Aquinas Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Aquinas. Here they are! All 100 of them:

β€œ
To one who has faith, no explanation is necessary. To one without faith, no explanation is possible.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Beware the man of a single book.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
We must love them both, those whose opinions we share and those whose opinions we reject, for both have labored in the search for truth, and both have helped us in finding it.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
The things that we love tell us what we are.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
There is nothing on this earth more to be prized than true friendship.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Fear is such a powerful emotion for humans that when we allow it to take us over, it drives compassion right out of our hearts.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Grant me, O Lord my God, a mind to know you, a heart to seek you, wisdom to find you, conduct pleasing to you, faithful perseverance in waiting for you, and a hope of finally embracing you. Amen.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
The Study of philosophy is not that we may know what men have thought, but what the truth of things is.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Sorrow can be alleviated by good sleep, a bath and a glass of wine
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
The soul is like an uninhabited world that comes to life only when God lays His head against us.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Because philosophy arises from awe, a philosopher is bound in his way to be a lover of myths and poetic fables. Poets and philosophers are alike in being big with wonder.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Better to illuminate than merely to shine to deliver to others contemplated truths than merely to contemplate.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Wonder is the desire of knowledge.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
How is it they live in such harmony, the billions of stars, when most men can barely go a minute without declaring war in their minds?
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Most men seem to live according to sense rather than reason.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
We don’t lock up books in this house,” Philippe said, β€œonly food, ale, and wine. Reading Herodotus or Aquinas seldom leads to bad behavior.
”
”
Deborah Harkness (Shadow of Night (All Souls Trilogy, #2))
β€œ
I would rather feel compassion than know the meaning of it. I would hope to act with compassion without thinking of personal gain.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Rarely affirm, seldom deny, always distinguish.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Friendship is the source of the greatest pleasures, and without friends even the most agreeable pursuits become tedious.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Three things are necessary for the salvation of man: to know what he ought to believe; to know what he ought to desire; and to know what he ought to do.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
For those with faith, no evidence is necessary; for those without it, no evidence will suffice.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Love follows knowledge.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
It was the outstanding fact about St. Thomas [Aquinas] that he loved books and lived on books ... When asked for what he thanked God most, he answered simply, β€˜I have understood every page I ever read’.
”
”
G.K. Chesterton (Saint Thomas Aquinas)
β€œ
There must be must be a first mover existing above all – and this we call God.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
If the highest aim of a captain were to preserve his ship, he would keep it in port forever.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Reading list (1972 edition)[edit] 1. Homer – Iliad, Odyssey 2. The Old Testament 3. Aeschylus – Tragedies 4. Sophocles – Tragedies 5. Herodotus – Histories 6. Euripides – Tragedies 7. Thucydides – History of the Peloponnesian War 8. Hippocrates – Medical Writings 9. Aristophanes – Comedies 10. Plato – Dialogues 11. Aristotle – Works 12. Epicurus – Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus 13. Euclid – Elements 14. Archimedes – Works 15. Apollonius of Perga – Conic Sections 16. Cicero – Works 17. Lucretius – On the Nature of Things 18. Virgil – Works 19. Horace – Works 20. Livy – History of Rome 21. Ovid – Works 22. Plutarch – Parallel Lives; Moralia 23. Tacitus – Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania 24. Nicomachus of Gerasa – Introduction to Arithmetic 25. Epictetus – Discourses; Encheiridion 26. Ptolemy – Almagest 27. Lucian – Works 28. Marcus Aurelius – Meditations 29. Galen – On the Natural Faculties 30. The New Testament 31. Plotinus – The Enneads 32. St. Augustine – On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine 33. The Song of Roland 34. The Nibelungenlied 35. The Saga of Burnt NjΓ‘l 36. St. Thomas Aquinas – Summa Theologica 37. Dante Alighieri – The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy 38. Geoffrey Chaucer – Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales 39. Leonardo da Vinci – Notebooks 40. NiccolΓ² Machiavelli – The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy 41. Desiderius Erasmus – The Praise of Folly 42. Nicolaus Copernicus – On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres 43. Thomas More – Utopia 44. Martin Luther – Table Talk; Three Treatises 45. FranΓ§ois Rabelais – Gargantua and Pantagruel 46. John Calvin – Institutes of the Christian Religion 47. Michel de Montaigne – Essays 48. William Gilbert – On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies 49. Miguel de Cervantes – Don Quixote 50. Edmund Spenser – Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene 51. Francis Bacon – Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis 52. William Shakespeare – Poetry and Plays 53. Galileo Galilei – Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences 54. Johannes Kepler – Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World 55. William Harvey – On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals 56. Thomas Hobbes – Leviathan 57. RenΓ© Descartes – Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy 58. John Milton – Works 59. MoliΓ¨re – Comedies 60. Blaise Pascal – The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises 61. Christiaan Huygens – Treatise on Light 62. Benedict de Spinoza – Ethics 63. John Locke – Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education 64. Jean Baptiste Racine – Tragedies 65. Isaac Newton – Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics 66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz – Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology 67. Daniel Defoe – Robinson Crusoe 68. Jonathan Swift – A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal 69. William Congreve – The Way of the World 70. George Berkeley – Principles of Human Knowledge 71. Alexander Pope – Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man 72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu – Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws 73. Voltaire – Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary 74. Henry Fielding – Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones 75. Samuel Johnson – The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets
”
”
Mortimer J. Adler (How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading)
β€œ
Faith has to do with things that are not seen, and hope with things that are not in hand.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
To love is to will the good of the other.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
The truth of our faith becomes a matter of ridicule among the infidels if any Catholic, not gifted with the necessary scientific learning, presents as dogma what scientific scrutiny shows to be false.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
It is necessary for the perfection of human society that there should be men who devote their lives to contemplation.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Mercy without justice is the mother of dissolution; justice without mercy is cruelty.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
The study of truth requires a considerable effort - which is why few are willing to undertake it out of love of knowledge - despite the fact that God has implanted a natural appetite for such knowledge in the minds of men.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas (Summa Contra Gentiles: Volumes 1-4 in Five Books)
β€œ
Give us, O Lord, a steadfast heart, which no unworthy affection may drag downwards; give us an unconquered heart, which no tribulation can wear out; give us an upright heart, which no unworthy purpose may tempt aside. Bestow upon us also, O Lord our God, understanding to know you, diligence to seek you, wisdom to find you, and a faithfulness that may finally embrace you; through Jesus Christ our Lord.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Obedience unites us so closely to God that it in a way transforms us into Him, so that we have no other will but His. If obedience is lacking, even prayer cannot be pleasing to God.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
God is never angry for His sake, only for ours.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
The happy man in this life needs friends.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
A song is the exultation of the mind dwelling on eternal things, bursting forth in the voice.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
While injustice is the worst of sins, despair is the most dangerous; because when you are in despair you care neither about yourself nor about others.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Man has free choice, or otherwise counsels, exhortations, commands, prohibitions, rewards and punishments would be in vain.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
The human mind may perceive truth only through thinking, as is clear from Augustine.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas (Summa Theologica)
β€œ
Thomas Aquinas said of suffering, as Aristotle had said of shame, that it was a thing not good in itself; but a thing which might have a certain goodness in particular circumstances. That is to say, if evil is present, pain at recognition of the evil, being a kind of knowledge, is relatively good.
”
”
C.S. Lewis (The Problem of Pain)
β€œ
It is not theft, properly speaking, to take secretly and use another's property in a case of extreme need: because that which he takes for the support of his life becomes his own property by reason of that need
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Nothing which implies contradiction falls under the omnipotence of God.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas (Summa Theologica)
β€œ
Beware of the person of one book
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Man should not consider his material possessions as his own, but as common to all, so as to share them without hesitation when others are in need
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Commentators who today talk of 'The Dark Ages' when faith instead of reason was said to ruthlessly rule, have for their animadversions only the excuse of perfect ignorance. Both Aquinas' intellectual gifts and his religious nature were of a kind that is no longer commonly seen in the Western world.
”
”
David Berlinski (The Devil's Delusion: Atheism and Its Scientific Pretensions)
β€œ
If you are looking for the way by which you should go, take Christ, because he himself is the way.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
The existence of a prime mover- nothing can move itself; there must be a first mover. The first mover is called God.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Grant, O Lord my God, that I may never fall away in success or in failure; that I may not be prideful in prosperity nor dejected in adversity. Let me rejoice only in what unites us and sorrow only in what separates us. May I strive to please no one or fear to displease anyone except Yourself. May I see always the things that are eternal and never those that are only temporal. May I shun any joy that is without You and never seek any that is beside You. O Lord, may I delight in any work I do for You and tire of any rest that is apart from You. My God, let me direct my heart towards You, and in my failings, always repent with a purpose of amendment.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
برای Ψ’Ω†β€ŒΪ©Ψ³ Ϊ©Ω‡ Ψ§ΫŒΩ…Ψ§Ω† دارد، Ω‡ΫŒΪ† Ψͺوآیحی Ω„Ψ§Ψ²Ω… Ω†ΫŒΨ³Ψͺ. برای Ψ’Ω†β€ŒΪ©Ψ³ Ϊ©Ω‡ Ψ§ΫŒΩ…Ψ§Ω† Ω†Ψ―Ψ§Ψ±Ψ―ΨŒ Ω‡ΫŒΪ† Ψͺوآیحی کافی Ω†ΫŒΨ³Ψͺ
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
The blessed in the kingdom of heaven will see the punishments of the damned, in order that their bliss be more delightful for them.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
It must be said that charity can, in no way, exist along with mortal sin.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas (Disputed Questions Virtues)
β€œ
As St. Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274) taught, whatever we say about God is more unlike God than saying nothing. If we do say something, it can only be a pointer toward the Mystery that can never be articulated in words. All that words can do is point in the direction of the Mystery.
”
”
Thomas Keating (On Prayer)
β€œ
The happy life does not mean loving what we possess, but possessing what we love." Possession of the beloved, St. Thomas holds, takes place in an act of cognition, in seeing, in intuition, in contemplation.
”
”
Josef Pieper (Happiness and Contemplation)
β€œ
Thus the sun which possesses light perfectly, can shine by itself; whereas the moon which has the nature of light imperfectly, sheds only a borrowed light.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas (Summa Theologica (Complete & Unabridged))
β€œ
That the saints may enjoy their beatitude and the grace of God more abundantly they are permitted to see the punishment of the damned in hell.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Since faith rests upon infallible truth, and since the contrary of a truth can never be demonstrated, it is clear that the arguments brought against faith cannot be demonstrations, but are difficulties that can be answered.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
One of the most fundamental problems in the spiritual order is that we sense within ourselves the hunger for God, but we attempt to satisfy it with some created good that is less than God. Thomas Aquinas said that the four typical substitutes for God are wealth, pleasure, power, and honor. Sensing the void within, we attempt to fill it up with some combination of these four things, but only by emptying out the self in love can we make the space for God to fill us. The classical tradition referred to this errant desire as "concupiscence," but I believe that we could neatly express the same idea with the more contemporary term "addiction." When we try to satisfy the hunger for God with something less than God, we will naturally be frustrated, and then in our frustration, we will convince ourselves that we need more of that finite good, so we will struggle to achieve it, only to find ourselves again, necessarily, dissatisfied. At this point, a sort of spiritual panic sets in, and we can find ourselves turning obsessively around this creaturely good that can never in principle make us happy.
”
”
Robert Barron
β€œ
If grass grows and withers, it can only mean that it is part of a greater thing, which is even more real; not that the grass is less real than it looks. St. Thomas (Aquinas) has a really logical right to say, in the words of the modern mystic, A. E.: "I begin by the grass to be bound again to the Lord.
”
”
G.K. Chesterton (Saint Thomas Aquinas)
β€œ
I receive Thee ransom of my soul. For love of Thee have I studied and kept vigil toiled preached and taught…
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
He who is not angry when there is just cause for anger is immoral. Why? Because anger looks to the good of justice. And if you can live amid injustice without anger, you are immoral as well as unjust.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
The slenderest knowledge that may be obtained of the highest things is more desirable than the most certain knowledge obtained of lesser things.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
By nature all men are equal in liberty, but not in other endowments.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
to make peace either in oneself or among others, shows a man to be a follower of God,
”
”
Thomas Aquinas (Summa Theologica (Complete & Unabridged))
β€œ
The times are never so bad that a good man cannot live in them
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
But no moral philosopher, from Aristotle to Aquinas, to John Locke and Adam Smith, divorced economics from a set of moral ends or held the production of wealth to be an end in itself; rather it was seen as a means to the realization of virtue, a means of leading a civilized life.
”
”
Daniel Bell (The Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism)
β€œ
Saint Thomas Aquinas says, wisely, that the only way to drive out a bad passion is by a stronger good passion. The same is true of thoughts as of passions. When your mind wanders, like a child, your will must bring it back, like a mother. [. . .] The will-parent must discipline the mind-child, avoiding both the opposite extremes commonly made in disciplining either children or thoughts: tyranny or permissiveness.
”
”
Peter Kreeft (Prayer for Beginners)
β€œ
It has become the fashion to talk about Mysticism, even to pose as Mystics, andβ€”need it be said?β€”those who talk the most on such subjects are those who know the least.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas (On Prayer and The Contemplative Life)
β€œ
There would not be a perfect likeness of God in the universe if all things were of one grade of being.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
It is better to illuminate than merely to shine. Maius est illuminare quam lucere solum.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
I answer that, As Augustine says (De Moribus Eccl. vi), "the soul needs to follow something in order to give birth to virtue: this something is God: if we follow Him we shall live aright.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas (The Summa Theologica: Complete Edition)
β€œ
knowledge depends on the mode of the knower; for what is known is in the knower according to the measure of his mode
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
The truth can be perceived only through thinking, as is proven by Augustine.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas (Summa Theologica)
β€œ
Man cannot live without joy. That is why one deprived of spiritual joys goes over to carnal pleasures.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
The splendor of a soul in grace is so seductive that it surpasses the beauty of all created things.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Temperance is simply a disposition of the mind which set bounds to the passions
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
The Saint is a medicine because he is an antidote. Indeed that is why the saint is often a martyr; he is mistaken for a poison because he is an antidote.
”
”
G.K. Chesterton (Saint Thomas Aquinas)
β€œ
our manner of knowing is so weak that no philosopher could perfectly investigate the nature of even one little fly.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas (The Catechetical Instructions)
β€œ
It is absurd and a detestable shame, that we should suffer those traditions to be changed which we have received from the fathers of old.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
To him, even the momentary was momentous.
”
”
G.K. Chesterton (Saint Thomas Aquinas)
β€œ
Many cry to the Lord that they may win riches, that they may avoid losses; they cry that their family may be established, they ask for temporal happiness, for worldly dignities; and, lastly, they cry for bodily health, which is the patrimony of the poor. For these and suchlike things many cry to the Lord; hardly one cries for the Lord Himself! How easy it is for a man to desire all manner of things from the Lord and yet not desire the Lord Himself! As though the gift could be sweeter than the Giver!
”
”
Thomas Aquinas (On Prayer and The Contemplative Life)
β€œ
Not everything that is more difficult is more meritorious
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Love takes up where knowledge leaves off.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
In deliberation we may hesitate; but a deliberated act must be performed swiftly.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
justice without mercy is cruelty; mercy without justice is dissolution.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas (Commentary on the Gospel of St. Matthew)
β€œ
I couldn't make any judgment on the Summa, except to say this: I read it for about twenty minutes every night before I go to bed. If my mother were to come in during this process and say, 'Turn off that light. It's late,' I with a lifted finger and broad bland beatific expression, would reply, 'On the contrary, I answer that the light, being eternal and limitless, cannot be turned off. Shut your eyes,' or some such thing.
”
”
Flannery O'Connor (The Habit of Being: Letters of Flannery O'Connor)
β€œ
Creator of all things, true source of light and wisdom, origin of all being, graciously let a ray of your light penetrate the darkness of my understanding. Take from me the double darkness in which I have been born, an obscurity of sin and ignorance. Give me a keen understanding, a retentive memory, and the ability to grasp things correctly and fundamentally. Grant me the talent of being exact in my explanations and the ability to express myself with thoroughness and charm. Point out the beginning, direct the progress, and help in the completion.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
But a dauntless faith believes
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
Buddhism and Christianity are in one sense parallel and equal; as a mound and a hollow, as a valley and a hill. There is a sense in which that sublime despair is the only alternative to that divine audacity. It is even true that the truly spiritual and intellectual man sees it as sort of dilemma; a very hard and terrible choice. There is little else on earth that can compare with these for completeness. And he who does not climb the mountain of Christ does indeed fall into the abyss of Buddha.
”
”
G.K. Chesterton (Saint Thomas Aquinas)
β€œ
God Himself is the rule and mode of virtue. Our faith is measured by divine truth, our hope by the greatness of His power and faithful affection, our charity by His goodness. His truth, power and goodness outreach any measure of reason. We can certainly never believe, trust or love God more than, or even as much as, we should. Extravagance is impossible. Here is no virtuous moderation, no measurable mean; the more extreme our activity, the better we are.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas (Summa Theologica)
β€œ
I can hardly conceive of any educated man believing in God at all without believing that God contains in Himself every perfection including eternal joy; and does not require the solar system to entertain Him like a circus.
”
”
G.K. Chesterton (Saint Thomas Aquinas)
β€œ
In a lovely book called On Hope, Josef Pieper explores Thomas Aquinas' theology of hope along these lines: the hopeful person is by definition a wayfarer (viator), because the virtue of hope lies midway between the two vices of despair (desperatio) and presumption (praesumptio). What despairing persons and presumptuous persons have in common is that they aren't going anywhere, they are fixed in place: the despairing because they don't think there's anywhere to go, the presumptuous because they think they have reached the pinnacle of achievement.
”
”
Alan Jacobs (The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction)
β€œ
Yet through virtuous living man is further ordained to a higher end, which consists in the enjoyment of God, as we have said above. Consequently, since society must have the same end as the individual man, it is not the ultimate end of an assembled multitude to live virtuously, but through virtuous living to attain to the possession of God.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas (On Kingship to the King of Cyprus)
β€œ
Even though the natural light of the human mind is inadequate to make known what is revealed by faith, nevertheless what is divinely taught to us by faith cannot be contrary to what we are endowed with by nature. One or the other would have to be false, and since we have both of them from God, he would be the cause of our error, which is impossible.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas (Faith, Reason and Theology (Mediaeval Sources in Translation))
β€œ
Nobody can understand the greatness of the thirteenth century, who does not realize that it was a great growth of new things produced by a living thing. In that sense it was really bolder and freer than what we call the renaissance, which was a resurrection of old things discovered in a dead thing... and the Gospel according to St. Thomas... was a new thrust like the titanic thrust of Gothic engineering; and its strength was in a God that makes all things new.
”
”
G.K. Chesterton (Saint Thomas Aquinas)
β€œ
That feeling stayed with me for months. In fact, I had grown so accustomed to that floating feeling that I started to panic at the prospect of losing it. So I began to ask friends, theologians, historians, pastors I knew, nuns I liked, *What am I going to do when it's gone?* And they knew exactly what I meant because they had either felt it themselves or read about it in great works of Christian theology. St. Augustine called it "the sweetness." Thomas Aquinas called it something mystical like "the prophetic light." But all said yes, it will go. The feelings will go. The sense of God's presence will go. There will be no lasting proof that God exists. There will be no formula for how to get it back. But they offered me this small bit of certainty, and I clung to it. When the feelings recede like the tides, they said, they will leave an imprint. I would somehow be marked by the presence of an unbidden God.
”
”
Kate Bowler (Everything Happens for a Reason: And Other Lies I've Loved)
β€œ
In belief in what? In love with what? In hope for what?β€”There’s no doubt that these weak peopleβ€”at some time or another they also want to be the strong people, some day their "kingdom" is to arriveβ€”they call it simply "the kingdom of God" as I mentioned. People are indeed so humble about everything! Only to experience that, one has to live a long time, beyond deathβ€”in fact, people must have an eternal life, so they can also win eternal recompense in the "kingdom of God" for that earthly life "in faith, in love, in hope." Recompense for what? Recompense through what? In my view, Dante was grossly in error when, with an ingenuity inspiring terror, he set that inscription over the gateway into his hell:"Eternal love also created me." Over the gateway into the Christian paradise and its "eternal blessedness" it would, in any event, be more fitting to let the inscription stand "Eternal hate also created me"β€”provided it’s all right to set a truth over the gateway to a lie! For what is the bliss of that paradise? Perhaps we might have guessed that already, but it is better for it to be expressly described for us by an authority we cannot underestimate in such matters, Thomas Aquinas, the great teacher and saint: "In the kingdom of heaven" he says as gently as a lamb, "the blessed will see the punishment of the damned, so that they will derive all the more pleasure from their heavenly bliss.
”
”
Friedrich Nietzsche
β€œ
It's worth remembering that [having a baby] is not of vital use to you as a woman. Yes, you could learn thousands of interesting things about love, strength, faith, fear, human relationships, genetic loyalty, and the effect of apricots on an immune digestive system. But I don't think there's a single lesson that motherhood has to offer that couldn't be learned elsewhere. If you want to know what's in motherhood for you, as a woman, then-in truth-it's nothing you couldn't get from, say, reading the 100 greatest books in human history; learning a foreign language well enough to argue in it; climbing hills; loving recklessly; sitting quietly, alone, in the dawn; drinking whiskey with revolutionaries; learning to do close-hand magic; swimming in a river in the winter; growing foxgloves, peas, and roses; calling your mum; singing while you walk; being polite; and always, always helping strangers. No one has ever claimed for a minute that childless men have missed out on a vital aspect of their existence, and were the poorer and crippled by it. Da Vinci, Van Gogh, Newton, Faraday, Plato, Aquinas, Beethoven, Handel, Kant, Hume, Jesus. They all seem to have managed quite well.
”
”
Caitlin Moran (How to Be a Woman)
β€œ
God loves his creatures, and he loves each one the more, the more it shares his own goodness, which is the first and primary object of his love. Therefore he wants the desires of his rational creatures to be fulfilled because they share most perfectly of all creatures the goodness of god. And his will is an accomplisher of things because he is the cause of things by his will. So it belongs to the divine goodness to fulfill the desires of rational creatures which are put to him in prayer.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas
β€œ
[I]t is to be borne in mind, in regard to the philosophical sciences, that the inferior sciences neither prove their principles nor dispute with those who deny them, but leave this to a higher science; whereas the highest of them, viz. metaphysics, can dispute with one who denies its principles, if only the opponent will make some concession; but if he concede nothing, it can have no dispute with him, though it can answer his objections. Hence Sacred Scripture, since it has no science above itself, can dispute with one who denies its principles only if the opponent admits some at least of the truths obtained through divine revelation; thus we can argue with heretics from texts in Holy Writ, and against those who deny one article of faith, we can argue from another. If our opponent believes nothing of divine revelation, there is no longer any means of proving the articles of faith by reasoning, but only of answering his objections β€” if he has any β€” against faith. Since faith rests upon infallible truth, and since the contrary of a truth can never be demonstrated, it is clear that the arguments brought against faith cannot be demonstrations, but are difficulties that can be answered.
”
”
Thomas Aquinas