Bilingual Teacher Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Bilingual Teacher. Here they are! All 54 of them:

The philosopher Zeng said, "I daily examine myself on three points: whether, in transacting business for others, I may have been not faithful; whether, in intercourse with friends, I may have been not sincere; whether I may have not mastered and practiced the instructions of my teacher.
Confucius (The Analects of Confucius: Bilingual Edition, English and Chinese: 論語)
When people talk about other cultures, they tend to describe the differences and not the similarities. • Differences between cultures are generally seen as threatening and described in negative terms. • Stereotyping is probably inevitable in the absence of frequent contact or study.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
Parents who listen to their children read are engaging in a most valuable activity.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
The parent has been successful in providing the conditions for later growth. Not all flowers bloom early. Some flowers that bloom late in the summer, even in the autumn, retain all the beauty promised in the sowing of the seed.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
Dominus et magister nī Jesus Chrs̄ dicendo, Penitentiam agite etc, omnē vitam fidelium penitentiam esse voluit. (Our Lord and teacher, Jesus Christ, in saying, "repent," wanted the entire life life of a believer to be repentance.)
Martin Luther (The 95 Theses: Die 95 Thesen (Bilingual Edition: English / German) (Religion & Souls Book 2))
sayings, folk tales, family history, and funny and important incidents told by previous generations and the extended family. A self-made, treasured family book can be jointly produced. The past is celebrated in the present; the contemporary is engraved in the history of the child.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
Vary what the child writes in the home: for example, helping to compose a shopping list, writing and rewriting a favourite family story together, writing a recipe to cook together later, keeping a diary, writing in a photo album that records family experiences, poetry, imaginative or personal stories, and writing jokes and cartoons.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
It is natural for a child or adult to have different identities in different contexts which change across time. Identities are about becoming rather than being. It is not only ‘who we are’ or ‘where we have come from’, but also ‘how we are represented’ and ‘what we might become’ and ‘what we cannot be’. Cultural, ethnic or language identity is often about making sense out of our past, present and future.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
deriving from the research of Professor Jean-Marc Dewaele of Birkbeck College in the University of London, bilinguals and multilinguals appear in research to have higher levels of open-mindedness (being more receptive to new and different ideas and more broad-minded to the opinions of others), and of cognitive empathy (being able to understand another person's experiences and feelings and an ability to view the outside world from another person's perspective).
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
It is often important that the anchor language is retained. The home language gives assurance and a feeling of security when there are stormy seas. Even if the child is slow in sailing in that language with progress delayed, it is the boat known to the child. Being forced to switch to the majority language will not make the journey faster or less problematic. It is more important to learn to sail in a familiar boat (the home language) in minority language situations.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
Earlier this year, a self-identified White, monolingual English-speaking teacher explained to me that, among other signs of her stupidity, Dr Baez’s English language skills are ‘horrible, and from what I hear, her Spanish isn’t that good either’...If Dr Baez, the bilingual school principal with multiple university degrees, including a doctorate in education, was subjected to such discriminatory thinking, then what could this mean for students, who were positioned in highly subordinate institutional positions?
Jonathan Rosa (Looking like a Language, Sounding like a Race: Raciolinguistic Ideologies and the Learning of Latinidad (Oxf Studies in Anthropology of Language))
Recent evidence from the field of neurobiology, including the use of neuroimaging techniques, seems to show that the languages of bilinguals are not differently located in the brain; rather, they share a common space. This fact alone might support a re-evaluation of the role of translation in the process of becoming bilingual.
Scott Thornbury (Scott Thornbury's 30 Language Teaching Methods Kindle eBook: Cambridge Handbooks for Language Teachers)
I raised you to care deeply, too much so. About words, for one thing. All those years spent working as a bilingual teacher’s aide, undoing what Khmer children learned at home, perhaps it had made me paranoid. I thought I needed to ensure your fluency in English, in being American. The last thing I had wanted was for you to end up like your Ba—speaking broken English to angry customers, his life covered in the grease of cars belonging to men who were more American. So I read to you as much as I could, packed your room with dictionaries and encyclopedias, played movies in English constantly in the background, and spoke Khmer only in whispers, behind closed doors. No wonder mere words affected you so much. Even now, you still think language is the key to everything. And that’s my fault—I thought the same thing.
Anthony Veasna So (Afterparties)
Example 3. (T: Male Mandarin teacher in his late twenties. B1 and B2 boys about 13 years old; G1: a 12-year-old girl.) T: (Speaking slowly as he writes on the whiteboard) 摆-乌-龙 (bai wulong). Mess up. 乌龙 (wulong), black dragon. 乌龙茶 知道吗? Wulong Tea, do you know? Black Dragon tea. 乌龙 (wulong)? means /mI ∫eIp/. (Silence) T: 乌龙 (wulong) /mI ∫eIp/. 摆乌龙 (bai wulong). Mess up. B1: What? T: Made a mistake. Accident. /mI ∫eIp/. G1: /mIshǽp/, you mean? B1: Oh I see. T: What? B2: /mIshǽp/. It’s /mIshǽp/. B1: Not /mI ∫eIp/. T: /mIshǽp/. B1: Yes.
Stephen May (The Multilingual Turn: Implications for SLA, TESOL, and Bilingual Education)
Example 3. (T: Male Mandarin teacher in his late twenties. B1 and B2 boys about 13 years old; G1: a 12-year-old girl.) T: (Speaking slowly as he writes on the whiteboard) 摆-乌-龙 (bai wulong). Mess up. 乌龙 (wulong), black dragon. 乌龙茶 知道吗? Wulong Tea, do you know? Black Dragon tea. 乌龙 (wulong)? means /mI ∫eIp/.
Stephen May (The Multilingual Turn: Implications for SLA, TESOL, and Bilingual Education)
Example 6. (T: Male teacher in his early thirties. B1 and B2 are boys about 13 years old.) B1: Are the Chinese still fighting? T: No, why? B1: So why are you always talking about 统一? unite B2: It’s about Taiwan and China. They are two countries, and they want to be united. T: No. 不是两个国家。台湾是中国的一部分。 Not two countries. Taiwan is part of China. B2: No, they are not. T: They are. B2: They are not. In the Olympics, there were separate teams. I saw it. T: It’s like Scotland or Northern Ireland. 都是英国, 但是世界杯 football 还有rugby也 是分开的了。 All part of the UK. But for the World Cup football and rugby, they can be separately represented. B1: Scotland is a different country. T: No it is not. B2: It is. XXX (a girl in the class) is from Scotland. She was born in … where were you born again? B1: Dundee. T: 但它是统一的了。不是两个国家. The UNITED Kingdom 知不知道?! But it is united. Not two separate countries. The United Kingdom, don’t you understand?!
Stephen May (The Multilingual Turn: Implications for SLA, TESOL, and Bilingual Education)
Children become socialized into the patterns of speaking that they hear others use. That includes both separating two (or more) languages and using both when this is acceptable.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
When language is separated along divisions of different people, different contexts, even different times of the week or day, a child is learning that language compartmentalisation exists. Mixing may still occur early on, but boundaries enable a smooth transition to a stage where children keep their languages relatively separate.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
Parents can do three things to make reading active. (1) Elaborate and explain the text to the child. This extends and deepens the experience of the story. (2) Relate the story to the child's own experiences. An interest in reading and understanding the meaning of the text occur if there is ‘further information’ to personalize the text. (3) Ask questions to ensure the child understands the story, thinks about the characters and plot, and extends their imagination.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
When children are younger, one possible solution is to extend the range of language experiences in their less preferred language, for example, staying with grandparents or cousins, visits to enjoyable cultural festivals, a renewal in the language materials and other language stimuli in the home for that weaker language (e.g. videos, pop records, the visits of cousins). If both parents read to, or listen to the child reading before bedtime, or if the language of family conversation at the meal table is manipulated to advantage, then subtly the language balance of the home may be readjusted.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
There are long-term possibilities dormant in short-term failure.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
There may be occasional periods when the bilingual child seems a little behind the monolingual in learning a language. However, this lag is usually temporary. With sufficient exposure and practice, the bilingual child will go through the same language development stages as the monolingual child. Occasionally the speed of the journey may be slightly slower, but the route through the developmental stages is the same.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
Ethnic identity, for example, begins around three to five years of age.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
In the teenage years, ethnic differences may become increasingly conscious and considered. Overt and covert racial discrimination, racial abuse and harassment, colour, religion, dress and dietary differences surface to increasingly focus ethnic awareness, identity and inequity.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
In teaching a child your native language, you are transmitting something about yourself, your heritage and the extended family.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
The transmission of the parents’ heritage is best recounted in the mother tongue.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
One example of the pay-off for a parent using a minority language is when the children are in their teenage years. If a language minority mother or father has ignored their first language and speaks the majority language to her children, problems can arise. The majority language may be spoken with a ‘foreign’ accent (see Glossary), the language used may be perceived by the teenager as incorrect. One outcome might be that the teenager is embarrassed, the parent mocked and held in disdain, and the minority language hated. If such a language minority mother speaks her minority language instead, she may retain more prestige and credibility, and be more respected by the teenager.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
If children live with criticism, they learn to condemn. If children live with hostility, they learn to fight. If children live with ridicule, they learn to be shy. If children live with shame, they learn to feel guilty. If children live with tolerance, they learn to be patient. If children live with encouragement, they learn confidence. If children live with praise, they learn to appreciate. If children live with fairness, they learn justice.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
If children live with criticism, they learn to condemn. If children live with hostility, they learn to fight. If children live with ridicule, they learn to be shy. If children live with shame, they learn to feel guilty. If children live with tolerance, they learn to be patient. If children live with encouragement, they learn confidence. If children live with praise, they learn to appreciate. If children live with fairness, they learn justice. If children live with security, they learn to have faith. If children live with approval, they learn to like themselves. If children live with acceptance and friendship, they learn to find love in the world
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
The advice too frequently given is that the home, minority language should be replaced by the majority language. Such an overnight switch may well have painful outcomes for the child. The mother tongue is denied, the language of the family is buried, and the child may feel as if thrown from a secure boat into strange waters. This solution is likely to exacerbate the problem.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
developed than another, it may be sensible to concentrate on developing the stronger language. When a child has severe educational needs or is severely cognitively challenged, then ensuring a solid foundation in one language first is important. This does not mean that the chance of bilingualism is lost forever. If, or when, language delay disappears, the other language can be reintroduced. If a child with emotional problems really detests using or even being spoken to in a particular language, the family may sensibly decide to accede to the child's preference. Again, once problems have been resolved, the ‘dropped’ language may be reintroduced, so long as it is immediately associated with pleasurable experiences.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
There are other occasions where changing from bilingualism to monolingualism is unnecessary and wrong. If someone who has loved, cared for and played with the child in one language suddenly only uses another language, the emotional well-being of the child may well be negatively affected.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
C18: A child is autistic or has Asperger's syndrome. Should we use one language only with the child?
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
C18: A child is autistic or has Asperger's syndrome. Should we use one language only with the child? Children diagnosed with a specific autism spectrum disorder have a greater or lesser degree of impairment in language and communication skills, as well as repetitive or restrictive patterns of thought and behaviour, with delays in social and emotional development. Such children use language in restricted ways, expecting much consistency in language and communication, and are less likely to learn through language. However, such children may experience the social and cultural benefits of bilingualism when living in a dual language environment. For example, such children may understand and speak two languages of the local community at their own level. Like many parents of children with language impairment, bilingualism was frequently blamed by teachers and other professionals for the early signs of Asperger's, and a move to monolingualism was frequently regarded as an essential relief from the challenges. There is almost no research on autism and bilingualism or on Asperger's syndrome and bilingualism. However, a study by Susan Rubinyi of her son, who has Asperger's syndrome, provides insights. Someone with the challenge of Asperger's also has gifts and exceptional talents, including in language. Her son, Ben, became bilingual in English and French using the one parent–one language approach (OPOL). Susan Rubinyi sees definite advantages for a child who has challenges with flexibility and understanding the existence of different perspectives. Merely the fact that there are two different ways to describe the same object or concept in each language, enlarges the perception of the possible. Since a bilingual learns culture as well as language, the child sees alternative ways of approaching multiple areas of life (eating, recreation, transportation etc.) (p. 20). She argues that, because of bilingualism, her son's brain had a chance to partly rewire itself even before Asperger's syndrome became obvious. Also, the intense focus of Asperger's meant that Ben absorbed vocabulary at a very fast rate, with almost perfect native speaker intonation. Further Reading: Rubinyi, S. (2006) Natural Genius: The Gifts of Asperger's Syndrome . Philadelphia & London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
It is often people who can't speak a second language who tend to poke fun at those who can speak two or three languages.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
C19: People make fun of our speaking a minority language. How should I react? It is often people who can't speak a second language who tend to poke fun at those who can speak two or three languages.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
It is important for speakers of a minority language to have high self-esteem. Minority speakers can form cohesive, self-confident networks which take pride in language vitality.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
Geographical isolation needs counteracting by creative means of communication to launch a language community. If there are self-doubts and derision by outsiders, there is strength to be gained from being part of a language community.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
When one language is much stronger than the other, achieving literacy in that one language first is preferable.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
As parents read to the very young child, they can gently hold a child's finger and show the movement of the words across the page from left to right (or right to left in some languages), in a rhythmical sequence. As favourite books are read night after night, a child will begin to recognize certain words and begin to associate meaning and word form.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
simply speaking the majority language will not cause a sudden change away from racism, discrimination and prejudice. Such negative attitudes by majority peoples tend to be based on anxieties about a different ethnic group, a fear of their economically privileged position being overturned, a fear of the unknown culture, and a fear about loss of political and economic power and status. Becoming monolingual majority language speakers does not change economic disadvantage nor racial prejudice. Bilingualism that includes a well-developed fluency and literacy in the majority language has the equal advantage of allowing potential access to different economic markets and employment, as well as retaining all that is good from the past. There is good reason for the family to become fluent in the majority language. This need not be at the cost of the first or minority language.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
When children come from language minority backgrounds, working towards integration between their two cultures and languages may require more emphasis on the minority language, particularly in the early years. To counterbalance the effect of the dominant majority language, there may need to be two objectives. First, ensuring the child feels secure and confident in the minority language and culture. Second, to ensure that the child is taught the advantages of biculturalism (see Glossary), the value of harmony between cultures and languages, and not taught that conflicting competition is the inevitable outcome of two languages and cultures in contact.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
If teenagers are to maintain both of their languages, it has to come from conviction rather than conformity.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
What happens to bilingualism during adolescence, even if problematic, may not be long term.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
To increase the chances of reversing the rejection of one language, parents can talk to the teenager in that language. The teenager may insist on responding in a different language, but at least ‘passive’ or ‘receptive’ bilingualism will be maintained by the child consistently hearing the other language. It makes it easier for them to speak that language again later in life.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
I lift my hat every day to my parents for bringing me up bilingually. It is the greatest gift they have ever given me, and I lift off my hat to all other parents who have done, are doing, or thinking about doing the same. Bilinguals, don't worry if people think you are a bit different. Be proud of it. It may not always seem so but I suppose we are kind of special!
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
All parents can do is to provide the conditions in which an individual makes up their own mind about the future of their language existence. The gardener can prepare the ground, sow the seeds and provide an optimal environment for language growth. The parent cannot force the growth, change the colour of the language flower or have control over its final blossoming.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
There are exceptions to this sequential pattern. In a language majority context, children sometimes learn to read in their second language. For example, in Canada children from English-speaking homes take their early years of education through French. Hence, they may learn to read in French first, and English a little later. This usually results in fully biliterate children. Learning to read in French first will not impede later progress in learning to read English.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
Many reading skills (and attitudes) are simply transferred from one language to the next.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
For example, there is transfer of: learning to recognize that letters mean sounds, making sense of words as parts and wholes, making sensible guesses at words given the storyline, understanding the meaning of sentences from a string of words and moving left to right (or right to left) across the page.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
is important that such roles and resultant sub-identities integrate into a satisfactory harmonized whole. We need coherence and wholeness around those sub-identities.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
Ensure the child has the opportunity to read and write in the minority or heritage language. Parents can write with their children the important wise
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
Their poking fun may be a sense of their inadequacy in communication, their underlying jealousy, their worries about exclusion from the conversation, and meeting someone different from themselves. For bilinguals meeting this situation, it is a matter of diplomacy, building bridges and breaking down barriers, keeping a good sense of humour, and trying to be tolerant. Pragmatically, rather than idealistically, it is bilinguals who often have to forge improved relationships. Bilinguals have the role of diplomats and not dividers, showing that language diversity does not mean social divisions, that speaking a different language can still mean a harmonious relationship. Ironically, those who are the victims have to become the healers.
Colin Baker (A Parents' and Teachers' Guide to Bilingualism)
Study Questions Define the terms deaf and hard of hearing. Why is it important to know the age of onset, type, and degree of hearing loss? What is the primary difference between prelingual and postlingual hearing impairments? List the four major types of hearing loss. Describe three different types of audiological evaluations. What are some major areas of development that are usually affected by a hearing impairment? List three major causes of hearing impairment. What issues are central to the debate over manual and oral approaches? Define the concept of a Deaf culture. What is total communication, and how can it be used in the classroom? Describe the bilingual-bicultural approach to educating pupils with hearing impairments. In what two academic areas do students with hearing impairments usually lag behind their classmates? Why is early identification of a hearing impairment critical? Why do professionals assess the language and speech abilities of individuals with hearing impairments? List five indicators of a possible hearing loss in the classroom. What are three indicators in children that may predict success with a cochlear implant? Identify five strategies a classroom teacher can use to promote communicative skills and enhance independence in the transition to adulthood. Describe how to check a hearing aid. How can technology benefit individuals with a hearing impairment?
Richard M. Gargiulo (Special Education in Contemporary Society: An Introduction to Exceptionality)