Bard Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Bard. Here they are! All 100 of them:

β€œ
To hurt is as human as to breathe.
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
β€œ
I apologize for anything I might have done. I was not myself.” β€œI apologize for shooting you in the leg.” said Lila. β€œI was myself entirely.
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V.E. Schwab (A Darker Shade of Magic (Shades of Magic, #1))
β€œ
Oh yes, your relationship with Miss Bard is positively ordinary." "Be quiet." "Crossing worlds, killing royals, saving cities. The marks of every good courtship.
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V.E. Schwab (A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic, #2))
β€œ
I know where you sleep, Bard." She smirked. "Then you know I sleep with knives.
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V.E. Schwab (A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic, #2))
β€œ
You can’t go back and make a new start, but you can start right now and make a brand new ending.
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James R. Sherman (Rejection)
β€œ
Lila Bard knew in her bones that she was meant to be a pirate.
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V.E. Schwab (A Darker Shade of Magic (Shades of Magic, #1))
β€œ
There are many kinds of joy, but they all lead to one: the joy to be loved.
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Michael Ende (The Neverending Story)
β€œ
No man or woman alive, magical or not, has ever escaped some form of injury, whether physical, mental, or emotional. To hurt is as human as to breathe.
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
β€œ
Lila Bard lived by a simple rule: if a thing was worth having, it was worth taking.
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V.E. Schwab (A Darker Shade of Magic (Shades of Magic, #1))
β€œ
I am Delilah Bard, she thought, as the ropes cut into her skin. I am a thief and a pirate and a traveler. I have set foot in three different worlds, and lived. I have shed the blood of royals and held magic in my hands.
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V.E. Schwab (A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic, #2))
β€œ
Caring was a thing with claws. It sank them in, and didn’t let go. Caring hurt more than a knife to the leg, more than a few broken ribs, more than anything that bled or broke and healed again. Caring didn’t break you clean. It was a bone that didn’t set, a cut that wouldn’t close.
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V.E. Schwab (A Conjuring of Light (Shades of Magic, #3))
β€œ
Clever as I am, I remain just as big a fool as anyone else.
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
β€œ
There were a hundred shades between a truth and lie, and she knew them all.
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V.E. Schwab (A Conjuring of Light (Shades of Magic, #3))
β€œ
Looking for trouble, he'd say. You're gonna look til you find it. Trouble is the looker, she'd answer. It keeps looking till it finds you. Might as well find it first. Why do you want to die? I don't, she'd say. I just want to live.
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V.E. Schwab (A Darker Shade of Magic (Shades of Magic, #1))
β€œ
The bards sing of love, they celebrate slaughter, they extol kings and flatter queens, but were I a poet I would write in praise of friendship.
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Bernard Cornwell (The Winter King (The Warlord Chronicles, #1))
β€œ
Delilah Bard,” she said. β€œWe’ve met before. And you looked worse.” Rhy laughed silently. β€œI apologize for anything I might have done. I was not myself.” β€œI apologize for shooting you in the leg,” said Lila. β€œI was myself entirely.” Rhy broke into his perfect smile. β€œI like this one,” he said to Kell. β€œCan I borrow her?” β€œYou can try,” said Lila, raising a brow. β€œBut you’ll be a prince without his fingers.
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V.E. Schwab (A Darker Shade of Magic (Shades of Magic, #1))
β€œ
Adventure, yeah. I guess that's what you call it when everybody comes back alive.
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Mercedes Lackey (Spirits White as Lightning (Bedlam's Bard, #5))
β€œ
Death comes for us all in the end.
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
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Don't get yourself killed." "I'll do my best," said Kell, and then he was going. "And come back," added Rhy. Kell paused. "Don't worry," he said. "I will. Once I've seen it." "Seen what?" asked Rhy. Kell smiled. "Everything.
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V.E. Schwab (A Conjuring of Light (Shades of Magic, #3))
β€œ
She enjoys rain for its wetness, winter for its cold, summer for its heat. She loves rainbows as much for fading as for their brilliance. It is easy for her, she opens her heart and accepts everything.
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Morgan Llywelyn (Bard: The Odyssey of the Irish)
β€œ
No witch has ever claimed to own the Elder Wand. Make of that what you will.
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
β€œ
A man should learn to detect and watch that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice his thought, because it is his. In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected thoughts: they come back to us with a certain alienated majesty.
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Ralph Waldo Emerson (Self-Reliance: An Excerpt from Collected Essays, First Series)
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I have lived one step away from losing my mind for years. I am quick and accurate in spotting unstable streaks in others.
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Charlaine Harris (Shakespeare's Landlord (Lily Bard, #1))
β€œ
Hope springs forever.
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
β€œ
But Death was cunning.
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
β€œ
Are you ready ?" she asked, spinning the chamber. Kell gazed through the gate at the waiting castle. "No." At that, she offered him the sharpest edge of a grin. "Good," she said. "The ones who think they're ready always end up dead.
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V.E. Schwab (A Darker Shade of Magic (Shades of Magic, #1))
β€œ
And then the door burst open, and Lila Bard stormed in (...) and Rhy watched his brother move toward her as naturally as if the world had simply tipped. For Kell, apparently, it had.
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V.E. Schwab (A Conjuring of Light (Shades of Magic, #3))
β€œ
Magic causes as much trouble as it cures.
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
β€œ
I can't make sense out of that girl," he said to the bard, "Can you?" "Never mind," Fflewddur said, "We aren't really expected to.
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Lloyd Alexander (The Book of Three (The Chronicles of Prydain, #1))
β€œ
If anyone could make the strange seem ordinary, the impossible look easy, it was Delilah Bard
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V.E. Schwab (A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic, #2))
β€œ
Glorious victories make fine songs, Yarvi, but inglorious ones are no worse once the bards are done with them. Glorious defeats, meanwhile, are just defeats.
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Joe Abercrombie (Half a King (Shattered Sea, #1))
β€œ
You know, Miss Bard, there is such a thing as being sharp enough to cut yourself.
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V.E. Schwab (A Conjuring of Light (Shades of Magic, #3))
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But alas, hearts are meant to be broken, aren’t they, bard?” β€œIf they must break,” Jack said, β€œthen they break and remake themselves into stronger vessels.
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Rebecca Ross (A River Enchanted (Elements of Cadence, #1))
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By all means," cried the bard, his eyes lighting up. "A Fflam to the rescue! Storm the castle! Carry it by assault! Batter down the gates!" "There's not much of it left to storm," said Eilonwy. "Oh?" said Fflewddur, with disappointment. "Very well, we shall do the best we can.
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Lloyd Alexander (The Book of Three (The Chronicles of Prydain, #1))
β€œ
We are what ballads are written of, what bards sing of. We are epic, you and I.
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Samantha Garman (Dandelion Dreams)
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The heroes and heroines who triumph in his stories are not those with the most powerful magic, but rather those who demonstrate the most kindness, common sense and ingenuity.
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard)
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Walking away had been easy. Not looking back was harder.
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V.E. Schwab (A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic, #2))
β€œ
Only a fool wants war, but once a war starts then it cannot be fought half-heartedly. It cannot even be fought with regret, but must be waged with a savage joy in defeating the enemy, and it is that savage joy that inspires our bards to write their greatest songs about love and war.
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Bernard Cornwell (Excalibur (The Warlord Chronicles, #3))
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Trust thyself: every heart vibrates to that iron string. Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind. A man should learn to detect and watch that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages... In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected thoughts: they come back to us with a certain alienated majesty. The power which resides in him is new in nature, and none but he knows what that is which he can do, nor does he know until he has tried
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Ralph Waldo Emerson
β€œ
Sometimes humans hit on a moment of profundity more complete than their dim minds could comprehend, and they took that nugget of truth and dumped it in the refuse for the bards and the poets to find, and mangle into yodeling paeans of love.
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Kelley Armstrong (Haunted (Women of the Otherworld, #5))
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Battle for the sake of honor may be a fine thing for bards to sing of, but it is no way to preserve one's homeland
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Jacqueline Carey (Kushiel's Chosen (Phèdre's Trilogy, #2))
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Are you as famous in your world as Kell is here?” Lila thought of the wanted posters lining her London. β€œNot for the same reasons.
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V.E. Schwab (A Conjuring of Light (Shades of Magic, #3))
β€œ
No, no," said Taran slowly, "It would be folly to think of attacking them." He smiled quickly at Fflewddur. "The bards would sing of us," he admitted, "but we'd be in no position to appreciate it.
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Lloyd Alexander (The Book of Three (The Chronicles of Prydain, #1))
β€œ
Let muggles manage without us!
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
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Dammit Bard, you're going to set the cat on fire.
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V.E. Schwab (A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic, #2))
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Bards were terrible at keeping secrets. They insisted on putting them to music.
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Tanya Huff (Sing the Four Quarters (Quarters, #1))
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Ah, there you are, Bard,” came a familiar voice, and she turned to see Alucard striding over. β€œSaints, is that a dress you’re in? The crew will never believe it.” β€œYou’ve got to be kidding me,” growled Kell.
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V.E. Schwab (A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic, #2))
β€œ
Delilah Bard never read many books. The few she did had pirates and thieves, and always ended with freedom and the promise of more stories. Characters sailed away. They lived on. Lila always imagined people that way, a series of intersections and adventures. It was easy when you moved through life--through worlds--the way she did. Easy when you didn't care, when people came onto the page and walked away again, back to their own stories, and you could imagine whatever you wanted for them, if you cared enough to write it in your head.
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V.E. Schwab (A Conjuring of Light (Shades of Magic, #3))
β€œ
Stories have power. Gleemen's tales, and bards' epics, and rumors in the street alike. They stir passions, and change the way men see the world.
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Robert Jordan (Winter's Heart (The Wheel of Time, #9))
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Take her to the kitchen,” came the order. β€œIf she lies, throw her in the cauldron." β€œHe was jesting about the cauldron, wasn’t he? You cannot have a cauldron big enough for a person?” Bard halted, sighed, looked at her with those wide, liquid eyes.β€œWe,” he said, β€œhave knives.
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Nalini Singh (Lord of the Abyss (Royal House of Shadows, #4))
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ere the hour of the twattering of bards in the twitterlitter between Druidia and the Deepsleep Sea
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James Joyce (Finnegans Wake)
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A bard must know history so she does not repeat it. She tells the tales but is never part of them. She watches but remains above what she sees. She inspires passions in others and rules her own.
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David Gaider (The Stolen Throne (Dragon Age, #1))
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The Day is Done The day is done, and the darkness Falls from the wings of Night, As a feather is wafted downward From an eagle in his flight. I see the lights of the village Gleam through the rain and the mist, And a feeling of sadness comes o'er me That my soul cannot resist: A feeling of sadness and longing, That is not akin to pain, And resembles sorrow only As the mist resembles the rain. Come, read to me some poem, Some simple and heartfelt lay, That shall soothe this restless feeling, And banish the thoughts of day. Not from the grand old masters, Not from the bards sublime, Whose distant footsteps echo Through the corridors of Time. For, like strains of martial music, Their mighty thoughts suggest Life's endless toil and endeavor; And to-night I long for rest. Read from some humbler poet, Whose songs gushed from his heart, As showers from the clouds of summer, Or tears from the eyelids start; Who, through long days of labor, And nights devoid of ease, Still heard in his soul the music Of wonderful melodies. Such songs have power to quiet The restless pulse of care, And come like the benediction That follows after prayer. Then read from the treasured volume The poem of thy choice, And lend to the rhyme of the poet The beauty of thy voice. And the night shall be filled with music, And the cares, that infest the day, Shall fold their tents, like the Arabs, And as silently steal away.
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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (The Belfry of Bruges and Other Poems)
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Delilah Bardβ€”always a thief, recently a magician, and one day, hopefully, a pirateβ€”was running as fast as she could.
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V.E. Schwab (A Conjuring of Light (Shades of Magic, #3))
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It is no small thing to be a Throne Warden of Anniera. They have been sung about by bards for a thousand years and are accorded a place of honor like no other kingdomβ€”like no other kingβ€”in the worldβ€”not because they’re lords, but because they’re servants.
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Andrew Peterson (On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness (The Wingfeather Saga, #1))
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Bards don’t believe in goodbyesβ€”we know that the roads we walk are winding, and we generally tend to come back to people and places we’ve known and been before, and often at just the right time.” I smiled. β€œWe’ll meet again.
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Sean Gibson (The Chronicle of Heloise & Grimple)
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Humans have a knack of choosing precisely those things that are worst for them.
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
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If the bards of old the true has told The sirens have raven hair. But over the earth since art had birth, They paint the angels fair.
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L.M. Montgomery (Emily's Quest (Emily, #3))
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Magic ran between them like a current, a cord, and he wondered who she would have been if she’d stayed in Grey London. If she’d never picked his pocket, never held the contents ransom for adventure. Maybe she would never have discovered magic. Or maybe she would have simply changed her world instead of his.
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V.E. Schwab (A Conjuring of Light (Shades of Magic, #3))
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I told you, Hell-Bard. Everyone lies. It's in the way we banter with our friends. It's in the mundane greetings we give passersby. It's in the most meaningless things we do every single moment of every single day. Hundreds upon thousands of tiny, inconsequential lies.
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Susan Dennard (Windwitch (The Witchlands, #2))
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We're all here for a reason, Bard. Some reasons are just bigger than others. So I guess I'm not scared of who you are, or even what you are. I'm scared of why you are.
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V.E. Schwab (A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic, #2))
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Picasso said he'd paint with his own wet tongue on the dusty floor of a jail cell if he had to. We have to create. It is the only thing louder than destruction. It's the only chance the bard are gonna break, our hands full of color reaching towards the sky, a brush stroke in the dark. It is not too late. That starry night is not yet dry.
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Andrea Gibson (The Madness Vase)
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We can't all turn blood and whispers into weapons.
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V.E. Schwab (A Darker Shade of Magic (Shades of Magic, #1))
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We know summer is the height of of being alive. We don't believe in God or the prospect of an afterlife mostly, so we know that we're only given eighty summers or so per lifetime, and each one has to be better then the last, has to encompass a trip to that arts center up at Bard, a seemingly mellow game of badminton over at some yahoo's Vermont cottage, and a cool, wet, slightly dangerous kayak trip down an unforgiving river. Otherwise, how would you know that you have lived your summertime best? What if you missed out on some morsel of shaded nirvana?
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Gary Shteyngart (Super Sad True Love Story)
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And sure enough, in seeking to become superhuman this foolhardy young man renders himself inhuman. The heart that he has locked away slowly shrivels and grows hair, symbolising his own descent to beasthood.
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
β€œ
What are you?” she asked. β€œA monster,” said Kell hoarsely. β€œYou’d better let me go.” The girl gave a small, mocking laugh. β€œMonsters don’t faint in the presence of ladies.” β€œLadies don’t dress like men and pick pockets,” retorted Kell. Her smile only sharpened. β€œWhat are you really?” β€œTied to your bed,” said Kell matter-of-factly.” β€œAnd?” His brow furrowed. β€œAnd in trouble.
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V.E. Schwab (A Darker Shade of Magic (Shades of Magic, #1))
β€œ
The bards all sing of the bravery of heroes and the greatness of your deeds; it is one of the few elements of your story on which they all agree. But no one sings of the courage required by those of us who were left behind.
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Natalie Haynes (A Thousand Ships)
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What must strike any intelligent witch or wizard on studying the so-called history of the Elder Wand is that every man who claims to have owned it has insisted that it is "unbeatable," when the known facts of its passage through many owners' hands demonstrate that has it not only been beaten hundreds of times, but that it also attracts trouble as Grumble the Grubby Goat attracted flies.
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
β€œ
They weren't tears of sadness or even tears of joy. I was just overflowing. Like so many things since I'd been here, I didn't yet understand it, but I felt it.
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Elizabeth Bard (Lunch in Paris: A Love Story, with Recipes)
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Literature was not promulgated by a pale and emasculated critical priesthood singing their litanies in empty churches - nor is it a game for the cloistered elect, the tinhorn mendicants of low calorie despair. Literature is as old as speech. It grew out of human need for it, and it has not changed except to become more needed. The skalds, the bards, the writers are not separate and exclusive. From the beginning, their functions, their duties, their responsibilities have been decreed by our species. --speech at the Nobel Banquet at the City Hall in Stockholm, December 10, 1962
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John Steinbeck
β€œ
This exchange marked the beginning of Mr. Malfoy's long campaign to have me removed from my post as headmaster of Hogwarts, and of mine to have him removed from his position as Lord Voldemort's Favorite Death Eater. My response prompted several further letters from Mr. Malfoy, but as they consisted mainly of opprobrious remarks on my sanity, parentage, and hygiene, their relevance to this commentary is remote.
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
β€œ
Mysteries are always more exciting than truths
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V.E. Schwab (A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic, #2))
β€œ
No better way to avoid making a decision than burying yourself in a big fat book.” (p. 105).
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Elizabeth Bard (Lunch in Paris: A Love Story, with Recipes)
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For such a career I lacked both endurance and inclination: the stress of ambition left me cold, while the Muse, the creative spirit, was forever urging on me that haven of leisure to which I'd always leaned. The poets of those days I cultivated and cherished: for me, bards were so many gods.
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Ovid (The Poems of Exile: Tristia and the Black Sea Letters)
β€œ
This day,” said Gabriel, β€œthis moment, is when you step out from the shadow of the past. Today you make your name. Today your legend is born. Come tomorrow, every tale the bards tell will belong to you, because today we save the world!” Clay sighed in relief. There’d been a hammer, after all. Gabriel tore Vellichor from its scabbard and leveled it at the encroaching Horde. β€œThis is not a choice between life and death, but life and immortality! Remain here and die in obscurity, or follow me now and live forever!
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Nicholas Eames (Kings of the Wyld (The Band, #1))
β€œ
For the record, I'm not an indecisive person, and I'm not a coward. I just have a very detailed imaginary life, and it sometimes takes precedence over what's actually happening around me.
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Elizabeth Bard (Lunch in Paris: A Love Story, with Recipes)
β€œ
She has her own glamour, Willy lad. All poets do, all the bards and artists, all the musicians who truly take the music into their own hearts. They all straddle the border of Faerie, and they see into both worlds. Not dependably into either, perhaps, but that uncertainty keeps them honest and at a distance.
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Emma Bull (War for the Oaks)
β€œ
Names are important,” she said, twirling the cord. β€œMine is Ojka, and I have orders to keep you out.” Beyond the doors, Kell let out a scream of frustration, a sob of pain. β€œMy name is Lila Bard,” she answered, drawing her favorite knife, β€œand I don’t give a damn.
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V.E. Schwab
β€œ
Children being children, however, the grotesque Hopping Pot had taken hold of their imaginations. The solution was to jettison the pro-Muggle moral but keep the warty cauldron, so by the middle of the sixteenth century a different version of the tale was in wide circulation among wizarding families. In the revised story, the Hopping Pot protects an innocent wizard from his torch-bearing, pitchfork-toting neighbours by chasing them away from the wizard's cottage, catching them and swallowing them whole.
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
β€œ
She used to think that if she stole enough, the want would fade, the hunger would go away, but maybe it wasn’t that simple. Maybe it wasn’t a matter of what she didn’t have, of what she wasn’t, but what she was.
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V.E. Schwab (A Gathering of Shadows (Shades of Magic, #2))
β€œ
Have it compose a poem- a poem about a haircut! But lofty, tragic, timeless, full of love, treachery, retribution, quiet heroism in the face of certain doom! Six lines, cleverly rhymed, and every word beginning with the letter S!!” [sic]…. Seduced, shaggy Samson snored. She scissored short. Sorely shorn, Soon shackled slave, Samson sighed, Silently scheming Sightlessly seeking Some savage, spectacular suicide." ("The First Sally (A) or The Electronic Bard" THE CYBERIAD)
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StanisΕ‚aw Lem
β€œ
99% of natural poets discovered their talents through love letters.
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Michael Bassey Johnson
β€œ
Bodies wear out to remind us they are temporary, and force us to spend more thought on our spirits
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Morgan Llywelyn (Bard: The Odyssey of the Irish)
β€œ
I wonder if the heroes the bards sang of that evening knew before they triumphed what they would become. In those crucial moments when a fateful decision was made, did they feel the air brighten with the zing of destiny? Or did they blunder on, not realising the pivotal moment in which destiny swung and the fates were forged?
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Jennifer Saint (Ariadne)
β€œ
Powerful infatuations can be induced by the skilful potioneer, but never yet has anyone managed to create the truly unbreakable, eternal, unconditional attachment that alone can be called Love
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
β€œ
Kell looked down at Delilah Bard, a cutthroat and a thief, a valiant partner and a strange, terrifying girl. He would see her again. He knew he would. Magic bent the world. Pulled it into shape. There were fixed points. Most of the time those points were places. But sometimes, rarely, they were people. For someone who never stood still, Lila still felt like a pin in Kell’s world. One he was sure to snag on.
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V.E. Schwab (A Darker Shade of Magic (Shades of Magic, #1))
β€œ
Now, as I understand it, the bards were feared. They were respected, but more than that they were feared. If you were just some magician, if you'd pissed off some witch, then what's she gonna do, she's gonna put a curse on you, and what's gonna happen? Your hens are gonna lay funny, your milk's gonna go sour, maybe one of your kids is gonna get a hare-lip or something like that β€” no big deal. You piss off a bard, and forget about putting a curse on you, he might put a satire on you. And if he was a skilful bard, he puts a satire on you, it destroys you in the eyes of your community, it shows you up as ridiculous, lame, pathetic, worthless, in the eyes of your community, in the eyes of your family, in the eyes of your children, in the eyes of yourself, and if it's a particularly good bard, and he's written a particularly good satire, then three hundred years after you're dead, people are still gonna be laughing, at what a twat you were.
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Alan Moore
β€œ
The role of listeners has never been fully appreciated. However, it is well known that most people don’t listen. They use the time when someone else is speaking to think of what they’re going to say next. True Listeners have always been revered among oral cultures, and prized for their rarity value; bards and poets are ten a cow, but a good Listener is hard to find, or at least hard to find twice.
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Terry Pratchett (Pyramids (Discworld, #7))
β€œ
i've been reading whitman, you know what he says, cheer up slaves, and horrify foreign despots, he means that's the attitude for the bard, the zen lunacy bard of old desert paths, see the whole thing is a world full of rucksack wanderers, dharma bums refusing to subscribe to the general demand that they consume production and there have to work for the privilege of consuming, all that crap they didn't really want anyway such as refrigerators, tv sets, cars, at least new fancy cars, certain hair oils and deodorants and general junk you finally always see a week later in the garbage anyway, all of them imprisoned in a system of work, produce, consume, work, produce, consume, i see a vision of a great rucksack revolution thousands or even millions of young americans wandering around with rucksacks, going up into the mountains to pray, making children laugh and old men glad, making young girls happy and old girls happier, all of 'em zen lunatics who go about writing poems that happen to appear in their heads for no reason and also by being kind and also by strange unexpected acts keep giving visions of eternal freedom to everybody and to all living creatures
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Jack Kerouac (The Dharma Bums)
β€œ
Christianity - and that is its greatest merit - has somewhat mitigated that brutal Germanic love of war, but it could not destroy it. Should that subduing talisman, the cross, be shattered, the frenzied madness of the ancient warriors, that insane Berserk rage of which Nordic bards have spoken and sung so often, will once more burst into flame. This talisman is fragile, and the day will come when it will collapse miserably. Then the ancient stony gods will rise from the forgotten debris and rub the dust of a thousand years from their eyes, and finally Thor with his giant hammer will jump up and smash the Gothic cathedrals. ... Do not smile at the visionary who anticipates the same revolution in the realm of the visible as has taken place in the spiritual. Thought precedes action as lightning precedes thunder. German thunder is of true Germanic character; it is not very nimble, but rumbles along ponderously. Yet, it will come and when you hear a crashing such as never before has been heard in the world's history, then you know that the German thunderbolt has fallen at last. At that uproar the eagles of the air will drop dead, and lions in the remotest deserts of Africa will hide in their royal dens. A play will be performed in Germany which will make the French Revolution look like an innocent idyll. (1834)
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Heinrich Heine
β€œ
Go on," Kell told him without taking his eyes from Lila. " Get some rest." Hastra shifted. "I can't, sir," he said. "I'm to escort Miss Bard--" "I'll take that charge," cut in Kell. Hastra bit his lip and retreated several steps. Lila let her forehead come to rest against his, her face so close the features blurred. And yet, that fractured eye shone with frightening clarity. "You never told me," he whispered. "You never noticed," she answered. And then, "Alucard did." The blow landed, and Kell started to pull away when Lila's eyelids fluttered and she swayed dangerously. He braced her. "Come on," he said gently. "I have a room upstairs. Why don't we--" A sleepy flicker of amusement. "Trying to get me into bed?" Kell mustered a smile. "It's only fair. I've spent enough time in yours." "If I remember correctly," she said, her voice dreamy with fatigue, "you were on top of the bed the entire time." "And tied to it," observed Kell. Her words were soft at the edges. "Those were the days..." she said, right before she fell forward. It happened so fast Kell could do nothing but throw his arms around her. "Lila?" he asked, first gently, and then more urgently. "Lila?" She murmured against his front, something about sharp knives and soft corners, but didn't rouse, and Kell shot a glance at Hastra, who was still standing there, looking thoroughly embarrassed. "What have you done?" demanded Kell. "It was just a tonic, sir," he fumbled, "something for sleep." "You drugged her?" "It was Tieren's order," said Hastra, chastised. "He said she was mad and stubborn and no use to us dead." Hastra lowered his voice when he said this, mimicking Tieren's tone with startling accuracy. "And what do you plan to do when she wakes back up?" Hastra shrank back. "Apologize?" Kell made an exasperated sound as Lila nuzzled-- actually nuzzled-- his shoulder. "I suggest," he snapped at the young man, "you think of something better. Like an escape route." Hastra paled, and Kell swept Lila up into his arms, amazed at her lightness... Kell swept through the halls until he reached his room and lowered Lila onto the couch. Hastra handed him a blanket. "Shouldn't you take off her knives?" "There's not enough tonic in the world to risk it," said Kell.
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V.E. Schwab (A Conjuring of Light (Shades of Magic, #3))
β€œ
As the sun fell below the horizon, Sir Luckless emerged from the waters with the glory of his triumph upon him, and flung himself in his rusted armor at the feet of Amata, who was the kindest and most beautiful woman he had ever beheld. Flushed with success, he begged for her hand and her heart, and Amata, no less delighted, realized that she had found a man worthy of them.
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J.K. Rowling (The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Hogwarts Library, #3))
β€œ
Literature is as old as speech. It grew out of human need for it and it has not changed except to become more needed. The skalds, the bards, the writers are not separate and exclusive. From the beginning, their functions, their duties, and their responsibilities have been decreed by our species... the writer is delegated to declare and to celebrate man's proven capacity for greatness of heart and spirit - for gallantry in defeat, for courage, compassion and love. In the endless war against weakness and despair, these are the bright rally flags of hope and of emulation. I hold that a writer who does not passionately believe in the perfectibility of man has no dedication nor any membership in literature.
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John Steinbeck
β€œ
There is some confusion as to what magic actually is. I think this can be cleared up if you just look at the very earliest descriptions of magic. Magic in its earliest form is often referred to as β€œthe art”. I believe this is completely literal. I believe that magic is art and that art, whether it be writing, music, sculpture, or any other form is literally magic. Art is, like magic, the science of manipulating symbols, words, or images, to achieve changes in consciousness. The very language about magic seems to be talking as much about writing or art as it is about supernatural events. A grimmoir for example, the book of spells is simply a fancy way of saying grammar. Indeed, to cast a spell, is simply to spell, to manipulate words, to change people's consciousness. And I believe that this is why an artist or writer is the closest thing in the contemporary world that you are likely to see to a Shaman. I believe that all culture must have arisen from cult. Originally, all of the faucets of our culture, whether they be in the arts or sciences were the province of the Shaman. The fact that in present times, this magical power has degenerated to the level of cheap entertainment and manipulation, is, I think a tragedy. At the moment the people who are using Shamanism and magic to shape our culture are advertisers. Rather than try to wake people up, their Shamanism is used as an opiate to tranquilize people, to make people more manipulable. Their magic box of television, and by their magic words, their jingles can cause everyone in the country to be thinking the same words and have the same banal thoughts all at exactly the same moment. In all of magic there is an incredibly large linguistic component. The Bardic tradition of magic would place a bard as being much higher and more fearsome than a magician. A magician might curse you. That might make your hands lay funny or you might have a child born with a club foot. If a Bard were to place not a curse upon you, but a satire, then that could destroy you. If it was a clever satire, it might not just destroy you in the eyes of your associates; it would destroy you in the eyes of your family. It would destroy you in your own eyes. And if it was a finely worded and clever satire that might survive and be remembered for decades, even centuries. Then years after you were dead people still might be reading it and laughing at you and your wretchedness and your absurdity. Writers and people who had command of words were respected and feared as people who manipulated magic. In latter times I think that artists and writers have allowed themselves to be sold down the river. They have accepted the prevailing belief that art and writing are merely forms of entertainment. They’re not seen as transformative forces that can change a human being; that can change a society. They are seen as simple entertainment; things with which we can fill 20 minutes, half an hour, while we’re waiting to die. It’s not the job of the artist to give the audience what the audience wants. If the audience knew what they needed, then they wouldn’t be the audience. They would be the artists. It is the job of artists to give the audience what they need.
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Alan Moore
β€œ
William Shakespeare (baptised 26 April 1564 – died 23 April 1616) was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon" (or simply "The Bard"). His surviving works consist of 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and several other poems. His plays have been translated into every major living language, and are performed more often than those of any other playwright. Shakespeare was born and raised in Stratford-upon-Avon. At the age of 18 he married Anne Hathaway, who bore him three children: Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith. Between 1585 and 1592 he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part owner of the playing company the Lord Chamberlain's Men, later known as the King's Men. He appears to have retired to Stratford around 1613, where he died three years later. Few records of Shakespeare's private life survive, and there has been considerable speculation about such matters as his sexuality, religious beliefs, and whether the works attributed to him were written by others. Shakespeare produced most of his known work between 1590 and 1613. His early plays were mainly comedies and histories, genres he raised to the peak of sophistication and artistry by the end of the sixteenth century. Next he wrote mainly tragedies until about 1608, including Hamlet, King Lear, and Macbeth, considered some of the finest examples in the English language. In his last phase, he wrote tragicomedies, also known as romances, and collaborated with other playwrights. Many of his plays were published in editions of varying quality and accuracy during his lifetime, and in 1623 two of his former theatrical colleagues published the First Folio, a collected edition of his dramatic works that included all but two of the plays now recognised as Shakespeare's. Shakespeare was a respected poet and playwright in his own day, but his reputation did not rise to its present heights until the nineteenth century. The Romantics, in particular, acclaimed Shakespeare's genius, and the Victorians hero-worshipped Shakespeare with a reverence that George Bernard Shaw called "bardolatry". In the twentieth century, his work was repeatedly adopted and rediscovered by new movements in scholarship and performance. His plays remain highly popular today and are consistently performed and reinterpreted in diverse cultural and political contexts throughout the world. Source: Wikipedia
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William Shakespeare (Romeo and Juliet)
β€œ
It was a still night, tinted with the promise of dawn. A crescent moon was just setting. Ankh-Morpork, largest city in the lands around the Circle Sea, slept. That statement is not really true On the one hand, those parts of the city which normally concerned themselves with, for example, selling vegetables, shoeing horses, carving exquisite small jade ornaments, changing money and making tables, on the whole, slept. Unless they had insomnia. Or had got up in the night, as it might be, to go to the lavatory. On the other hand, many of the less law-abiding citizens were wide awake and, for instance, climbing through windows that didn’t belong to them, slitting throats, mugging one another, listening to loud music in smoky cellars and generally having a lot more fun. But most of the animals were asleep, except for the rats. And the bats, too, of course. As far as the insects were concerned… The point is that descriptive writing is very rarely entirely accurate and during the reign of Olaf Quimby II as Patrician of Ankh some legislation was passed in a determined attempt to put a stop to this sort of thing and introduce some honesty into reporting. Thus, if a legend said of a notable hero that β€œall men spoke of his prowess” any bard who valued his life would add hastily β€œexcept for a couple of people in his home village who thought he was a liar, and quite a lot of other people who had never really heard of him.” Poetic simile was strictly limited to statements like β€œhis mighty steed was as fleet as the wind on a fairly calm day, say about Force Three,” and any loose talk about a beloved having a face that launched a thousand ships would have to be backed by evidence that the object of desire did indeed look like a bottle of champagne.
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Terry Pratchett (The Light Fantastic (Discworld, #2; Rincewind, #2))
β€œ
Certainly not! I didn't build a machine to solve ridiculous crossword puzzles! That's hack work, not Great Art! Just give it a topic, any topic, as difficult as you like..." Klapaucius thought, and thought some more. Finally he nodded and said: "Very well. Let's have a love poem, lyrical, pastoral, and expressed in the language of pure mathematics. Tensor algebra mainly, with a little topology and higher calculus, if need be. But with feeling, you understand, and in the cybernetic spirit." "Love and tensor algebra?" Have you taken leave of your senses?" Trurl began, but stopped, for his electronic bard was already declaiming: Come, let us hasten to a higher plane, Where dyads tread the fairy fields of Venn, Their indices bedecked from one to n, Commingled in an endless Markov chain! Come, every frustum longs to be a cone, And every vector dreams of matrices. Hark to the gentle gradient of the breeze: It whispers of a more ergodic zone. In Reimann, Hilbert or in Banach space Let superscripts and subscripts go their ways. Our asymptotes no longer out of phase, We shall encounter, counting, face to face. I'll grant thee random access to my heart, Thou'lt tell me all the constants of thy love; And so we two shall all love's lemmas prove, And in bound partition never part. For what did Cauchy know, or Christoffel, Or Fourier, or any Boole or Euler, Wielding their compasses, their pens and rulers, Of thy supernal sinusoidal spell? Cancel me not--for what then shall remain? Abscissas, some mantissas, modules, modes, A root or two, a torus and a node: The inverse of my verse, a null domain. Ellipse of bliss, converge, O lips divine! The product of our scalars is defined! Cyberiad draws nigh, and the skew mind Cuts capers like a happy haversine. I see the eigenvalue in thine eye, I hear the tender tensor in thy sigh. Bernoulli would have been content to die, Had he but known such a^2 cos 2 phi!
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StanisΕ‚aw Lem (The Cyberiad)
β€œ
To what a world does the illustrious bard carry me! To wander over pathless wilds, surrounded by impetuous whirlwinds, where, by the feeble light of the moon, we see the spirits of our ancestors; to hear from the mountain-tops, mid the roar of torrents, their plaintive sounds issuing from deep caverns, and the sorrowful lamentations of a maiden who sighs and expires on the mossy tomb of the warrior by whom she was adored. I meet this bard with silver hair; he wanders in the valley; he seeks the footsteps of his fathers, and, alas! he finds only their tombs. Then, contemplating the pale moon, as she sinks beneath the waves of the rolling sea, the memory of bygone days strikes the mind of the hero, days when approaching danger invigorated the brave, and the moon shone upon his bark laden with spoils, and returning in triumph. When I read in his countenance deep sorrow, when I see his dying glory sink exhausted into the grave, as he inhales new and heart-thrilling delight from his approaching union with his beloved, and he casts a look on the cold earth and the tall grass which is so soon to cover him, and then exclaims, "The traveller will come, -- he will come who has seen my beauty, and he will ask, 'Where is the bard, where is the illustrious son of Fingal?' He will walk over my tomb, and will seek me in vain!
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Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (The Sorrows of Young Werther)
β€œ
To Juan at the Winter Solstice There is one story and one story only That will prove worth your telling, Whether as learned bard or gifted child; To it all lines or lesser gauds belong That startle with their shining Such common stories as they stray into. Is it of trees you tell, their months and virtues, Or strange beasts that beset you, Of birds that croak at you the Triple will? Or of the Zodiac and how slow it turns Below the Boreal Crown, Prison to all true kings that ever reigned? Water to water, ark again to ark, From woman back to woman: So each new victim treads unfalteringly The never altered circuit of his fate, Bringing twelve peers as witness Both to his starry rise and starry fall. Or is it of the Virgin's silver beauty, All fish below the thighs? She in her left hand bears a leafy quince; When, with her right hand she crooks a finger, smiling, How many the King hold back? Royally then he barters life for love. Or of the undying snake from chaos hatched, Whose coils contain the ocean, Into whose chops with naked sword he springs, Then in black water, tangled by the reeds, Battles three days and nights, To be spewed up beside her scalloped shore? Much snow if falling, winds roar hollowly, The owl hoots from the elder, Fear in your heart cries to the loving-cup: Sorrow to sorrow as the sparks fly upward. The log groans and confesses: There is one story and one story only. Dwell on her graciousness, dwell on her smiling, Do not forget what flowers The great boar trampled down in ivy time. Her brow was creamy as the crested wave, Her sea-blue eyes were wild But nothing promised that is not performed.
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Robert Graves
β€œ
... WHEN ONE LOOKS INTO THE DARKNESS THERE IS ALWAYS SOMETHING THERE... Far-off, most secret, and inviolate Rose, Enfold me in my hour of hours; where those Who sought thee in the Holy Sepulchre, Or in the wine-vat, dwell beyond the stir And tumult of defeated dreams; and deep Among pale eyelids, heavy with the sleep Men have named beauty. Thy great leaves enfold The ancient beards, the helms of ruby and gold Of the crowned Magi; and the king whose eyes Saw the pierced Hands and Rood of elder rise In Druid vapour and make the torches dim; Till vain frenzy awoke and he died; and him Who met Fand walking among flaming dew By a grey shore where the wind never blew, And lost the world and Emer for a kiss; And him who drove the gods out of their liss, And till a hundred morns had flowered red Feasted, and wept the barrows of his dead; And the proud dreaming king who flung the crown And sorrow away, and calling bard and clown Dwelt among wine-stained wanderers in deep woods: And him who sold tillage, and house, and goods, And sought through lands and islands numberless years, Until he found, with laughter and with tears, A woman of so shining loveliness That men threshed corn at midnight by a tress, A little stolen tress. I, too, await The hour of thy great wind of love and hate. When shall the stars be blown about the sky, Like the sparks blown out of a smithy, and die? Surely thine hour has come, thy great wind blows, Far-off, most secret, and inviolate Rose? Out of sight is out of mind: Long have man and woman-kind, Heavy of will and light of mood, Taken away our wheaten food, Taken away our Altar stone; Hail and rain and thunder alone, And red hearts we turn to grey, Are true till time gutter away. ... the common people are always ready to blame the beautiful.
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W.B. Yeats (The Secret Rose and Rosa Alchemica by W.B.Yeats, Fiction, Literary, Classics)