Dev Movie Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Dev Movie. Here they are! All 8 of them:

What are we watching?" [...] [...] He hugged her closer. "The sacrifices I make for you -just watch." She was intrigued enough to pay attention to the screen. "Pride and Prejudice," she read out. "It's a book written by a human. Nineteenth century?" "Uh-huh." "The hero is... Mr. Darcy?" "Yes. According to Ti, he's the embodiment of male perfection." Dev ripped open a bag of chips he'd grabbed and put it in Katya's hands. "I don't know -the guy wears tights.
Nalini Singh (Blaze of Memory (Psy-Changeling #7))
She was the kind of star who sold happy dreams. She didn't want to sell darkness. Pain was best left in the real world where it belonged, where it burrowed so deep you needed a multimillion-dollar industry to escape from it.
Sonali Dev (The Bollywood Bride (Bollywood, #2))
I’ve seen this movie before. The plot is simple: First, you take an urgent date-driven project, where the shipment date cannot be delayed because of external commitments made to Wall Street or customers. Then you add a bunch of developers who use up all the time in the schedule, leaving no time for testing or operations deployment. And because no one is willing to slip the deployment date, everyone after Development has to take outrageous and unacceptable shortcuts to hit the date.
Gene Kim (The Phoenix Project: A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win)
be said on the subject.” McInery opened her mouth to speak, but Mathias continued, “No, we’re not kicking anyone out. As you say, we’re all that’s left. That has to mean something.” From McInery’s face that was not what she had planned to say. 3rd August - Kirkman House Wyndham Square “It’s movie night,” Dev said. “Just as soon as it gets dark. That’s in about three hours.” Tuck and Jay were sitting in the third floor conference room that was being used
Frank Tayell (Reunion (Surviving The Evacuation #5))
Life in IT is pretty shitty when it’s so misunderstood and mismanaged. It becomes thankless and frustrating as people realize that they are powerless to change the outcome, like an endlessly repeating horror movie. If that’s not damaging to our self-worth as human beings, I don’t know what is. That’s got to change,
Gene Kim (The Phoenix Project: A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win)
My heart lurches as all the implications sink in. I’ve seen this movie before. The plot is simple: First, you take an urgent date-driven project, where the shipment date cannot be delayed because of external commitments made to Wall Street or customers. Then you add a bunch of developers who use up all the time in the schedule, leaving no time for testing or operations deployment. And because no one is willing to slip the deployment date, everyone after Development has to take outrageous and unacceptable shortcuts to hit the date.
Gene Kim (The Phoenix Project: A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win)
I think I understand why Bollywood movies have songs," he said. "They understand that sometimes people feel so much they have to sing and dance about it.
Nisha Sharma (My So-Called Bollywood Life)
These were the horror stories I’d heard from job candidates coming from other companies. I interviewed veterans who’d worked for eight years in top studios and never shipped a game because of cancellations and changes from marketing. Some publishers didn’t allow their developers to play games, even after-hours (this was especially strange to us, since Blizzard encouraged this, stocking its hallway game cabinets with free copies of games for people to check out on a first-come, first-served basis). Yet some studios considered familiarity with other games bad for morale and prevented their employees from hanging posters from other projects or properties (including movies) because they didn’t reinforce “team spirit.” Many studios were highly structured, politically driven machines where argument was frowned upon and decisions were made by a small number of people. But the most common flaw in the industry at the time was its shortsighted nature—treating employees as temporary or easily replaced assets. Dev teams were often rebooted between projects, wiped before they ever established a rhythm or voice of their own. It was no wonder Blizzard retained its employees longer than other companies.
John Staats (The World of Warcraft Diary: A Journal of Computer Game Development)