Auld Lang Syne Quotes

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When the fiddle had stopped singing Laura called out softly, "What are days of auld lang syne, Pa?" "They are the days of a long time ago, Laura," Pa said. "Go to sleep, now." But Laura lay awake a little while, listening to Pa's fiddle softly playing and to the lonely sound of the wind in the Big Woods,… She was glad that the cozy house, and Pa and Ma and the firelight and the music, were now. They could not be forgotten, she thought, because now is now. It can never be a long time ago.
Laura Ingalls Wilder
Should auld acquaintance be forgot and never brought to mind? Should auld acquaintance be forgot and days of auld lang syne? For auld lang syne, my dear, for auld lang syne, we'll take a cup of kindness yet, for auld lang syne.
Robert Burns
When the fiddle had stopped singing Laura called out softly, “What are days of auld lang syne, Pa?” “They are the days of a long time ago, Laura,” Pa said. “Go to sleep, now.” But Laura lay awake a little while, listening to Pa’s fiddle softly playing and to the lonely sound of the wind in the Big Woods. She looked at Pa sitting on the bench by the hearth, the firelight gleaming on his brown hair and beard and glistening on the honey-brown fiddle. She looked at Ma, gently rocking and knitting. She thought to herself, “This is now.” She was glad that the cosy house, and Pa and Ma and the firelight and the music, were now. They could not be forgotten, she thought, because now is now. It can never be a long time ago.
Laura Ingalls Wilder (Little House in the Big Woods (Little House, #1))
As the seasons age us I close my eyes and wish for snow Alas the Irish seasons been foretold For Spring will dawn and I will go Into another season Jack Frost cold. And when its here, I wish for night As childhood memories flash right by To see the birds in humble flight I wish for Summer with a sigh And on I go to months so sweet Dawns sweet chorus and sunbeams bright I yearn for Autumn leaves under feet Yet now I dream of Winters night As Auld Lang Syne rings in New Year Alas! I’m one year older as Spring draws near.
Michelle Geaney (Under these Rebel skies)
We danced about a mile apart the whole time, until during “Auld Lang Syne” he suddenly rested his chin on the top of my head as if he were very tired.
Sylvia Plath (The Bell Jar)
One day, all those who love in the society of Auld Lang Syne shall meet again. In the New City of the Burning Heart, there, the veil will drop. The arc of the seas shall finally know the skies. Day and night shall end. The clock tower will crumble. Time shall fly to the place of no more. For we were born for meaning. We were born to love. There, we shall all be together with all the lovelies ever known who chose mercy and kindness amidst the forget-me-nots and the countless stars.
David Paul Kirkpatrick (The Address Of Happiness)
To birth, to death, and that wondrous thing in between. And to auld lang syne.
Stephen Cox (It's a Wonderful Life: A Memory Book)
We live in hope—that life will get better, and more importantly that it will go on, that love will survive even though we will not. And between now and then, we are here because we’re here because we’re here because we’re here. I give auld lang syne five stars.
John Green (The Anthropocene Reviewed: Essays on a Human-Centered Planet)
It’s a song soldiers in England used to sing to the tune of the New Year’s song, “Auld Lang Syne.” It goes, “We’re here because we’re here because we’re here because we’re here.
John Green (Turtles All the Way Down)
auld lang syne.
Stephen King (The Shining (The Shining, #1))
Pa’s strong, sweet voice was softly singing: “Shall auld acquaintance be forgot, And never brought to mind? Shall auld acquaintance be forgot, And the days of auld lang syne? And the days of auld lang syne, my friend, And the days of auld lang syne, Shall auld acquaintance be forgot, And the days of auld lang syne?” When the fiddle had stopped singing Laura called out softly, “What are days of auld lang syne, Pa?” “They are the days of a long time ago, Laura,” Pa said. “Go to sleep, now.” But Laura lay awake a little while, listening to Pa’s fiddle softly playing and to the lonely sound of the wind in the Big Woods. She looked at Pa siting on the bench by the hearth, and the fire-light gleaming on his brown hair and beard and glistening on the honey-brown fiddle. She looked at Ma, gently rocking and knitting. She thought to herself, “This is now.” She was glad that the cosy house, and Pa and Ma and the fire-light and the music, were now. They could not be forgotten, she thought, because now is now. It can never be a long time ago.
Laura Ingalls Wilder (Little House in the Big Woods (Little House, #1))
The ceilings had set off a ghostly echo, giving all the desperate hilarity the quality of a memory even as I sat listening to it, memories of things I'd never known. Charlestons on the wings of airborne biplanes. Parties on sinking ships, the icy water bubbling around the waists of the orchestra as they sawed out a last brave chorus of "Auld Lang Syne." Actually, it wasn't "Auld Lang Syne" they'd sung, the night the Titanic went down but hymns, lots of hymns, and the Catholic priest saying Hail Marys, and the first-class salon which had really looked a lot like this: dark wood, potted palms, rose silk lampshades with their swaying fringe. I really had had too much to drink. I was sitting sideways in my chair, holding tight to the arms (Holy Mary, Mother of God), and even the floors were listing, like the decks of a foundering ship; like we might all slide to the other end with a hysterical wheeee! piano and all.
Donna Tartt (The Secret History)
Hey, you’re the one who came here talking about ‘I’m sorry’ and ‘let’s be friends.’ You don’t get to force me into accepting your half-assed apology.” “Well, I wish you a happy new year anyway.” Now I’m the one being sarcastic, and it sure is satisfying. “Have a nice life. Auld lang syne and all that.” “Fine. Bye.” I turn to go. I was so hopeful this morning. I had such stars in my eyes imagining how this was all going to go. God, what a jerk Peter is. Good riddance to him! “Wait a minute.” Hope leaps into my heart like Jamie Fox-Pickle leaps into my bed--swift and unbidden. But I turn back around, like Ugh, what do you want now, so he doesn’t see it. “What’s that you’ve got crumpled up in your pocket?” My hand flies down to my pocket. “That? Oh, it’s nothing. It’s junk mail. It was on the ground by your mailbox. No worries, I’ll recycle it for you.” “Give it to me and I’ll recycle it right now,” he says, holding out his hand. “No, I said I’ll do it.” I reach down to stuff the letter deeper into my coat pocket, and Peter tries to snatch it out of my hand. I twist away from him wildly and hold on tight. He shrugs, and I relax and let out a small sigh of relief, and then he lunges forward and plucks it away from me. I pant, “Give it back, Peter!” Blithely he says, “Tampering with US mail is a federal offense.” Then he looks down at the envelope. “This is to me. From you.” I make a desperate grab for the envelope, and it takes him by surprise. We wrestle for it; I’ve got the corner of it in my grip, but he’s not letting go. “Stop, you’re going to rip it!” he yells, prying it out of my grasp. I try to grab harder, but it’s too late. He has it.
Jenny Han (P.S. I Still Love You (To All the Boys I've Loved Before, #2))
As a kid, I thought the song Auld Lang Syne was called Old Man's Eye. I like my version better.
Stewart Stafford
The royal couple stood on the rear platform of the train as it pulled out and the people who were gathered on the banks of the Hudson suddenly began to sing, "Auld Lang Syne." There was something incredibly moving about the scene—the river in the evenign light, the voices of many people singing this old song, and the train slowly pulling out with the young couple waving good-by. One thought of the clouds that hung over them and the worries they were going to face, and turned away and left the scene with a heavy heart.
Eleanor Roosevelt (The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt)
There's only one thing left to do. St. Paul's on Old Year's Night. For Auld Lang Syne, my dears. For old time's sake.
Jacqueline Winspear (Among the Mad (Maisie Dobbs, #6))
The band is playing Auld Lang Syne But the heart will not retreat There's no forsaking what you love No existential leap As witnessed here in time and blood A thousand kisses deep
Leonard Cohen
Auld Lang Syne” isn’t traditionally a New Year’s song, like we’ve grown to think of it. An old Scotsman gave it to Robert Burns in 1788 to write down and make sure it got passed on. As I look around our Thanksgiving table, there’s a lot of “old time sake” to be had, so the song seems more appropriate this year than most, even if it does dredge up a lot of the past that I wish had remained there. When it’s over, and we’ve unchained ourselves from one another, I serve the pudding and pass the dishes around the table. I take a double helping, because I only get it once a year and I made it so, why the heck shouldn’t I?
Whitney Dineen (Relatively Normal (Relativity, #1))
Quella era una fine d’anno speciale, dopotutto, e le speranze e i timori per il futuro di ognuno sembravano affiorare in quei pochi minuti che precedevano l’arrivo del nuovo secolo. Tenendosi per mano, gli ospiti si disposero a cerchio, pronti a intonare le dolci note di Auld Lang Syne, I bei tempi andati, come voleva un’antica tradizione britannica diffusasi anche nel Nuovo Mondo. Le spalle all’ingresso del salone, come gli altri emozionata e incerta per il domani, Camille prese posto tra i Campbell. «Sarà un fantastico secolo il 1900, Camille, e tu lo percorrerai a testa alta, mia cara» le disse Agnes sorridendole. «Due minuti, signori, due minuti!» urlò il giudice Harris. Le voci si alzarono festose, per poi morire di nuovo. Il grande cerchio era ora immobile, in silenziosa attesa. Anche i camerieri avevano interrotto il loro lavoro e l’orchestra taceva. «Trenta secondi al nuovo secolo!» «Venti secondi!» Camille all’improvviso sentì la testa girarle e il cuore battere impetuoso contro il petto: Mr Campbell, alla sua destra, aveva lasciato che un’altra mano, più forte e più grande, stringesse la sua. Non capiva di chi fosse quella mano, perché Agnes sorridesse, perché tutti, in quel cerchio festoso, la guardassero. O meglio, lo capiva perfettamente ma temeva che se si fosse girata, se avesse guardato l’uomo che aveva preso il posto di Mr Campbell nel cerchio, quel sogno si sarebbe interrotto. «Cinque secondi al nuovo secolo!» sentenziò il giudice Harris. «Quattro, tre, due, uno! Buon anno!» esclamarono tutti, all’unisono. L’orchestra intonò le prime battute di Auld Lang Syne e gli ospiti incominciarono a cantare. Camille si girò con lentezza infinita verso l’uomo che stringeva con forza e dolcezza e speranza la sua mano. L’uomo che la stava guardando sorridente, felice come un ragazzino. Era fradicio e aveva gli occhi lucidi. E cantava. Camille non disse nulla e si unì al coro, mentre lacrime di gioia le scivolavano sul viso. *** Quando la musica terminò il cerchio non si ruppe subito. Tutti rimasero immobili a osservare la scena che si svolgeva davanti a loro. Frank Raleigh, il solito anticonformista, gocciolante e vestito come un mandriano, se ne stava in ginocchio davanti a Miss Brontee con in mano un solitario dalle notevoli dimensioni. Nessuno ebbe dubbi su cosa le stesse chiedendo. Miss Brontee lo fissava a bocca aperta, gli occhi tondi di sorpresa, il petto che si alzava e si abbassava troppo in fretta, il volto pallido. «Allora, Miss Brontee, dite di sì a quel poveretto prima che si prenda una polmonite!» esclamò burbera un’anziana signora, rompendo la tensione di quel momento. Tutti scoppiarono a ridere. «Sì, Miss Brontee, ditegli di sì. Almeno metterà la testa a posto!» «Ti prego, Camille, dimmi di sì» implorò Frank in un sussurro. Camille deglutì, si guardò intorno come per chiedere consiglio ai presenti, incontrò lo sguardo di Agnes e di Mr Campbell, che insieme assentirono. Poi guardò Raleigh e semplicemente rispose: «Sì!» La sala esplose in una girandola di congratulazioni, poi altro champagne fu stappato e i brindisi al nuovo secolo e ai promessi sposi si rincorsero. Mr Raleigh, indifferente al centinaio di persone che li stava fissando, si era intanto rialzato e tenendo Miss Brontee stretta tra le braccia le mormorava parole che tutti i presenti avrebbero voluto udire ma che giunsero solo al cuore di Camille.
Viviana Giorgi (Un amore di fine secolo)
If you thought “Rabbie Burns” wrote “Auld Lang Syne,” you’d be doubly wrong. Burns never signed his name “Rabbie” or “Robbie” (or, indeed, “Bobbie” Burns, as some North Americans insist on calling him). His signatures included “Robert,” “Robin,” “Rab”—and, on at least one occasion, “Spunkie.
John Lloyd (QI: The Second Book of General Ignorance)
When the fiddle had stopped singing Laura called out softly, “What are days of auld lang syne, Pa?” “They are the days of a long time ago, Laura,” Pa said. “Go to sleep, now.” But Laura lay awake a little while, listening to Pa’s fiddle softly playing and to the lovely sound of the wind in the Big Woods. She looked at Pa sitting on the bench by the hearth, the firelight gleaming on his brown hair and beard and glistening on the honey-brown fiddle. She looked at Ma, gently rocking and knitting. She thought to herself, “This is now.” She was glad that the cozy house, and Pa and Ma and the firelight and the music, were now. They could not be forgotten, she thought, because now is now. It can never be a long time ago. -Little House in the Big Woods, Laura Ingalls Wilder But now is now and now is already a long time ago. How breathtaking, how fleeting, how precious is my ordinary day. Now is now. Here is my treasure.
Gretchen Rubin (Happier at Home: Kiss More, Jump More, Abandon a Project, Read Samuel Johnson, and My Other Experiments in the Practice of Everyday Life)
His first New Year’s broadcast aired on WBBM, Chicago, in 1927. His theme song, Auld Lang Syne, was already a traditional year-ender, and soon Lombardo became known as “the man who invented New Year’s Eve.
John Dunning (On the Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio)