Diamond Sutra Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Diamond Sutra. Here they are! All 37 of them:

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As a lamp, a cataract, a star in space an illusion, a dewdrop, a bubble a dream, a cloud, a flash of lightning view all created things like this.
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Red Pine (The Diamond Sutra)
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This is how to contemplate our conditioned existence in this fleeting world: Like a tiny drop of dew, or a bubble floating in a stream; Like a flash of lightning in a summer cloud, Or a flickering lamp, an illusion, a phantom, or a dream. So is all conditioned existence to be seen.
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Gautama Buddha
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Diamond Sutra says, 'Make no formed conceptions about the realness of existence nor about the unrealness of existence," or words like that. Handcuffs will get soft and billy clubs will topple over, let's go on being free anyhow.
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Jack Kerouac (The Dharma Bums)
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Subhuti, someone might fill innumerable worlds with the seven treasures and give all away in gifts of alms, but if any good man or any good woman awakens the thought of Enlightenment and takes even only four lines from this Discourse, reciting, using, receiving, retaining and spreading them abroad and explaining them for the benefit of others, it will be far more meritorious. Now in what manner may he explain them to others? By detachment from appearances-abiding in Real Truth. -So I tell you- Thus shall you think of all this fleeting world: A star at dawn, a bubble in a stream; A flash of lightening in a summer cloud, A flickering lamp, a phantom, and a dream. When Buddha finished this Discourse the venerable Subhuti, together with the bhikshus, bhikshunis, lay-brothers and sisters, and the whole realms of Gods, Men and Titans, were filled with joy by His teaching, and, taking it sincerely to heart they went their ways.
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Gautama Buddha (Diamond Sutra)
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We must not despair the evanescent nature of time or our brief existence; we must embrace our delectable moment on earth. Life is a fantastic dream where we rejoice in the incomparable beauty of this misty world of ethereal sensations and sentiments. Buddha said, β€œIt is better to travel well than to arrive.” We must swim with the tide and rejoice in life of memory, dreams, and the beauty that is transpiring before our very eyes. Indian Buddhist teacher and philosopher Nagarjuna advises in β€œThe Diamond Sutra,” to enjoy the dream world, β€œThus shall you think of this fleeting world: A star at dawn, a bubble in the stream; a flash of lightening in a summer cloud; a flickering lamp, a phantom, and a dream.
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Kilroy J. Oldster (Dead Toad Scrolls)
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We must lead all beings to the shore of awakening, but, after these beings have become liberated, we do not, in truth, think that a single being has been liberated.
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Thich Nhat Hanh (The Diamond That Cuts Through Illusion: Commentaries on the Prajnaparamita Diamond Sutra)
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phenomenal
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Hsing Yun (Describing the Indescribable: A Commentary on the Diamond Sutra)
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understanding the nature of things just as they are. Why? Because: So you should view all of the fleeting worlds: A star at dawn, a bubble in the stream; A flash of lightning in a summer cloud; A flickering lamp, a phantom, and a dream.
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Mu Soeng (The Diamond Sutra: Transforming the Way We Perceive the World)
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When we first hear about emptiness, we feel a little frightened. But after practicing for a while, we see that things do exist, only in a different way than we'd thought. Emptiness is the Middle Way between existent and nonexistent. The beautiful flower does not become empty when it fades and dies. It is already empty, in its essence. Looking deeply, we see that the flower is made of non-flower elements β€” light, space, clouds, earth, and consciousness. It is empty of a separate, independent self. In the Diamond Sutra, we are taught that a human being is not independent of other species, so to protect humans, we have to protect the non-human species. If we pollute the water and air, the vegetables and minerals, we destroy ourselves. We have to learn to see ourselves in things that we thought were outside of ourselves in order to dissolve false boundaries.
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Thich Nhat Hanh (The Heart of the Buddha's Teaching: Transforming Suffering into Peace, Joy, and Liberation)
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Form is emptiness, emptiness is form; emptiness is not separate from form, form is not separate from emptiness; whatever is form is emptiness, whatever is emptiness is form.
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Edward Conze (Buddhist Wisdom: The Diamond Sutra and The Heart Sutra)
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Form is emptiness, emptiness is form.
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Edward Conze (Buddhist Wisdom: The Diamond Sutra and The Heart Sutra)
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experience. Direct perception into one’s own experience allows a practitioner to become free of the concepts of self or no-self, dharmas or no-dharmas. This awareness or direct perception has meant, for practitioners, an expansion of self-imposed boundaries of β€œself ” and a merging, so to speak, with the true or universal self. It cannot be cautioned too often that in pure experience, linguistic terms do not suffice. The Buddha also gives this warning in this passage.
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Mu Soeng (The Diamond Sutra: Transforming the Way We Perceive the World)
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How Buddhism Entered the World Like a dream, an illusion, a bubble, a shadow, a drop of dew, a flash of lightning. This is how to contemplate all phenomena. – The Buddha, Diamond Sutra It’s hard to project ourselves back two and a half thousand years into another time, another age, another continent, another country, another economy, another political structure, another social system, and a whole other worldview, and try to intuit the innermost thoughts of a spiritual innovator like the Buddha. However, if we can understand a little better what he experienced and how his contemporaries understood his instructions, we can better know how his teachings relate to us. So before we get to some of the insights, let me share with you some of his story.
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Doug Kraft (Meditator's Field Guide: Reflections on 57 Insights that Slip Away)
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We all enjoy leaving the city and going to the countryside. The trees are so beautiful; the air is so fresh. For me, this is one of the great pleasures of life. In the countryside, I like to walk slowly in the woods, look deeply at the trees and flowers, and, when I have to pee, I can do so right in the open air. The fresh air is so much more pleasant than any bathroom in the city, especially some very smelly public restrooms. But I have to confess that for years I was uneasy about peeing in the woods. The moment I approached a tree, I felt so much respect for its beauty and grandeur that I couldn’t bring myself to pee right in front of it. It seemed impolite, even disrespectful. So I would walk somewhere else, but there was always another tree or bush, and I felt equally disrespectful there. We usually think of our bathroom at home, made of wood, tile, or cement, as inanimate and we have no problem peeing there. But after I studied the Diamond Sutra and I saw that wood, tile, and cement are also marvelous and animate, I began to even feel uncomfortable using my own bathroom. Then I had a realization. I realized that peeing is also a marvelous and wondrous reality, our gift to the universe. We only have to pee mindfully, with great respect for ourselves and whatever surroundings we are in. So now I can pee in nature, fully respectful of the trees, the bushes, and myself. Through studying the Diamond Sutra, I solved this dilemma, and I enjoy being in the countryside now more than ever.
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Thich Nhat Hanh (The Diamond That Cuts Through Illusion: Commentaries on the Prajnaparamita Diamond Sutra)
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In fact, those who want to learn about wisdom must of necessity draw on the tradition of the fairly remote past. For centuries almost everyone has been silent on the subject. Philosophers, of whom some "love of wisdom" might be expected, have increasingly turned to the critical examination of knowledge, and are largely engaged in active disparagement of all that once passed of "wisdom." Nor has the effect of scientific and technical progress been any more propitious. What, indeed, could be more "unscientific" than the pursuit of wisdom-with its concern for the meaning of life, with its search for ends, purposes and values worthy of being pursued, with its desire to penetrate beyond the appearance of things to their true reality?
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Edward Conze (Buddhist Wisdom: The Diamond Sutra and The Heart Sutra)
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The term fraud alludes to a saying of the Buddha which the Mahayanists were fond of quoting: "All conditioned things are worthless, unsubstantial, fraudulent, deceptive and unreliable, but only fools are deceived by them. Nirvana alone, the highest reality, is free from deception." Two classes of facts are here distinguished-the deceptive multiple things on one side, and the true reality of the Absolute on the other.
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Edward Conze (Buddhist Wisdom: The Diamond Sutra and The Heart Sutra)
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In the present period of history we find ourselves in one of the worst possible cosmic ages, with Buddhism in full decline, and the people everywhere singularly obtuse about matters spiritual, and incredibly dimwitted when confronted with the wisdom of the sages.
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Edward Conze (Buddhist Wisdom: The Diamond Sutra and The Heart Sutra)
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Subhuti asked: Will there be any beings in the future period, in the last time, in the last epoch, in the last five hundred years, at the time of collapse of the good doctrine who, when these words of the Sutra are being taught, will understand their truth?-The Lord replied: Do not speak thus Subhuti! Yes, even then there will be beings who, when these words of the Sutra are being taught, will understand their truth.
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Edward Conze (Buddhist Wisdom: The Diamond Sutra and The Heart Sutra)
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The last five hundred years: It is well known from the Scriptures of all schools that after the Buddha's Nirvana the Dharma will progressively decline, and that every five hundred years a decisive change for the worse takes place... "The last five hundred years, when Buddhists will be strong in nothing but fighting and reproving, and the Dharma itself becomes practically invisible.
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Edward Conze (Buddhist Wisdom: The Diamond Sutra and The Heart Sutra)
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Buddhist tradition, in fact, distinguishes two classes of people, the "common worldlings" and the "saints" (arya), who occupy two distinct planes of existence, respectively known as the "worldly" and the "supramudane." The saints alone are truly alive, while the worldlings just vegetate along in a sort of dull and aimless bewilderment. Not content with being born in the normal way, the saints have undergone a spiritual rebirth, which is technically known as "winning the path.
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Edward Conze (Buddhist Wisdom: The Diamond Sutra and The Heart Sutra)
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Some of them taught that all worldly things are unreal, because [they are] a result of the perverted views. Only that which transcends worldly things and can be called β€œemptiness,” being the absence of them all, is real. Others said that everything, both worldly and supramundane, both absolute and relative, both Samsara and Nirvana, is fictitious and unreal and that all we have got is a number of verbal expressions to which nothing real corresponds.
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Mu Soeng (The Diamond Sutra: Transforming the Way We Perceive the World)
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For the practitioner, the understanding of wisdom and compassionβ€”and the inherent tension between the twoβ€”is not to be resolved on a theoretical level, but to be experienced in one’s own mind and body. In this way one finds emptiness and compassion to be mutually supportive rather than mutually contradictory.
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Mu Soeng (The Diamond Sutra: Transforming the Way We Perceive the World)
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saving all beings knowing full well that there is no one to save.
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Mu Soeng (The Diamond Sutra: Transforming the Way We Perceive the World)
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The bodhisattva vow provides the context and the inspiration to motivate the individual to gain insight into shunyata (emptiness), the essential nature of all phenomena, which leads to an experience of tathata (of suchness), of things as they are in their essential nature, of the mutual identity of phenomenal and transcendent reality. At the same time they cultivate karuna (compassion) for all those still caught in delusions, and help them through upaya (skillful means) so that they too may become free and attain buddhahood
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Mu Soeng (The Diamond Sutra: Transforming the Way We Perceive the World)
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Just be true, and there are no barriers.
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Hui-Neng (The Sutra of Hui-neng, Grand Master of Zen: With Hui-neng's Commentary on the Diamond Sutra (Shambhala Dragon Editions))
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It is a perfection that does not aim at completion; rather, it is wisdom based on practice through which one is always progressing toward the ideal.
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Mu Soeng (The Diamond Sutra: Transforming the Way We Perceive the World)
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In the Diamond Sutra the meditator is urged to throw away, to release, four notions in order to understand our own true nature and the true nature of reality: the notion of β€œself,” the notion of β€œhuman being,” the notion of β€œliving beings,” and the notion of β€œlife span.
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Thich Nhat Hanh (Zen and the Art of Saving the Planet)
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inspire people to move from a totally information-based orientation toward the transformattive integration of insights from the wisdom traditions with their own experience.
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Mu Soeng (The Diamond Sutra: Transforming the Way We Perceive the World)
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This wisdom is not formulaic and cannot be captured in words, for it has gone beyond words to a place where direct realization rather than conceptual verbalization is the essential mode of being.
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Mu Soeng (The Diamond Sutra: Transforming the Way We Perceive the World)
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When we can see the non-rose elements when looking at a rose, it is safe for us to use the word "rose." When we look at A and see that A is not A, we know that A is truly A. Then A is no longer a dangerous obstacle for us.
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Thich Nhat Hanh (The Diamond That Cuts Through Illusion: Commentaries on the Prajnaparamita Diamond Sutra)
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A true bodhisattva is one who sees no demarcations between organic and non-organic, self and non-self, living beings and non-living beings, bodhisattvas and non-bodhisattvas.
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Thich Nhat Hanh (The Diamond That Cuts Through Illusion: Commentaries on the Prajnaparamita Diamond Sutra)
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Subhuti, do not believe that the well-traveled one ever thinks, 'I ought to present a system for teaching spiritual truths.' You should never entertain such an idea. Why? Because if anyone thinks this way, they will not only be misunderstanding the teachings of the well- traveled one, but they will be slandering as well. Furthermore, what has been referred to as 'a system of teaching' has no meaning, because truth cannot be cut up into pieces and arranged into a system. The words can only be used as figures of speech.
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The Diamond Sutra
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In a place where there is something that can be distinguished by signs, in that place there is deception. If you can see the signless nature of signs, then you can see the Tathagata.
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Thich Nhat Hanh (The Diamond That Cuts Through Illusion: Commentaries on the Prajnaparamita Diamond Sutra)
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A meditation center, for example, is only a form. In our daily life we need forms, but we do not need to cling to them. We can study and practice meditation anywhere.
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Thich Nhat Hanh (The Diamond That Cuts Through Illusion: Commentaries on the Prajnaparamita Diamond Sutra)
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In what spirit is this explanation given? Without being caught up in signs, just according to things as they are, without agitation.
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Thich Nhat Hanh (The Diamond That Cuts Through Illusion: Commentaries on the Prajnaparamita Diamond Sutra)
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The Diamond Sutra,
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Aldous Huxley (Island)
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Any bodhisattva who undertakes the practice of meditation should cherish one thought only: β€œWhen I attain perfect wisdom, I will liberate all sentient beings in every realm of the universe, and allow them to pass into the eternal peace of Nirvana.” And yet, when vast, uncountable, unthinkable myriads of beings have been liberated, truly no being has been liberated. Why? Because no bodhisattva who is a true bodhisattva entertains such concepts as β€œself” or β€œothers.” Thus there are no sentient beings to be liberated and no self to attain perfect wisdom. β€”The Diamond Sutra (4th century Ce)
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Stephen Mitchell (The Second Book of the Tao)