Ar Rahman Music Quotes

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Now AR Rahman app for music lovers
Anonymous
Kadri was one of the first to introduce the Western saxophone to Carnatic music. It took him nearly twenty years to really master that very complex instrument and finally do so. The man claims that when he met AR, he played him some thirty different Carnatic melodies on his saxophone.1 But AR wasn’t satisfied with any of them. Finally, Kadri played a melody known as Kalyanavasantham, a derived scale which did not possess all seven notes in the ascending scale, and AR exclaimed, ‘That’s it!
Krishna Trilok (Notes of a Dream: The Authorized Biography of A.R. Rahman)
On the day Roja released, Rahman’s younger sister Fathima was sitting in a theatre in Chennai with her friends, all set to watch the movie. The opening credits rolled, the film began and the first song—‘Chinna Chinna Aasai’ as you might guess—played with the movie’s heroine singing the song, scaling Chalakudy’s waterfall and playing in the verdant fields of the South Indian countryside. The song was already a hit and by the intermission, Fathima heard a very drunk man sitting in a seat behind her say, ‘Evano semayaa paattu pottu vachchurukaan da.’ (Whoever did the music for this has done a great job.) ‘That’s when I knew,’ she says with a laugh. ‘That’s when I knew my brother had got it right. I was so proud.
Krishna Trilok (Notes of a Dream: The Authorized Biography of A.R. Rahman)
Mani Ratnam is by no stretch of the imagination an expressive person. He does not show much emotion, except in his stories. But that does not mean he doesn’t feel it in real life. ‘I was stunned that day,’ he says, some twenty-five years later. ‘I could not believe what I was hearing. The music he played for me that day, it was fabulous.’ AR thought, at the time, that Mani Ratnam hated his music. ‘I didn’t think he would ever come back,’ he says.2 But a few days later, the director got in touch with AR and told him that he’d like to sign him on for his next film—as music director. ‘I love a lot of stuff,’ he said. ‘Let’s meet and I’ll tell you what will work for me.’3 It was a decision that would end up altering the course of AR’s life, as well as Tamil, Indian and world music and cinema.
Krishna Trilok (Notes of a Dream: The Authorized Biography of A.R. Rahman)
AR confesses that 1989 was a turning point in his life. ‘I had my studio at last,’ he says. ‘The only problem was that the room was an empty shell. I would sit in it and look around at the empty space and wonder if I could ever afford to buy any equipment to fill it.’1 Kareema Begum took yet another bold decision at that point. She sold all the gold jewellery she had saved for the marriage of her two younger daughters, Fathima and Ishrath. ‘We had to take loans too,’ recalls Fathima. ‘But Amma was very firm about it. I used to go with her to get a loan for the generator and so on.’ With all this money his mother managed to raise, AR got his first Fostex 16-track mixer-recorder. ‘Sitting in the music studio that night and staring at my new recorder, I felt like a king,’ says AR. ‘The new me was born . . .’2
Krishna Trilok (Notes of a Dream: The Authorized Biography of A.R. Rahman)
What is funny though is how, with time, people seem to have forgotten that it was this period that really made Rahman what he is. The man is Tamil and Tamil music was how he started out, and some of his best songs are in Tamil. On 8 July 2017, AR performed at Wembley Stadium in London, a concert titled Netru, Indru, Naalai (Tamil for ‘yesterday, today, tomorrow’). Soon after the concert, Twitter went berserk with a number of fans who’d attended the concert taking to social media to attack the composer, accusing him of playing ‘too many Tamil songs’. Some claimed that they’d walked out of the show in protest. AR addressed the issue politely and diplomatically. He reasoned that he had ‘tried his best’, was grateful to his fans and loved them for all they’d given him. As for the walking out bit, he said that some people always tend to leave the venue before he finishes a concert. He said there would always be pockets in the seats, here and there, by the time he got to the end of a show. His actual response though was quite brilliant. For his next set of concerts in Canada, AR cleverly released two posters for two different shows—one of which would be Tamil songs only and the other Hindi songs only. That one move said more than all his statements to the media.
Krishna Trilok (Notes of a Dream: The Authorized Biography of A.R. Rahman)
He took the trophy and the mic and said, ‘Uhm,’ and then laughed, almost as if he were at a loss for words. When the presenters insisted though, he looked to the audience and thanked his crew again, Danny Boyle especially, the people of Mumbai and the optimism that he believed was the essence of the film. ‘All my life,’ he said, finally looking like he was starting to choke up, ‘I had a choice of hate and love. I chose love. And I’m here. God bless.’ Truer words he could not have spoken. At every point in his life he had faced this crucial choice. When his father died. When he had to start working before he was even a teenager. When he had to drop out of school. When he had to grow up faster than any child could have reasonably been expected to; when he had to become the man of the house at eleven, had to take care of his family. When he felt creatively stifled during his days as a sessions player and wondered if this was all his life was going to be about. When he felt his music wasn’t being appreciated widely or truly enough before Roja. When it seemed he was all alone, with no one to turn to. When he became famous. He could have chosen to be bitter, prideful or sad at every stage. But he didn’t. If not for his music, then simply for his capacity to choose light over dark, A.R. Rahman deserves every bit of adulation he got that day and ever since. His speech done, AR lowered his mic, as if not trusting himself to keep his composure for much longer, and walked off the stage.
Krishna Trilok (Notes of a Dream: The Authorized Biography of A.R. Rahman)
There’s one thing you have to remember about Rahman—he’s a doer,’ says Mani Ratnam, the director of Roja, the first feature film AR ever composed for, and whose every film AR has made music for since. ‘A lot of us talk about our plans, but he actually acts. He’ll tell you he wants to do something and, a few months later, he’s actually done it. That’s an incredible thing about him. He doesn’t just talk.
Krishna Trilok (Notes of a Dream: The Authorized Biography of A.R. Rahman)
To this day, Raja makes music, good music, and is still a respected artist. A lot of people still prefer Raja’s songs when sitting at home with a cup of coffee on a rainy day even now. And ‘Rahman sir or Raja sir?’ is still a divisive—if not polarizing—question.
Krishna Trilok (Notes of a Dream: The Authorized Biography of A.R. Rahman)