Brothers Karamazov Quotes

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Above all, don't lie to yourself. The man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point that he cannot distinguish the truth within him, or around him, and so loses all respect for himself and for others. And having no respect he ceases to love.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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What is hell? I maintain that it is the suffering of being unable to love.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I love mankind, he said, "but I find to my amazement that the more I love mankind as a whole, the less I love man in particular.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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The mystery of human existence lies not in just staying alive, but in finding something to live for.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I can see the sun, but even if I cannot see the sun, I know that it exists. And to know that the sun is there - that is living.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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The awful thing is that beauty is mysterious as well as terrible. God and the devil are fighting there and the battlefield is the heart of man.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I think the devil doesn't exist, but man has created him, he has created him in his own image and likeness.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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The world says: "You have needs -- satisfy them. You have as much right as the rich and the mighty. Don't hesitate to satisfy your needs; indeed, expand your needs and demand more." This is the worldly doctrine of today. And they believe that this is freedom. The result for the rich is isolation and suicide, for the poor, envy and murder.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Besides, nowadays, almost all capable people are terribly afraid of being ridiculous, and are miserable because of it.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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This is my last message to you: in sorrow, seek happiness.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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There is one other book, that can teach you everything you need to know about life... it's The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, but that's not enough anymore.
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Kurt Vonnegut Jr. (Slaughterhouse-Five)
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Love in action is a harsh and dreadful thing compared to love in dreams.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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You will burn and you will burn out; you will be healed and come back again.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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A beast can never be as cruel as a human being, so artistically, so picturesquely cruel.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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The more stupid one is, the closer one is to reality. The more stupid one is, the clearer one is. Stupidity is brief and artless, while intelligence squirms and hides itself. Intelligence is unprincipled, but stupidity is honest and straightforward.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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And what's strange, what would be marvelous, is not that God should really exist; the marvel is that such an idea, the idea of the necessity of God, could enter the head of such a savage, vicious beast as man.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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They were like two enemies in love with one another.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Be not forgetful of prayer. Every time you pray, if your prayer is sincere, there will be new feeling and new meaning in it, which will give you fresh courage, and you will understand that prayer is an education.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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One can fall in love and still hate.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov (Abridged))
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Forgive me... for my love -for ruining you with my love.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Love children especially, for they too are sinless like the angels; they live to soften and purify our hearts and, as it were, to guide us.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Nothing has ever been more insupportable for a man and a human society than freedom. โ€“The Grand Inquisitor
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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But to fall in love does not mean to love. One can fall in love and still hate.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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But I always liked side-paths, little dark back-alleys behind the main road- there one finds adventures and surprises, and precious metal in the dirt.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Love life more than the meaning of it?
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Life is paradise, and we are all in paradise, but we refuse to see it.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I believe like a child that suffering will be healed and made up for, that all the humiliating absurdity of human contradictions will vanish like a pitiful mirage, like the despicable fabrication of the impotent and infinitely small Euclidean mind of man, that in the world's finale, at the moment of eternal harmony, something so precious will come to pass that it will suffice for all hearts, for the comforting of all resentments, for the atonement of all the crimes of humanity, for all the blood that they've shed; that it will make it not only possible to forgive but to justify all that has happened.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Itโ€™s not God that I donโ€™t accept, Alyosha, only I most respectfully return him the ticket.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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If he's honest, he'll steal; if he's human, he'll murder; if he's faithful, he'll deceive.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Love is such a priceless treasure that you can buy the whole world with it, and redeem not only your own but other people's sins. Go, and do not be afraid.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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That day was turning out to be longer than The Brothers Karamazov.
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Carlos Ruiz Zafรณn (The Shadow of the Wind (The Cemetery of Forgotten Books, #1))
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Man, do not pride yourself on your superiority to the animals, for they are without sin, while you, with all your greatness, you defile the earth wherever you appear and leave an ignoble trail behind you -- and that is true, alas, for almost every one of us!
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Everything passes, only truth remains.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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In most cases, people, even wicked people, are far more naive and simple-hearted than one generally assumes. And so are we.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Love all Godโ€™s creation, both the whole and every grain of sand. Love every leaf, every ray of light. Love the animals, love the plants, love each separate thing. If thou love each thing thou wilt perceive the mystery of God in all; and when once thou perceive this, thou wilt thenceforward grow every day to a fuller understanding of it: until thou come at last to love the whole world with a love that will then be all-embracing and universal.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I punish myself for my whole life, my whole life I punish.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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There is nothing more alluring to man than freedom of conscience, but neither is there anything more agonizing.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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The world stands on absurdities, and without them perhaps nothing at all would happen.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Believe to the end, even if all men went astray and you were left the only one faithful; bring your offering even then and praise God in your loneliness.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Since man cannot live without miracles, he will provide himself with miracles of his own making. He will believe in witchcraft and sorcery, even though he may otherwise be a heretic, an atheist, and a rebel.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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For all is like an ocean, all flows and connects; touch it in one place and it echoes at the other end of the world.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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They have succeeded in accumulating a greater mass of objects, but the joy in the world has grown less.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I have so much to say to you that I am afraid I shall tell you nothing.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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The more I love humanity in general the less I love man in particular. In my dreams, I often make plans for the service of humanity, and perhaps I might actually face crucifixion if it were suddenly necessary. Yet I am incapable of living in the same room with anyone for two days together. I know from experience. As soon as anyone is near me, his personality disturbs me and restricts my freedom. In twenty-four hours I begin to hate the best of men: one because heโ€™s too long over his dinner, another because he has a cold and keeps on blowing his nose. I become hostile to people the moment they come close to me. But it has always happened that the more I hate men individually the more I love humanity.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Itโ€™s not God that I do not accept, you understand, it is this world of Godโ€™s, created by God, that I do not accept and cannot agree to accept.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Being at a loss to resolve these questions, I am resolved to leave them without any resolution.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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In this world, there is no absolute good, no absolute evil," the man said. "Good and evil are not fixed, stable entities, but are continually trading places. A good may be transformed into an evil in the next second. And vice versa. Such was the way of the world that Dostoevsky depicted in The Brothers Karamazov. The most important thing is to maintain the balance between the constantly moving good and evil. If you lean too much in either direction, it becomes difficult to maintain actual morals. Indeed, balance itself is the good.
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Haruki Murakami (1Q84 (1Q84 #1-3))
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We don't understand that life is heaven, for we have only to understand that and it will at once be fulfilled in all its beauty, we shall embrace each other and weep.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I am too young and I've loved you too much.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I do not rebel against my God, I simply do not accept his world.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Above all, avoid lies, all lies, especially the lie to yourself. Keep watch on your own lie and examine it every hour, every minute. And avoid contempt, both of others and of yourself: what seems bad to you in yourself is purified by the very fact that you have noticed it in yourself. And avoid fear, though fear is simply the consequence of every lie. Never be frightened at your own faintheartedness in attaining love, and meanwhile do not even be very frightened by your own bad acts.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Above all, do not lie to yourself. A man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point where he does not discern any truth either in himself or anywhere around him, and thus falls into disrespect towards himself and others. Not respecting anyone, he ceases to love, and having no love, he gives himself up to passions and coarse pleasures in order to occupy and amuse himself, and in his vices reaches complete beastiality, and it all comes form lying continually to others and himself. A man who lies to himself is often the first to take offense. it sometimes feels very good to take offense, doesn't it? And surely he knows that no one has offended him, and that he himself has invented the offense and told lies just for the beauty of it, that he has exaggerated for the sake of effect, that he has picked up on a word and made a mountain out of a pea--he knows all of that, and still he is the first to take offense, he likes feeling offended, it gives him great pleasure, and thus he reaches the point of real hostility...
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Imagine that you are creating a fabric of human destiny with the object of making men happy in the end, giving them peace and rest at last. Imagine that you are doing this but that it is essential and inevitable to torture to death only one tiny creature...in order to found that edifice on its unavenged tears. Would you consent to be the architect on those conditions? Tell me. Tell the truth.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I think I could stand anything, any suffering, only to be able to say and to repeat to myself every moment, 'I exist.' In thousands of agonies -- I exist. I'm tormented on the rack -- but I exist! Though I sit alone in a pillar -- I exist! I see the sun, and if I don't see the sun, I know it's there. And there's a whole life in that, in knowing that the sun is there.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Men are made for happiness, and he who is completely happy has the right to say to himself, 'I am doing God's will on earth.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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You must know that there is nothing higher and stronger and more wholesome and good for life in the future than some good memory, especially a memory of childhood, of home. People talk to you a great deal about your education, but some good, sacred memory, preserved from childhood, is perhaps the best education. If a man carries many such memories with him into life, he is safe to the end of his days, and if one has only one good memory left in one's heart, even that may sometime be the means of saving us.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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How good life is when one does something good and just!
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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The man who lies to himself can be more easily offended than anyone else. You know it is sometimes very pleasant to take offense, isn't it? A man may know that nobody has insulted him, but that he has invented the insult for himself, has lied and exaggerated to make it picturesque, has caught at a word and made a mountain out of a molehill--he knows that himself, yet he will be the first to take offense, and will revel in his resentment till he feels great pleasure in it.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Loving someone is different from being in love with someone. You can hate someone you're in love with
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Love the animals. God has given them the rudiments of thought and joy untroubled. Don't trouble it, don't harass them, don't deprive them of their happiness, don't work against God's intent.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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So long as man remains free he strives for nothing so incessantly and so painfully as to find someone to worship.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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As a general rule, people, even the wicked, are much more naive and simple-hearted than we supposed. And we ourselves are, too.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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The centripetal force on our planet is still fearfully strong, Alyosha. I have a longing for life, and I go on living in spite of logic. Though I may not believe in the order of the universe, yet I love the sticky little leaves as they open in spring. I love the blue sky, I love some people, whom one loves you know sometimes without knowing why. I love some great deeds done by men, though Iโ€™ve long ceased perhaps to have faith in them, yet from old habit oneโ€™s heart prizes them. Here they have brought the soup for you, eat it, it will do you good. Itโ€™s first-rate soup, they know how to make it here. I want to travel in Europe, Alyosha, I shall set off from here. And yet I know that I am only going to a graveyard, but itโ€™s a most precious graveyard, thatโ€™s what it is! Precious are the dead that lie there, every stone over them speaks of such burning life in the past, of such passionate faith in their work, their truth, their struggle and their science, that I know I shall fall on the ground and kiss those stones and weep over them; though Iโ€™m convinced in my heart that itโ€™s long been nothing but a graveyard. And I shall not weep from despair, but simply because I shall be happy in my tears, I shall steep my soul in emotion. I love the sticky leaves in spring, the blue sky โ€” thatโ€™s all it is. Itโ€™s not a matter of intellect or logic, itโ€™s loving with oneโ€™s inside, with oneโ€™s stomach.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Do you know I've been sitting here thinking to myself: that if I didn't believe in life, if I lost faith in the woman I love, lost faith in the order of things, were convinced in fact that everything is a disorderly, damnable, and perhaps devil-ridden chaos, if I were struck by every horror of man's disillusionment -- still I should want to live. Having once tasted of the cup, I would not turn away from it till I had drained it! At thirty though, I shall be sure to leave the cup even if I've not emptied it, and turn away -- where I don't know. But till I am thirty I know that my youth will triumph over everything -- every disillusionment, every disgust with life. I've asked myself many times whether there is in the world any despair that could overcome this frantic thirst for life. And I've come to the conclusion that there isn't, that is until I am thirty.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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There is only one way to salvation, and that is to make yourself responsible for all men's sins. As soon as you make yourself responsible in all sincerity for everything and for everyone, you will see at once that this is really so, and that you are in fact to blame for everyone and for all things.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Here is a commandment for you: seek happiness in sorrow. Work, work tirelessly.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Schoolboys are a merciless race, individually they are angels, but together, especially in schools, they are often merciless.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Love is a teacher, but one must know how to acquire it, for it is difficult to acquire, it is dearly bought, by long work over a long time, for one ought to love not for a chance moment but for all time. Anyone, even a wicked man, can love by chance.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Because I'm a Karamazov. Because when I fall into the abyss, I go straight into it, head down and heels up, and I'm even pleased that I'm falling in just such a humiliating position, and for me I find it beautiful.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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With such a hell in your heart and your head, how can you live? How can you love?
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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You mustn't ask too much of human endurance, one must be merciful.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I exist.โ€™ In thousands of agonies โ€” I exist. Iโ€™m tormented on the rack โ€” but I exist! Though I sit alone in a pillar โ€” I exist! I see the sun, and if I donโ€™t see the sun, I know itโ€™s there. And thereโ€™s a whole life in that, in knowing that the sun is there.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Being in love doesn't mean loving.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Paradise is hidden in each one of use, it is concealed within me too, right now, and if I wish, it will come for me in reality, tomorrow even, and for the rest of my life.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Equality lies only in human moral dignity. ... Let there be brothers first, then there will be brotherhood, and only then will there be a fair sharing of goods among brothers.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Remember particularly that you cannot be a judge of anyone. For no one can judge a criminal until he recognizes that he is just such a criminal as the man standing before him, and that he perhaps is more than all men to blame for that crime. When he understands that, he will be able to be a judge. Though that sounds absurd, it is true. If I had been righteous myself, perhaps there would have been no criminal standing before me. If you can take upon yourself the crime of the criminal your heart is judging, take it at once, suffer for him yourself, and let him go without reproach. And even if the law itself makes you his judge, act in the same spirit so far as possible, for he will go away and condemn himself more bitterly than you have done. If, after your kiss, he goes away untouched, mocking at you, do not let that be a stumbling-block to you. It shows his time has not yet come, but it will come in due course. And if it come not, no matter; if not he, then another in his place will understand and suffer, and judge and condemn himself, and the truth will be fulfilled. Believe that, believe it without doubt; for in that lies all the hope and faith of the saints.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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People talk sometimes of a bestial cruelty, but that's a great injustice and insult to the beasts; a beast can never be so cruel as a man, so artistically cruel. The tiger only tears and gnaws, that's all he can do. He would never think of nailing people by the ears, even if he were able to do it.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Ah, Misha, he has a stormy spirit. His mind is in bondage. He is haunted by a great, unsolved doubt. He is one of those who don't want millions, but an answer to their questions.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov: A Novel in Four Parts With Epilogue)
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Brother, Iโ€™m not depressed and havenโ€™t lost spirit. Life everywhere is life, life is in ourselves and not in the external. There will be people near me, and to be a human being among human beings, and remain one forever, no matter what misfortunes befall, not to become depressed, and not to falter โ€“ this is what life is, herein lies its task.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Alyosha's heart could not bear uncertainty, for the nature of his love was always active. He could not love passively; once he loved, he immediately also began to help.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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The secret of man's being is not only to live but to have something to live for.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I want to suffer and be purified by suffering!
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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ุฅู†ู†ูŠ ุฃุญุจ ุงู„ุงู†ุณุงู†ูŠุฉ , ุบูŠุฑ ุฃู† ู‡ู†ุงูƒ ุดูŠุฆุง ููŠ ู†ูุณูŠ ูŠุฏู‡ุดู†ูŠ : ูƒู„ู…ุง ุงุฒุฏุงุฏ ุญุจูŠ ู„ู„ุงู†ุณุงู†ูŠุฉ ุฌู…ู„ุฉ ูˆุงุญุฏุฉ , ู†ู‚ุต ุญุจูŠ ู„ู„ุจุดุฑ ุงูุฑุงุฏุง , ุงูŠ ุฃุดุฎุงุตุง ู„ู‡ู… ุญูŠุงุชู‡ู… ุงู„ุฎุงุตุฉ
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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For if there's no everlasting God, there's no such thing as virtue, and there's no need of it.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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By the experience of active love. Strive to love your neighbour actively and indefatigably. In as far as you advance in love you will grow surer of the reality of God and of the immortality of your soul. If you attain to perfect self-forgetfulness in the love of your neighbour, then you will believe without doubt, and no doubt can possibly enter your soul. This has been tried. This is certain.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Love the animals. God has given them the rudiments of thought and joy untroubled. Donโ€™t trouble it, donโ€™t harass them, donโ€™t deprive them of their happiness, donโ€™t work against Godโ€™s intent. Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov
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Richard Adams (Watership Down)
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...I believe that you are sincere and good at heart. If you do not attain happiness, always remember that you are on the right road, and try not to leave it. Above all, avoid falsehood, every kind of falsehood, especially falseness to yourself. Watch over your own deceitfulness and look into it every hour, every minute. Avoid being scornful, both to others and to yourself. What seems to you bad within you will grow purer from the very fact of your observing it in yourself. Avoid fear, too, though fear is only the consequence of every sort of falsehood. Never be frightened at your own faint-heartedness in attaining love.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
ู…ุง ูƒุงู† ุฐู„ูƒ ู…ู†ู‡ุง ุฅู„ุง ู‚ูˆู„ุงู‹ ุทุงุฆุดุงู‹..........ูŠุฌุจ ุฃู† ู†ุบูุฑ ุงู„ุฃู‚ูˆุงู„ ุงู„ุทุงุฆุดุฉุŒ ู„ุฃู†ู‡ุง ุชู‡ุฏู‰ุก ุงู„ู†ูุณ...ูˆุจุฏูˆู†ู‡ุง ูŠุตุจุญ ุฃู„ู… ุงู„ุฅู†ุณุงู† ุฃุดุฏ ู…ู† ุฃู† ูŠูุทุงู‚
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Learning to love is hard and we pay dearly for it. It takes hard work and a long apprenticeship, for it is not just for a moment that we must learn to love, but forever.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
The genuine realist, if he is an unbeliever, will always find strength and ability to disbelieve in the miraculous, and if he is confronted with a miracle as an irrefutable fact he would rather disbelieve his own senses than admit the miraculous also.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Woe to the man who offends a small child!
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
I love the sticky leaves in spring, the blue sky โ€” thatโ€™s all it is. Itโ€™s not a matter of intellect or logic, itโ€™s loving with oneโ€™s inside, with oneโ€™s stomach.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
ู„ุฃู† ุงู„ู…ุฑุก ูŠูƒูˆู† ุฃู‚ุฑุจ ุฅู„ู‰ ุงู„ุญู‚ูŠู‚ุฉ ุญูŠู† ูŠูƒูˆู† ุบุจูŠู‘ูŽุงู‹ุŒ ุฅู† ุงู„ุบุจุงุก ูŠู…ุถูŠ ู†ุญูˆ ุงู„ู‡ุฏู ุฑุฃุณุงู‹ุŒ ุงู„ุจุบุงุก ุจุณุงุทุฉ ูˆุฅูŠุฌุงุฒุŒ ุฃู…ุง ุงู„ุฐูƒุงุก ูู…ูƒุฑ ูˆู…ุฎุงุชู„ุฉ. ุฅู† ุงู„ููƒุฑ ุงู„ุฐูƒูŠ ูุงุฌุฑูŒ ูุงุณุฏุŒ ุฃู…ุง ุงู„ุบุจุงุก ูู…ุณุชู‚ูŠู… ุดุฑูŠูุŒ ู„ู‚ุฏ ุดุฑุญุช ู„ูƒ ูŠุฃุณูŠุŒ ูˆุนู„ู‰ ู‚ุฏุฑ ู…ุง ูŠูƒูˆู† ุงู„ุดุฑุญ ุบุจูŠุงู‹ ูŠูƒูˆู† ุงู„ุฃู…ุฑ ุฃูุถู„ ููŠ ู†ุธุฑูŠ.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Lamentations comfort only by lacerating the heart still more. Such grief does not desire consolation. It feeds on the sense of its hopelessness. Lamentations spring only from the constant craving to re-open the wound.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Fathers and teachers, I ponder, "What is hell?" I maintain that it is the suffering of being unable to love.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Every one is really responsible to all men for all men and for everything.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
There is something spiteful and yet open-hearted about you
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov (Illustrated))
โ€œ
And so in that very shame I suddenly begin a hymn.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
You will see great sorrow, and in that sorrow you will be happy. This is my last message to you: in sorrow seek happiness. Work, work unceasingly. Remember my words, for although I shall talk with you again, not only my days but my hours are numbered.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
You can't be angry with me, because I am a hundred times more severely punished than you, if only by the fact that I shall never see you again.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Drive nature out of the door and it will fly in at the window
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
But what are years, what are months!" he would exclaim. "Why count the days, when even one day is enough for man to know all happiness.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
... active love is a harsh and fearful thing compared with the love in dreams. Love in dreams thirsts for immediate action, quickly performed, and with everyone watching. Indeed, it will go as far as the giving even of one's life, provided it does not take long but is soon over, as on stage, and eveyone is looking on and praising. Whereas active love is labor and persistence, and for some people, perhaps, a whole science.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Obedience, fasting, and prayer are laughed at, yet only through them lies the way to real true freedom. I cut off my superfluous and unnecessary desires, I subdue my proud and wanton will and chastise it with obedience, and with God's help I attain freedom of spirit and with it spiritual joy.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
ุฌู…ูŠุน ุงู„ู†ุงุณ ูŠุนูŠุจูˆู† ุงู„ุฎู„ุงุนุฉุŒ ูˆู„ูƒู†ู‡ู… ุฌู…ูŠุนุง ูŠุชุนุงุทูˆู†ู‡ุง.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Do you think it is a vain hope that one day man will find joy in noble deeds of light and mercy, rather than in the coarse pleasures he indulges in today -- gluttony, fornication, ostentation, boasting, and envious vying with his neighbor? I am certain this is not a vain hope and that the day will come soon.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
I think everyone must love life more than anything else in the world.' 'Love life more than the meaning of it?' 'Yes, certainly. Love it regardless of logic, as you say. Yes, most certainly regardless of logic, for only then will I grasp its meaning. That's what I've been vaguely aware of for a long time. Half your work is done, Ivan: you love life. Now you must try to do the second half and you are saved.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Is there beauty in Sodom? Believe me, that for the immense mass of mankind beauty is found in Sodom. Did you know that secret? The awful thing is that beauty is mysterious as well as terrible. God and the devil are fighting there and the battlefield is the heart of man.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Itโ€™s not miracles that generate faith, but faith that generates miracles
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
It's the great mystery of human life that old grief passes gradually into quiet tender joy. The mild serenity of age takes the place of the riotous blood of youth.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
ุฃู†ุง ู…ูู‡ุฑุฌ ูŠุง ุตุงุญุจ ุงู„ุณุนุงุฏุฉ ,ุฃู†ุง ู…ูู‡ุฑุฌ ุญู‚ูŠู‚ู‰ , ู…ูู‡ุฑุฌ ู…ูุทูˆุฑ ุนู„ู‰ ุงู„ุชู‡ุฑูŠุฌ , ูˆ ุฅู† ุดุฆุช ูู‚ู„ ูŠุง ุตุงุญุจ ุงู„ุณุนุงุฏุฉ ุฃู†ู‰ ุงู†ุณุงู† ุจุณูŠุท ุฃุจู„ู‡ ! ... ู‚ุฏ ุชูƒูˆู† ุงู„ุฑูˆุญ ุงู„ุชู‰ ุชุญุฑูƒู†ู‰ ุบูŠุฑ ุทุงู‡ุฑุฉ , ุฃู†ุง ู„ุง ุฃุฌุญุฏ ุฐู„ูƒ ูู„ูˆ ูƒุงู†ุช ุฑูˆุญุงู‹ ูƒุจูŠุฑุฉ ู‚ูˆูŠุฉ ู„ุงุฎุชุงุฑุช ู„ู‡ุง ู…ุณูƒู†ุงู‹ ุฃูุถู„ .
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
If you are penitent, you love. And if you love you are of God. All things are atoned for, all things are saved by love...Love is such a priceless treasure that you can redeem the whole world by it, and expiate not only your own sins but the sins of others.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
--you wouldn't have hurt me like this for nothing. So what have I done? How have I wronged you? Tell me.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
ุฅู† ุงู„ุฅู†ุณุงู†ูŠุฉ ุณุชุฌุฏ ููŠ ู†ูุณู‡ุง ุงู„ู‚ุฏุฑุฉ ุนู„ู‰ ุฃู† ุชุญูŠุง ู„ู„ูุถูŠู„ุฉ , ุณูˆุงุก ุฃุขู…ู†ุช ุจุฎู„ูˆุฏ ุงู„ุฑูˆุญ ุฃู… ู„ู… ุชุคู…ู†
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
They have this social justification for every nasty thing they do!
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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God preserve you, my dear boy, from ever asking forgiveness for a fault from a woman you love. From one you love especially, however greatly you may have been in fault. For a woman--devil only knows what to make of a woman: I know something about them, anyway. But try acknowledging you are in fault to a woman. Say, "I am sorry, forgive me," and a shower of reproaches will follow! Nothing will make her forgive you simply and directly, she'll humble you to the dust, bring forward things that have never happened, recall everything, forget nothing, add something of her own, and only then forgive you. And even the best, the best of them do it. She'll scrape up all the scrapings and load them on your head. They are ready to flay you alive, I tell you, every one of them, all these angels without whom we cannot live! I tell you plainly and openly, dear boy, every decent man ought to be under some woman's thumb. That's my conviction--not conviction, but feeling. A man ought to be magnanimous, and it's no disgrace to a man! No disgrace to a hero, not even a Caesar! But don't ever beg her pardon all the same for anything...
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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There is no virtue if there is no immortality.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Reading a book about something can be an obstacle to doing it because it gives you the impression that you are doing what you are only thinking about doing. It is tempting to remain in the comfortable theater of our imagination instead of the real world, to fall in love with the idea of becoming a saint and loving God and neighbor instead of doing the actual work, because the idea makes no demands on you. It is like a book on a shelf. But, as Dostoyevsky says, 'love in action is a harsh and dreadful thing compared to love in dreams' (The Brothers Karamazov).
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Peter Kreeft (Prayer For Beginners)
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You must know that there is nothing higher and stronger and more wholesome and good for life in the future than some good memory, especially a memory of childhood, of home. People talk to you a great deal about your education, but some good, sacred memory, preserved from childhood, is perhaps the best education.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
And what does it mean - ridiculous? wWhat does it matter how many times a man is or seems to be ridiculous? Besides, nowadays almost all capable people are terribly afraid of being ridiculous, and are miserable because of it.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Faith does not, in the realist, spring from the miracle but the miracle from faith. If the realist once believes, then he is bound by his very realism to admit the miraculous also.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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- What is a Socialist? - That's when all are equal and all have property in common, there are no marriages, and everyone has any religion and laws he likes best. You are not old enough to understand that yet.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
ุบูŠุฑ ุฃู† ู‡ู†ุงูƒ ุฃู†ุงุณุงู‹ ูŠุชุฃู„ู…ูˆู† ุฃู„ู…ุงู‹ ู…ุชูุฌุฑุงู‹ ูŠู†ุทู„ู‚ ุงู†ุชุญุงุจุงุช ุนู„ู‰ ุญูŠู† ูุฌุฃุฉุŒ ุซู… ุฅุฐุง ู‡ูˆ ูŠุนุชุตู… ุจุนุฏ ุฐู„ูƒ ุจุงู„ุชุฑุชูŠู„. ูˆู‡ุฐู‡ ุงู„ุญุงู„ุฉ ุชู„ุงุญุธ ุนู„ู‰ ุงู„ู†ุณุงุก ุฎุงุตุฉุŒ ูˆู„ูŠุณ ู‡ุฐุง ุงู„ุฃู„ู… ุฃู‚ู„ ุฃูˆ ุฃุฎู ู…ู† ุฃู„ู… ุงู„ุตุงู…ุชูŠู†. ุฅู† ุงู„ุชุฑุชูŠู„ ู„ุง ูŠุฎูู ุนู† ุงู„ู†ูุณ ุฅู„ุง ู„ุฃู†ู‡ ูŠุญูŠูŠ ุฌุฑูˆุญ ุงู„ู‚ู„ุจ ูˆูŠู†ูƒุคู‡ุง ุฃุนู…ู‚ ูุฃุนู…ู‚. ุฅู† ู‡ุฐู‡ ุงู„ุตูˆุฑุฉ ู…ู† ุตูˆุฑ ุงู„ุฃู„ู… ู„ุง ุชุชุทู„ุจ ุนุฒุงุก ูˆู„ุง ุชุณุนู‰ ุฅู„ู‰ ุณู„ูˆู‰ุŒ ู„ุฃู†ู‡ุง ุชุบุชุฐูŠ ู…ู† ุงู„ุดุนูˆุฑ ุจุงุณุชุญุงู„ุฉ ุงุดุจุงุนู‡ุŒ ูุงู„ุชุฑุชูŠู„ ุฅู†ู…ุง ูŠุนุจุฑ ุนู† ุงู„ุญุงุฌุฉ ุฅู„ู‰ ู†ูƒุก ุงู„ุฌุฑูˆุญ ุจุบูŠุฑ ุชูˆู‚ู.
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ููŠูˆุฏูˆุฑ ุฏูˆุณุชูˆูŠูุณูƒูŠ (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
...to return to their 'native soil,' as they say, to the bosom, so to speak, of their mother earth, like frightened children, yearning to fall asleep on the withered bosom of their decrepit mother, and to sleep there for ever, only to escape the horrors that terrify them.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
But how do you see you?" she asked. "Ever read The Brothers Karamazov?" I asked. "Once, a long time ago." "Well, toward the end, Alyosha is speaking to a young student named Kolya Krasotkin. And he says, Kolya, you're going to have a miserable future. But overall, you'll have a happy life." Two beers down, I hesitated before opening my third. "When I first read that, I didn't know what Alyosha meant," I said. "How was it possible for a life of misery to be happy overall? But then I understood, that misery could be limited to the future." "I have no idea what you're talking about." "Neither do I," I said. "Not yet.
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Haruki Murakami (Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World)
โ€œ
For socialism is not merely the labour question, it is before all things the atheistic question, the question of the form taken by atheism to-day, the question of the tower of Babel built without God, not to mount to Heaven from Earth but to set up Heaven on earth.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Anger was buried far too early in a young heart, which perhaps contained much good.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Nothing is more seductive for man than his freedom of conscience, but nothing is a greater cause of suffering.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Is there in the whole world a being who would have the right to forgive and could forgive? I don't want harmony. From love for humanity I don't want it. I would rather be left with the unavenged suffering. I would rather remain with my unavenged suffering and unsatisfied indignation, even if I were wrong. Besides, too high a price is asked for harmony; it's beyond our means to pay so much to enter on it. And so I hasten to give back my entrance ticket, and if I am an honest man I am bound to give it back as soon as possible. And that I am doing. It's not God that I don't accept, Alyosha, only I most respectfully return him the ticket.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Indeed, people speak sometimes about the โ€˜animalโ€™ cruelty of man, but that is terribly unjust and offensive to animals, no animal could ever be so cruel as a man, so artfully, so artistically cruel
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
ุฑุงู‚ุจ ุณู„ูˆูƒูƒ ููŠ ูƒู„ ุณุงุนุฉ ูˆููŠ ูƒู„ ุฏู‚ูŠู‚ุฉ ู…ู† ุงู„ูŠูˆู… ุญุชู‰ ุชุดุน ุงู„ุทู‡ุงุฑุฉ ู…ู†ูƒ
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Do you know that centuries will pass and mankind will proclaim with the mouth of its wisdom and science that there is no crime, and therefore no sin, but only hungry men? Feed them first, then ask virtue of them.
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โ€
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
And so will I here state just plainly and briefly that I accept God. But I must point out one thing: if God does exist and really created the world, as we well know, he created it according to the principles of Euclidean geometry and made the human brain capable of grasping only three dimensions of space. Yet there have been and still are mathematicians and philosophers-among them some of the most outstanding-who doubt that the whole universe or, to put it more generally, all existence was created to fit Euclidean geometry; they even dare to conceive that two parallel lines that, according to Euclid, never do meet on earth do, in fact, meet somewhere in infinity. And so my dear boy, Iโ€™ve decided that I am incapable of understanding of even that much, I cannot possibly understand about God.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Fathers, provoke not your children to wrath.
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โ€
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
For the secret of human existence lies not only in living, but in knowing what to live for.
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โ€
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
โ€œ
Be near your brothers. Not just one, but both of them.
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โ€
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Above all, do not lie to yourself. A man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point where he does not discern any truth either in himself or anywhere around him, and thus falls into disrespect towards himself and others. Not respecting anyone, he ceases to love, and having no love, he gives himself up to passions and coarse pleasures, in order to occupy and amuse himself, and in his vices reaches complete bestiality, and it all comes from lying continually to others and to himself. A man who lies to himself is often the first to take offense. It sometimes feels very good to take offense, doesn't it? And surely he knows that no one has offended him, and that he himself has invented the offense and told lies just for the beauty of it, that he has exaggerated for the sake of effect, that he has picked on a word and made a mountain out of a pea--he knows all of that, and still he is the first to take offense, he likes feeling offended, it gives him great pleasure, and thus he reaches the point of real hostility.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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She has known all the time that I cared for her--though I never said a word of my love to her--
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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They were given paradise, they wanted freedom, and stole fire from heaven, though they knew that they would become unhappy.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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He who loves men, loves their joy.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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..., and if one has only one good memory left in one's heart, even that may sometimes be the means of saving us.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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It's God that's worrying me. That's the only thing that's worrying me. What if He doesn't exist? What if Rakitin's right -that it's an idea made up by men? Then, if He doesn't exist, man is the king of the earth, of the universe. Magnificent! Only how is he going to be good without God? That's the question. I always come back to that. Who is man going to love then? To whom will he be thankful? To whom will he sing the hymn? Rakitin laughs. Rakitin says that one can love humanity instead of God. Well, only an idiot can maintain that. I can't understand it. Life's easy for Rakitin. 'You'd better think about the extension of civic rights, or of keeping down the price of meat. You will show your love for humanity more simply and directly by that, than by philosophy.' I answered him: 'Well, but you, without a God, are more likely to raise the price of meat if it suits you, and make a rouble on every penny.' He lost his temper. But after all, what is goodness? Answer that, Alyosha. Goodness is one thing with me and another with a Chinaman, so it's relative. Or isn't it? Is it not relative? A treacherous question! You won't laugh if I tell you it's kept me awake for two nights. I only wonder now how people can live and think nothing about it. Vanity!
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I donโ€™t understand anything...and I no longer want to understand anything. I want to stick to the fact...If I wanted to understand something, I would immediately have to betray the fact, but Iโ€™ve made up my mind to stick to the fact.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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The man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to such a pass that he cannot distinguish the truth within him, or around him, and so loses all respect for himself and for others. And having no respect he ceases to love, and in order to occupy and distract himself without love he gives way to passions and coarse pleasures, and sinks to bestiality in his vices, all from continual lying to other men and to himself. (Zosimaโ€™s advice to Fyodor Pavlovich)
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I bless the rising sun each day, and, as before, my heart sings to meet it, but now I love even more its setting, its long slanting rays & the soft tender gentle memories that come with them...โ€™ -Father Zossima
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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ุฅู† ุงู„ูƒุฐุงุจูŠู† ุงู„ุนุฑูŠู‚ูŠู† ุงู„ุฐูŠู† ุธู„ูˆุง ุธู„ูˆุง ุทูˆุงู„ ุญูŠุงุชู‡ู… ูŠู…ุซู‘ูู„ูˆู† ูŠุจู„ุบูˆู† ุฃุญูŠุงู†ุงู‹ ู…ู† ุนู…ู‚ ุชู‚ู…ุตู‡ู… ู„ู„ุฏูˆุฑ ุงู„ุฐูŠ ูŠู…ุซู„ูˆู†ู‡ ุฃู†ู‡ู… ูŠุฑุชุนุดูˆู† ุงู†ูุนุงู„ุงูŽ ูˆูŠุจูƒูˆู†ุŒ ุฑุบู… ู‚ุฏุฑุชู‡ู… ุนู„ู‰ ุฃู† ูŠู‚ูˆู„ูˆุง ู„ุฃู†ูุณู‡ู… ููŠ ุงู„ูˆู‚ุช ู†ูุณู‡ (ุฃูˆ ุจุนุฏ ุจุถุน ุฏู‚ุงุฆู‚): "ุฃู†ุช ุชูƒุฐุจ ุฃูŠู‡ุง ุงู„ูƒุงุฐุจ ุงู„ุนุฑูŠู‚! ุฃู†ุช ุชู…ุซู„ ุญุชู‰ ููŠ ู‡ุฐู‡ ุงู„ู„ุญุธุฉุŒ ุฑุบู… ุบุถุจูƒ "ุงู„ู…ู‚ุฏุณ" ูˆุฑุบู… ู‡ุฐู‡ ุงู„ุฏู‚ูŠู‚ุฉ "ุงู„ู…ู‚ุฏุณุฉ" ู…ู† ุงู„ุบุถุจ ".
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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What is the use of Christ's words, unless we set an example?
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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ูƒูŠ ูŠุญุจ ุงู„ุฅู†ุณุงู† ุงู„ุขุฎุฑ ูŠุฌุจ ุฃู† ูŠูƒูˆู† ุฎููŠุงู‹ ูุฅู† ุธู‡ุฑ ูˆุฌู‡ู‡ ุฒุงู„ุช ุงู„ู…ุญุจุฉ
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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ุฅู† ู…ู† ูŠูƒุฐุจ ุนู„ู‰ ู†ูุณู‡ ูˆ ูŠุฑุถู‰ ุฃู† ุชู†ุทู„ู‰ ุนู„ูŠู‡ ุงูƒุงุฐูŠุจู‡ ูŠุตู„ ู…ู† ุฐู„ูƒ ุฅู„ู‰ ุฃู† ูŠุตุจุญ ุนุงุฌุฒุง ุนู† ุฑุคูŠุฉ ุงู„ุญู‚ูŠู‚ุฉ ูู‰ ุฃู‰ ู…ูˆุถุน ูู„ุง ูŠุนูˆุฏ ูŠุฑุงู‡ุง ู„ุง ูู‰ ู†ูุณู‡ ูˆู„ุง ููŠู…ุง ุญูˆู„ู‡
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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The righteous man departs, but his light remains.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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ุฅู† ู…ุง ู‚ุฏ ูŠุจุฏูˆ ู„ูƒ ููŠ ุทุจูŠุนุชูƒ ุดุฑุง ุงู†ู…ุง ูŠุตููŠู‡ ูˆูŠู†ู‚ูŠู‡ ูˆูŠุทู‡ุฑู‡ ู…ุฌุฑุฏ ุดุนูˆุฑูƒ ุจู‡
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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The more I love humanity in general, the less I love man in particular.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Don't think I'm talking nonsense because I'm drunk. I'm not a bit drunk. Brandy's all very well, but I need two bottles to make me drunk.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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My brother asked the birds to forgive him: that sounds senseless, but it is right; for all is like an ocean, all is flowing and blending; a touch in one place sets up movement at the other end of the earth. It may be senseless to beg forgiveness of the birds, but birds would be happier at your side โ€“a little happier, anywayโ€“ and children and all animals, if you yourself were nobler than you are now. Itโ€™s all like an ocean, I tell you. Then you would pray to the birds too, consumed by an all-embracing love in a sort of transport, and pray that they too will forgive you your sin.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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It is precisely that requirement of shared worship that has been the principal source of suffering for individual man and the human race since the beginning of history. In their efforts to impose universal worship, men have unsheathed their swords and killed one another. They have invented gods and challenged each other: "Discard your gods and worship mine or I will destroy both your gods and you!
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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A final word. Curious. Many years of reading many books has led me to a somewhat bizarre literary critical theory, namely that all significant texts are distinguished by the preponderance of a single word. In Aliceโ€™s adventures in Wonderland that word is โ€˜curiousโ€™ (In The Brothers Karamazov itโ€™s โ€˜ecstasyโ€™, but that neednโ€™t concern us here.) The word โ€˜curiousโ€™ appears so frequently in Carrollโ€™s text that it becomes a kind of tocsin awakening us from our reverie. But it isnโ€™t the strangeness of Aliceโ€™s Wonderland that it reminds us of-itโ€™s the bizarre incomprehensibility of our own.
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Will Self
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Father monks, why do you fast! Why do you expect reward in heaven for that?...No, saintly monk, you try being virtuous in the world, do good to society, without shutting yourself up in a monastery at other people's expense, and without expecting a reward up aloft for it--you'll find that a bit harder.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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You will have many enemies, but even your foes will love you. Life will bring you many misfortunes, but you will find your happiness in them, and will bless life and will make others bless it--which is what matters most.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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ู‚ุฏ ุชู…ุฑ ู‚ุฑุจ ุทูู„ ูˆู‚ุฏ ุนุตู ุจูƒ ุงู„ุบุถุจุŒ ูุชูู„ุช ู…ู† ู„ุณุงู†ูƒ ูƒู„ู…ุฉ ุณูŠุฆุฉุŒ ู„ุนู„ูƒ ู„ู… ุชู„ุงุญุธ ูˆุฌูˆุฏ ุงู„ุทูู„ุŒ ูˆู„ูƒู†ู‡ ุฑุขูƒุŒ ูˆุงู„ุตูˆุฑุฉ ุงู„ู†ุฌุณุฉ ุงู„ุฎุจูŠุซุฉ ุงู„ุชูŠ ุชุฑูƒุชู‡ุง ู„ู‡ ุณุชุจู‚ู‰ ููŠ ู‚ุฑุงุฑุฉ ู‚ู„ุจู‡ุŒ ู„ู‚ุฏ ุจุฐุฑุช -ุฏูˆู† ุฃู† ูŠุฎุทุฑ ุจุจุงู„ูƒ- ุจุฐุฑุฉ ุงู„ุดุฑ ููŠ ู‡ุฐุง ุงู„ูƒุงุฆู† ุงู„ุตุบูŠุฑุŒ ูˆู„ุง ุดูƒ ุฃู† ุงู„ุจุฐุฑุฉ ุงู„ุณูŠุฆุฉ ุณุชุทู„ุน ูŠูˆู…ุง ู„ุชุฌู„ุจ ู„ู‡ ุงู„ุดู‚ุงุก
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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One day is enough for a man to know all happiness. My dear ones, why do we quarrel, try to outshine each other and keep grudges against each other? Let's go straight into the garden, walk and play there, love, appreciate each other and glorify life.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I tell you, the old-fashioned doctor who treated all diseases has completely disappeared, now there are only specialists, and they advertise all the time in the newspapers. If your nose hurts, they send you to Paris: there's a European specialist there, he treats noses. You go to Paris, he examines your nose: I can treat only your right nostril, he says, I don't treat left nostrils, it's not my specialty, but after me, go to Vienna, there's a separate specialist there who will finish treating your left nostril.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Look around you โ€” the clear sky, the pure air, the tender grass, the birds; nature is beautiful and sinless, and we, only we, are foolish and we donโ€™t understand that life is heaven, for we have only to understand that and it will at once be fulfilled in all its beauty, we shall embrace each other and weep.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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76. David Hume โ€“ Treatise on Human Nature; Essays Moral and Political; An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding 77. Jean-Jacques Rousseau โ€“ On the Origin of Inequality; On the Political Economy; Emile โ€“ or, On Education, The Social Contract 78. Laurence Sterne โ€“ Tristram Shandy; A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy 79. Adam Smith โ€“ The Theory of Moral Sentiments; The Wealth of Nations 80. Immanuel Kant โ€“ Critique of Pure Reason; Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals; Critique of Practical Reason; The Science of Right; Critique of Judgment; Perpetual Peace 81. Edward Gibbon โ€“ The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire; Autobiography 82. James Boswell โ€“ Journal; Life of Samuel Johnson, Ll.D. 83. Antoine Laurent Lavoisier โ€“ Traitรฉ ร‰lรฉmentaire de Chimie (Elements of Chemistry) 84. Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison โ€“ Federalist Papers 85. Jeremy Bentham โ€“ Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation; Theory of Fictions 86. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe โ€“ Faust; Poetry and Truth 87. Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier โ€“ Analytical Theory of Heat 88. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel โ€“ Phenomenology of Spirit; Philosophy of Right; Lectures on the Philosophy of History 89. William Wordsworth โ€“ Poems 90. Samuel Taylor Coleridge โ€“ Poems; Biographia Literaria 91. Jane Austen โ€“ Pride and Prejudice; Emma 92. Carl von Clausewitz โ€“ On War 93. Stendhal โ€“ The Red and the Black; The Charterhouse of Parma; On Love 94. Lord Byron โ€“ Don Juan 95. Arthur Schopenhauer โ€“ Studies in Pessimism 96. Michael Faraday โ€“ Chemical History of a Candle; Experimental Researches in Electricity 97. Charles Lyell โ€“ Principles of Geology 98. Auguste Comte โ€“ The Positive Philosophy 99. Honorรฉ de Balzac โ€“ Pรจre Goriot; Eugenie Grandet 100. Ralph Waldo Emerson โ€“ Representative Men; Essays; Journal 101. Nathaniel Hawthorne โ€“ The Scarlet Letter 102. Alexis de Tocqueville โ€“ Democracy in America 103. John Stuart Mill โ€“ A System of Logic; On Liberty; Representative Government; Utilitarianism; The Subjection of Women; Autobiography 104. Charles Darwin โ€“ The Origin of Species; The Descent of Man; Autobiography 105. Charles Dickens โ€“ Pickwick Papers; David Copperfield; Hard Times 106. Claude Bernard โ€“ Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine 107. Henry David Thoreau โ€“ Civil Disobedience; Walden 108. Karl Marx โ€“ Capital; Communist Manifesto 109. George Eliot โ€“ Adam Bede; Middlemarch 110. Herman Melville โ€“ Moby-Dick; Billy Budd 111. Fyodor Dostoevsky โ€“ Crime and Punishment; The Idiot; The Brothers Karamazov 112. Gustave Flaubert โ€“ Madame Bovary; Three Stories 113. Henrik Ibsen โ€“ Plays 114. Leo Tolstoy โ€“ War and Peace; Anna Karenina; What is Art?; Twenty-Three Tales 115. Mark Twain โ€“ The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; The Mysterious Stranger 116. William James โ€“ The Principles of Psychology; The Varieties of Religious Experience; Pragmatism; Essays in Radical Empiricism 117. Henry James โ€“ The American; The Ambassadors 118. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche โ€“ Thus Spoke Zarathustra; Beyond Good and Evil; The Genealogy of Morals;The Will to Power 119. Jules Henri Poincarรฉ โ€“ Science and Hypothesis; Science and Method 120. Sigmund Freud โ€“ The Interpretation of Dreams; Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis; Civilization and Its Discontents; New Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis 121. George Bernard Shaw โ€“ Plays and Prefaces
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Mortimer J. Adler (How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading)
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Young man, do not forget to pray. Each time you pray, if you do so sincerely, there will be the flash of a new feeling in it, and a new thought as well, one you did not know before, which will give you fresh courage; and you will understand that prayer is education.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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One cannot prove anything here, but it is possible to be convinced.' How? By what?' By the experience of active love. Try to love your neighbors actively and tirelessly. The more you succeed in loving, the more you'll be convinced of the existence of God and the immortality of your soul. And if you reach complete selflessness in the love of your neighbor, then undoubtedly you will believe, and no doubt will even be able to enter your soul. This has been tested. It is certain... Active love is a harsh and fearful thing compared with love in dreams. Love in dreams thirsts for immediate action, quickly performed, and with everyone watching. Indeed, it will go as far as the giving even of one's life, provided it does not take long but is soon over, as on stage, and everyone is looking on and praising. Whereas active love is labor and perseverance, and for some people, perhaps, a whole science...in that very moment when you see with horror that despite all your efforts, you not only have not come nearer your goal but seem to have gotten farther from it, at that very moment...you will suddenly reach your goal and will clearly behold over you the wonder-working power of the Lord, who all the while has been loving you, and all the while has been mysteriously guiding you.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I have a longing for life, and I go on living in spite of logic. Though I may not believe in the order of the universe, yet I love the sticky little leaves in spring. I love the blue sky. I love some people, whom one loves you know sometimes without knowing why. I love some great deeds done by men, though I've long ceased perhaps to have faith in them. Yet from habit one's heart prizes them.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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ุฅู† ุงู„ุชุฑุชูŠู„ ู„ุง ูŠุฎูู ุนู† ุงู„ู†ูุณ ุฅู„ุง ู„ุฃู†ู‡ ูŠุญูŠูŠ ุฌุฑูˆุญ ุงู„ู‚ู„ุจ ูˆูŠู†ูƒุคู‡ุง ุฃุนู…ู‚ ูุฃุนู…ู‚. ุฅู† ู‡ุฐู‡ ุงู„ุตูˆุฑุฉ ู…ู† ุตูˆุฑ ุงู„ุฃู„ู… ู„ุง ุชุชุทู„ุจ ุนุฒุงุก ูˆู„ุง ุชุณุนู‰ ุฅู„ู‰ ุณู„ูˆู‰ุŒ ู„ุฃู†ู‡ุง ุชุชุบุฐู‰ ู…ู† ุงู„ุดุนูˆุฑ ุจุงุณุชุญุงู„ุฉ ุฅุดุจุงุนู‡ุŒ ูุงู„ุชุฑุชูŠู„ ุฅู†ู…ุง ู‡ูˆ ุงู„ุชุนุจูŠุฑ ุนู† ุงู„ุญุงุฌุฉ ุฅู„ู‰ ู†ูƒุก ุงู„ุฌุฑูˆุญ ุจุบูŠุฑ ุชูˆู‚ู.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I could have done even better, miss, and I'd know a lot more, if it wasn't for my destiny ever since childhood. I'd have killed a man in a duel with a pistol for calling me low-born, because I came from Stinking Lizaveta without a father, and they were shoving that in my face in Moscow. It spread there thanks to Grigory Vasilievich. Grigory Vasilievich reproaches me for rebelling against my nativity: 'You opened her matrix,' he says. I don't know about her matrix, but I'd have let them kill me in the womb, so as not to come out into the world at all, miss.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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And even though we may be involved with the most important affairs, achieve distinction or fall into some great misfortune- all the same, let us never forget how good we all once felt here, all together, united by such good and kind feelings as made us, too,...perhaps better than we actually are.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I am sorry I can say nothing more to console you, for love in action is a harsh and dreadful thing compared with love in dreams. Love in dreams is greedy for immediate action, rapidly performed and in the sight of all. Men will even give their lives if only the ordeal does not last long but is soon over, with all looking on and applauding as though on stage. But active love is labor and fortitude, and for some people too, perhaps, a complete science.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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[to Jesus] You did not come down from the cross when they shouted to you, mocking and reviling you: "Come down from the cross and we will believe that it is you." You did not come down because, again, you did not want to enslave man by a miracle and thirsted for faith that is free, not miraculous...I swear, man is created weaker and baser than you thought him! How, how can he ever accomplish the same things as you? ...Respecting him less, you would have demanded less of him, and that would be closer to love, for his burden would be lighter.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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ูŠุง ุฑุจ! ุงู‚ุจู„ู†ูŠ ุฑุบู… ุญุทุชูŠุŒ ูˆู„ูƒู† ู„ุง ุชุญูƒู… ุนู„ูŠู‘. ุงู„ู„ู‡ู… ุงุณู…ุญ ู„ูŠ ุฃู† ุฃุฌูŠุก ุฅู„ูŠูƒ ุฏูˆู† ุฃู† ุฃู…ุซู„ ุฃู…ุงู… ู…ุญูƒู…ุชูƒ... ู„ุง ุชุญูƒู… ุนู„ูŠู‘ุŒ ู…ุง ุฏู…ุช ู‚ุฏ ุญูƒู…ุช ุนู„ู‰ ู†ูุณูŠ ุจู†ูุณูŠ.... ู„ุง ุชุญูƒู… ุนู„ูŠู‘ุŒ ู„ุฃู†ู†ูŠ ุฃุญุจูƒ ูŠุง ุฑุจ! ุงู„ู„ู‡ู… ุฅู†ู†ูŠ ุฎุจูŠุซ ุฏู†ูŠุกุŒ ูˆู„ูƒู†ูŠ ุฃุญุจูƒุŒ ูˆุญุชู‰ ููŠ ุงู„ุฌุญูŠู…ุŒ ุฅุฐุง ุฃู†ุช ุฃุฑุณู„ุชู†ูŠ ุฅู„ู‰ ุงู„ุฌุญูŠู…ุŒ ุณุฃุธู„ ุฃุญุจูƒุŒ ูˆุณุฃุธู„ ุฃู‡ุชู ู„ูƒ ุจุญุจูŠ ุฅู„ู‰ ุงู„ุฃุจุฏุŒ ูˆู„ูƒู† ุฏุน ู„ูŠ ุฃู† ุฃุญุจ ุญุจูŠ ุงู„ุฃุฑุถูŠ ุญุชู‰ ุงู„ู†ู‡ุงูŠุฉ.. ุฅุณู…ุญ ู„ูŠ ุฃู† ุงุธู„ ุฃุญุจุŒ ููŠ ู‡ุฐู‡ ุงู„ุญูŠุงุฉ ุงู„ุฏู†ูŠุงุŒ ุฎู…ุณ ุณุงุนุงุช ุฃุฎุฑู‰ุŒ ุฅู„ู‰ ุฃู† ุชุทู„ุน ุดู…ุณูƒ ุงู„ุฏุงูุฆุฉ.. ุฅู†ู†ูŠ ุฃุญุจ ู…ู„ูƒุฉ ู‚ู„ุจูŠุŒ ูˆู„ุง ุฃู…ู„ูƒ ุฃู† ุฃู…ุชู†ุน ุนู† ุญุจู‡ุงุŒ ุงู„ู„ู‡ู… ุฅู†ูƒ ุชุฑุงู†ูŠ ูƒู„ูŠ ููŠ ู‡ุฐู‡ ุงู„ู„ุญุธุฉุŒ ุณูˆู ุฃู‡ุฑุน ุฅู„ูŠู‡ุงุŒ ูุฃุฑุชู…ูŠ ุนู†ุฏ ู‚ุฏู…ูŠู‡ุงุŒ ูˆุฃู‚ูˆู„ ู„ู‡ุง: ู„ู‚ุฏ ูƒู†ุช ุนู„ู‰ ุญู‚ ุญูŠู† ู†ุจุฐุชูŠู†ูŠุŒ ูˆุฏุงุนุง.. ุฅู†ุณูŠ ุถุญูŠุชูƒุŒ ูˆู„ุง ุชุฏุนูŠ ู„ุฐูƒุฑุงูŠ ุฃู† ุชุนุฐุจูƒ ูŠูˆู…ุง
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Though these young men unhappily fail to understand that the sacrifice of life is, in many cases, the easiest of all sacrifices, and that to sacrifice, for instance, five or six years of their seething youth to hard and tedious study, if only to multiply tenfold their powers of serving the truth and the cause they have set before them as their goal--such a sacrifice is utterly beyond the strength of many of them.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Then it happened. One night as the rain beat on the slanted kitchen roof a great spirit slipped forever into my life. I held his book in my hands and trembled as he spoke to me of man and the world, of love and wisdom, pain and guilt, and I knew I would never be the same. His name was Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky. He knew more of fathers and sons than any man in the world, and of brothers and sisters, priests and rogues, guilt and innocence. Dostoyevsky changed me. The Idiot, The Possessed, The Brothers Karamazov, The Gambler. He turned me inside out. I found I could breathe, could see invisible horizons. The hatred for my father melted. I loved my father, poor, suffering, haunted wretch. I loved my mother too, and all my family. It was time to become a man, to leave San Elmo and go out into the world. I wanted to think and feel like Dostoyevsky. I wanted to write. The week before I left town the draft board summoned me to Sacramento for my physical. I was glad to go. Someone other than myself could make my decisions. The army turned me down. I had asthma. Inflammation of the bronchial tubes. โ€œThatโ€™s nothing. Iโ€™ve always had it.โ€ โ€œSee your doctor.โ€ I got the needed information from a medical book at the public library. Was asthma fatal? It could be. And so be it. Dostoyevsky had epilepsy, I had asthma. To write well a man must have a fatal ailment. It was the only way to deal with the presence of death.
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John Fante (The Brotherhood of the Grape)
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But what about me? I suffer, but still, I donโ€™t live. I am x in an indeterminate equation. I am a sort of phantom in life who has lost all beginning and end, and who has even forgotten his own name. You are laughing- no, you are not laughing, you are angry again. You are forever angry, all you care about is intelligence, but I repeat again that I would give away all this superstellar life, all the ranks and honours, simply to be transformed into the soul of a merchantโ€™s wife weighing eighteen stone and set candles at Godโ€™s shrine
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov (Illustrated))
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No, I can't admit it. Brother,' said Alyosha suddenly, with flashing eyes, 'you said just now, is there a being in the whole world who would have the right to forgive and could firgive? But there is a Being and He can forgive everything, all and for all, because He gave His innocent blood for all and everything. You have forgotten Him, and on Him is built the edifice, and it is to Him they cry aloud, "Thou art just, O Lord, for Thy ways are revealed!
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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ุฅู†ู‡ ูŠุชูู‚ ู„ูŠ ูƒุซูŠุฑุง ุฃุซู†ุงุก ุงู†ุฏูุงุนูŠ ููŠ ุงู„ุงุญู„ุงู… ุฃู† ุชุณุชุจุฏ ุจูŠ ุญู…ุงุณุฉ ุดุดุฏูŠุฏุฉ ูˆุฑุบุจุฉ ุนุงุฑู…ุฉ ุฌุงู…ุญุฉ ููŠ ุฎุฏู…ุฉ ุงู„ุงู†ุณุงู†ูŠุฉ , ุญุชู‰ ู„ู‚ุฏ ุงุฑุชุถูŠ ุฃู† ุฃู† ุฃูุตู„ุจ ููŠ ุณุจูŠู„ ุงู„ุจุดุฑ ุฅุฐุง ุจุฏุง ู‡ุฐุง ุถุฑูˆุฑูŠุง ููŠ ู„ุญุธุฉ ู…ู† ุงู„ู„ุญุธุงุช . ูˆู…ุน ุฐู„ูƒ ู„ูˆ ุฃุฑูŠุฏ ู„ูŠ ุฃู† ุฃุนูŠุด ูŠูˆู…ูŠู† ู…ุชุชุงู„ูŠู† ููŠ ุบุฑูุฉ ูˆุงุญุฏุฉ ู…ุน ุฃูŠ ุฅู†ุณุงู† , ู„ู…ุง ุงุณุชุทุนุช ุฅู† ุฃุญุชู…ู„ ุฐู„ูƒ . ุฅู†ู†ูŠ ุฃุนุฑู ู‡ุฐุง ุจุชุฌุฑุจุฉ . ูู…ุชู‰ ูˆุฌุฏุช ู†ูุณูŠ ู‚ุฑุจ ุฅู†ุณุงู† ุขุฎุฑ ุฃุญุณุณุช ุจุฃู† ุดุฎุตูŠุชู‡ ุชุตุฏู… ุฐุงุชูŠ ูˆุชุฌูˆุฑ ุนู„ู‰ ุญุฑูŠุชูŠ . ุฅู†ู†ูŠ ู‚ุงุฏุฑ ููŠ ู…ุฏู‰ ุฃุฑุจุน ูˆุนุดุฑูŠู† ุณุงุนุฉ ุนู„ู‰ ุฃู† ุฃูƒุฑู‡ ุฃุญุณู† ุฅู†ุณุงู† :ูู‡ุฐุง ูŠุตุจุญ ููŠ ู†ุธุฑูŠ ุฅู†ุณุงู†ุง ู„ุง ูŠุทุงู‚ ู„ุฃู†ู‡ ู…ุณุฑู ููŠ ุงู„ุจุทุก ููŠ ุชู†ุงูˆู„ู‡ ุงู„ุทุนุงู… ุนู„ู‰ ุงู„ู…ุงุฆุฏุฉ , ูˆู‡ุฐุง ู„ุฃู†ู‡ ู…ุตุงุจ ุจุฒูƒุงู… ูู‡ูˆ ู„ุง ูŠู†ููƒ ูŠู…ุฎุท . ุฅู†ู†ูŠ ุฃุตุจุญ ุนุฏูˆุงู‹ ู„ู„ุจุดุฑ ู…ุชู‰ ุงู‚ุชุฑุจูˆุง ู…ู†ูŠ ูˆู„ูˆ ู‚ู„ูŠู„ุงู‹... ูˆู„ูƒู†ู†ูŠ ู„ุงุญุธุช ููŠ ูƒู„ ู…ุฑุฉ ุฃู†ู†ูŠ ูƒู„ู…ุง ุงุฒุฏุฏุช ูƒุฑู‡ุง ู„ู„ุจุดุฑ ุฃูุฑุงุฏุงู‹, ุงุฒุฏุงุฏุช ุญุฑุงุฑุฉ ุญุจูŠ ู„ู„ุฅู†ุณุงู†ูŠุฉ ุฌู…ู„ุฉ
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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...in my opinion miracles will never confound a realist. It is not miracles that bring a realist to faith. A true realist, if he is not a believer, will always find in himself the strength and ability not to believe in miracles as well, and if a miracle stands before him as an irrefutable fact, he will sooner doubt his own senses than admit the fact. And even if he does admit it, he will admit it as a fact of nature that was previously unknown to him. In the realist, faith is not born from miracles, but miracles from faith. Once the realist comes to believe, then, precisely because of his realism, he must also allow for miracles. The Apostle Thomas declared that he would not believe until he saw, and when he saw, he said: "My Lord and My God!" Was it the miracle that made him believe? Most likely not, but he believed first and foremost because he wished to believe, and maybe already fully believed in his secret heart even as he was saying: "I will not believe until I see.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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What do you mean by isolation?' I asked him. 'Why, the isolation that prevails everywhere, above all in our age-it has not fully developed, it has not reached its limit yet. Fore every one strives to keep his individuality as apart as possible, wishes to secure the greatest possible fulness of life for himself; but meantime all his efforts result not in attaining fulness of life but self-destruction, for instead of self-realisation he ends by arriving at complete solitude. All mankind in our age have split up into unites, they all keep apart, each in his own groove; each one holds aloof, hides himself and hides what he has, from the rest, and he ends by being repelled by others and repelling them.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Active love is labor and perseverance, and for some people, perhaps, a whole science. But I predict that even in that very moment when you see with horror that despite all your efforts, you not only have not come nearer your goal but seem to have gotten farther from it, at that very moment--I predict this to you--you will suddenly reach your goal and will clearly behold over you the wonder-working power of the Lord, who all the while has been loving you, and all the while has been mysteriously guiding you.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Because I'll tell everything to you alone, because it's necessary, because you're necessary, because tomorrow I'll fall from the clouds, because tomorrow life will end and begin. Have you ever felt, have you ever dreamed that you were falling off a mountain into a deep pit? Well, I'm falling now, and not in a dream. And I'm not afraid, and don't you be afraid either. That is, I am afraid, but I'm delighted! That is, not delighted, but ecstatic...Oh, to hell with it, it's all the same, whatever it is. Strong spirit, weak spirit, woman's spirit--whatever it is!
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I am leaving now; but know, Katerina Ivanovna, that you indeed love only him. And the more he insults you, the more you love him. That is your strain. You precisely love him as he is, you love him insulting you. If he reformed, you would drop him at once and stop loving him altogether. But you need him in order to continually contemplate your high deed of faithfulness, and to reproach him for his unfaithfulness. And it all comes from your pride. Oh, there is much humility and humiliation in it, but all of it comes from pride.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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And so these refined parents rejected their five-year-old girl to all kinds of torture. They beat her, kicked her, flogged her, for no reason that they themselves knew of. The childโ€™s whole body was covered in bruises. Eventually they devised a new refinement. Under the pretext that the child dirtied her bed (as though a five-year-old deep in her angelic sleep could be punished for that), they forced her to eat excrement, smearing it all over her face. And it was the mother that did it! And that woman would lock her daughter up in the outhouse until morning and she did so even on the coldest nights, when it was freezing. Just imagine the woman being able to sleep with the childโ€™s cries coming from that outhouse! Imagine that little creature, unable to even understand what is happening to her, beating her sore little chest with her tiny fist, weeping hot, unresentful, meek tears, and begging โ€˜gentle Jesusโ€™ to help herโ€ฆ ...letโ€™s assume that you were called upon to build the edifice of human destiny so that men would finally be happy and would find peace and tranquility. If you knew that, only to attain this, you would have to torture just one single creature, letโ€™s say the little girl who beat her chest so desperately in the outhouse, and that on her unavenged tears you could build that edifice, would you agree to do it?
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I can't bear it that some man, even with a lofty heart and the highest mind, should start from the ideal of the Madonna and end with the ideal of Sodom. It's even more fearful when someone who already has the ideal of Sodom in his soul does not deny the ideal of the Madonna either, and his hear burns with it, verily, verily burns, as in his young, blameless years. No, man is broad, even too broad, I would narrow him down. Devil knows even what to make of him, that's the thing! What's shame for the mind is beauty all over for the heart. Can there be beauty in Sodom? Believe me, for the vast majority of people, that's just where beauty lies--did you know that secret? The terrible thing is that beauty is not only fearful but also mysterious. Here the devil is struggling with God, and the battlefield is the human heart. But, anyway, why kick against the pricks?
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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The painter Kramskoy has a remarkable painting entitled The Contemplator: it depicts a forest in winter, and in the forest, standing all by himself on the road, in deepest solitude, a stray little peasant in a ragged caftan and bast shoes; he stands as if he were lost in thought, but he is not thinking, he is "contemplating" something. If you nudged him, he would give a start and look at you as if he had just woken up, but without understanding anything. It's true that he would come to himself at once, and yet, if he were asked what he had been thinking about while standing there, he would most likely not remember, but would most likely keep hidden away in himself the impression he had been under while contemplating. These impressions are dear to him, and he is most likely storing them up imperceptibly and even without realizing it--why and what for, he does not know either; perhaps suddenly, having stored up his impressions over many years, he will drop everything and wander off to Jerusalem to save his soul, or perhaps he will suddenly burn down his native village, or perhaps he will do both. There are a good many "contemplatives" among our peasants. And Smerdyakov was probably one of them. And he was probably greedily hoarding up his impressions, hardly knowing why.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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My task is to explain to you as quickly as possible my essence, that is, what sort of man I am, what I believe in, and what I hope for, is that right? And therefore I declare that I accept God pure and simple. But this, however, needs to be noted: if God exists and if he indeed created the earth, then, as we know perfectly well, he created it in accordance with Euclidean geometry, and he created human reason with a conception of only three dimensions of space. At the same time there were and are even now geometers and philosophers, even some of the most outstanding among them, who doubt that the whole universe, or, even more broadly, the whole of being, was created purely in accordance with Euclidean geometry; they even dare to dream that two parallel lines, which according to Euclid cannot possibly meet on earth, may perhaps meet somewhere in infinity. I, my dear, have come to the conclusion that if I cannot understand even that, then it is not for me to understand about God. I humbly confess that I do not have any ability to resolve such questions, I have a Euclidean mind, an earthly mind, and therefore it is not for us to resolve things that are not of this world. And I advise you never to think about it, Alyosha my friend, and most especially about whether God exists or not. All such questions are completely unsuitable to a mind created with a concept of only three dimensions. And so, I accept God, not only willingly, but moreover I also accept his wisdom and his purpose, which are completely unknown to us; I believe in order, in the meaning of life, I believe in eternal harmony, in which we are all supposed to merge, I believe in the Word for whom the universe is yearning, and who himself was 'with God,' who himself is God, and so on and so forth, to infinity. Many words have been invented on the subject. It seems I'm already on a good path, eh? And now imagine that in the final outcome I do not accept this world of God's, created by God, that I do not accept and cannot agree to accept. With one reservation: I have a childlike conviction that the sufferings will be healed and smoothed over, that the whole offensive comedy of human contradictions will disappear like a pitiful mirage, a vile concoction of man's Euclidean mind, feeble and puny as an atom, and that ultimately, at the world's finale, in the moment of eternal harmony, there will occur and be revealed something so precious that it will suffice for all hearts, to allay all indignation, to redeem all human villainy, all bloodshed; it will suffice not only to make forgiveness possible, but also to justify everything that has happened with men--let this, let all of this come true and be revealed, but I do not accept it and do not want to accept it! Let the parallel lines even meet before my own eyes: I shall look and say, yes, they meet, and still I will not accept it.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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When all are undressed, one is somehow not ashamed, but when one's the only one undressed and everybody is looking, it's degrading,' he kept repeating to himself, again and again. 'It's like a dream, I've sometimes dreamed of being in such degrading positions.' It was a misery to him to take off his socks. They were very dirty, and so were his underclothes, and now everyone could see it. And what was worse, he disliked his feet. All his life he had thought both his big toes hideous. He particularly loathed the coarse, flat, crooked nail on the right one, and now they would all see it. Feeling intolerably ashamed made him, at once and intentionally, rougher. He pulled off his shirt, himself.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Much on earth is concealed from us, but in place of it we have been granted a secret, mysterious sense of our living bond with the other world, with the higher heavenly world, and the roots of our thoughts and feelings are not here but in other worlds. That is why philosophers say it is impossible on earth to conceive the essence of things. God took seeds from other worlds and sowed them on this earth, and raised up his garden; and everything that could sprout sprouted, but it lives and grows only through its sense of being in touch with other mysterious worlds; if this sense is weakened or destroyed in you, that which has grown up in you dies. Then you become indifferent to life, and even come to hate it.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I heard exactly the same thing, a long time ago to be sure, from a doctor," the elder remarked. "He was then an old man, and unquestionably intelligent. He spoke just as frankly as you, humorously, but with a sorrowful humor. 'I love mankind,' he said, 'but I am amazed at myself: the more I love mankind in general, the less I love people in particular, that is, individually, as separate persons. In my dreams,' he said, 'I often went so far as to think passionately of serving mankind, and, it may be, would really have gone to the cross for people if it were somehow suddenly necessary, and yet I am incapable of living in the same room with anyone even for two days, this I know from experience. As soon as someone is there, close to me, his personality oppresses my self-esteem and restricts my freedom. In twenty-four hours I can begin to hate even the best of men: one because he takes too long eating his dinner, another because he has a cold and keeps blowing his nose. I become the enemy of people the moment they touch me,' he said. 'On the other hand, it has always happened that the more I hate people individually, the more ardent becomes my love for humanity as a whole.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I've been sitting here now, and do you know what I was saying to myself? If I did not believe in life, if I were to lose faith in the woman I love, if I were to lose faith in the order of things, even if I were to become convinced, on the contrary, that everything is a disorderly, damned, and perhaps devilish chaos, if I were struck even by all the horrors of human disillusionment--still I would want to live, and as long as I have bent to this cup, I will not tear myself from it until I've drunk it all. However, by the age of thirty, I will probably drop the cup, even if I haven't emptied it, and walk away...I don't know where. But until my thirtieth year, I know this for certain, my youth will overcome everything--all disillusionment, all aversion to live. I've asked myself many times: is there such despair in the world as could overcome this wild and perhaps indecent thirst for life in me, and have decided that apparently there is not--that is, once again, until my thirtieth year, after which I myself shall want no more, so it seems to me. Some snotty-nosed, consumptive moralists, poets especially, often call this thirst for life base. True, it's a feature of the Karamazovs, to some extent, this thirst for life despite all; it must be sitting in you too; but why is it base? There is still an awful lot of centripetal force on our planet, Alyosha. I want to live, and I do live, even if it be against logic. Though I do not believe in the order of things, still the sticky little leaves that come out in the spring are dear to me, the blue sky is dear to me, some people are dear to me, whom one loves sometimes, would you believe it, without even knowing why; some human deeds are dear to me, which one has perhaps long ceased believing in, but still honors with one's heart, out of old habit...I want to go to Europe, Alyosha, I'll go straight from here. Of course I know that I will only be going to a graveyard, but to the most, the most previous graveyard, that's the thing! The precious dead lie there, each stone over them speaks of such ardent past life, of such passionate faith in their deeds, their truth, their struggle, and their science, that I--this I know beforehand--will fall to the ground and kiss those stones and weep over them--being wholeheartedly convinced, at the same time, that it has all long been a graveyard and nothing more. And I will not weep from despair, but simply because I will be happy in my shed tears. I will be drunk with my own tenderness. Sticky spring leaves, the blue sky--I love them, that's all! Such things you love not with your mind, not with logic, but with your insides, your guts, you love your first young strength...
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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All we Karamazovs are such insects. And angel as you are, that insect lives in you, too, and will stir up a tempest in your blood. Tempests, because sensual lust is a tempest - worse than a tempest! Beauty is a terrible and awful thing! It is terrible because it has not been fathomed and never can be fathomed, for God sets before us nothing but riddles. Here the boundaries meet and all contradictions exist side by side. I am not an educated nor cultured man, Alyosha, but I've thought a lot about this. It's terrible what mysteries there are! Too many riddles weigh men down on earth. We must solve as we can, and try to keep a dry skin in the water. Beauty! I can't bear the thought that a man of lofty mind and heart begins with the ideal of the Madonna and ends with the ideal of Sodom. What's still more awful is that a man with the ideal of Sodom in his soul does not renounce the ideal of the Madonna, and his heart may be on fire with that ideal, genuinely on fire, just as in his days of youth and innocence. Yes, man is broad, too broad. I'd have him narrower. The devil only knows what to make of it! What to the mind is shameful is beauty and nothing else to the heart. Is there beauty in Sodom? Believe me, that for the immense mass of mankind beauty is found in Sodom. Did you know that secret? The awful thing is that beauty is mysterious as well as terrible. God and the devil are fighting there and the battlefield is the heart of man.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Do you suppose, gentlemen, that our children as they grow up and begin to reason can avoid such questions? No, they cannot, and we will not impose on them an impossible restriction. The sight of an unworthy father involuntarily suggests tormenting questions to a young creature, especially when he compares him with the excellent fathers of his companions. The conventional answer to this question is: 'He begot you, and you are his flesh and blood, and therefore you are bound to love him.' The youth involuntarily reflects: 'But did he love me when he begot me?' he asks, wondering more and more. 'Was it for my sake he begot me? He did not know me, not even my sex, at that moment, at the moment of passion, perhaps, inflamed by wine, and he has only transmitted to me a propensity to drunkenness- that's all he's done for me.... Why am I bound to love him simply for begetting me when he has cared nothing for me all my life after? Oh, perhaps those questions strike you as coarse and cruel, but do not expect an impossible restraint from a young mind. 'Drive nature out of the door and it will fly in at the window'.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Why, the isolation that prevails everywhere, above all in our ageโ€”it has not fully developed, it has not reached its limit yet. For every one strives to keep his individuality as apart as possible, wishes to secure the greatest possible fullness of life for himself; but meantime all his efforts result not in attaining fullness of life but self-destruction, for instead of self-realization he ends by arriving at complete solitude. All mankind in our age have split up into units, they all keep apart, each in his own groove; each one holds aloof, hides himself and hides what he has, from the rest, and he ends by being repelled by others and repelling them. He heaps up riches by himself and thinks, โ€˜How strong I am now and how secure,โ€™ and in his madness he does not understand that the more he heaps up, the more he sinks into self-destructive impotence. For he is accustomed to rely upon himself alone and to cut himself off from the whole; he has trained himself not to believe in the help of others, in men and in humanity, and only trembles for fear he should lose his money and the privileges that he has won for himself. Everywhere in these days men have, in their mockery, ceased to understand that the true security is to be found in social solidarity rather than in isolated individual effort. But this terrible individualism must inevitably have an end, and all will suddenly understand how unnaturally they are separated from one another. It will be the spirit of the time, and people will marvel that they have sat so long in darkness without seeing the light.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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I am trying to explain as quickly as possible my essential nature, that is, what manner of man I am, what I believe in, and for what I hope, that's it, isn't it? And therefore I tell you that I accept God honestly and simply. But you must note this: If God exists and if He really did create the world, then, as we all know, He created it according to the geometry of only three dimensions in space. Yet there have been some very distinguished ones, who doubt whether the whole universe, or to speak more generally the whole of being, was only created in Euclid's geometry; they even dare to dream that two parallel lines, which according to Euclid can never meet on earth, may meet somewhere in infinity. I have come to the conclusion that, since I can't understand even that, I can't expect to understand about God. I acknowledge humbly that I have no faculty for settling such questions, I have a Euclidian earthly mind, and how could I solve problems that are not of this world? And I advise you never to think about it either, my dear Alyosha, especially about God, whether He exists or not. All such questions are utterly inappropriate for a mind created with a conception of only three dimensions. And so I accept God and am glad to, and what's more I accept His wisdom, His purpose - which are utterly beyond our ken; I believe in the underlying order and the meaning of life; I believe in the eternal harmony in which they say we shall one day be blended. I believe in the Word to Which the universe is striving, and Which Itself was "with God", and Which Itself is God and so on, and so on, to infinity.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Love one another, fathers," the elder taught (as far as Alyosha could recall afterwards). "Love God's people. For we are not holier than those in the world because we have come here and shut ourselves within these walls, but, on the contrary, anyone who comes here, by the very fact that he has come, already knows himself to be worse than all those who are in the world, worse than all on earth...And the longer a monk lives within his walls, the more keenly he must be aware of it. For otherwise he had no reason to come here. But when he knows that he is not only worse than all those in the world, but is also guilty before all people, on behalf of all and for all, for all human sins, the world's and each person's, only then will the goal of our unity be achieved. For you must know, my dear ones, that each of us is undoubtedly guilty on behalf of all and for all on earth, not only because of the common guilt of the world, but personally, each one of us, for all people and for each person on this earth. This knowledge is the crown of the monk's path, and of every man's path on earth. For monks are not a different sort of men, but only such as all men on earth ought also to be. Only then will our hearts be moved to a love that is infinite, universal, and that knows no satiety. Then each of us will be able to gain the whole world by love and wash away the world's sins with his tears...Let each of you keep close company with his heart, let each of you confess to himself untiringly. Do not be afraid of your sin, even when you perceive it, provided you are repentant, but do not place conditions on God. Again I say, do not be proud. Do not be proud before the lowly, do not be proud before the great either. And do not hate those who reject you, disgrace you, revile you, and slander you. Do not hate atheists, teachers of evil, materialists, not even those among them who are wicked, nor those who are good, for many of them are good, especially in our time. Remember them thus in your prayers: save, Lord, those whom there is no one to pray for, save also those who do not want to pray to you. And add at once: it is not in my pride that I pray for it, Lord, for I myself am more vile than all...Love God's people, do not let newcomers draw your flock away, for if in your laziness and disdainful pride, in your self-interest most of all, you fall asleep, they will come from all sides and lead your flock away. Teach the Gospel to the people untiringly...Do not engage in usury...Do not love silver and gold, do not keep it...Believe, and hold fast to the banner. Raise it high...
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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If the wickedness of people arouses indignation and insurmountable grief in you, to the point that you desire to revenge yourself upon the wicked, fear that feeling most of all; go at once and seek torments for yourself, as if you yourself were guilty of their wickedness. Take these torments upon yourself and suffer them, and your heart will be eased, and you will understand that you, too, are guilty, for you might have shone to the wicked, even like the only sinless One, but you did not. If you had shone, your light would have lighted the way for others, and the one who did wickedness would perhaps not have done so in your light. And even if you do shine, but see that people are not saved even with your light, remain steadfast, and do not doubt the power of the heavenly light; believe that if they are not saved now, they will be saved later. And if they are not saved, their sons will be saved, for your light will not die, even when you are dead. The righteous man departs, but his light remains. People are always saved after the death of him who saved them. The generation of men does not welcome its prophets and kills them, but men love their martyrs and venerate those they have tortured to death. Your work is for the whole, your deed is for the future. Never seek a reward, for great is your reward on earth without that: your spiritual joy, which only the righteous obtain. Nor should you fear the noble and powerful, but be wise and ever gracious. Know measure, know the time, learn these things. When you are alone, pray. Love to throw yourself down on the earth and kiss it. Kiss the earth and love it, tirelessly, insatiable, love all men, love all things, seek this rapture and ecstasy. Water the earth with the tears of your joy, and love those tears. Do not be ashamed of this ecstasy, treasure it, for it is a gift from God, a great gift, and it is not given to many, but to those who are chosen.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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Filled with rapture, his soul yearned for freedom, space, vastness. Over him the heavenly dome, full of quiet, shining stars, hung boundlessly. From the zenith to the horizon the still-dim Milky Way stretched its double strand. Night, fresh and quiet, almost unstirring, enveloped the earth. The white towers and golden domes of the church gleamed in the sapphire sky. The luxuriant autumn flowers in the flowerbeds near the house had fallen asleep until morning. The silence of the earth seemed to merge with the silence of the heavens, the mystery of the earth touched the mystery of the stars... Alyosha stood gazing and suddenly, as if he had been cut down, threw himself to the earth. He did not know why he was embracing it, he did not try to understand why he longed so irresistibly to kiss it, to kiss all of it, but he was kissing it, weeping, sobbing, and watering it with his tears, and he vowed ecstatically to love it, to love it unto ages of ages. "Water the earth with the tears of your joy, and love those tears...," rang in his soul. What was he weeping for? Oh, in his rapture he wept even for the stars that shone on him from the abyss, and "he was not ashamed of this ecstasy." It was as if threads from all those innumerable worlds of God all came together in his soul, and it was trembling all over, "touching other worlds." He wanted to forgive everyone and for everything, and to ask forgiveness, oh, not for himself! but for all and for everything, "as others are asking for me," rang again in his soul. But with each moment he felt clearly and almost tangibly something as firm and immovable as this heavenly vault descend into his soul. Some sort of idea, as it were, was coming to reign in his mind-now for the whole of his life and unto ages of ages. He fell to the earth a weak youth and rose up a fighter, steadfast for the rest of his life, and he knew it and felt it suddenly, in that very moment of his ecstasy. Never, never in all his life would Alyosha forget that moment. "Someone visited my soul in that hour," he would say afterwards, with firm belief in his words...
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky
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I tell you that man has no more tormenting care than to find someone to whom he can hand over as quickly as possible that gift of freedom with which the miserable creature is born. But he alone can take over the freedom of men who appeases their conscience. With bread you were given an indisputable banner: give man bread and he will bow down to you, for there is nothing more indisputable than bread. But if at the same time someone else takes over his conscience - oh, then he will even throw down your bread and follow him who has seduced his conscience. In this you were right. For the mystery of man's being is not only in living, but in what one lives for. Without a firm idea of what he lives for, man will not consent to live and will sooner destroy himself than remain on earth, even if there is bread all around him. That is so, but what came of it? Instead of taking over men's freedom, you increased it still more for them! Did you forget that peace and even death are dearer to man than free choice in the knowledge of good and evil? There is nothing more seductive for man than the freedom of his conscience, but there is nothing more tormenting either. And so, instead of a firm foundation for appeasing human conscience once and for all, you chose everything that was unusual, enigmatic, and indefinite, you chose everything that was beyond men's strength, and thereby acted as if you did not love them at all - and who did this? He who came to give his life for them! Instead of taking over men's freedom, you increased it and forever burdened the kingdom of the human soul with its torments. You desired the free love of man, that he should follow you freely. seduced and captivated by you. Instead of the firm ancient law, men had henceforth to decide for himself, with a free heart, what is good and what is evil, having only your image before him as a guide - but did it not occur to you that he would eventually reject and dispute even your image and your truth if he was oppressed by so terrible a burden as freedom of choice? They will finally cry out that the truth is not in you, for it was impossible to leave them in greater confusion and torment than you did, abandoning them to so many cares and insoluble problems. Thus you yourself laid the foundation for the destruction of your own kingdom, and do not blame anyone else for it.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky
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(Ivan) Hold your tongue, or I'll kill you! (The devil) You'll kill me? No, excuse me, I will speak. I came to treat myself to that pleasure. Oh, I love the dreams of my ardent young friends, quivering with eagerness for life! 'There are new men,' you decided last spring, when you were meaning to come here, 'they propose to destroy everything and begin with cannibalism. Stupid fellows! they didn't ask my advice! I maintain that nothing need be destroyed, that we only need to destroy the idea of God in man, that's how we have to set to work. It's that, that we must begin with. Oh, blind race of men who have no understanding! As soon as men have all of them denied God -- and I believe that period, analogous with geological periods, will come to pass -- the old conception of the universe will fall of itself without cannibalism, and, what's more, the old morality, and everything will begin anew. Men will unite to take from life all it can give, but only for joy and happiness in the present world. Man will be lifted up with a spirit of divine Titanic pride and the man-god will appear. From hour to hour extending his conquest of nature infinitely by his will and his science, man will feel such lofty joy from hour to hour in doing it that it will make up for all his old dreams of the joys of heaven. Everyone will know that he is mortal and will accept death proudly and serenely like a god. His pride will teach him that it's useless for him to repine at life's being a moment, and he will love his brother without need of reward. Love will be sufficient only for a moment of life, but the very consciousness of its momentariness will intensify its fire, which now is dissipated in dreams of eternal love beyond the grave'... and so on and so on in the same style. Charming! Ivan sat with his eyes on the floor, and his hands pressed to his ears, but he began trembling all over. The voice continued. (The devil) The question now is, my young thinker reflected, is it possible that such a period will ever come? If it does, everything is determined and humanity is settled for ever. But as, owing to man's inveterate stupidity, this cannot come about for at least a thousand years, everyone who recognises the truth even now may legitimately order his life as he pleases, on the new principles. In that sense, 'all things are lawful' for him. What's more, even if this period never comes to pass, since there is anyway no God and no immortality, the new man may well become the man-god, even if he is the only one in the whole world, and promoted to his new position, he may lightheartedly overstep all the barriers of the old morality of the old slaveman, if necessary. There is no law for God. Where God stands, the place is holy. Where I stand will be at once the foremost place... 'all things are lawful' and that's the end of it! That's all very charming; but if you want to swindle why do you want a moral sanction for doing it? But that's our modern Russian all over. He can't bring himself to swindle without a moral sanction. He is so in love with truth-.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)
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[The Devil] "This legend is about paradise. There was, they say, a certain thinker and philospher here on your earth, who 'rejected all--laws, conscience faith, and, above all, the future life. He died and thought he'd go straight into darkness and death, but no--there was the future life before him. He was amazed and indignant. 'This,' he said, 'goes against my convictions.' So for that he was sentenced...I mean, you see, I beg your pardon, I'm repeating what I heard, it's just a legend...you see, he was sentenced to walk in darkness a quadrillion kilometers (we also use kilometers now), and once he finished that quadrillion, the doors of paradise would be open to him and he would be forgiven everything...Well, so this man sentenced to the quadrillion stood a while, looked, and then lay down across the road: 'I dont want to go, I refuse to go on principle!' Take the soul of an enlightened Russian atheist and mix it with the soul of the prophet Jonah, who sulked in the belly of a whale for three days and three nights--you'll get the character of this thinker lying in the road...He lay there for nearly a thousand years, and then got up and started walking." "What an ass!" Ivan exclaimed, bursting into nervous laughter, still apparently trying hard to figure something out. "isn't it all the same whether he lies there forever or walks a quadrillion kilometers? It must be about a billion years' walk!" "Much more, even. If we had a pencil and paper, we could work it out. But he arrived long ago, and this is where the anecdote begins." "Arrived! But where did he get a billion years?" "You keep thinking about our present earth! But our present earth may have repeated itself a billion times; it died out, lets say, got covered with ice, cracked, fell to pieces, broke down into its original components, again there were the waters above the firmament, then again a comet, again the sun, again the earth from the sun--all this development may already have been repeated an infinite number of times, and always in the same way, to the last detail. A most unspeakable bore... "Go on, what happened when he arrived?" "The moment the doors of paradise were opened and he went in, before he had even been there two seconds--and that by the watch--before he had been there two seconds, he exclaimed that for those two seconds it would be worth walking not just a quadrillion kilometers, but a quadrillion quadrillion, even raised to the quadrillionth power! In short, he sang 'Hosannah' and oversweetened it so much that some persons there, of a nobler cast of mind, did not even want to shake hands with him at first: he jumped over to the conservatives a bit too precipitously. The Russian character. I repeat: it's a legend.
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky (The Brothers Karamazov)