Diogenes Of Sinope Quotes

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It is not that I am mad, it is only that my head is different from yours.
Diogenes of Sinope
Of what use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings?
Diogenes of Sinope
In a rich man's house there is no place to spit but his face.
Diogenes of Sinope
It is the privilege of the gods to want nothing, and of godlike men to want little.
Diogenes of Sinope
I am a citizen of the world.
Diogenes of Sinope (The Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers)
When some one reminded him that the people of Sinope had sentenced him to exile, he said, "And I sentenced them to stay at home.
Diogenes of Sinope
Dogs and philosophers do the greatest good and get the fewest rewards.
Diogenes of Sinope
Poverty is a virtue which one can teach oneself.
Diogenes of Sinope
No man is hurt but by himself
Diogenes of Sinope
A philosopher named Aristippus, who had quite willingly sucked up to Dionysus and won himself a spot at his court, saw Diogenes cooking lentils for a meal. "If you would only learn to compliment Dionysus, you wouldn't have to live on lentils." Diogenes replied, "But if you would only learn to live on lentils, you wouldn't have to flatter Dionysus.
Diogenes of Sinope
Behold! I've brought you a man.
Diogenes of Sinope
I am Diogenes the Dog. I nuzzle the kind, bark at the greedy and bite scoundrels.
Diogenes of Sinope
What else was Diogenes of Sinope seeking for than the true enjoyment of life, which he discovered in having the least possible wants?
Max Stirner (The Ego And His Own: The Case Of The Individual Against Authority (Radical Thinkers Book 8))
As a matter of self-preservation, a man needs good friends or ardent enemies, for the former instruct him and the latter take him to task.
Diogenes of Sinope
If I gained one thing from philosophy is that at the very least, I am well prepared to confront any change in fortune.
Diogenes of Sinope
Cuanto más conozco a la gente, más quiero a mi perro.
Diogenes of Sinope
No man is hurt but by himself.
Diogenes of Sinope
The insult dishonors the one who infers it, not the one who receives it.
Diogenes of Sinope
You are a simpleton, Hegesias; you do not choose painted figs, but real ones; and yet you pass over the true training and would apply yourself to written rules
Diogenes of Sinope
anche il sole entra ne' cessi ma non s'imbratta
Diogenes of Sinope (Filosofia del Cane)
Do života je třeba mít připravený buď rozum, nebo provaz
Diogenes of Sinope
Ο κόσμος ευημερεί όταν οι βασιλιάδες φιλοσοφούν και οι φιλόσοφοι βασιλεύουν.
Diogenes of Sinope
I watch Fox news for the comedy, MSNBC when I need to be reminded that mind midgets exist and CNN when I want to check out the latest in media lies and special interest propaganda. On the other 364 days of the year I read the American transcendentalists, David Hume, Rene Descartes, Immanuel Kant, Niccolo Machiavelli and Diogenes of Sinope.
James Scott, Senior Fellow, The Center for Cyber Influence Operations Studies (CCIOS)
Το φτωχικό δείπνο δεν κάνει τους ανθρώπους να παραφέρονται.
Diogenes of Sinope
But if you would only learn to live on lentils, you wouldn't have to flatter Dionysus.
Diogenes of Sinope
Thereupon many statesmen and philosophers came to Alexander with their congratulations, and he expected that Diogenes of Sinope also, who was tarrying in Corinth, would do likewise. But since that philosopher took not the slightest notice of Alexander, and continued to enjoy his leisure in the suburb Craneion, Alexander went in person to see him; and he found him lying in the sun. Diogenes raised himself up a little when he saw so many people coming towards him, and fixed his eyes upon Alexander. And when that monarch addressed him with greetings, and asked if he wanted anything, "Yes," said Diogenes, "stand a little out of my sun." It is said that Alexander was so struck by this, and admired so much the haughtiness and grandeur of the man who had nothing but scorn for him, that he said to his followers, who were laughing and jesting about the philosopher as they went away, "But truly, if I were not Alexander, I wish I were Diogenes.
Plutarch (The Life of Alexander the Great)
The most illustrious of this school—illustrious especially through his eccentricity—was Diogenes, who rolled on the ramparts of Corinth the tub which served him as a house, lighted his lantern in broad daylight on the pretext of "searching for a man," called himself a citizen of the world, was accused of being banished from Sinope by his fellow-countrymen and replied, "It was I who condemned them to remain," and said to Alexander, who asked him what he could do for him: "Get out of my sunshine; you are putting me in the shade.
Anonymous
THERE ARE MANY stories about Diogenes that may be apocryphal. As Luis E. Navia writes in Diogenes of Sinope: The Man in the Tub, his status as an uncompromising “dog” who “stood proudly as the living refutation of his world” must have inspired a huge number of stories with varying degrees of embellishment. To this day, although he has his critics, Diogenes is often hailed as a hero. For Foucault, he was the model of the philosopher who tells it like it is;13 for Nietzsche, he was the originator of the Cynic approach behind any genuine philosophy.
Jenny Odell (How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy)
Philosophers involved themselves intimately in debate about what society should be like and how it should govern itself. Some did this through deliberately aggressive and paradoxical distancing from everyday life, brutally to present reality to their fellow citizens, particularly the complacently wealthy. So Diogenes of Sinope, whom the philosopher Plato nicknamed ‘Socrates gone mad’, became a wandering beggar and, when infesting Athens with his presence, he slept in a large wine jar (he was sufficiently appreciated by the citizenry that when a teenage vandal broke his jar the ekklēsia is said to have bought him a replacement and to have had the boy flogged). His lifestyle was an enacted reminder that although human beings were rational animals, they were still animals – he was nicknamed ‘the dog’, from which his admirers and imitators took the name Cynics (‘those like dogs’).
Diarmaid MacCulloch (A History of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years)
Diogenes, who prided himself on requiring no more than was absolutely necessary, and flung away his bowl after he had learned from some lad to stoop down and drink from the hollow of his hand.
Diogenes Laërtius (Diogenes of Sinope - Life and Legend: Handbook of Source Material)
A bald man insulted Diogenes the Cynic and Diogenes replied, 'Far be it from me to make insults! But I do want to compliment your hair for having abandoned such a worthless head.
Diogenes Laërtius (Diogenes of Sinope - Life and Legend: Handbook of Source Material)
Now does a manly and grave appearance befit such a spirit, or rather a weak and effeminate one? Therefore we shall dress him up in his proper attire, not in the brave and awe-inspiring clothes which he often assumes when playing a part. So, by heavens, let him step forth luxurious, breathing of myrrh and wine, in a saffron robe, with much inordinate laughter, resembling a drunken reveler in a wanton midday riot and wearing faded garlands on his head and about his neck, reeling in his gait, dancing and singing an effeminate and tuneless song. Let him be led by brazen, dissolute women, known as certain of the sensual lusts, each pulling him her own way, and he rebuffs none of them nor says her nay, but follows readily and eagerly enough. And let them, with a great din of cymbals and flutes, come eagerly forth, escorting the frenzied fellow. And from the midst of the women let him utter shriller and more passionate cries than they; he is pale and effeminate in appearance, unacquainted with heaven's air or honest toil, lets his head droop, and leers lasciviously, with his watery eyes ever studying his fleshy self, but heedless of the soul and her mandates.
Diogenes Laërtius (Diogenes of Sinope - Life and Legend: Handbook of Source Material)
Those with Diogenes syndrome live in a state of squalor. Diogenes of Sinope, a Greek philosopher, lived in a barrel in ancient Athens and disparaged material possessions. So naming this syndrome after him was a misnomer. You need stuff to have squalor.
F.E. Beyer (Smoko)
Diogenes of Sinope said we sell things of great value for things of very little, and vice versa.” —DIOGENES LAERTIUS, LIVES OF THE EMINENT PHILOSOPHERS, 6.2.35b
Ryan Holiday (The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living: Featuring new translations of Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius)
The proper social role of the highly able Endogenous personality is not as leader. Indeed, the Endogenous personality should be excluded from leadership as he will tend to lack the desire to cooperate with or care for the feelings of others. His role should be as an intuitive/ inspired ‘adviser’ of rulers. Adviser-of-rulers is a term which should be taken to include various types of prophet, shaman, genius, wizard, hermit, and holy fool – the Socrates of the early Platonic dialogues is an historical example, as is Diogenes, the Cynic, of Sinope (c.412-323 BC), who lived in a barrel and is supposed to have snubbed Alexander the Great (without being punished), or even the Fool character in Shakespeare plays. These are extremes; but the description of Endogenous personality and of an ‘inner orientation’ also applies to most historical examples of creative genius. The Endogenous personality – therefore – does not (as most men) seek primarily for social, sexual or economic success; instead the Endogenous personality wants to live by his inner imperatives. The way it is supposed-to-work, the ‘deal’, the ‘social contract’; is that the Endogenous personality, by his non-social orientation, is working for the benefit of society as a whole; at the cost of his not competing in the usual status competitions within that society. His ‘reward’ is simply to be allowed, or – better – actively enabled, to have the minimal necessary sustenance, psychological support (principally being ‘left alone’ and not harassed or molested; but ideally sustained by his family, spouse, patron or the like) to be somehow providedwith the time and space and wherewithal to do his work and communicate the outcome. For the Endogenous personality, this is its own reward.
Edward Dutton (The Genius Famine: Why We Need Geniuses, Why They're Dying Out, Why We Must Rescue Them)