Daphne Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Daphne. Here they are! All 200 of them:

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But luxury has never appealed to me, I like simple things, books, being alone, or with somebody who understands.
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Daphne du Maurier
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I have found the paradox, that if you love until it hurts, there can be no more hurt, only more love.
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Daphne Rae (Love Until It Hurts)
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Women want love to be a novel. Men, a short story.
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Daphne du Maurier
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Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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If only there could be an invention that bottled up a memory, like scent. And it never faded, and it never got stale. And then, when one wanted it, the bottle could be uncorked, and it would be like living the moment all over again.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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Happiness is not a possession to be prized, it is a quality of thought, a state of mind.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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I am glad it cannot happen twice, the fever of first love. For it is a fever, and a burden, too, whatever the poets may say.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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you can take this mouth this wound you want but you can't kiss and make it better.
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Daphne Gottlieb (Why Things Burn)
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To be a baby elephant must be wonderful. Surrounded by a loving family 24 hours a day…. I think it must be how it ought to be, in a perfect world.
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Daphne Sheldrick
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I suppose sooner or later in the life of everyone comes a moment of trial. We all of us have our particular devil who rides us and torments us, and we must give battle in the end.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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I wish I was a woman of about thirty-six dressed in black satin with a string of pearls.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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Men are simpler than you imagine my sweet child. But what goes on in the twisted, tortuous minds of women would baffle anyone.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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I wondered how many people there were in the world who suffered, and continued to suffer, because they could not break out from their own web of shyness and reserve, and in their blindness and folly built up a great distorted wall in front of them that hid the truth.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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I wondered why it was that places are so much lovelier when one is alone.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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Be sure it's your real self you're showing. Because it is your real self that needs to be loved.
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Daphne Rose Kingma (Finding True Love: The 4 Essential Keys to Bring You the Love of Your Life)
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Either you go to America with Mrs. Van Hopper or you come home to Manderley with me." "Do you mean you want a secretary or something?" "No, I'm asking you to marry me, you little fool.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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We're not meant for happiness, you and I.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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A dreamer, I walked enchanted, and nothing held me back.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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It is not unknown for fathers with a brace of daughters to reel off their names in order of birth when summoning the youngest, and I had long ago become accustomed to being called 'Ophelia Daphne Flavia, damn it.
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Alan Bradley (The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie (Flavia de Luce, #1))
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The road to Manderley lay ahead. There was no moon. The sky above our heads was inky black. But the sky on the horizon was not dark at all. It was shot with crimson, like a splash of blood. And the ashes blew towards us with the salt wind from the sea.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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I believe there is a theory that men and women emerge finer and stronger after suffering, and that to advance in this or any world we must endure ordeal by fire.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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Maybe one of the monsters ate him," Daphne whimpered. "That would be awesome," Puck said. Sabrina flashed him an angry look. "Awesome in a terrible, heartbreakingly tragic way," Puck continued.
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Michael Buckley (The Everafter War (The Sisters Grimm, #7))
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Every moment was a precious thing, having in it the essence of finality.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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We can never go back again, that much is certain. The past is still close to us. The things we have tried to forget and put behind us would stir again, and that sense of fear, of furtive unrest, struggling at length to blind unreasoning panic - now mercifully stilled, thank God - might in some manner unforeseen become a living companion as it had before.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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Writers should be read, but neither seen nor heard.
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Daphne du Maurier
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You asked about love. I don't know about love, Daphne. I just know I don't want anything but you. I don't want to anywhere but with you.
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Brenna Yovanoff (The Space Between)
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...the routine of life goes on, whatever happens, we do the same things, go through the little performance of eating, sleeping, washing. No crisis can break through the crust of habit.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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I have no talent for making new friends, but oh such genius for fidelity to old ones.
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Daphne du Maurier
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The point is, life has to be endured, and lived. But how to live it is the problem.
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Daphne du Maurier (My Cousin Rachel)
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It wouldn't make for sanity would it, living with the devil.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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Will you look into my eyes and tell me that you love me now?
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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Did you know I have always suspected that men were idiots," Daphne ground out, "but I was never positive until today.
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Julia Quinn (The Duke and I (Bridgertons, #1))
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Because I want to; because I must; because now and forever more this is where I belong to be.
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Daphne du Maurier (Jamaica Inn)
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Boredom is a pleasing antidote for fear
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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But, Dad! We can't leave. Uncle Jake is hurt!" Daphne said. "Besides, that's Pinocchio. I want to get an autograph.
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Michael Buckley (The Everafter War (The Sisters Grimm, #7))
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[...]Since then it’s been passed from mother to daughter, along with The Face.” β€œThe Face?” Lucas asked. β€œThat Launched a Thousand Ships,” Daphne said, repeating the title automatically. β€œIt’s our curse.
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Josephine Angelini (Starcrossed (Starcrossed, #1))
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I had build up false pictures in my mind and sat before them. I had never had the courage to demand the truth.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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I didn't do it,' he insisted. 'Then why did you run?' Sabrina asked. 'And send rabbits to eat us! I'm a seven-year-old girl,' Daphne said. 'Do you know how important bunny rabbits are to me?
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Michael Buckley (The Unusual Suspects (The Sisters Grimm, #2))
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Come and see us if you feel like it,' she said. 'I always expect people to ask themselves. Life is too short to send out invitations.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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Time will mellow it, make it a moment for laughter. But now it was not funny, now I did not laugh. It was not the future, it was the present. It was too vivid and too real.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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There is no going back in life. There is no return. No second chance.
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Daphne du Maurier
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The moment of crisis had come, and I must face it. My old fears, my diffidence, my shyness, my hopeless sense of inferiority, must be conquered now and thrust aside. If I failed now I should fail forever.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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Don't duh me!" Puck snapped. "Trying to figure out what you're thinking from one day to the next takes more brains than I have." Well, maybe you should stop. I'd hate to burn out that little peanut in your head.
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Michael Buckley (The Everafter War (The Sisters Grimm, #7))
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You can't ground us. We're homeless," Daphne said.
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Michael Buckley (The Council of Mirrors (The Sisters Grimm, #9))
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This house sheltered us, we spoke, we loved within those walls. That was yesterday. To-day we pass on, we see it no more, and we are different, changed in some infinitesimal way. We can never be quite the same again.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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We've got a bond in common, you and I. We are both alone in the world.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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He gave her a sly, sideways look. "Did you bring it?" "My list? Heavens, no. What can you be thinking?" His smile widened. "I brought mine." Daphne gasped. "You didn't!" "I did. Just to torture Mother. I'm going peruse it right in front of her, pull out my quizzing glassβ€”" "You don't have a quizzing glass." He grinnedβ€”the slow, devastatingly wicked smile that all Bridgerton males seemed to possess. "I bought one just for this occasion." "Anthony, you absolutely cannot. She will kill you. And then, somehow, she'll find a way to blame me." "I'm counting on it.
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Julia Quinn (The Duke and I (Bridgertons, #1))
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come back so i can say yes this time do it again now that i know what to call what you did this time i'll be ready i like it rough now and i'm done with romance i never met another man who loved me so much at first sight he had to hurt me to do it
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Daphne Gottlieb (Why Things Burn)
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Tonight," he whispered, his voice hoarse and hot in her ear, "I will make you mine." -Simon to Daphne
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Julia Quinn (The Duke and I (Bridgertons, #1))
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Nothing and no one is perfect. It just takes a good eye to find those hidden imperfections.
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Daphne Delacroix
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Sometimes it’s a sort of indulgence to think the worst of ourselves. We say, β€˜Now I have reached the bottom of the pit, now I can fall no further,’ and it is almost a pleasure to wallow in the darkness. The trouble is, it’s not true. There is no end to the evil in ourselves, just as there is no end to the good. It’s a matter of choice. We struggle to climb, or we struggle to fall. The thing is to discover which way we’re going.
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Daphne du Maurier
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The wildest hath not such a heart as you. Run when you will, the story shall be changed: Apollo flies, and Daphne holds the chase; The dove pursues the griffin; the mild hind Makes speed to catch the tiger; bootless speed, When cowardice pursues and valour flies.
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William Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream)
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Heartache, Daphne eventually learned, never really went away; it just dulled. The sharp, stabbing pain that one felt with each breath eventually gave way to a blunter, lower acheβ€”the kind that one could almostβ€”but never quiteβ€”ignore.
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Julia Quinn (The Duke and I (Bridgertons, #1))
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We are all ghosts of yesterday, and the phantom of tomorrow awaits us alike in sunshine or in shadow, dimly perceived at times, never entirely lost.
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Daphne du Maurier (Myself When Young: The Shaping of a Writer)
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I wanted to go on sitting there, not talking, not listening to the others, keeping the moment precious for all time, because we were peaceful all of us, we were content and drowsy even as the bee who droned above our heads. In a little while it would be different, there would come tomorrow, and the next day and another year. And we would be changed perhaps, never sitting quite like this again. Some of us would go away, or suffer, or die, the future stretched away in front of us, unknown, unseen, not perhaps what we wanted, not what we planned. This moment was safe though, this could not be touched. Here we sat together, Maxim and I, hand-in-hand, and the past and the future mattered not at all. This was secure, this funny little fragment of time he would never remember, never think about again…For them it was just after lunch, quarter-past-three on a haphazard afternoon, like any hour, like any day. They did not want to hold it close, imprisoned and secure, as I did. They were not afraid.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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Puck turned to Sabrina. "What is she doing down there?" Hiding, I guess." Puck leaned down and poked his head under the seat. "I found you." Ms. Smirt shrieked. Puck lifted himself up to his full height and laughed. "She's fun." He leaned back down and she screamed again. "I could do this all day. Can I keep her?
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Michael Buckley (The Everafter War (The Sisters Grimm, #7))
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She knew that this was happiness, this was living as she had always wished to live.
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Daphne du Maurier (Frenchman's Creek)
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If you think I'm one of those people who try to be funny at breakfast you're wrong. I'm invariably ill-tempered in the early morning.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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Why this man should love that woman, what queer chemical mix-up in our blood draws us to one another, who can tell?
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Daphne du Maurier
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Daphne felt something wild and wicked take hold. β€œLet’s walk in the garden,” she said softly. β€œWe can’t.” β€œWe must.” β€œWe can’t.
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Julia Quinn (The Duke and I (Bridgertons, #1))
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They are not brave, the days when we are twenty-one. They are full of little cowardices, little fears without foundation, and one is so easily bruised, so swiftly wounded, one falls to the first barbed word. To-day, wrapped in the complacent armour of approaching middle age, the infinitesimal pricks of day by day brush one but lightly and are soon forgotten, but thenβ€”how a careless word would linger, becoming a fiery stigma, and how a look, a glance over a shoulder, branded themselves as things eternal.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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I held out my arms to him and he came to me like a child.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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I don't mind. I like being alone.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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There is no going back in life, no return, no second chance. I cannot call back the spoken word or the accomplished deed.
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Daphne du Maurier (My Cousin Rachel)
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Dead men tell no tales, Mary.
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Daphne du Maurier (Jamaica Inn)
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We all of us have our particular devil who ruses us and torments us, and we must give battle in the end.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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When I get to the end of my life, I want to be able to look back and know that my being here made things better - Daphne
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Karen Rose (Did You Miss Me? (Romantic Suspense, #14; Baltimore, #3))
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She wandered over to the enclosed range, a rather modern-looking contraption that Cook had purchased earlier in the year. β€œDo you know how to work this?” she asked. β€œNo idea. You?” Daphne shook her head. β€œNone.” She reached forward and gingerly touched the surface of the stove top. β€œIt's not hot.” β€œNot even a little bit?” She shook her head. β€œIt's rather cold, actually.” Brother and sister were silent for a few seconds. β€œYou know,” Anthony finally said, β€œcold milk might be quite refreshing.” β€œI was just thinking that very thing!
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Julia Quinn (The Duke and I (Bridgertons, #1))
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You've never heard of the Trickster King?" Puck asked, shocked. The girls shook their heads. "The Prince of Fairies? Robin Goodfellow? The Imp?" "Do you work for Santa?" Daphne asked. "I'm a fairy, not an elf!" Puck roared. "You really don't know who I am! Doesn't anyone read the classics anymore? Dozens of writers have warned about me. I'm in the most famous of all of William Shakespeare's plays." "I don't remember any Puck in Romeo and Juliet," Sabrina muttered, feeling a little amused at how the boy was reacting to his non-celebrity. "Besides Romeo and Juliet!" Puck shouted. "I'm the star of a Midsummer Night's Dream!" "Congratulation," Sabrina said flatly. "Never read it.
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Michael Buckley (The Fairy-Tale Detectives (The Sisters Grimm, #1))
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Why did dogs make one want to cry? There was something so quiet and hopeless about their sympathy. Jasper, knowing something was wrong, as dogs always do. Trunks being packed. Cars being brought to the door. Dogs standing with drooping tails, dejected eyes. Wandering back to their baskets in the hall when the sound of the car dies away.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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I would have gone too but I wanted to come straight back to you.I kept thinking of you, waiting here, all by yourself, not knowing what was going to happen.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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I wondered why it was that places are so much lovelier when one is alone. How commonplace and stupid it would be if I had a friend now, sitting beside me, someone I had known at school, who would say: β€œBy-the-way, I saw old Hilda the other day. You remember her, the one who was so good at tennis. She’s married, with two children.” And the bluebells beside us unnoticed, and the pigeons overhead unheard. I did not want anyone with me. Not even Maxim. If Maxim had been there I should not be lying as I was now, chewing a piece of grass, my eyes shut. I should have been watching him, watching his eyes, his expression. Wondering if he liked it, if he was bored. Wondering what he was thinking. Now I could relax, none of these things mattered. Maxim was in London. How lovely it was to be alone again.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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I wished that the chains would break and the wind would sweep me up, up, up into the sky, beyond the clouds, beyond the sun and the moon, to some marvelous kingdom where no one ever changed and friends were friends for life.
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Mary Downing Hahn (Daphne's Book)
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I am glad it cannot happen twice, the fever of first love. For it is a fever, and a burden, too, whatever the poets may say. They are not brave, the days when we are twenty-one. They are full of little cowardices, little fears without foundation, and one is so easily bruised, so swiftly wounded, one falls to the first barbed word. To-day, wrapped in the complacent armour of approaching middle age, the infinitesimal pricks of day by day brush one but lightly and are soon forgotten, but then--how a careless word would linger, becoming a fiery stigma, and how a look, a glance over a shoulder, branded themselves as things eternal. A denial heralded the thrice crowing of a cock, and an insincerity was like the kiss of Judas. The adult mind can lie with untroubled conscience and a gay composure, but in those days even a small deception scoured the tongue, lashing one against the stake itself.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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What can I say?" I grinned. I have a magic touch when it comes to animals." Daphne snorted. "You're touched in the head is more like it.
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Jennifer Estep (Midnight Frost (Mythos Academy, #5))
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And this then, that I am feeling now, is the hell that comes with love, the hell and the damnation and the agony beyond all enduring, because after the beauty and the loveliness comes the sorrow and the pain.
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Daphne du Maurier (Frenchman's Creek)
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We know one another. This is the present. There is no past and no future. Here I am washing my hands, and the cracked mirror shows me to myself, suspended as it were, in time; this is me, this moment will not pass. And then I open the door and go to the dining-room, where he is sitting waiting for me at a table, and I think how in that moment I have aged, and passed on, how I have advanced one step towards an unknown destiny. We smile, we choose our lunch, we speak of this and that, but - I say to myself-I am not she who left him five minutes ago. She has stayed behind. I am another woman, older, more mature…
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Daphne du Maurier
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What degradation lay in being young.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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He was like someone sleeping who woke suddenly and found the world...all the beauty of it, and the sadness too. The hunger and the thirst. Everything he had never thought about or known was there before him, and magnified into one person who by chance, or fate--call it what you will--happened to be me.
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Daphne du Maurier (My Cousin Rachel)
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Language does have the power to change reality. Therefore, treat your words as the mighty instruments they are - to heal, to bring into being, to remove, as if by magic, the terrible violations of childhood, to nurture, to cherish, to bless, to forgive - to create from the whole cloth of your soul, true love.
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Daphne Rose Kingma
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You understand now... how simple life becomes when things like mirrors are forgotten.
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Daphne du Maurier (Frenchman's Creek)
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It wasn't that she didn't believe in love; but she no longer believed in it for herself.
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Daphne Kalotay (Russian Winter)
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...She looked at the people around her and felt not just that she was surrounded by strangers, but that she herself was strange, somehow, that something kept her from ever fully bridging the gap between who she was and who all these other people, making their way through the very same day, were.
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Daphne Kalotay (Russian Winter)
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I thought of all those heroines of fiction who looked pretty when they cried, and what a contrast I must make with a blotched and swollen face, and red rims to my eyes.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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She has done for me at last, Rachel my torment.
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Daphne du Maurier (My Cousin Rachel)
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The humans who love us never last long. Scions are tragedy magnets. It's safer for them if we leave before the trouble starts." ~ Daphne
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Josephine Angelini (Starcrossed (Starcrossed, #1))
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Let me walk you to your room," Logan offered in a helpful voice. "You, me, and the Gypsy girl could have our own bonfire tonight." Daphne and I stared at each other. I rolled my eyes while Daphne sniffed. "Oh, please," she scoffed. "Like I need a guy to protect me. I'm a Valkyrie, remember? I could pick you up and break your back over my knee, Spartan. Like you were a piΓ±ata." "Kinky," Logan said, smiling at her. "I like it." She snorted. "Save the smarmy charm for Gwen. We all know that she's the one you're really trying to impress anyway." We did? Because I hadn't gotten that message at all.
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Jennifer Estep (Touch of Frost (Mythos Academy, #1))
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She had to live in this bright, red gabled house with the nurse until it was time for her to die... I thought how little we know about the feelings of old people. Children we understand, their fears and hopes and make-believe.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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Fuck yr heroes, I'm saving myself.
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Daphne Gottlieb (Final Girl)
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...but I should say that kindliness, and sincerity, and if I may say so--modesty--are worth far more to a man, to a husband, than all the wit and beauty in the world.
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Daphne du Maurier
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...there are only two things that really matter in life. Literature and love.
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Daphne Kalotay (Russian Winter)
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It doesn't matter what you do in the bedroom as long as you don't do it in the street and frighten the horses.
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Daphne Fielding
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When she smiled it was as though she embraced the world.
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Daphne du Maurier (The Birds and Other Stories)
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An empty house can be as lonely as a full hotel" he said at length."The trouble is that it is less impersonal.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
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She had contemplated life so long it had become indifferent to her.
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Daphne du Maurier (My Cousin Rachel)
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Daphne," he said with controlled gentleness, "what is wrong?" She sat down opposite him and placed a hand on his cheek. "I'm so insensitive," she whispered. "I should have known. I should never have said anything." "Should have known what?" he ground out. Her hand fell away. "That you can'tβ€”that you couldn'tβ€”" "Can't what?" She looked down at her lap, where her hands were attempting to wring each other to shreds. "Please don't make me say it," she said. 'This," Simon muttered, "has got to be why men avoid marriage.
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Julia Quinn (The Duke and I (Bridgertons, #1))
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Watch that boy. He's going to startle somebody someday.
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Daphne du Maurier (The Parasites)
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He stole horses' you'll say to yourself, 'and he didn't care for women; and but for my pride I'd have been with him now.
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Daphne du Maurier (Jamaica Inn)
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You are very clever," said the old man shyly. "I would like to eat your brains, one day." For some reason the books of etiquette that Daphne's grandmother had forced on her didn't quite deal with this. Of course, silly people would say to babies, "You're so sweet I could gobble you all up!" but that sort of nonsense seemed less funny when it was said by a man in war paint who owned more than one skull. Daphne, cursed with good manners, settled for "It's very kind of you to say so.
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Terry Pratchett (Nation)
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Life was a series of greetings and farewells, one was always saying good-bye to something, to someone.
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Daphne du Maurier
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Heart turned to me, his face thoughtΒ­ful. β€œYesΒ­terΒ­day mornΒ­ing. Yes, that means that Daphne hadn’t been home for two days beΒ­fore that.” He smiled at me. β€œYou were supΒ­posed to be the AlΒ­pha’s eye canΒ­dy.” Adam laughed. β€œWhat?” I asked him. β€œYou don’t think I’d be good eye canΒ­dy?” I looked down at my overΒ­alls and grease-​stained hands. I’d torn anΒ­othΒ­er nail to the quick. β€œHonΒ­ey is eye canΒ­dy,” said Ben apoloΒ­getΒ­icalΒ­ly. β€œYou’re . . . just you.” β€œMine,” said Adam, edgΒ­ing beΒ­tween Heart and me. β€œMine is what she is.
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Patricia Briggs (Silver Borne (Mercy Thompson, #5))
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Sabrina turned back to the house and saw the horrible truth- a pair of legs was sticking out from beneath it and they were wearing a pari of shiny silver shoes with a remarkable red tint to them. She suddenly realized they hadn't just entered a story. They had entered one of the most famous stories ever told. "Daphne, I don't think we're in Ferryport Landing anymore.
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Michael Buckley (The Everafter War (The Sisters Grimm, #7))
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... and through it all and afterwards they would be together, making their own world where nothing mattered but the things they could give to one another, the loveliness, the silence, and the peace.
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Daphne du Maurier (Frenchman's Creek)
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Want the change. Be inspired by the flame where everything shines as it disappears. The artist, when sketching, loves nothing so much as the curve of the body as it turns away. What locks itself in sameness has congealed. Is it safer to be gray and numb? What turns hard becomes rigid and is easily shattered. Pour yourself like a fountain. Flow into the knowledge that what you are seeking finishes often at the start, and, with ending, begins. Every happiness is the child of a separation it did not think it could survive. And Daphne, becoming a laurel, dares you to become the wind. - Sonnets To Orpheus, Part Two, XII
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Rainer Maria Rilke (Sonnets to Orpheus)
β€œ
If you tell me, I will leave you alone," I said. "And if you don't tell me, I am going to grab the nearest ghostwritten James Patterson romance novel and I am going to follow you through this store reading it out loud until you relent. Would you prefer me to read from Daphne's Three Tender Months with Harold or Cindy and John's House of Everlasting Love? I guarantee, your sanity and your indie street cred won't last a chapter. And they are very, very short chapters." Now I could see the fright beneath the defiance.
”
”
David Levithan (Dash & Lily's Book of Dares (Dash & Lily, #1))
β€œ
No, Mary had no illusions about romance. Falling in love was a pretty name for it, that was all.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Jamaica Inn)
β€œ
There was something rather blousy about roses in full bloom, something shallow and raucous, like women with untidy hair
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
Puck stopped his drumming [on his belly] for a brief moment and grinned at Sabrina. I hear they have a lot of plastic surgeons in New York City. If I were you I'd make an appointment for that face as soon as you get there," he quipped. Sabrina scowled and shook a fist at him. "Keep it up, stinkpot, and you're going to need a plastic surgeon yourself." Puck winked. "No need to get all mushy on me, Grimm.
”
”
Michael Buckley (The Everafter War (The Sisters Grimm, #7))
β€œ
Everyone I say stop bullying it is sad and tears someones heart apart and next thing they do is Suicide because they think that is the right next step! If you are a Person who gets bullied find someone who will stop this! Don't just kill yourself for the other person to be happy because you are gone! They are just jealous of you and want to start problems and make you a troublemaker! Ignore those mean cruel evil people in you life and spend time with the nice caring sweet loving angels of yours! :D Because bullying is a dumb and stupid waste of time! Try to shake it off the mean hurtful stuff and keep on doing the right stuff that is going to help you become a better person and when i say a better person i mean more than a better person! ~Skye Daphne~
”
”
Skye Daphne (The Witch who was a princess)
β€œ
Living as we do in an age of noise and bluster, success is now measured accordingly. We must all be seen, and heard, and on the air.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (The "Rebecca" Notebook: And Other Memories)
β€œ
We were like two performers in a play, but we were divided, we were not acting with one another. We had to endure it alone, we had to put up this show, this miserable, sham performance for the sake of all these people I did not know and did not want to see again.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
I could not ask for forgiveness for something I had not done. As scapegoat, I could only bear the fault.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (The Scapegoat)
β€œ
Simon stopped breathing until her forefinger touched his nipple, and then his hand shot up to cover hers. "I want you," he said. Her eyes flicked downward, and her lips curved ever so slightly. "I know." "No," he groaned, pulling her closer. "I want to be in your heart. I want-" His entire body shuddered when their skin touched. "I want to be in your soul.
”
”
Julia Quinn (The Duke and I (Bridgertons, #1))
β€œ
Because I believe there is nothing so self-destroying, and no emotion quite so despicable, as jealousy.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (My Cousin Rachel)
β€œ
I wonder ... when it was that the world first went amiss, and men forgot how to live and to love and to be happy.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Frenchman's Creek)
β€œ
I felt rather exhausted, and wondered, rather shocked at my callous thought, why old people were sometimes such a strain. Worse than young children or puppies because one had to be polite.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
They used to hang men at Four Turnings in the old days. Not anymore, though.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (My Cousin Rachel)
β€œ
From the very first, I knew that it would be so...I smiled to myself, and said, "That -- and none other.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Frenchman's Creek)
β€œ
how lacking in intuition men could be in persuading themselves that mending some stranger's socks, and attending to his comfort, could content a woman...
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (The Glass-Blowers)
β€œ
That woman is hiding something!" she said. "You think everyone's hiding something." "And you would hug the devil if he gave you cookies.
”
”
Michael Buckley
β€œ
There are some women, Philip, good women very possibly, who through no fault of their own impel disaster. Whatever they touch, somehow turns to tragedy.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (My Cousin Rachel)
β€œ
Why, he wondered, should he remember her suddenly, on such a day, watching the rain falling on the apple trees?
”
”
Daphne du Maurier
β€œ
Looking from the window at the fantastic light and colour of my glittering fairy-world of fact that holds no tenderness, no quietude, I long suddenly for peace, for understanding.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (The Birds and Other Stories)
β€œ
You had to endure something yourself before it touched you.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (The Birds)
β€œ
I would not be young again, if you offered me the world. But then I'm prejudiced.' 'You talk,' I said, 'as if you were ninety-nine.' 'For a woman I very nearly am,' she said. 'I'm thirty five.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (My Cousin Rachel)
β€œ
I could fight with the living but I could not fight the dead. If there was some woman in London that Maxim loved, someone he wrote to, visited, dined with, slept with, I could fight her. We would stand on common ground. I should not be afraid. Anger and jealousy were things that could be conquered. One day the woman would grow old or tired or different, and Maxim would not love her anymore. But Rebecca would never grow old. Rebecca would always be the same. And she and I could not fight. She was too strong for me.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
I am glad it cannot happen twice, the fever of first love. For it is a fever, and a burden, too, whatever the poets may say. They are not brave, the days when we are twenty one. They are so full of little cowardices, little fears without foundation, and one is so easily bruised, so swiftly wounded, one falls to the first barbed word.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
I wondered how it could be that two people who had loved could yet have such a misconception of each other and, with a common grief, grow far apart. There must be something in the nature of love between a man and a woman that drove them to torment and suspicion.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (My Cousin Rachel)
β€œ
He lacked tenderness; he was rude; and he had more than a streak of cruelty in him; he was a thief and a liar. He stood for everything she feared and hated and despised; but she knew she could love him... This was no choice made with the mind.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier
β€œ
In a field. With the moon. And the dark. And the dirt. With your mouth. And just one word: god god god.
”
”
Daphne Gottlieb (15 Ways to Stay Alive)
β€œ
There is nothing going on. I took nothing you wanted. You can't have it back.
”
”
Daphne Gottlieb (Final Girl)
β€œ
Of course we have our moments of depression; but there are other moments too, when time, unmeasured by the clock, runs on into eternity and, catching his smile, I know we are together, we march in unison, no clash of thought or of opinion makes a barrier between us.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
We can see the film stars of yesterday in yesterday’s films, hear the voices of poest and singers on a record, keep the plays of dead dramatists upon our bookshelves, but the actor who holds his audience captive for one brief moment upon a lighted stage vanishes forever when the curtain falls.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (The "Rebecca" Notebook: And Other Memories)
β€œ
Your favourite virtue ... Simplicity Your favourite virtue in man ... Strength Your favourite virtue in woman ... Weakness Your chief characteristic ... Singleness of purpose Your idea of happiness ... To fight Your idea of misery ... Submission The vice you excuse most ... Gullibility The vice you detest most ... Servility Your aversion ... Martin Tupper Favourite occupation ... Book-worming Favourite poet ... Shakespeare, Aeschylus, Goethe Favourite prose-writer ... Diderot Favourite hero ... Spartacus, Kepler Favourite heroine ... Gretchen [Heroine of Goethe's Faust] Favourite flower ... Daphne Favourite colour ... Red Favourite name ... Laura, Jenny Favourite dish ... Fish Favourite maxim ... Nihil humani a me alienum puto [Nothing human is alien to me] Favourite motto ... De omnibus dubitandum [Everything must be doubted].
”
”
Karl Marx
β€œ
My two greatest loves were, of course, Daphne and Hyacinthus, but when you're a god as popular as I am-- Hold on. Did I just tell you who I liked? I did, didn't I? Gods of Olympus, forget I mentioned their names! I am so embarrassed. Please don't say anything. In this mortal life, I've never been in love with anyone! I am so confused.
”
”
Rick Riordan (The Hidden Oracle (The Trials of Apollo, #1))
β€œ
If there’s one thing that makes a man sick, it’s to have his ale poured out of an ugly hand.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Jamaica Inn)
β€œ
Life is for the living, not the dead, who belong to the past and are at peace and beyond all further pain and suffering 'somewhere in the great somewhere
”
”
Daphne Sheldrick (Love, Life, and Elephants: An African Love Story)
β€œ
the frightening truth about desire it's on but i don't know whether i want to be her, fuck her or borrow her clothes.
”
”
Daphne Gottlieb
β€œ
And, though there should be a world of difference between the smile of a man and the bared fangs of a wolf, with Joss Merlyn they were one and the same.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Jamaica Inn)
β€œ
We were dreamers, both of us, unpractical, reserved, full of great theories never put to test, and like all dreamers, asleep to the waking world. Disliking our fellow men, we craved affection; but shyness kept impulse dormant until the heart was touched. When that happened the heavens opened, and we felt, the pair of us, that we have the whole wealth of the universe to give. We would have both survived, had we been other men.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (My Cousin Rachel)
β€œ
For love, as she knew it now, was something without shame and without reserve, the possession of two people who had no barrier between them, and no pride; whatever happened to him would happen to her too, all feeling, all movement, all sensation of body and of mind.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Frenchman's Creek)
β€œ
Those dripping crumpets, I can see them now. Tiny crisp wedges of toast, and piping-hot, flaky scones. Sandwiches of unknown nature, mysteriously flavoured and quite delectable, and that very special gingerbread. Angel cake, that melted in the mouth, and his rather stodgier companion, bursting with peel and raisins. There was enough food there to keep a starving family for a week.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
So you see, when war comes to one’s village, one’s doorstep, it isn’t tragic and impersonal any longer. It is just an excuse to vomit private hatred. That is why I am not a great patriot.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (The Scapegoat)
β€œ
I am no traveller, you are my world.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (My Cousin Rachel)
β€œ
All whispers and echoes from a past that is gone teem into the sleeper's brain, and he is with them, and part of them.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Frenchman's Creek)
β€œ
You have blotted out the past for me, far more effectively than all the bright lights of Monte Carlo.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
But I have had enough melodrama in this life, and would willingly give my five senses if they could ensure us our present peace and security. Happiness is not a possession to be prized, it is a quality of thought, a state of mind. Of course we have our moments of depression; but there are other moments too, when time, unmeasured by the clock, runs on into eternity and, catching his smile, I know we are together, we march in unison, no flash of thought or opinion makes a barrier between us.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
I was following a phantom in my mind, whose shadowy form had taken shape at last. Her features were blurred, her coloring indistinct, the setting of her eyes and the texture of her hair was still uncertain, still to be revealed. She had beauty that endured, and a smile that was not forgotten. Somewhere her voice still lingered, and the memory of her words.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
He belonged to a walled city of the fifteenth century, a city of narrow, cobbled streets, and thin spires, where the inhabitants wore pointed shoes and worsted hose. His face was arresting, sensitive, medieval in some strange inexplicable way, and I was reminded of a portrait seen in a gallery I had forgotten where, of a certain Gentleman Unknown. Could one but rob him of his English tweeds, and put him in black, with lace at his throat and wrists, he would stare down at us in our new world from a long distant pastβ€”a past where men walked cloaked at night, and stood in the shadow of old doorways, a past of narrow stairways and dim dungeons, a past of whispers in the dark, of shimmering rapier blades, of silent, exquisite courtesy.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
She realized for the first time that aversion and attraction ran side by side; that the boundary-line was thin between them.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Jamaica Inn)
β€œ
People who mattered could not take the humdrum world. But this was not the world, it was enchantment; and all of it was mine.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (My Cousin Rachel)
β€œ
Time could not wreck the perfect symmetry of those walls, nor the site itself, a jewel in the hollow of a hand.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
First of all, this goes no further than this room." "Agreed," she said quickly. Anthony looked pointedly at Simon. "Of course," he replied. "Mother would be devastated if she learned the truth." "Actually," Simon murmured, "I rather think your mother would applaud our ingenuity, but since you have quite obviously known her longer, I bow to your discretion." Anthony shot him a frosty look. "Second, under no circumstances are the two of you to be alone together. Ever." "Well, that should be easy," Daphne said, "as we wouldn't be allowed to be alone if we were courting in truth, anyway." Simon recalled their brief interlude in the hall at Lady Danbury's house, and found it a pity that he wasn't to be allowed any more private time with Daphne, but he recognized a brick wall when he saw one, especially when said wall happened to be named Anthony Bridgerton. So he just nodded and murmured his assent. "Thirdβ€”" "There is a third?" Daphne asked.Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β Β  "There would be thirty if I could think of them," Anthony growled.Β  Β Β Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  Β  "Very well," she acceded, looking most aggrieved. "If you must.
”
”
Julia Quinn (The Duke and I (Bridgertons, #1))
β€œ
There was never an accident.Rebecca was not drowned at all. I killed her.I shot Rebecca in the cottage in the cove.I carried her body to the cabin, and took the boat out that night and sunk it there, where they found it today.It's Rebecca who's lying dead there on the cabin floor.Will you look into my eyes and tell me that you love me now?
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
here was a silence between them for a moment, and she wondered if all women, when in love, were torn between two impulses, a longing to throw modesty and reserve to the winds and confess everything, and an equal determination to conceal the love forever, to be cool, aloof, utterly detached, to die rather than admit a thing so personal, so intimate.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier
β€œ
[Kevin and Molly's adorable banter] "I'm not carrying anything until I see what's on your panties." "It's Daphne, okay?" "I'm supposed to believe you're wearing the same underpants you had on yesterday?" "I have more than one pair" "I think you're lying. I want to see for myself." He dragged her deeper into the pines. While Roo circled them barking, he reached for the snap on her shorts. "Quiet, Godzilla! There's some serious business going on here." Roo obediently quieted. She grabbed his wrists and pushed. "Get away." "That's not what you were saying last night." "Somebody'll see." "I'll tell them a bee got you, and I'm taking out the stinger." "Don't touch my stinger!" She grabbed for her shorts, but they were already heading for her knees. "Stop that!" He peered down at her panties. "It's the badger. You lied to me." "I wasn't paying attention when I got dressed." "Hold still. I've just about found that stinger." She heard herself sigh. "Oh, yeah..." His body moved against hers. "There it is.
”
”
Susan Elizabeth Phillips (This Heart of Mine (Chicago Stars, #5))
β€œ
Only a lover of animals will understand the sudden feeling of loss, of emptiness, and the intuitive bond which exists between man and dog, has always existed from the beginning and will, please God, continue to the end.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Myself When Young: The Shaping of a Writer)
β€œ
I am a few years older now and I know this: There are tastes of mouths I could not have lived without; there are times I’ve pretended it was just about the sex because I couldn’t stand the way my heart was about to burst with happiness and awe and I couldn’t be that vulnerable, not again, not with this one. That waiting to have someone’s stolen seconds can burn you alive. That the shittiest thing you can do in the world is lie to someone you love; also that there are certain times you have no other choice – not honoring this fascination, this car crash of desire, is also a lie. That there is power in having someone risk everything for you. That there is nothing more frightening than being willing to take this freefall. That it is not as simple as we were always promised. Love – at least the pair-bonded, prescribed love – does not conquer all.
”
”
Daphne Gottlieb (Homewrecker: An Adultery Anthology)
β€œ
When the leaves rustle, they sound very much like the stealthy movement of a woman in evening dress, and when they shiver suddenly, and fall, and scatter away along the ground, they might be the patter of a woman’s hurrying footsteps, and the mark in the gravel the imprint of a high-heeled shoe.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
You have a minute and a half left." "Fine," she snapped. "Then I'll reduce this conversation to one single fact. Today I had six callers. Six! Can you recall the last time I had six callers?" Anthony just stared at her blankly. "I can't," Daphne continued, in fine form now. "Because it has never happened. Six men marched up our steps, knocked on our door, and gave Humboldt their cards. Six men brought me flowers, engaged me in conversation, and one even recited poetry." Simon winced. "And do you know why?" she demanded, her voice rising dangerously. "Do you?" Anthony, in his somewhat belatedly arrived wisdom, held his tongue. "It is all because he"β€”she jabbed her forefinger toward Simonβ€”"was kind enough to feign interest in me last night at Lady Danbury's ball.
”
”
Julia Quinn (The Duke and I (Bridgertons, #1))
β€œ
Colin's chuckles grew more heartfelt. "You really ought to have more faith in your favorite brother, dear sis." "He’s your favorite brother?" Simon asked, one dark brow raised in disbelief. "Only because Gregory put a toad in my bed last night," Daphne bit off, "and Benedict's standing has never recovered from the time he beheaded my favorite doll." "Makes me wonder what Anthony's done to deny him even an honorable mention," Colin murmured. "Don't you have somewhere else to be?" Daphne asked pointedly. Colin shrugged. "Not really." "Didn't," she asked through clenched teeth, "you just tell me you promised a dance to Prudence Featherington?" "Gads, no. You must have misheard." "Perhaps Mother is looking for you, then. In fact, I'm certain I hear her calling your name." Colin grinned at her discomfort. "You're not supposed to be so obvious," he said in a stage whisper, purposely loud enough for Simon to hear. "He'll figure out that you like him." Simon's entire body jerked with barely contained mirth. "It's not his company I'm trying to secure," Daphne said acidly. "It's yours I'm trying to avoid." Colin clapped a hand over his heart. "You wound me, Daff." He turned to Simon. "Oh, how she wounds me." "You missed your calling, Bridgerton," Simon said genially. "You should have been on the stage." "An interesting idea," Colin replied, "but one that would surely give my mother the vapors." His eyes lit up. "Now that's an idea. And just when the party was growing tedious. Good eve to you both." He executed a smart bow and walked off.
”
”
Julia Quinn (The Duke and I (Bridgertons, #1))
β€œ
...as the slow sea sucked at the shore and then withdrew, leaving the strip of seaweed bare and the shingle churned, the sea birds raced and ran upon the beaches. Then that same impulse to flight seized upon them too. Crying, whistling, calling, they skimmed the placid sea and left the shore. Make haste, make speed, hurry and begone; yet where, and to what purpose? The restless urge of autumn, unsatisfying, sad, had put a spell upon them and they must flock, and wheel, and cry; they must spill themselves of motion before winter came.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (The Birds and Other Stories)
β€œ
Daphne Bridgerton, I don'tβ€”" "β€”like my tone, I know." Daphne grinned. "But you love me." Violet smiled warmly and wrapped an arm around Daphne's shoulder. "Heaven help me, I do." Daphne gave her mother a quick peck on the cheek. "It's the curse of motherhood. You're required to love us even when we vex you." Violet just sighed. "I hope that someday you have childrenβ€”" "β€”just like me, I know." Daphne smiled nostalgically and rested her head on her mother's shoulder. Her mother could be overly inquisitive, and her father had been more interested in hounds and hunting than he'd been in society affairs, but theirs had been a warm marriage, filled with love, laughter, and children. "I could do a great deal worse than follow your example, Mother," she murmured.
”
”
Julia Quinn (The Duke and I (Bridgertons, #1))
β€œ
No, solitude did not trouble her. She could spend long minutes gazing out the window, hours listening to the BBC on the public radio station. She relished the very texture of her privacy, its depth of space and freedom, much of an entire day hers alone.
”
”
Daphne Kalotay (Russian Winter)
β€œ
He had the face of one who walks in his sleep, and for a wild moment the idea came to me that perhaps he was not normal, not altogether sane. There were people who had trances, I had surely heard of them, and they followed strange laws of which we could know nothing, they obeyed the tangled orders of their own sub-conscious minds. Perhaps he was one of them, and here we were within six feet of death.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
Little notes, scrawled on half-sheets of paper, and letters, when he was away, page after page, intimate, their news. Her voice, echoing through the house, and down the garden, careless and familiar like the writing in the book. And I had to call him Maxim.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
And all this, she thought, is only momentary, is only a fragment in time that will never come again, for yesterday already belongs to the past and is ours no longer, and tomorrow is an unknown thing that may be hostile. This is our day, our moment, the sun belongs to us, and the wind, and the sea, and the men for'ard there singing on the deck. This day is forever a day to be held and cherished, because in it we shall have lived, and loved, and nothing else matters but that in this world of our own making to which we have escaped.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Frenchman's Creek)
β€œ
And perhaps one day, in after years, someone would wander there and listen to the silence, as she had done, and catch the whisper of the dreams that she had dreamt there, in midsummer, under the hot sun and the white sky.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Frenchman's Creek)
β€œ
Contentment is a state of mind and body when the two work in harmony, and there is no friction. The mind is at peace, and the body also. The two are sufficient to themselves. Happiness is elusive -- coming perhaps once in a life-time -- and approaching ectasy.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Frenchman's Creek)
β€œ
I KNEW IT WAS OVER when tonight you couldn't make the phone ring when you used to make the sun rise when trees used to throw themselves in front of you to be paper for love letters that was how i knew i had to do it swaddle the kids we never had against january's cold slice bundle them in winter clothes they never needed so i could drop them off at my mom's even though she lives on the other side of the country and at this late west coast hour is assuredly east coast sleeping peacefully her house was lit like a candle the way homes should be warm and golden and home and the kids ran in and jumped at the bichon frise named lucky that she never had they hugged the dog it wriggled and the kids were happy yours and mine the ones we never had and my mom was grand maternal, which is to say, with style that only comes when you've seen enough to know grace like when to pretend it's christmas or a birthday so she lit her voice with tiny lights and pretended she didn't see me crying as i drove away to the hotel connected to the bar where i ordered the cheapest whisky they had just because it shares your first name because they don't make a whisky called baby and i only thought what i got was what i ordered i toasted the hangover inevitable as sun that used to rise in your name i toasted the carnivals we never went to and the things you never won for me the ferris wheels we never kissed on and all the dreams between us that sat there like balloons on a carney's board waiting to explode with passion but slowly deflated hung slave under the pin- prick of a tack hung heads down like lovers when it doesn't work, like me at last call after too many cheap too many sweet too much whisky makes me sick, like the smell of cheap, like the smell of the dead like the cheap, dead flowers you never sent that i never threw out of the window of a car i never really owned
”
”
Daphne Gottlieb (Final Girl)
β€œ
He took her face in his hands and kissed it, and she saw that he was laughing. "When you're an old maid in mittens down at Helford, you'll remember that," he said, "and it will have to last you to the end of your days. 'He stole horses,' you'll say to yourself, 'and he didn't care for women; and but for my pride I'd have been with him now.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Jamaica Inn)
β€œ
The child destined to be a writer is vulnerable to every wind that blows. Now warm, now chill, next joyous, then despairing, the essence of his nature is to escape the atmosphere about him, no matter how stable, even loving. No ties, no binding chains, save those he forges for himself. Or so he thinks. But escape can be delusion, and what he is running from is not the enclosing world and its inhabitants, but his own inadequate self that fears to meet the demands which life makes upon it. Therefore create. Act God. Fashion men and women as Prometheus fashioned them from clay, and, by doing this, work out the unconscious strife within and be reconciled. While in others, imbued with a desire to mold, to instruct, to spread a message that will inspire the reader and so change his world, though the motive may be humane and even noble--many great works have done just this--the source is the same dissatisfaction, a yearning to escape.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (The Loving Spirit)
β€œ
Louise often feels like part of her is "acting." At the same time , "there is another part 'inside' that is not connecting with the me that is talking to you," she says. When the depersonalization is at its most intense, she feels like she just doesn't exist. These experiences leave her confused about who she really is, and quite often, she feels like an "actress" or simply, "a fake.
”
”
Daphne Simeon (Feeling Unreal: Depersonalization Disorder and the Loss of the Self)
β€œ
...she thought with pity of all the men and women who were not light-hearted when they loved, who were cold, who were reluctant, who were shy, who imagined that passion and tenderness were two things separate from one another, and not the one, gloriously intermingled, so that to be fierce was also to be gentle, so that silence was a speaking without words.
”
”
Daphne du Maurier (Frenchman's Creek)
β€œ
People are often dismissive of librarians and libraries - as if the words are synonymous with boredom or timidity. But isn't that where the best stories are kept? Hidden away on the library bookshelves, lost and forgotten, waiting, waiting, until someone like me comes along, and wants to borrow them?
”
”
Justine Picardie (Daphne)
β€œ
All the black leather she needs is the E-Z boy recliner where her love is parked with one of his hands wrapped around a remote, the other, a bottle of beer. She's right. It's kinky. The way he doesn't look away from the TV, as her head bobs in his lap like a fisherman's float on a nature program, hectic with the pace his breath sets. His crotch swells under her mouth's prowess. He's such a sweetheart he waits until the commercials to come.
”
”
Daphne Gottlieb (Why Things Burn)
β€œ
I believe there is a theory that men and women emerge finer and stronger after suffering, and that to advance in this or any world we must endure ordeal by fire. This we have done in full measure, ironic though it seems. We have both known fear, and loneliness, and very great distress. I suppose sooner or later in the life of everyone comes a moment of trial. We all of us have our particular devil who rides us and torments us, and we must give battle in the end.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
Packing up. The nagging worry of departure. When shutting drawers and flinging wide an hotel wardrobe, or the impersonal shelves of a furnished villa, I am aware of sadness, of a sense of loss. Here, I say, we have lived, we have been happy. This has been ours, however brief the time. Though two nights only have been spent beneath a roof, yet we leave something of ourselves behind. Nothing material, not a hair-pin on a dressing-table, not an empty bottle of Aspirin tablets, not a handkerchief beneath a pillow, but something indefinable, a moment of our lives, a thought, a mood. This house sheltered us, we spoke, we loved within those walls. That was yesterday. Today we pass on, we see it no more, and we are different, changed in some infinitesimal way. We can never be quite the same again.
”
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
They were all fitting into place, the jig-saw pieces. The odd strained shapes that I had tried to piece together with my fumbling fingers and they had never fitted. Frank's odd manner when I spoke about Rebecca. Beatrice and her rather diffident negative attitude. The silence that I had always taken for sympathy and regret was a silence born of shame and embarrassment. It seemed incredible to me now that I had never understood. I wondered how many people there were in the world who suffered, and continued to suffer, because they could not break out from their own web of shyness and reserve, and in their blindness and folly built up a great wall in front of them that hid the truth. This was what I had done. I had built up false pictures in my mind and sat before them. I had never had the courage to demand the truth. Had I made one step forward out of my own shyness Maxim would have told these things four months, five months ago.
”
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
You have qualities that are just as important, far more so, in fact. It's perhaps cheeky of me to say so, I don't know you very well. I'm a bachelor, I don't know very much about women, I lead a quiet sort of life down here at Manderley, as you know, but I should say that kindliness, and sincerity, and if I may say soβ€”modestyβ€”are worth far more to a man, to a husband, than all the wit and beauty in the world.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
Jem was safe from her, and he would ride away with a song on his lips and a laugh at her expense, forgetful of her, and of his brother, and of God; while she dragged through the years, sullen and bitter, the stain of silence marking her, coming in the end to ridicule as a soured spinster who had been kissed once in her life and could not forget it.
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Daphne du Maurier (Jamaica Inn)
β€œ
I am aware of sadness, of a sense of loss. Here, I say, we have lived, we have been happy. This has been ours, however brief the time. Though two nights only have been spent beneath a roof, yet we leave something of ourselves behind. Nothing material, . . . but something indefinable, a moment of our lives, a thought, a mood. The house sheltered us, we spoke, we loved within those walls. That was yesterday. To-day we pass on, we see it no more, and we are different, changed in some infinitesimal way. We can never be quite the same again.
”
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
MY MOTHER GETS DRESSED It is impossible for my mother to do even the simplest things for herself anymore so we do it together, get her dressed. I choose the clothes without zippers or buckles or straps, clothes that are simple but elegant, and easy to get into. Otherwise, it's just like every other day. After bathing, getting dressed. The stockings go on first. This time, it's the new ones, the special ones with opaque black triangles that she's never worn before, bought just two weeks ago at her favorite department store. We start with the heavy, careful stuff of the right toes into the stocking tip then a smooth yank past the knob of her ankle and over her cool, smooth calf then the other toe cool ankle, smooth calf up the legs and the pantyhose is coaxed to her waist. You're doing great, Mom, I tell her as we ease her body against mine, rest her whole weight against me to slide her black dress with the black empire collar over her head struggle her fingers through the dark tunnel of the sleeve. I reach from the outside deep into the dark for her hand, grasp where I can't see for her touch. You've got to help me a little here, Mom I tell her then her fingertips touch mine and we work her fingers through the sleeve's mouth together, then we rest, her weight against me before threading the other fingers, wrist, forearm, elbow, bicep and now over the head. I gentle the black dress over her breasts, thighs, bring her makeup to her, put some color on her skin. Green for her eyes. Coral for her lips. I get her black hat. She's ready for her company. I tell the two women in simple, elegant suits waiting outside the bedroom, come in. They tell me, She's beautiful. Yes, she is, I tell them. I leave as they carefully zip her into the black body bag. Three days later, I dream a large, green suitcase arrives. When I unzip it, my mother is inside. Her dress matches her eyeshadow, which matches the suitcase perfectly. She's wearing coral lipstick. "I'm here," she says, smiling delightedly, waving and I wake up. Four days later, she comes home in a plastic black box that is heavier than it looks. In the middle of a meadow, I learn a naked more than naked. I learn a new way to hug as I tighten my fist around her body, my hand filled with her ashes and the small stones of bones. I squeeze her tight then open my hand and release her into the smallest, hottest sun, a dandelion screaming yellow at the sky.
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Daphne Gottlieb (Final Girl)
β€œ
Trapped within the confines of his mind, he is too aware of every thought passing through it, as if he were outside, looking in. At night he often lies awake ruminating endlessly about what’s wrong with him, about death, and about the meaning of existence itself. At times his arms and legs feel like they don’t belong with his body. But most of the time, his mind feels like it is operating apart from the body that contains it.
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Daphne Simeon (Feeling Unreal: Depersonalization Disorder and the Loss of the Self)
β€œ
As she bends for a Kleenex in the dark, I am thinking of other girls: the girl I loved who fell in love with a lion--she lost her head over it--we just necked a lot; of the girl who fell in love with the tightrope, got addicted to getting high wired and nothing else was enough; all the beautiful, damaged women who have come through my life and I wonder what would have happened if I'd met them sooner, what they were like before they were so badly wounded. All this time I thought I'd been kissing, but maybe I'm always doing mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, kissing dead girls in hopes that the heart will start again. Where there's breath, I've heard, there's hope.
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Daphne Gottlieb (Kissing Dead Girls)
β€œ
The peace of Manderley. The quietude and the grace. Whoever lived within its walls, whatever trouble there was and strife, however much uneasiness and pain, no matter what tears were shed, what sorrows borne, the peace of Manderley could not be broken or the loveliness destroyed. The flowers that died would bloom again another year, the same birds build their nests, the same trees blossom. That old quiet moss smell would linger in the air, and the bees would come, and crickets, the herons build their nests in the deep dark woods. The butterflies would dance their merry jug across the lawns, and spiders spin foggy webs, and small startled rabbits who had no business to come trespassing poke their faces through the crowded shrubs. There would be lilac, and honeysuckle still, and the white magnolia buds unfolding slow and tight beneath the dining-room window. No one would ever hurt Manderley. It would lie always in its hollow like an enchanted thing, guarded by the woods, safe, secure, while the sea broke and ran and came again in the little shingle bays below.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
...are you happy?" "I am content." "What is the difference?" "Between happiness and contentment? Ah, there you have me. It is not easy to put into words. Contentment is a state of mind and body when the two work in harmony, and there is no friction. The mind is at peace, and the body also. The two are sufficient to themselves. Happiness is elusive--coming perhaps once in a life-time--and approaching ecstasy." "Not a continuous thing, like contentment?" "No, not a continuous thing. But there are, after all, degrees of happiness.
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Daphne du Maurier (Frenchman's Creek)
β€œ
Good God!" she cried. She rolled off him, tugging down her clothing. "Are you mad?" He blinked and dragged in air. "Well, yes," He said thickly. "Lust does that to a man." "You thought we would--you would-- do...that in public?" "I wasn't thinking about where we were." He said. Her eyes widened. "I'm a man," he said with what he was sure must be, in the circumstances, saintly patience. "I can do one or the other. Lovemaking or thinking. But not both at the same time." She stared at him for a moment. Then she drew up her knees and folded her arms upon them and buried her face in her folded arms. She did not pick up the rifle and knock him on the head with it. Perhaps all was not lost. "Somewhere else then?" He said hopefully.
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Loretta Chase (Mr. Impossible (Carsington Brothers, #2))
β€œ
I wanted to go on sitting there, not talking, not listening to the others, keeping the moment precious for all time, because we were peaceful all of us, we were content and drowsy even as the bee who droned above our heads. In a little while it would be different, there would come tomorrow, and the next day and another year. And we would be changed perhaps, never sitting qite like this again. Some of us would go away, or suffer, or die, the future stretched away in front of us, unknown, unseen, not perhaps what we wanted, not what we planned. This moment was safe though, this could not be touched.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
Fifteen Ways to Stay Alive 1. Offer the wolves your arm only from the elbow down. Leave tourniquet space. Do not offer them your calves. Do not offer them your side. Do not let them near your femoral artery, your jugular. Give them only your arm. 2. Wear chapstick when kissing the bomb. 3. Pretend you don’t know English. 4. Pretend you never met her. 5. Offer the bomb to the wolves. Offer the wolves to the zombies. 6. Only insert a clean knife into your chest. Rusty ones will cause tetanus. Or infection. 7. Don’t inhale. 8. Realize that this love was not your trainwreck, was not the truck that flattened you, was not your Waterloo, did not cause massive haemorrhaging from a rusty knife. That love is still to come. 9. Use a rusty knife to cut through most of the noose in a strategic place so that it breaks when your weight is on it. 10. Practice desperate pleas for attention, louder calls for help. Learn them in English, French, Spanish: May Day, Aidez-Moi, AyΓΊdame. 11. Don’t kiss trainwrecks. Don’t kiss knives. Don’t kiss. 12. Pretend you made up the zombies, and only superheroes exist. 13. Pretend there is no kryptonite. 14. Pretend there was no love so sweet that you would have died for it, pretend that it does not belong to someone else now, pretend like your heart depends on it because it does. Pretend there is no wreck β€” you watched the train go by and felt the air brush your face and that was it. Another train passing. You do not need trains. You can fly. You are a superhero. And there is no kryptonite. 15. Forget her name.
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Daphne Gottlieb
β€œ
This week in live current events: your eyes. All power can be dangerous: Direct or alternating, you, socket to me. Plugged in and the grid is humming, this electricity, molecule-deep desire: particular friction, a charge strong enough to stop a heart or start it again; volt, re-volt-- I shudder, I stutter, I start to life. I've got my ion you, copper-top, so watch how you conduct yourself. Here's today's newsflash: a battery of rolling blackouts in California, sudden, like lightning kisses: sudden, whitehot darkness and you're here, fumbling for that small switch with an urgent surge strong enough to kill lesser machines. Static makes hair raise, makes things cling, makes things rise like a gathering storm charging outside our darkened house and here I am: tempest, pouring out mouthfulls of tsunami on the ground, I've got that rain-soaked kite, that drenched key. You know what it's for, circuit-breaker, you know how to kiss until it's hertz.
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Daphne Gottlieb (Why Things Burn)
β€œ
Four brothers,” Daphne said, shoving the wicket into the ground, β€œprovide quite a marvelous education.” β€œThe things you must have learned,” Kate said, quite impressed. β€œCan you give a man a black eye? Knock him to the ground?” Daphne grinned wickedly. β€œAsk my husband.” β€œAsk me what?” the duke called out from where he and Colin were placing a wicket on a tree root on the opposite side of the tree. β€œNothing,” the duchess called out innocently. β€œI’ve also learned,” she whispered to Kate, β€œwhen it’s best just to keep one’s mouth shut. Men are much easier to manage once you understand a few basic facts about their nature.” β€œWhich are?” Kate prompted. Daphne leaned forward and whispered behind her cupped hand, β€œThey’re not as smart as we are, they’re not as intuitive as we are, and they certainly don’t need to know about fifty percent of what we do.” She looked around. β€œHe didn’t hear that, did he?” Simon stepped out from behind the tree. β€œEvery word.” Kate choked on a laugh as Daphne jumped a foot. β€œBut it’s true,” Daphne said archly. Simon crossed his arms. β€œI’ll let you think so.” He turned to Kate. β€œI’ve learned a thing or two about women over the years.” β€œReally?” Kate asked, fascinated. He nodded and leaned in, as if imparting a grave state secret. β€œThey’re much easier to manage if one allows them to believe that they are smarter and more intuitive than men. And,” he added with a superior glance at his wife, β€œour lives are much more peaceful if we pretend that we’re only aware of about fifty percent of what they do.” Colin approached, swinging a mallet in a low arc. β€œAre they having a spat?” he asked Kate. β€œA discussion,” Daphne corrected. β€œGod save me from such discussions,” Colin muttered.
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Julia Quinn (The Viscount Who Loved Me (Bridgertons, #2))
β€œ
She stared at me curiously. Her voice dropped to a whisper. "Sometimes, when I walk along the corridor here, I fancy I hear her just behind me. That quick, light footstep. I could not mistake it anywhere. And in the minstrels' gallery above the hall. I've seen her leaning there, in the evenings in the old days, looking down at the hall below and calling to the dogs. I can fancy her there now from time to time. It's almost as though I catch the sound of her dress sweeping the stairs as she comes down to dinner." She paused. She went on looking at me, watching my eyes. "Do you think she can see us, talking to one another now?" she said slowly. "Do you think the dead come back and watch the living?
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
Rebecca, always Rebecca. Wherever I walked in Manderley, wherever I sat, even in my thoughts and in my dreams, I met Rebecca. I knew her figure now, the long slim legs, the small and narrow feet. Her shoulders, broader than mine, the capable clever hands. Hands that could steer a boat, could hold a horse. Hands that arranged flowers, made the models of ships, and wrote β€œMax from Rebecca” on the flyleaf of a book. I knew her face too, small and oval, the clear white skin, the cloud of dark hair. I knew the scent she wore, I could guess her laughter and her smile. If I heard it, even among a thousand others, I should recognize her voice. Rebecca, always Rebecca. I should never be rid of Rebecca. Perhaps
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
One of us should save her,” Benedict mused. β€œNah,” Colin said, grinning. β€œMother’s only had her over there with Macclesfield for ten minutes.” β€œMacclesfield?” Simon asked. β€œThe earl,” Benedict replied. β€œCastleford’s son.” β€œTen minutes?” Anthony asked. β€œPoor Macclesfield.” Simon shot him a curious look. β€œNot that Daphne is such a chore,” Anthony quickly added, β€œbut when Mother gets it in her head to, ah . . .” β€œPursue,” Benedict filled in helpfully. β€œβ€” a gentleman,” Anthony continued with a nod of thanks toward his brother, β€œshe can be, ah . . .” β€œRelentless,” Colin said. Anthony smiled weakly. β€œYes. Exactly.” Simon looked back over toward the trio in question. Sure enough, Daphne looked miserable, Macclesfield was scanning the room, presumably looking for the nearest exit, and Lady Bridgerton’s eyes held a gleam so ambitious that Simon cringed in sympathy for the young earl. β€œWe should save Daphne,” Anthony said. β€œWe really should,” Benedict added. β€œAnd Macclesfield,” Anthony said. β€œOh, certainly,” Benedict added. But Simon noticed that no one was leaping into action. β€œAll talk, aren’t you?” Colin chortled. β€œI don’t see you marching over there to save her,” Anthony shot back. β€œHell no. But I never said we should. You, on the other hand . . .” β€œWhat the devil is going on?” Simon finally asked. The three Bridgerton brothers looked at him with identical guilty expressions. β€œWe should save Daff,” Benedict said. β€œWe really should,” Anthony added. β€œWhat my brothers are too lily-livered to tell you,” Colin said derisively, β€œis that they are terrified of my mother.” β€œIt’s true,” Anthony said with a helpless shrug. Benedict nodded. β€œI freely admit it.
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Julia Quinn (The Duke and I (Bridgertons, #1))
β€œ
I thought how little we know about the feelings of old people. Children we understand, their fears and hopes and make-believe. I was a child yesterday. I had not forgotten. But Maxim’s grandmother, sitting there in her shawl with her poor blind eyes, what did she feel, what was she thinking? Did she know that Beatrice was yawning and glancing at her watch? Did she guess that we had come to visit her because we felt it right, it was a duty, so that when she got home afterwards Beatrice would be able to say, β€œWell, that clears my conscience for three months”? Did she ever think about Manderley? Did she remember sitting at the dining room table, where I sat? Did she too have tea under the chestnut tree? Or was it all forgotten and laid aside, and was there nothing left behind that calm, pale face of hers but little aches and little strange discomforts, a blurred thankfulness when the sun shone, a tremor when the wind blew cold? I wished that I could lay my hands upon her face and take the years away. I wished I could see her young, as she was once, with color in her cheeks and chestnut hair, alert and active as Beatrice by her side, talking as she did about hunting, hounds, and horses. Not sitting there with her eyes closed while the nurse thumped the pillows behind her head. β€œWe’ve got a treat today, you know,” said the nurse, β€œwatercress sandwiches for tea. We love watercress, don’t we?
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
The potential for loss of soul--to one degree or another--is the affliction of a society that as a collective has lost its sense of the holy, of a culture that values everything else above the spiritual. We live in such a spiritually impoverished culture--and in such a time. Loss of soul, to one degree or another, is a constant teasing possibility. We are invited at every corner to hedge on the truth, indulge outselves, act as if our words and actions have no ultimate consequence, make an absolute of the material world, and treat the spiritual world as if it were some kind of frothy, angelic fantasy. In such a world the soul struggles for survival; in such a world a man can lose his own soul and have the whole culture support him, and in such a world, conversely, the light of a single, great soul that lives in integrity can truly illumine the world.
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Daphne Rose Kingma
β€œ
A cloud, hitherto unseen, came upon the moon, and hovered an instant like a dark hand before a face.The illusion went with it, and the lights in the windows were extinguished. I looked upon a desolate shell, soulless at last, unhaunted, with no whisper of the past about its staring walls. The house was a sepulchre, our fear and suffering lay buried in the ruins. There would be no resurrection. When I thought of Manderley in my waking hours I would not be bitter. I should think of it as it might have been, could I have lived there without fear. I should remember the rose-garden in summer, and the birds that sang at dawn.Tea under the chestnut tree, and the murmur of the sea coming up to us from the lawns below. I would think of the blown lilac, and the Happy Valley. These things were permanent, they could not be dissolved.They were memories that cannot hurt.
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Daphne du Maurier (Rebecca)
β€œ
GONE TO STATIC it sounds better than it is, this business of surviving, making it through the wrong place at the wrong time and living to tell. when the talk shows and movie credits wear off, it's just me and my dumb luck. this morning I had that dream again: the one where I'm dead. I wake up and nothing's much different. everything's gone sepia, a dirty bourbon glass by the bed, you're still dead. I could stumble to the shower, scrub the luck of breath off my skin but it's futile. the killer always wins. it's just a matter of time. and I have time. I have grief and liquor to fill it. tonight, the liquor and I are talking to you. the liquor says, 'remember' and I fill in the rest, your hands, your smile. all those times. remember. tonight the liquor and I are telling you about our day. we made it out of bed. we miss you. we were surprised by the blood between our legs. we miss you. we made it to the video store, missing you. we stopped at the liquor store hoping the bourbon would stop the missing. there's always more bourbon, more missing tonight, when we got home, there was a stray cat at the door. she came in. she screams to be touched. she screams when I touch her. she's right at home. not me. the whisky is open the vcr is on. I'm running the film backwards and one by one you come back to me, all of you. your pulses stutter to a begin your eyes go from fixed to blink the knives come out of your chests, the chainsaws roar out from your legs your wounds seal over your t-cells multiply, your tumors shrink the maniac killer disappears it's just you and me and the bourbon and the movie flickering together and the air breathes us and I am home, I am lucky I am right before everything goes black
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Daphne Gottlieb (Final Girl)
β€œ
It seems right now that all I’ve ever done in my life is making my way here to you.’ I could see that Rosie could not place the line from The Bridges of Madison County that had produced such a powerful emotional reaction on the plane. She looked confused. β€˜Don, what are you…what have you done to yourself?’ β€˜I’ve made some changes.’ β€˜Big changes.’ β€˜Whatever behavioural modifications you require from me are a trivial price to pay for having you as my partner.’ Rosie made a downwards movement with her hand, which I could not interpret. Then she looked around the room and I followed her eyes. Everyone was watching. Nick had stopped partway to our table. I realised that in my intensity I had raised my voice. I didn’t care. β€˜You are the world’s most perfect woman. All other women are irrelevant. Permanently. No Botox or implants will be required. β€˜I need a minute to think,’ she said. I automatically started the timer on my watch. Suddenly Rosie started laughing. I looked at her, understandably puzzled at this outburst in the middle of a critical life decision. β€˜The watch,’ she said. β€˜I say β€œI need a minute” and you start timing. Don is not dead. 'Don, you don’t feel love, do you?’ said Rosie. β€˜You can’t really love me.’ β€˜Gene diagnosed love.’ I knew now that he had been wrong. I had watched thirteen romantic movies and felt nothing. That was not strictly true. I had felt suspense, curiosity and amusement. But I had not for one moment felt engaged in the love between the protagonists. I had cried no tears for Meg Ryan or Meryl Streep or Deborah Kerr or Vivien Leigh or Julia Roberts. I could not lie about so important a matter. β€˜According to your definition, no.’ Rosie looked extremely unhappy. The evening had turned into a disaster. 'I thought my behaviour would make you happy, and instead it’s made you sad.’ β€˜I’m upset because you can’t love me. Okay?’ This was worse! She wanted me to love her. And I was incapable. Gene and Claudia offered me a lift home, but I did not want to continue the conversation. I started walking, then accelerated to a jog. It made sense to get home before it rained. It also made sense to exercise hard and put the restaurant behind me as quickly as possible. The new shoes were workable, but the coat and tie were uncomfortable even on a cold night. I pulled off the jacket, the item that had made me temporarily acceptable in a world to which I did not belong, and threw it in a rubbish bin. The tie followed. On an impulse I retrieved the Daphne from the jacket and carried it in my hand for the remainder of the journey. There was rain in the air and my face was wet as I reached the safety of my apartment.
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Graeme Simsion (The Rosie Project (Don Tillman, #1))