is fundamentally inconsequential.
Emily Austin (Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead)
Of over 500 strains of bacteria they tested, more than 90 percent were able to produce neurotransmitters like dopamine and serotonin that play a key role in regulating human moods.
Jonathan Kennedy (Pathogenesis: A History of the World in Eight Plagues)
The brain is wired to make a clear, quick yes-or-no decision—fight or flight, click or scroll, read or ignore, remember or forget. • The dopamine blast of a great idea or word buys you a few more seconds of someone’s time. Every word is a battle for additional time and attention.
Jim Vandehei (Smart Brevity: The Power of Saying More with Less)
In scientific terms, when the dopamine system is at rest, it fires at a leisurely three to five times per second. When it’s excited, it zooms up to twenty to thirty times per second. When an expected reward fails to materialize, the dopamine firing rate drops to zero, and that feels terrible.
Daniel Z. Lieberman (The Molecule of More: How a Single Chemical in Your Brain Drives Love, Sex, and Creativity―and Will Determine the Fate of the Human Race)
Remember those cocaine addicts whose dopamine receptors (the tiny hands that grab neurochemicals) decreased after repeated drug use? Cocaine blasts the reward circuitry so that it pumps out massive amounts of exciting dopamine. This accounts for the high. Then two things happen simultaneously. First, the high begins to fade as the brain disposes of the extra dopamine. Second, because so much excess dopamine can damage or kill nerve cells, the cells protect themselves by reducing the number of dopamine receptors (little “hands”) on their surfaces. If a thunderstorm rolls in, you close all the windows and wait for it to pass. That’s what the cells do, except they assume that another storm is on the way, and stay closed up for a while. The addict has lowered her sensitivity to dopamine—a substance that helped give her the high. Now our addict feels rotten. She has two choices: Take more cocaine to jack up her mood artificially by saturating the remaining dopamine receptors, or suffer withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal symptoms arise when the reward circuitry is starving for dopamine. Whether you have too few receptors for dopamine, or too little dopamine circulating around the nerve cells, you get the same result. Your reward circuitry batteries are low, leaving you with an acute desire to feel normal again.
Marnia Robinson (Cupid's Poisoned Arrow: From Habit to Harmony in Sexual Relationships)
With a wry smile, he went on to hypothesize more generally—and, I suspect, only half-jokingly—that addicts are bored or frustrated problem-solvers who instinctively contrive Houdini-like situations from which to disentangle themselves when no other challenge happens to present itself. The drug becomes the reward when they succeed and the consolation prize when they fail.
Anna Lembke (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
I always thought of love as a chemical process in the brain, the release of dopamine and oxytocin to promote bonding. That doesn’t happen in my brain the way it does for normal people. But maybe I’m wrong. Maybe love can look different sometimes. It can be this. It can be us.
L. Eveland (Body Count (Wayward Sons #1))
Exercise has a more profound and sustained positive effect on mood, anxiety, cognition, energy, and sleep than any pill I can prescribe. But pursuing pain is harder than pursuing pleasure. It goes against our innate reflex to avoid pain and pursue pleasure. It adds to our cognitive load: We have to remember that we will feel pleasure after pain, and we’re remarkably amnestic about this sort of thing. I know I have to relearn the lessons of pain every morning as I force myself to get out of bed and go exercise.
Anna Lembke (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
It is not our perfection but our willingness to work together to remedy our mistakes that creates the intimacy that we crave.
Anna Lembke (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
We must have faith that actions that seem to have no impact in the present moment are in fact accumulating in a positive direction, which will be revealed to us only at some unknown time in the future.
Anna Lembke (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
By raising our neural set point with repeated pleasures, we become endless strivers, never satisfied with what we have, always looking for more.
Anna Lembke (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
long-time perspective, “was the most important determinant of financial and personal success in life.” He defined “long-time” as the “ability to think several years into the future while making decisions in the present.
Thibaut Meurisse (Dopamine Detox : A Short Guide to Remove Distractions and Get Your Brain to Do Hard Things (Productivity Series Book 1))
when faith-based organizations end up on the wrong side of the same equation, by shunning transgressors and/or encouraging a web of secrecy and lies, they contribute to the cycle of destructive shame.
Dr. Anna Lembke
The extraordinary lengths to which Jacob went to avoid anything likely to incite sexual desire seemed downright medieval to our modern sensibilities. Yes far from feeling constrained by his new way of living, he felt liberated. As Immanuel Kant wrote, "When we realize that we are capable of this inner legislation, the (natural) man feels himself compelled to reverence for the moral man in his own person." Binding ourselves is a way to be free.
Dr. Anna Lembke
(Hippocrates wrote): "Of two pains occurring together, not in the same part of the body, the stronger weakens the other.
Dr. Anna Lembke
Recounting our experiences gives us mastery over them. In writing in a journal, our honest disclosure brings our behavior into relief, allowing us in some cases to see it for the first time.
Dr. Anna Lembke
Shame makes us feel bad about ourselves as people, whereas guilt makes us feel bad about our actions while preserving positive sense of self. Shame is a maladaptive emotion. Guild is an adaptive emotion.
Dr. Anna Lembke
If others respond by rejecting, condemning, or shaming us, we enter the cycle of what I call destructive shame. If others respond by holding us closer and proving clear guidance for redemption/recovery, we enter the cycle of prosocial shame.
Dr. Anna Lembke
While I was compulsively reading romance novels, I was only partially aware of doing so. I was aware of the behavior at the same time I was not aware of it. This is a well-recognized phenomenon in addiction, a kind of half-conscious state akin to a waking dream, referred to as denial.
Dr. Anna Lembke
Because once he started using cannabis, he wasn't governed by reason; he was governed by the pleasure-pain balance. Even one joint created a state of wanting not easily influence by logic.
Dr. Anna Lembke
(Dopamine is...) WANTING more than LIKING.
Dr. Anna Lembke
Right after the conditioned cue, brain dopamine firing decreases not just to baseline levels, but below baseline levels. This transient dopamine mini-deficit state is what motivates us to seek out our reward. Dopamine levels below baseline drive craving.
Dr. Anna Lembke
The reason we're all so miserable may be because we're working so hard to avoid being miserable.
Dr. Anna Lembke
us focused, inspired and motivated to pursue our goals. So what’s the source of this mysterious energy? The short answer: feeling good. Positive emotions are bound up with a set of four hormones3 – endorphins, serotonin, dopamine and oxytocin – which are often labelled as the ‘feel-good hormones’. All of them allow us to accomplish more. Endorphins
Ali Abdaal (Feel-Good Productivity: How to Do More of What Matters to You)
I wasn’t just running for the rush of endorphins and dopamine. Because of serotonin, I was now running for them too. And it helped.
Simon Sinek (Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don't)
Dopamine is one of our feel-good hormones, and it also activates the part of the brain responsible for learning and forming memories.
Ali Abdaal (Feel-Good Productivity: How to Do More of What Matters to You)
The chemicals Adam’s brain denied him—the ones that released endorphins or dopamine or whatever it was that tricked people into thinking they were in love—were the same ones that told Noah nobody else mattered, nobody but Adam. Hell, Adam hadn’t even needed those chemicals to choose Noah. He just had. He’d looked at Noah and decided he was his person. The one he’d kill for, die for, choose over any other, including his own family. So, that had to be better, right? Making the decision to do those things without the chemicals. It felt better to Noah. It felt like love. So, that was what Noah would call it. Adam loved Noah in every way he could.
Onley James (Unhinged (Necessary Evils, #1))
People who repeatedly focus on where they want to be in the future, make better decisions in the present. They tend to eat healthier food, be more productive at work and save and invest more money than others.
Thibaut Meurisse (Dopamine Detox : A Short Guide to Remove Distractions and Get Your Brain to Do Hard Things (Productivity Series Book 1))
Nevertheless, international missions have an addictive quality. There’s something magical about them. Maybe it’s the dopamine rushes we get from being needed and appreciated. Or the sense of purpose and belonging that we feel. Or the basic honesty of the work itself. We might witness horrific scenes, but on our return we miss the sense of purpose and camaraderie that went with it. For some, returning to mission work is the only way to experience that feeling again.
Cecily Wang (No Crying in the Operating Room: My Life as an International Relief Doctor, from Haiti, to South Sudan, to the Syrian Civil War)
Чому в епоху небаченого багатства, свободи, розвитку технологій і досягнень медицини ми здаємося нещасливішими й відчуваємо більше болю, ніж будь-коли? … ми докладаємо занадто багато зусиль, аби уникати нещастя.
Анна Лембке (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
Ці механізми бездоганно пристосовані до світу нестачі ресурсів. Без задоволення ми не могли б їсти, пити чи розмножуватися. Без болю ми не могли б захищати себе від травм і загибелі. Змінюючи заданий рівень відчуттів за допомогою повторюваних задоволень, ми стаємо людьми, котрі безкінечно прагнуть чогось, ніколи не задовольняючись тим, що мають, завжди жадають більшого.
Анна Лембке (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
Ми потопаємо в дофаміні.
Анна Лембке (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
Світ багатий сенсорними відчуттями, проте бідний причиново-наслідковими зв’язками.
Анна Лембке (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
Дофамінове голодування відновлює здатність відчувати задоволення у різних проявах.
Анна Лембке (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
Сила волі не є невичерпним ресурсом людини.
Анна Лембке (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
У нашій зламаності люди бачать власну уразливість й людяність. Їх заспокоює те, що вони не самотні у своїх сумнівах, страхах і слабкостях.
Анна Лембке (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
Брехати – завжди гірше, ніж говорити правду. Брехня ніколи не варта наслідків.
Анна Лембке (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
Коли ми бачимо в інтернеті, що інші поводяться певним чином, то подібна поведінка сприймається нами як «нормальна», оскільки так чинять інші люди.
Анна Лембке (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
Крім надзвичайних випадків утечі від болю, ми втратили здатність витримувати навіть незначний дискомфорт. Ми постійно прагнемо відволіктися від буденності й жити розвагами.
Анна Лембке (Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence)
excitement is not the same thing as fulfillment
Thibaut Meurisse (Dopamine Detox : A Short Guide to Remove Distractions and Get Your Brain to Do Hard Things (Productivity Series Book 1))
psychology and neuroscience are in agreement as to how to “make” motivation, and have even offered up a recipe. Here are the key ingredients: The right mindset Autonomy, competence, and relatedness The optimal level of dopamine Flow
William Stixrud (The Self-Driven Child: The Science and Sense of Giving Your Kids More Control Over Their Lives)