Dolly Parton Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Dolly Parton. Here they are! All 137 of them:

Find out who you are and do it on purpose.
Dolly Parton
If your actions create a legacy that inspires others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, then, you are an excellent leader.
Dolly Parton
The way I see it, if you want the rainbow, you gotta put up with the rain!
Dolly Parton
Its hard to be a diamond in a rhinestone world.
Dolly Parton
I'm not going to limit myself just because people won't accept the fact that I can do something else.
Dolly Parton
If you don’t like the road you’re walking, start paving another one.
Dolly Parton
It's a good thing I was born a girl, otherwise I'd be a drag queen.
Dolly Parton
Don't get so busy making a living that you forget to make a life.
Dolly Parton
Storms make trees take deeper roots.
Dolly Parton
I tried every diet in the book. I tried some that weren't in the book. I tried eating the book. It tasted better than most of the diets.
Dolly Parton
It costs a lot of money to look this cheap
Dolly Parton
Find out who you are and do it on purpose. —Dolly Parton
Julie Murphy (Dumplin' (Dumplin', #1))
I'm not offended by all the dumb blonde jokes because I know I'm not dumb - and I'm not blonde either.
Dolly Parton
I always just thought if you see somebody without a smile, give'em yours!
Dolly Parton
My weaknesses have always been food and men - in that order.
Dolly Parton
People always ask me how long it takes to do my hair. I don’t know, I’m never there.
Dolly Parton
You sounded like Dolly parton on helium." (After kristy lee cook of season 7 on american idol,sang her country rendition of the Beatles'"Eight Days A Week.)
Simon Cowell
We cannot direct the wind, but we can adjust the sails.
Dolly Parton
I was the first woman to burn my bra - it took the fire department four days to put it out.
Dolly Parton
They think I’m simpleminded because I seem to be happy. Why shouldn’t I be happy? I have everything I ever wanted and more. Maybe I am simpleminded. Maybe that’s the key: simple.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
When someone shows you their true colors, believe them.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
Smile -- it increases your face value.
Dolly Parton
If you want the rainbow, you have to put up with the rain.
Dolly Parton
the magic is inside you. there ain't no crystal ball
Dolly Parton
If you talk bad about country music, it's like saying bad things about my momma. Them's fightin' words
Dolly Parton
If I see something saggin', baggin', or draggin', I'm gone have it nipped, tucked, or sucked!
Dolly Parton
Life is just a series of peaks and troughs. And you don't know whether you're in a trough until you're climbing out, or on a peak until you're coming down. And that's it you know, you never know what's round the corner. But it's all good. "If you want the rainbow, you've gotta put up with the rain." Do you know which "philosopher" said that? Dolly Parton. And people say she's just a big pair of tits.
Ricky Gervais (Office, The Scripts)
You'll never do a whole lot unless you're brave enough to try.
Dolly Parton
Sometimes my mouth is a little too big and a little too open and sounds too much like a sailor.
Dolly Parton
I would never stoop so low as to be fashionable.
Dolly Parton
If you see someone without a smile give them yours.
Dolly Parton
God is in everything I do and all my work glorifies Him.
Dolly Parton
Figure out who you are. Then do it on purpose.
Dolly Parton
Wouldn't it be something if we could have things we love in abudance without their losing that special attraction the want of them held for us.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
It takes a lot of time and money to look this cheap, honey,
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
Cause I am strong and I can prove it And I got my dreams to see me through It's just a mountain, I can move it And with faith enough there's nothing I can't do And I can see the light of a clear blue morning And I can see the light of brand new day I can see the light of a clear blue morning And everything's gonna be all right It's gonna be okay [lyrics from "Light of a Clear Blue Morning"]
Dolly Parton
I make jokes about it, but it's the truth that I kind of patterned my look after the town tramp. I didn't know what she was, just this woman who was blond and piled her hair up, wore high heels and tight skirts, and, boy, she was the prettiest thing I'd ever seen. Momma used to say, "Aw, she's just trash," and I thought, That's what I want to be when I grow up. Trash.
Dolly Parton
I don't know what the big deal is about old age. Old people who shine from the inside look 10 to 20 years younger.
Dolly Parton
Above everything else I've done, I've always said I've had more guts than I've got talent.
Dolly Parton
Life is just a series of peaks and troughs, and you don't whether you're in a trough until you're climbing out, or on a peak until you're coming down. And that's it, you know, you never know what's round the corner. But it's all good. "If you want the rainbow you've got to put up with the rain". Do you know which "philosopher" said that? Dolly Parton. And people say she's just a big pair of tits.
David Brent
It's over," Keelie said. Too bad. But I want you to know, I will always love you." She narrowed her eyes and said, "When you look at me and say that, are you thinking of Dolly Parton or Whitney Houston?" Burt Reynolds," he said. She nearly spit out her coffee when she laughed, then she said, "That almost makes me want to try again.
Becky Cochrane (A Coventry Christmas (Coventry, #1))
I make a point to appreciate all the little things in my life. I go out and smell the air after a good, hard rain. I re-read passages from my favorite books. I hold the little treasures that somebody special gave me. These small actions help remind me that there are so many great, glorious pieces of good in the world.
Dolly Parton (Dream More)
It doesn't bother me when someone calls me a 'dumb blonde.' I'm neither dumb or blonde.
Dolly Parton
Dolly Parton to my..well, ;et's just say that the greatly endowed wagon had passed me by.
Rachel Hawthorne (Love on the Lifts)
He looked GQ. I looked like Dolly Parton impossibly created a love child with Peg Bundy (no, I rocked that look).
Kristen Ashley (Rock Chick Reawakening (Rock Chick, #0.5))
All the best things in my life have started with a Dolly Parton song.
Julie Murphy (Dumplin' (Dumplin', #1))
They got me busier than a one-legged man in a butt-kicking contest.
Dolly Parton
My daddy has a chain five miles long, on each link a heart for a lover he has lost.
Dolly Parton
In order to get to the rainbow you must be able to deal with the rain.
Dolly Parton
I think of country radio like a great lover: you were nice to me, you gave me a lot of cool stuff, and then you dumped my ass for another woman.
Dolly Parton (Dream More)
Be the alligator girl. Be whatever your dreams and your luck will let you be. Wear your green cornflakes with pride. Snarl at the crowds, and do your best to make them flinch. Give them a quarter's worth of wonder.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
Love is like a butterfly As soft and gentle as a sigh The multicolored moods of love are like its satin wings Love makes your heart feel strange inside It flutters like soft wings in flight Love is like a butterfly, a rare and gentle thing
Dolly Parton
In Dallas for the premier of '9 to 5', I had an uncanny experience, and on the plane home to Chicago I confessed it to Siskel: I had been granted a private half hour with Dolly Parton, and as we spoke I was filled with a strange ethereal grace. This was not spiritual, nor was it sexual. It was healing and comforting. Gene listened and said, "Roger, I felt the exact same thing during my interview with her." We looked at each other. What did this mean? Neither one of us ever felt that feeling again. From time to time we would refer to it in wonder.
Roger Ebert (Life Itself)
I know who I am; I know what I can and can't do. I know what I will and won't do. I know what I am capable of and I don't agree to do things that I don't think I can pull off.
Dolly Parton
The way I see it, you've gotta put up with the rain to get a rainbow.
Dolly Parton
Finally, thank you, Dolly Parton. Just because.
Amy Poehler (Yes Please)
Yes, it’s unfortunate that we have been conditioned to see an alternative to motherhood as not normal. But you do all realise that some of the most brilliant women in the world don’t have kids, right? Oprah, Gloria Steinem, Helen Mirren, Dolly Parton? Do you think their lives carry an air of tragedy because they never had children? I don’t. I’m sure they all had different reasons for not doing it, some maybe couldn’t, some didn’t want to, but these women’s lives are not empty because of that. I think it’s important we take the lead from our heroes and for everyone to stop valuing women on whether they do, or do not, become mothers. The irony of yours and your listeners’ opinions is that it is you boxing women in to these roles, not men. It’s highly un-feminist of you.’ She
Dawn O'Porter (The Cows)
Maybe it’s no coincidence that Parton’s popularity seemed to surge the same year America seemed to falter. A fractured thing craves wholeness, and that’s what Dolly Parton offers—one woman who simultaneously embodies past and present, rich and poor, feminine and masculine, Jezebel and Holy Mother, the journey of getting out and the sweet return to home.
Sarah Smarsh (She Come By It Natural: Dolly Parton and the Women Who Lived Her Songs)
If I can hold God's attention, I can hold the world's..
Dolly Parton (Coat of Many Colors)
Also there’s this thing that happens to me sometimes, and it’ll usually be me watching a video of Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers singing “Islands in the Stream” and I wonder if I’m crying because I have majorly unaddressed psychological reasons or if that song is really that beautiful.
Molly McAleer (The Alcoholic Bitch Who Ruined Your Life: Stories About Love, Death and Rehab)
The way I see it, if you want a rainbow you have to put up with the rain.
Dolly Parton
Get down off ‘at cross; Somebody needs the wood!
Dolly Parton
A bird & a fish can fall in love, but where do they make a home?
Dolly Parton
As her idol Dolly Parton once said, “If you don’t like the road you’re walking, start paving another one.
Tessa Bailey (Protecting What's His (Line of Duty, #1))
The way I see it, if you want the rainbow, you gotta put up with the rain. - Dolly Parton     Either
Kathy Collins (200 Motivational and inspirational Quotes That Will Inspire Your Success)
Dolly Parton was a hero of the Rising, and I dare you to tell any red-blooded American girl who’s ever felt bad about her wardrobe differently,” said Governor Kilburn.
Mira Grant (Feedback (Newsflesh, #4))
If you love peanut butter pie, you are either Dolly Parton or someone who loves her.
Kate Lebo (A Commonplace Book of Pie)
That day on the set, after talking to Carl, she came over to me and asked, “What did Carl mean when he said that you’re an angel?” I didn’t know what he had said, but I was naturally dying to hear more. Jane went on, “I was telling him how sweet you are and how easy you are to work with, and he said, ‘Well, she’s an angel.’ I kinda laughed and said, ‘Yeah, she is.’ But he looked me right in the eye and said, ‘No, you don’t get it. She’s a real angel.’” I was flattered and honored that Carl thought that. It’s just like him to say it to somebody else, figuring I’ll never hear about it.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
I knew I wasn't second best for Tim (just as I knew that in real life, Jolene's flaming locks and eyes of emerald green stood no change against the aces of spades that was Dolly Parton's chest), but it took some believing, because I'd been second best to my sister for most of my life. That shakes your faith in yourself.
Anna Maxted (A Tale of Two Sisters)
People ask me, “Do you ever run out of patience? Are you ever rude to people?” Sometimes I am. I hate when it happens, but it seems like some people just try to get on your nerves. There are times when I feel like saying something like, “Why don’t you get out of my face, you ugly woman. And take those bratty kids with you!” But at times like that I usually get all flustered. I get confused and say stupid stuff like, “Kiss my ass, that’s what you are. And don’t think I can’t do it!
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
His colleague Richard Feynman wanted to call these new basic particles partons16, as in Dolly, but was over-ruled. Instead they became known as quarks.
Bill Bryson (A Short History of Nearly Everything)
When I discovered that there was actually a thing called a push-up bra, that, to me, had to be equal of the day Einstein figured out that relativity thing.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
There's a powerful wisdom in just leaving the bullshit for someone else to fix.
Sarah Smarsh (She Come By It Natural: Dolly Parton and the Women Who Lived Her Songs)
I've often said I don't lose my temper as much as use it. I don’t do either unless I have to because I love peace and harmony, but when you step in my territory, I will call you on it.
Dolly Parton
ONE All the best things in my life have started with a Dolly Parton song. Including my friendship with Ellen Dryver. The song that sealed the deal was “Dumb Blonde” from her 1967 debut album, Hello, I’m Dolly. During the summer before first grade, my aunt Lucy bonded with Mrs. Dryver over their mutual devotion to Dolly. While they sipped sweet tea in the dining room, Ellen and I would sit on the couch watching cartoons, unsure of what to make of each other. But then one afternoon that song came on over Mrs. Dryver’s stereo. Ellen tapped her foot as I hummed along, and before Dolly had even hit the chorus, we were spinning in circles and singing at the top of our lungs. Thankfully, our love for each other and Dolly ended up running deeper than one song. I
Julie Murphy (Dumplin' (Dumplin', #1))
So here I was trying to get married to a man who hadn’t really asked me, with a boss that didn’t want me to and a town that wouldn’t let me do it when I wanted. Yet I knew in my heart it was right.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
If you try to follow everyone else and be like everyone else, before you know it you’re gone. You’re not going to find yourself again; you’ll just be a version of what you might have hoped to have been.
Dolly Parton
Mary the Canary lives in a cloud of perfume and colours. She's an auxiliary nurse by day and a country and western singer by night: bed pans and power ballass. She's so glamorous she makes Mrs Hart look plain. She is the other woman and I'm bring trained to hate her even though I've never met her.
Damian Barr (Maggie & Me)
I was a reader, when I could get ahold of something to read, and literature showed me places I’d never seen. Another art form, though, showed me my own place: country music. Its sincere lyrics and familiar accent confirmed, with triumph and sorrow, that my home—invisible or ridiculed elsewhere in news and popular culture—deserved to be known, and that it was complicated and good.
Sarah Smarsh (She Come By It Natural: Dolly Parton and the Women Who Lived Her Songs)
I tried every diet in the book. I tried some that weren’t in the book. I tried eating the book. It tasted better than most of the diets. I tried the Scarsdale diet and the Stillman water diet (you remember that one, where you run weight off trying to get to the bathroom). I tried Optifast, Juicefast, and Waterfast. I even took those shots that I think were made from cow pee. I endured every form of torture anybody with a white coat and a clipboard could devise for a girl who really liked fried pork chops. One night while I was on some kind of liquid-protein diet made from bone marrow, or something equally appetizing, I was with a group of friends at a Howard Johnson’s and some of them were having fried clams. I’ll never forget sitting there with all of that glorious fried fat filling my nostrils and feeling completely left out. I went home and wrote one of my biggest hits, “Two Doors Down.” I also went off my diet and had some fried clams. There were times when I thought of chucking it all in. “Damn the movie,” I would say. “I’m just gonna eat everything and go ahead and weigh five hundred pounds and have to be buried in a piano case.” Luckily, a few doughnuts later, that thought would pass and I would be back to the goal at hand. I remember something in a book I read called Gentle Eating. The author said you should pretend the angels are eating with you and that you want to save some for them. I loved that idea, because I love angels. I have to admit, though, there were times I would slap those angels out of the way and have their part too. A true hog will do that.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
Carl picked me up right on time. He has always been prompt. He has also always been mysterious. He didn’t give me any kind of hint as to where we were going, so I didn’t know how to dress or anything. As we drove along, I was trying to see what part of town we were heading for to get some clue as to what was up. I was surprised when we pulled into the driveway of a private home. Carl walked me to the door and opened it. Inside, his mother was just putting supper on the table. Without any other word of introduction Carl said to his mother, “Fix this girl a plate. She’s the one I’m going to marry.” With a nervous laugh I tried to acknowledge that he had made a little joke. But something in his voice told me he hadn’t. In all my life, I have never felt such an odd combination of emotions. First, I was shocked that he wanted to marry me, since he had never given me any indication that he cared that much for me. Second, I was astounded. I remember thinking, “Who the hell does this guy think he is?” I felt flattered, outraged, touched, turned on, scared to death, and completely confused. The boy back home who had bought the house was not even this presumptuous. At least he had said he loved me at some point. There I was, feeling as mixed up as a road lizard in a spin dryer, and having to act sociable while trying to keep my dinner down. I somehow got through the meal and worked things out in my own mind enough to keep seeing Carl.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
I’ll never forget this one night when Daddy had taken us way out to a little church up on a high ridge. There was no kind of instrumentation, and the hymns were all sung a cappella. During the preaching, there was a little more shouting from the congregation than usual. When it came time for us to sing, we were introduced by the preacher, a wiry little man with kind of a fiery look in his eyes. We stepped to the front and took our places on the old wood-plank platform to one side of the pulpit. Softly, I sung a note to get us started because it was decided I could come closest to hitting a key that we could all sing in. We began our songs, just as we had planned. I was aware that the pastor was on the stage behind us, but I didn’t think anything of it. After a while, I could feel Stella nudging me in the ribs, trying not to be noticed. I looked at her, and she motioned with her head slightly back toward where the preacher was standing. He seemed to be totally wrapped up in the spirit, nearly in a trance. I didn’t think too much of it, until I spotted a familiar sight—the back markings of a snake, a cottonmouth moccasin. I had seen them in the woods, usually scurrying across the path toward cover. They were afraid of me, and I was afraid of them. And up to now, we had always managed to keep our distance from each other. Here, apparently, they were a part of the worship service. I could see now, out of my peripheral vision, that the preacher had a full grown cottonmouth by the back of the head and it was twisting and coiling all around his forearm. Some members of the congregation were reaching out as if they wanted to touch it. The preacher was getting more and more worked up, and he reached into a wooden crate by the pulpit and took out two more snakes. This time he seemed to be holding them much more carelessly. He lifted them near his face as if daring them to strike. We sisters just kept on singing, unconsciously moving away from the snakes until we were very near the front of the platform. Just then, I noticed something that struck a note of fear in my heart much greater than that inspired by the snakes. My father had stepped into the back of the church to hear his little girls sing. Whatever he had been drinking didn’t impair his ability to see exactly what the preacher had in his hands. Just at that moment, the man and his snakes took a step toward the congregation, thus toward us. Daddy had seen enough. He charged down the aisle like a wild boar through a thicket. “You get them Goddamn snakes away from my kids!” Daddy bellowed with a force in his voice I had never heard before. It was amazing how quickly that preacher broke his trance and paid heed. He had heard the voice of a higher power, in this case a really pissed-off redneck. Daddy swooped us up and out the front door before we had time to think about what was happening. We didn’t even stop singing until we were almost down the steps into the churchyard. We were glad to be out of there, and I at least was proud that Daddy had come to our rescue. But Daddy obviously felt terrible about it. On the way home in the car, he got to feeling especially bad. “Goddamn! I can’t believe I said Goddamn in church!” he muttered to himself. He finally got so upset he had to stop the car and get out in the woods and, in his way, ask God’s forgiveness. I couldn’t help thinking how badly Mama had always wanted Daddy to walk down the church aisle and declare himself. Now he had certainly done that, although not I’m sure the way Mama had in mind.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
One weekend we went to a concert at Buck Lake Ranch in Angola, Indiana, where Dolly Parton and Porter Wagoner were performing. That was something special!
Ora Jay Eash (Plain Faith: A True Story of Tragedy, Loss and Leaving the Amish)
There are an infinite number of ways to be female on this planet, just as there are an infinite number of ways to be human, and my belief is that all of them are cool. If my experience and Janet's, for instance, are very different, that makes neither one of us one speck less - or more, for that matter - female. If there is room for Dolly Parton, and room for my aunt Erna, and for Janet, then surely there ought to be room for me. I mention all of this because I admit I grow weary with clever theories about transgender people, as if our identity is part of an argument that anyone might win or lose. If you have a complex theory about gender that does nothing to reduce the suffering of a group of vulnerable, maligned souls, maybe what you need, above all, is a new theory.
Jennifer Finney Boylan (Good Boy: My Life in Seven Dogs)
Storms make trees take deeper roots. —Dolly Parton
Jody Cantrell Dyer (The Eye of Adoption)
Smile, it increases your face value.
Dolly Parton
No discussion of the South is complete without a tribute to that eternal symbol of southern womanhood: Dolly Parton.
Reese Witherspoon (Whiskey in a Teacup: What Growing Up in the South Taught Me About Life, Love, and Baking Biscuits)
I saw Warren’s eyes attach themselves to something in the distance. I turned around and saw in the next room, the dining room, Dolly Parton, quietly sitting at the table, alone, scribbling on a pad. In an instant, I could feel myself dropped as this new yummy dish was making Warren’s mouth water. He actually licked his lips as he left me on the couch and sat down next to her at the table. I followed him like a jilted wife, jealous, clumsy. I needn’t have bothered; Dolly was immune. Warren tried the whole deck of cards. Dolly concentrated on her numbers, adding, subtracting, and smiling adorably at his attempts. Watching her, I couldn’t blame him for trying. It was 1975. Dolly was all cream and roses, just astonishing and nice.
Lee Grant (I Said Yes to Everything: A Memoir)
In Barbie's early years, Mattel struggled to make its doll look like a real-life movie star. Today, however, real-life celebrities—as well as common folk—are emulating her. The postsurgical Dolly Parton looks like the post-surgical Ivana Trump looks like the postsurgical Michael Jackson looks like the postsurgical Joan Rivers looks like
M.G. Lord (Forever Barbie: The Unauthorized Biography of a Real Doll)
To produce Dolly, researchers at the Roslin Institute in Scotland used the DNA from just one cell from a mammary gland of her mother. A cell that forms the body of an organism is called a somatic cell. Most of your cells are somatic; the only exceptions are stem cells and reproductive cells. They say that Dolly the sheep was named for Dolly Parton, who along with a wonderful voice and excellent musical artistry has memorable mammary glands. (I am not kidding; that’s really what the Roslin scientists told reporters.)
Bill Nye (Undeniable: Evolution and the Science of Creation (Kindle Edition))
She was walking toward the beauty shop when Shay came out the door moving fast. The first thing Jill noticed was Shay’s hair and how it appeared really big. As Shay drew closer, Jill realized she looked like she was wearing a mask with big blue streaks over the eyes and giant red pouty lips. “What happened to you?” Jill asked in shock. “I’m not sure,” Shay said, looking just as stunned. “One minute, I was reading a magazine, and the next, two women that looked like Dolly Parton descended on me like vultures. They started putting stuff on my face, then they did all kinds of things to my hair.” Anne walked out of the shop next; her Napoleon hat ’do rode higher than ever. Ella followed with her little red hair ball reinflated. “Doesn’t Shay just look beautiful?” Ella chirped. She looked like a hooker who’d just survived a wind tunnel, but Jill nodded and tried to smile.
Robin Alexander (The Trip)
If you don't like th road your walking, start paving anotheer one
Dolly Parton
Double D up hoes, Dolly Parton
Nicki Minaj
Workin' 9 to 5, what a way to make a livin' Barely gettin' by, it's all takin' and no givin' They just use your mind and you never get the credit It's enough to drive you crazy if you let it 9 to 5, yeah they got you where they want you There's a better life, and you dream about it, don't you? It's a rich man's game no matter what they call it And you spend your life puttin' money in his wallet
Dolly Parton
If you want the rainbow, you gotta put up with the rain.
Dolly Parton
It takes a lot of money to look this cheap.
Dolly Parton
without Dolly Parton there would have been no Taylor Swift.
Helen Morales (Pilgrimage to Dollywood: A Country Music Road Trip through Tennessee (Culture Trails: Adventures in Travel))
She likes a quote by Dolly Parton: “Decide who you are, and then do it on purpose.
Bobby Hutchinson (Special Education)
The Grits Guide to Southern Humor “I am not offended by dumb blonde jokes because I know I’m not dumb…I also know I’m not blonde!” -Dolly Parton, Tennessee Grits
Deborah Ford (Grits (Girls Raised in the South) Guide to Life)
I would sit up on top of the woodpile playing and singing at the top of my lungs. Sometimes I would take a tobacco stake and stick it in the cracks between the boards on the front porch. A tin can on top of the tobacco stake turned it into a microphone, and the porch became my stage. I used to perform for anybody or anything I could get to watch. The younger kids left in my care would become the unwilling audience for my latest show. A two-year-old’s attention span is not very long. So there I would be in the middle of my act, thinking I was really something, and my audience would start crawling away. I was so desperate to perform that on more than one occasion I sang for the chickens and the pigs and ducks. They didn’t applaud much, but with the aid of a little corn, they could be counted on to hang around for a while.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
People have often asked me how we girls managed any privacy in a house with so many boys and no private rooms. It was difficult. We used to bathe with a washcloth from a pan of water. We would first start with our necks and faces and wash down as far as possible. Then we would wash the road dust from our feet and wash up as far as possible. Later, when the boys were out of the room, we would wash “possible.” It was these circumstances that led to a very embarrassing mishap that I have told very few people and would not relate here if it were not so funny. We had an outdoor bathroom, and there were times in the middle of the night when it was very inconvenient to dress and go out into the cold just to take a leak. For these times there was a little room, actually a closet, that had in it what was called a “slop jar” or “slop bucket.” It was actually an enameled pot with flared sides that was made to accommodate a woman squatting over it to do her business. The closet had no door as such, just a sort of curtain hung on a tight piece of wire. After dark when the fire had died down, it could afford some kind of privacy at least. One night when I was about sixteen or seventeen, I had been out on a date and got home fairly late. Everybody was already in bed, and I didn’t want to wake them and alert Mama and Daddy to the hour of my homecoming. I was absolutely bustin’ to pee, so I fumbled my way through the dark until I found the curtain to the closet and stepped inside. I dropped my panties and hiked up my skirt and assumed the position over the slop jar. I was feeling relieved in a physical sense and quite grown-up and somewhat smug that I “pulled it off,” so to speak. But suddenly, here in the middle of my little triumph, or more accurately here in the middle of my rump, came the cold nose of an unexpected intruder. A raccoon had gotten into the house, and unbeknownst to me, we were sharing the closet as well as a very intimate moment. When I felt that cold nose on my butt, I screamed bloody murder and literally peed all over myself. Of course I woke the whole house with my unscheduled concert. Daddy grabbed the poker to fend off an intruder. Mama started praying. The little kids cried, and the big kids just ran around confused. When everybody found out what had happened, they all had a good laugh at my expense. Except, of course, the raccoon. Once the lights were turned on, he acted like any man caught in a compromising position with a lady and bolted for the door. I often think of that moment at times when I’m feeling “too big for my britches,” and it tends to have a humbling effect.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
The thing I will never forget was the talk he gave about faith. While the forgettable man handed out little red leatherette-bound New Testaments, “Searchlight” passed out key chains. They were not just any key chains. Each one had a little plastic ball on the end with a single mustard seed inside. The plastic globe magnified it, much like the odd man’s eyes. If you looked closely, you could read a Bible verse on a shred of paper next to the mustard seed. It said, “If ye have faith, even as much as a single seed of mustard, ye shall be able to move mountains.” I took that to heart. In my particular case it might have said, “Ye shall move from the mountains” or even “Ye shall grow mountains and parlay them into a huge career.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
One of our favorite family stories tells about a preacher who stopped by one day while Daddy was hard at work. This particular preacher was never much of a help to anybody and seemed to show up only when he was out beatin' the bushes for money. Well, this snooty parson in his starched collar stopped by the fence while my daddy was sweating and groaning and trying to get a stump out of the ground, and he said, "Hello, Lee, this is a right nice place you and the Lord have here." Daddy wiped the sweat from his brow with the back of his sleeve and said, "Yeah, well, you should have seen the som'bitch when the Lord had it by hisself." I have often joked that we had "two rooms and a path, and running water, if you were willing to run to get it.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
Another thing we loved to do was to catch June bugs and tie them to a string. I'm sure it was more fun for us than the poor weighted-down June bugs, but we had a ball flying what we called our “’lectric kites." You tried to get a real good fat June bug with a lot of lifting power. Sometimes you could just fantasize about him being able to lift you right off the ground to where you could soar up among the clouds and look down at the trees and the fields. That kind of blissful thought would sometimes come to a sudden halt when your June bug would sacrifice his leg in the name of freedom and buzz off across the pasture. In the blink of an eye you could go from being a kind of daring Smoky Mountain astronaut to being just a kid with a bug leg hanging from a piece of thread. I'd like to take this opportunity to publicly thank all of those five-legged June bugs for those dreams, fleeting though they may have been.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
Among the most prominent under-the-tree drinkers were a pair of characters named Red and Clarence. They were two of the biggest drinking carousers around, but when the spirit hit them, they could get very religious. Once Red had decided he had received the “gift of tongues,” a common practice in our Pentecostal church. He went to church a few times and would, on impulse, stand up and go into seemingly meaningless strings of syllables, to which the believers would respond with “Bless him, Lord.” The story is that one day Red and Clarence were downtown in a truck belonging to one of them, and Red looked out the window and was reading a sign, somewhat haltingly. “E-CON-O-MY-AU-TO-SUP-PLY, Economy Auto Supply,” Red sputtered, to which Clarence, assuming his friend had gone into “tongues,” quickly came back with, “Bless him, Lord.” That story circulated through the ranks of the church membership and was the source of great laughter for a time around the Parton household. It became something of a running joke that would crop up whenever anybody said anything that could be mistaken for “tongues.” Sunday morning, getting ready for church, a brother would say, “Come tie my bow tie,” and some smart-aleck sibling would shout, “Bless him, Lord,” and the rest of us would join in, all pretending to be caught up in the spirit.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
Young boys were dragged to church the same way I was. But since they were destined to become men, they were given more leeway. I suppose when they started growing pubic hair they were allowed to wander out of church before the service was over to take their places outside, as if training to be men. Much of their training apparently involved staring back into the church at us girls. It was the custom after church for the boys and girls to do some limited socializing, flirting, and so on, while the women gossiped and the men smoked and spit. This flirtation, however, was limited by the distance the boy could get the girl to walk into the woods, and the girl’s own boundaries. So there I sat, trying to be holy, praying for forgiveness for sins I couldn’t put my finger on, repenting for things I had put my finger on, and all the while being aware of the boys looking at me, the woods behind the church, and the possible combinations of all of these things. The devil and I certainly had one thing in common: We were both horny.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
I flapped open the lid of my cardboard guitar case and whipped out my old Martin. Mr. Killen seemed a little taken aback. I think he wasn’t sure whether I was going to play the guitar or brain him with it. He breathed a sigh of relief when I went into a song. Bill hustled his guitar out as fast as he could and joined in. I sang loud and strong with the security that comes with knowing that one way or another, it’ll be over soon.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
Carl finally came home and would come to see me almost every night, usually staying to the wee hours. He was working with his father in his asphalt-paving business in South Nashville and I was living in Madison, Tennessee. Between that and the time he spent with me, he wasn’t getting any sleep at all. Finally, one day he said, quite matter-of-factly, “You’re either gonna have to move to the other side of town or we’re gonna have to get married.” That, to Carl, was a proposal. People always want to know how he asked me to marry him, and I always have to say, “He didn’t exactly ask.” Part of me was thrilled that he wanted to marry me, but another part was a little taken aback. That must have been the strongest part because that was the one that answered. “You never have even said you loved me.” “Hell, you know I love you,” was Carl’s answer. I attribute this to that same kind of unspoken communication that I explained when describing life with my daddy. It is one of the Parton/Dean rules of conduct I have become a one-woman committee to abolish. Always at holidays or other family gatherings, people would hug and say good-bye, but they would never say “I love you.” Sure, I know that the love is there, but dammit, I want to hear it! I was the first one in my family, that I know of, to ever tell other family members that I loved them. One day, after I had been living away from home for many years, I was saying good-bye to Daddy when I told him, “I love you.” He responded in the usual nonverbal, look-at-the-ground Parton way, and I just couldn’t stand it anymore. I took his head between my hands and made him look me right in the eye. “You tell me you love me,” I demanded. With no small amount of embarrassment he said, “Aww, you know I love you’uns” (a mountain word meaning more than one). “Not you’uns!” I kept on. “This has got nothing to do with Cassie or Bobby or anybody else. I want to know if you”—I emphasized the word by poking my finger into his chest—“love me,” I said with an emphatic point toward myself. He tried to look to one side, but I held his face firmly. He blushed and sputtered and finally said haltingly, “I love you.” That must have been the crack in the dam. Once the top man had fallen, it was easier to teach the rest of the Partons to say “I love you.” Now it is something we all do freely. It is still not something Carl does on a regular basis. But now and then, in a kind of sidewinding way, he will say it.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
I asked Carl to go to the event with me, and he agreed. We rented him a tuxedo, and he looked very handsome in it, if a little uncomfortable. The tuxedo was only the beginning of a miserable evening for Carl. Everywhere we went there were crowds of people, including photographers, and everybody made a big fuss over us. Carl sat through the ceremony and patiently waited afterward while I shook hands and accepted congratulations from a throng of music-industry people. I thought he was really handsome in his tux, but you could tell by the look on his face it suited him like a sock on a rooster. He didn’t say much all evening long, but on the way home, he took off his tuxedo jacket and tie and then even his shirt. I’ll never forget the way he looked sitting there in the car with his suspenders across his bare chest. Finally, he turned to me and said calmly, “Honey, I love you and I will support you in your career any way that I can. I know it’s a big part of you and you wouldn’t be the same person if you didn’t do it. But the limelight’s just not for me. I’ll be there at home waiting for you, but I am not going to any more of these wingdings.” He has been a wingdingless man of his word ever since.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
The storm turned out to be much worse even than our captain had imagined. Winds that must have been near hurricane force whipped the seas into a frenzy. The couple busied themselves with trying to handle the boat and keep it afloat, and I’m glad they did. But that left Sandy and me to fend for ourselves. Of the two of us, Sandy is the bigger sissy (he’s always more afraid he’s going to break a nail than I am). He had no idea what to do. Soon it became clear to both of us what to do: hold on for dear life! Waves began washing over the rear deck, and I started to get really scared. It takes a lot for me to take my shoes off, but this is one time I decided I could forgo the five-inch heels. I took them off, and it wasn’t long before “my little slings,” as I always called them, got slung. They went overboard with a wave, and all I could do was watch them go. The next wave almost got me. A wall of water came crashing over the boat, slapping it around like a toy. I slid across the deck, completely out of control. I felt a rush of cold water surround me as the sea swept me in. I managed to grab a railing and stay with the boat, but my whole body was dangling overboard. I could think of nothing but the shark stories the captain had told us earlier. Just as I began to lose my grip, I became aware of Sandy making his way across the pitching deck, reaching his hand out for me He somehow got a hold of me and dragged me back onto the boat and into the little cabin. It felt good to be out of the water, but by all appearances, the sharks’ dinner had only been delayed. There seemed to be no way our little boat could ride out this storm. You never know how you’re going to respond to a situation like that until you’re actually in it. The way Sandy and I chose to deal with it is still a source of wonder to me. We held a brief high-level discussion and unanimously decided that we were doomed. Sandy’s gutsy “They can kill us, but they won’t eat us” didn’t apply to sharks. Then we simply and calmly lay down on the little bunk, held hands, and waited to die. I thought to myself, “If this don’t beat all.” Here I am, a country girl from East Tennessee, about to die somewhere off the coast of Australia, side by side with a gay man from New York.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
One day I was standing with my stage manager, Sandy Prudden, and Buddy Sheffield watching as Kermit the Frog (with the help of the late Jim Henson) sweetly sang a song. Sandy was always a big joker. He sidled up to me and said, “Isn’t it amazing the way Kermit can sing like that with somebody’s hand up his ass.” Without missing a beat, I came back with, “Shoot, that ain’t nothin’. I did that for seven years on the ‘The Porter Wagoner Show.
Dolly Parton (Dolly: My Life and Other Unfinished Business)
There's some that constantly put monkeys on your back. It' their monkey, but somehow you end up carrying it. Often there are people who really care, but they constantly have problems and they want to share it with you and you're constantly trying to fix things for them. In truth, you're worried more about their problems than you do your own. Be weary of the monkeys.
Dolly Parton (Dream More)
There's some that constantly put monkeys on your back. It's their monkey, but somehow you end up carrying it. Often there are people who really care, but they constantly have problems and they want to share it with you and you're constantly trying to fix things for them. In truth, you're worried more about their problems than you do your own. Be weary of the monkeys.
Dolly Parton (Dream More)
All the best things in my life have started with a Dolly Parton song.
Julie Murphy (Dumplin' (Dumplin', #1))
All the best things in my life have started with a Dolly Parton song. Including my friendship with Ellen Dryver.
Julie Murphy (Dumplin' (Dumplin', #1))
Then, the music began. “Stairway to Heaven.” The Dolly Parton version.
Marshall Thornton (Masc (Femme, #2))
The doc swore she came out screamin' in the key of E.
Dolly Parton (Coat of Many Colors)
A minute to Dolly's like a lifetime to everybody else.
Dolly Parton (Coat of Many Colors)
I turned at this new voice, a female voice with a deep country twang. My mouth dropped open at what I saw. Dolly Parton, or a fair impersonation of her, was standing in the doorway. Big blonde hair, tiny body, enormous knockers, wearing a pink negligee set, complete with marabou feathers, even on the high-heeled slippers she wore. I realized she wasn’t Dolly because she had to be my age, or maybe a year or two older.
Kristen Ashley (Rock Chick Rescue (Rock Chick, #2))
The way I see it, if you want the rainbow, you gotta put up with the rain. - Dolly Parton
Kathy Collins (200 Motivational and inspirational Quotes That Will Inspire Your Success)
The woman was tall, wearing stretch leggings and a big red bulky sweater. Even though it was thick, it left no doubt that she filled it out a lot better than I filled out mine. Dolly Parton to my . . . well, let’s just say that the greatly endowed wagon had passed me by. Her blonde hair was cascading in glorious waves around her shoulders instead of hanging in tight curls like mine. She no doubt knew her way around a curling iron. She was resting a hand on Aunt Sue’s shoulders like they were the very best of friends. I couldn’t explain it, but I took an immediate dislike to her. Probably because Brad couldn’t take his eyes off her and was starting to drool. “Hey, everyone, this is Cynthia,” Aunt Sue announced, like we should all care when I definitely did not. “She’s staying at the condo next to yours. This is my niece, Kate, my nephew, Sam, and their friends.” “It’s great to meet you all,” Cynthia said a little too breathlessly, her voice having a little squeal to it, like she was trying really hard to sound sexy but she just came across sounding like a cat whose tail had been stepped on.
Rachel Hawthorne (Love on the Lifts)
I mean, Dolly Patron-THE Dolly Parton-is singing to some mysterious Jolene who she things is more beautiful and more worthy than her, begging her not to take her man. It's catchy and everyone knows the words, but to me, it's this reminder that no matter who you are, there will always be someone prettier or smarter or thinner. Perfection is nothing more than a phantom shadow we're all chasing.
Julie Murphy
Me and God have a great relationship, but we're both seeing other people.
Dolly Parton
Dolly Parton seems to be the stars of your dream!
Petra Hermans (Voor een betere wereld)
Except it made us look as if we were about to break out into song – a duet by Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers. Edie burst out laughing. Before I could stop myself, I started singing ‘Islands in the Stream’.
Jane Riley (The Likely Resolutions of Oliver Clock)
There is, then, intellectual knowledge--the stuff of research studies and think pieces--and there is experiential knowing. Both are important, and women from all backgrounds might possess both. But we rarely exalt the knowing, which is the only kind of feminism many working women have.
Sarah Smarsh (She Come By It Natural: Dolly Parton and the Women Who Lived Her Songs)
Political headlines were fixating on a hateful, sexist version of rural, working-class America that I did not recognize. Dolly’s music and life contained what I wanted to say about class, gender, and my female forebears: That country music by women was the formative feminist text of my life.
Sarah Smarsh (She Come By It Natural: Dolly Parton and the Women Who Lived Her Songs)
Parton’s musical genius deserves a discussion far beyond and above the matters of gender and class. But the lyrics she wrote are forever tied to the body that sang them, her success forever tied to having patterned her look after the “town trollop” of her native holler. For doing so, she received a fame laced with ridicule; during interviews in the 1970s and 1980s, both Barbara Walters and Oprah Winfrey asked her to stand up so they could point out, without humor, that she looked like a tramp.
Sarah Smarsh (She Come By It Natural: Dolly Parton and the Women Who Lived Her Songs)
I look like the girl next door—if you happen to live next to an amusement park.” ~Dolly Parton
J.C. McKenzie (Conspiracy of Ravens (Raven Crawford, #1))
I think of country radio like a great lover. You were great to me, you bought me a lot of nice things and then you dumped my ass for younger women.
Lydia R. Hamessley (Unlikely Angel: The Songs of Dolly Parton (Women Composers))
the way i see it, if you want the rainbow, you gotta out up with the rain~
Dolly Parton
When I wake up, I expect things to be good. If they're not, then I try to set about trying to make them as good as I can 'cause I know I'm gonna have to live that day anyway. So why not try to make the most of it if you can? Some days, they pan out a little better than others, but you still gotta always just try.” – Dolly Parton
Charles River Editors (American Legends: The Life of Dolly Parton)
Be whatever your dreams and your luck will let you be.
Dolly Parton
In the good old days when times were bad No amount of money could buy from me The memories that I have of then No amount of money could pay me To go back and live through it again
Dolly Parton
The woman who speaks about feminism is not always the one truly insisting on equality behind closed doors.
Sarah Smarsh (She Come By It Natural: Dolly Parton and the Women Who Lived Her Songs)
I strengthen the muscles around my heart, but I can’t harden it.
Dolly Parton
330 Love Ln. Playlist Love Story– Taylor Swift Everything I wanted – Billie Ellish Jolene – Dolly Parton Dust to Dust – The Civil Wars Adore You – Harry Styles This is Me Trying – Taylor Swift Till Forever – Joy Williams I Was Born to Love You – Ray LaMontagne
Mika Jolie (330 Love Ln (A Cherry Falls Romance #13))