Amor Fati Quotes

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Amor Fati – “Love Your Fate”, which is in fact your life.
Friedrich Nietzsche
I want to learn more and more to see as beautiful what is necessary in things; then I shall be one of those who make things beautiful. Amor fati: let that be my love henceforth! I do not want to wage war against what is ugly. I do not want to accuse; I do not even want to accuse those who accuse. Looking away shall be my only negation. And all in all and on the whole: some day I wish to be only a Yes-sayer.
Friedrich Nietzsche (The Gay Science: With a Prelude in Rhymes and an Appendix of Songs)
My formula for greatness in a human being is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity. Not merely bear what is necessary, still less conceal it—all idealism is mendaciousness in the face of what is necessary—but love it
Friedrich Nietzsche (On the Genealogy of Morals / Ecce Homo)
I want to learn more and more to see as beautiful what is necessary in things:—then I shall be one of those who make things beautiful. Amor fati: let that be my love from henceforth!
Friedrich Nietzsche
My formula for human greatness is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be different, not in the future, not in the past, not for all eternity. Not only to endure what is necessary, still less to conceal it — all idealism is falseness in the face of necessity — , but to love it...
Friedrich Nietzsche
Do not seek for things to happen the way you want them to; rather, wish that what happens happen the way it happens: then you will be happy.
Epictetus
My formula is Amor fati: ... not only to bear up under every necessity, but to love it. Semboyanku ialah Amor fati: ... tidak saja tabah menanggung segala keharusan (penderitaan), melainkan juga mencintainya.
Friedrich Nietzsche
Amor fati: this is the very core of my being—And as to my prolonged illness, do I not owe much more to it than I owe to my health? To it I owe a higher kind of health, a sort of health which grows stronger under everything that does not actually kill it!—To it, I owe even my philosophy.… Only great suffering is the ultimate emancipator of spirit, for it teaches one that vast suspiciousness which makes an X out of every U, a genuine and proper X, i.e., the antepenultimate letter. Only great suffering; that great suffering, under which we seem to be over a fire of greenwood, the suffering that takes its time—forces us philosophers to descend into our nethermost depths, and to let go of all trustfulness, all good-nature, all whittling-down, all mildness, all mediocrity,—on which things we had formerly staked our humanity.
Friedrich Nietzsche (Nietzsche contra Wagner)
No, really, Herr Nietzche, I have great admiration for you. Sympathy. You want to make us able to live with the void. Not lie ourselves into good-naturedness, trust, ordinary middling human considerations, but to question as has never been questioned before, relentlessly, with iron determination, into evil, through evil, past evil, accepting no abject comfort. The most absolute, the most piercing questions. Rejecting mankind as it is, that ordinary, practical, thieving, stinking, unilluminated, sodden rabble, not only the laboring rabble, but even worse the "educated" rabble with its books and concerts and lectures, its liberalism and its romantic theatrical "loves" and "passions"--it all deserves to die, it will die. Okay. Still, your extremists must survive. No survival, no Amor Fati. Your immoralists also eat meat. They ride the bus. They are only the most bus-sick travelers. Humankind lives mainly upon perverted ideas. Perverted, your ideas are no better than those the Christianity you condemn. Any philosopher who wants to keep his contact with mankind should pervert his own system in advance to see how it will really look a few decades after adoption. I send you greetings from this mere border of grassy temporal light, and wish you happiness, wherever you are. Yours, under the veil of Maya, M.E.H.
Saul Bellow (Herzog)
There is an important idea in Nietzsche, of Amor fati, the "love of your fate," which is in fact your life. As he says, if you say no to a single factor in your life, you have unravelled the whole thing. Furthermore, the more challenging or threatening the situation or context to be assimilated and affirmed, the greater the stature of the person who can achieve it. The demon you can swallow gives you its power, and the greater life's pain, the greater life's reply.
Joseph Campbell (The Power of Myth)
For the new year. -- I still live, I still think: I still have to live, for I still have to think. Sum, ergo cogito: cogito, ergo sum. Today everybody permits himself the expression of his wish and his dearest thought: hence I, too, shall say what it is that I wish from myself today, and what was the first thought to run across my heart this year -- what thought shall be for me the reason, warranty, and sweetness of my life henceforth. I want to learn to see more and more as beautiful what is necessary in things; then I shall be one of those who makes things beautiful. Amor fati: let that be my love henceforth! I do not want to wage war against what is ugly. I do not want to accuse. Looking away shall be my only negation. And all and all and on the whole: someday I wish to be only a Yes-sayer.
Friedrich Nietzsche
Andai akulah lampu itu akan kucahayai seluruh malammu sebab, aku tahu, jika kau dikuasai gelap tak sanggup aku memandangmu dengan lengkap * Petikan dari puisi Amor Fati.
Usman Arrumy
Amor fati, for Nietzsche, meant the unconditional acceptance of all life and experience: the highs and the lows, the meaning and the meaninglessness.
Mark Manson (Everything Is F*cked: A Book About Hope)
Amor Fati which translates from Latin to “love of one’s fate.” I’ll forever love what I'm destined for.
Sean Michael Hayes (Five Weeks in the Amazon)
If the event must occur, Amor fati (a love of fate) is the response.
Ryan Holiday (The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph)
My formula for greatness in a human being is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity. Not merely bear what is necessary, still less conceal it — all idealism is mendaciousness in the face of what is necessary — but love it.
Friedrich Nietzsche
Nietzsche saw that ultimately the problem of nihilism is the problem of what to do with time: Why keep investing in the future when there is no longer any transcendental guarantor, a positive end of time as ultimate reconciliation or redemption, ensuring a pay-off for this investment? Nietzsche's solution — his attempted overcoming of nihilism — consists in affirming the senselessness of becoming as such — all becoming, without reservation or discrimination. The affirmation of eternal recurrence is amor fati: the love of fate. It's an old quandary: either learn to love fate or learn to transform it. To affirm fate is to let time do whatever it will with us, but in such a way that our will might coincide with time's. The principal contention of my book, and the point at which it diverges most fundamentally from Nietzsche, is that nihilism is not the negation of truth, but rather the truth of negation, and the truth of negation is transformative.
Ray Brassier (Nihil Unbound: Enlightenment and Extinction)
Seneca had an extreme trick for practising amor fati. He was asthmatic, and attacks brought him almost to the point of suffocation. He often felt that he was about to die, but he learned to use each attack as a philosophical opportunity. While his throat closed and his lungs strained for breath, he tried to embrace what was happening to him: to say “yes” to it. I will this, he would think; and, if necessary, I will myself to die from it. When the attack receded, he emerged feeling stronger, for he had done battle with fear and defeated it.
Sarah Bakewell (How to Live: Or A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer)
We don’t get to choose what happens to us, but we can always choose how we feel about it. And why on earth would you choose to feel anything but good? We can choose to render a good account of ourselves. If the event must occur, Amor fati (a love of fate) is the response. Don’t waste a second looking back at your expectations. Face forward, and face it with a smug little grin.
Ryan Holiday (The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph)
So many times people get carried away by passion, do things they never thought they'd do, and their whole lives change in an instant. Sometimes people are simply insane - mentally ill - and it isn't their fault.
Koethi Zan (The Never List)
I want to learn more and more to see as beautiful what is necessary in things; then I shall be one of those who make things beautiful. Amor fati: let that be my love henceforth! I do not want to wage war against what is ugly…And all in all and on the whole: some day I wish to be only a Yes-sayer.
Friedrich Nietzsche (The Gay Science: With a Prelude in Rhymes and an Appendix of Songs)
Amor fati, yazgını sev!
Irvin D. Yalom (When Nietzsche Wept)
Amor Fati
Epictetus
Quiero aprender cada vez mejor a ver lo necesario de las cosas como lo bello; así, seré de los que vuelven bellas las cosas. ¡Amor fati: que ese sea en adelante mi amor! No quiero librar guerra a lo feo. No quiero acusar, no quiero ni siquiera acusar a los acusadores. ¡Apartar la mirada, que sea ésta mi única negación! Y, en definitiva, y en grande: ¡quiero ser, un día, uno que sólo dice sí!
Friedrich Nietzsche (The Gay Science: With a Prelude in Rhymes and an Appendix of Songs)
…neurosis is…a defence…or an attempt, somewhat dearly paid for, to escape from the inner voice and hence from the vocation…Behind the neurotic perversion is concealed his vocation, his destiny: the growth of personality, the full realization of the life-will that is born with the individual. It is the man without amor fati [love of fate] who is the neurotic; he, truly, has missed his vocation.
C.G. Jung
My formula for greatness in a human being is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity. Not merely bear what is necessary, still less conceal it . . . but love it. —NIETZSCHE
Ryan Holiday (The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph)
My formula for greatness in a human being is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity. Not merely bear what is necessary, still less conceal it . . . but love it. —NIETZSCHE
Ryan Holiday (The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph)
Saya sudah menunjukkan secara panjang lebar dalam La distinction di mana cinta itu juga bisa dideskripsikan sebagai bentuk dari amor fati, bahwa mencintai sampai titik tertentu selalu berarti mencintai seseorang sebagai cara lain untuk memenuhi takdir sosialnya sendiri.
Pierre Bourdieu (Choses dites (Le sens commun) (French Edition))
We don’t get to choose what happens to us, but we can always choose how we feel about it. And why on earth would you choose to feel anything but good? We can choose to render a good account of ourselves. If the event must occur, Amor fati (a love of fate) is the response.
Ryan Holiday (The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph)
Ikke som en cæsar gjorde, skal du med et sverd bevæbne deg mot verden, men med ordet; Amor Fati - elsk din skjebne. Denne formel skal du fatte som din sterkeste befrier: Du har valgt din sti i krattet. Ikke skjel mot andre stier! Også smerten er din tjener. Lammet, sønderknust, elendig ser du at den gjenforener deg med det som er nødvendig. Også fallet, også sviket hjelper deg som dine venner. Dine nederlag er rike gaver, lagt i dine hender. Engang skal du, tilfredsstillet av å bli din skjebne verdig vite: Dette har jeg villet. Alt som skjer meg skjer rettferdig. Si da, når din levegledes grønne skog er gjennomvandret: Intet vil jeg anderledes. Intet ønsker jeg forandret.
André Bjerke
Everything happen for a reason. Accept it, love it, learn from it, and in the end become great because of it.
Gary Tolan aka King Tolan
This death to the logic of emotional commitments of our chance moment in the world of space and time, this recognition of, the shift of our emphasis to, the universal life that throbs and celebrates its victory in the very kiss of our own annihilation, this amor fati, 'love of fate,' love of the fate that is inevitably death, constitutes the experience of the tragic art...
Joseph Campbell
I owe a lot to my upbringing. I was made for it and made by it. I wouldn’t be who I am today without each one of those experiences. The Stoics have a term for this: amor fati. Love of fate. “Do not seek for things to happen the way you want them to,” the great Stoic philosopher and former slave Epictetus said. “Rather, wish that what happens happen the way it happens. Then you will be happy.
Arnold Schwarzenegger (Be Useful: Seven Tools for Life)
AMOR FATI Inside every world there is another world trying to get out, and there is something in you that would like to discount this world. The stars could rise in darkness over heartbreaking coasts, and you would not know if you were ruining your life or beginning a real one. You could claim professional fondness for the world around you; the pictures would dissolve under the paint coming alive, and you would only feel a phantom skip of the heart, absorbed so in the colors. Your disbelief is a later novel emerging in the long, long shadow of an earlier one— is this the great world, which is whatever is the case? The sustained helplessness you feel in the long emptiness of days is matched by the new suspiciousness and wrath you wake to each morning. Isn’t this a relationship with your death, too, to fall in love with your inscrutable life? Your teeth fill with cavities. There is always unearned happiness for some, and the criminal feeling of solitude. Always, everyone lies about his life.
Sandra Lim (The Wilderness: Poems)
The focus of AMOR FATI offers a much gentler and more passive sentiment. However, AMOR FATI need not deny the notion of trying to overcome and accomplish, of trying to thrash and swim against the current of existence and achieve things within it or control where it takes us. Rather one’s fate includes this. It includes trying to overcome life’s conditions and failing in some ultimate sense. And arguably this idea of AMOR FATI was in its own right an overcoming of Nietzsche’s, as well as potentially for those who adopt it. An overcoming of this ultimate conclusion of self-overcoming the unattainable ideal self and ideal life, AMOR FATI is a sentiment of willingness to accept at last the way things have gone and will go, to live a life that tries in almost every moment to make you hate it and to still stare back at it and say: YES, I LOVE IT!!! What’s scarier than an opponent who smiles while being beaten. And perhaps because of that Nietzsche remains arguably one of the most notable and dynamic philosophers of all time.
Robert Pantano
amor fati, a Latin phrase translated as “love of one’s fate.” It describes an attitude in which one sees everything that happens in life, including pain and loss, as good, or at least necessary. In this mindset, we can accept the events of life, and possibly see them as opportunities. We certainly prefer to avoid suffering, but when it finds us, we accept that it’s our turn and try to push through gracefully. We cannot avoid it, and grumbling about it doesn’t help. How we suffer matters, and there are many options for how to do it.
Nate Dallas (You're Too Good to Feel This Bad: An Orthodox Approach to Living an Unorthodox Life)
…I, too, want to say what I wish from myself today and what thought first crossed my heart this year – what thought shall be the reason, warrant and sweetness of the rest of my life! I want to learn more and more to see what is necessary in things as beautiful – thus I will be one of those who make things beautiful. Amor fati: Let that be my love from now on! I do not want to wage war against ugliness. I do not want to accuse; I do not even want to accuse the accusers. Let looking away be my only negation! And, all in all and on the whole: some day I want only to be a Yes-sayer!
Robert B. Pippin (Introductions to Nietzsche)
For the new year. – I’m still alive; I still think: I must still be alive because I still have to think. Sum, ergo cogito: cogito, ergo sum.1 Today everyone allows himself to express his dearest wish and thoughts: so I, too, want to say what I wish from myself today and what thought first crossed my heart – what thought shall be the reason, warrant, and sweetness of the rest of my life! I want to learn more and more how to see what is necessary in things as what is beautiful in them – thus I will be one of those who make things beautiful. Amor fati:2 let that be my love from now on! I do not want to wage war against ugliness. I do not want to accuse; I do not even want to accuse the accusers. Let looking away be my only negation! And, all in all and on the whole: some day I want only to be a Yes-sayer!
Friedrich Nietzsche (The Gay Science)
The task of a philosopher: we should bring our will into harmony with whatever happens, so that nothing happens against our will, and nothing that we wish for fails to happen.' -Epictetus. A long 'to-do' list seems intimidating and burdensome...but a 'get-to-do' list sounds like a privilege...Today, don't try to impose your will on the world; instead, see yourself as fortunate to receive and respond to the will in the world.
Ryan Holiday (The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living)
For the New Year. I am still living, I am still thinking: I have to go on living because I have to go on thinking. Sum, ergo cogito: cogito, ergo sum. Today everyone is permitted to express his desire and dearest thoughts: so I too would like to say what I have desired of myself today and what thought was the first to cross my heart this year – what thought shall be the basis, guarantee and sweetness of all my future life! I want to learn more and more to see what is necessary in things as the beautiful in them – thus I shall become one of those who make things beautiful. Amor fati: may that be my love from now on! I want to wage no war against the ugly. I do not want to accuse, I do not want even to accuse the accusers. May looking away be my only form of negation! And, all in all: I want to be at all times hereafter only an affirmer (ein Ja-sagender)! (276).
Friedrich Nietzsche (Thus Spoke Zarathustra)
Amor Fati means accepting our fate, a term from Nietzsche that both Jung and Campbell were fond of using. This is really a second-half-of-life need—that is, a state of longing for meaning. We are thrust into this state after experiencing the psychological heroism of the first half of life. As you may know, heroism, in the first half of life, describes the quest for independence, identity, and a place in the world. We need this heroic attitude in order to overcome and subdue the dragon of our dependency needs. Heroism supports our struggle to achieve a place in the world and stability in love and work. But when midlife, unhappiness, trauma, or illness thrusts us into the search for meaning—as well as the need for the support of our own depths and the Divine within us, the Self—a new kind of heroism is called for. This heroism is the ability to say yes to our fate, to what is already happening to us, to dive into it and into our own depths.
Bud Harris (Becoming Whole: A Jungian Guide to Individuation)
276. Pour la nouvelle année. Je vis encore, je pense encore : il faut encore que je vive, car il faut encore que je pense. Sum, ergo cogito : cogito, ergo sum. Aujourd’hui je permets à tout le monde d’exprimer son désir et sa pensée la plus chère : et, moi aussi, je vais dire ce qu’aujourd’hui je souhaite de moi-même et quelle est la pensée que, cette année, j’ai prise à cœur la première — quelle est la pensée qui devra être dorénavant pour moi la raison, la garantie et la douceur de vivre ! Je veux apprendre toujours davantage à considérer comme la beauté ce qu’il y a de nécessaire dans les choses : c’est ainsi que je serai de ceux qui rendent belles les choses. Amor fati : que cela soit dorénavant mon amour. Je ne veux pas entrer en guerre contre la laideur. Je ne veux pas accuser, je ne veux même pas accuser les accusateurs. Détourner mon regard, que ce soit là ma seule négation ! Et, somme toute, pour voir grand : je veux, quelle que soit la circonstance, n’être une fois qu’affirmateur !
Friedrich Nietzsche (Oeuvres complètes (24 titres annotés))
Man, rather the Superman, by participating with his Self, not with his 'I', in the immense process of Energy, which Nietzsche calls Will of Power, He does it without changing anything, accepting the fatality of chance of the Eternal Return, because you can not modify it, you can not change a single blade, or a detail, or a star. However, by accepting the Eternal Return, having had the 'vision' (which includes nostalgia) has passed, in an instant (at the Gateway of the Moment) to modify everything irremediably and forever. How? Giving The Sense your acceptance. That is, he has created, he has invented an Inexistent Flower, but it is more real than all the flowers of the gardens of the earth. We will not try to explain this mostly, because you can not. the same Superman is a creation of this kind, non-existent, an illusion. Pure magic. It is not real and it is more real than everything real. Without us everything will return, without doubt, but when we enter to intervene, wishing it with the Self and from the Self, everything will return in a different way, everything will be different, even when nothing has changed apparently. However, the alteration is essential, definitive: chance has been transformed into destination. Amor fati takes ownership of the process. This is why Nietzsche is a magician, a poet-magician. We will return to this key point and center of the Drama, which is thus transmuted into game, in the Great Game of the Maya-Power, in the Dance of the Shakti-Power. It's a Comedy, a Gay-Comedy, a histrionics, a slapstick, an affair cheerful, or a joy of pain, as Nietzsche would like to say, imagining that 'the highest music would be the one that could interpret the joy of pain and none another.' It is a Divine Comedy.
Miguel Serrano
479Amor fati
Friedrich Nietzsche
Amor fati
Friedrich Nietzsche
Amor fati.
Friedrich Nietzsche
...the sacramentality of the tragic in a poet like Gerard Manley Hopkins or a depressive like Logan Runnalls: In his critique of disability studies, Logan holds the Weilian tension as his own confession: 'What I understand (in my vague way) disability studies to be doing is erasing the tension we find in life. I'm not comfortable thinking of my depression as in the realms of good or unflawed. And yet I now believe that this is a really important way that I bear the image of Christ. I too am a 'man of sorrows.' I do not want to get rid of the tension between depression as flaw and depression as way of bearing the image of God. Nor do I see any reason to be compelled to. To do so is to give up on loving the Other and settling for a weak justice.' Runnalls' tension is perfect commentary for Weil's amor fati and George Grant's theodicy of the Cross. His consent to God and to the reality of his depression becomes a means of grace in this world—or light in the cave.
Bradley Jersak (Red Tory, Red Virgin: Essays on Simone Weil and George P. Grant)
First, God consents for the world to exist as it does, including evils experienced through the gravity of natural law and the willfulness of semi-free people. Somehow, consenting to such a universe (without endorsing the particulars) is also God's will. Second, I too must consent for the world to exist as it does, including the evils experienced through the gravity of natural law and the willfulness of semi-free people. The Stoics, Nietzsche, and Weil all call this amor fati. The recovery community calls it acceptance. Theologians of the Cross say, 'It is what it is.
Bradley Jersak (Red Tory, Red Virgin: Essays on Simone Weil and George P. Grant)
Amor fati
Mark Manson (Everything Is F*cked: A Book About Hope)
Nietzsche was to reiterate this, long after the Greeks—which proves in passing that their message preserves an actuality such as can still be found in modern philosophy: the ultimate end of human life is what Nietzsche calls amor fati, or “love of one’s fate.” To embrace everything that is the case, our destiny—which, in essence, means the present moment, considered as the highest form of wisdom, and the only form that can rid us of what Spinoza (whom Nietzsche regarded as “a brother”) named, equally memorably, the “sad passions”: fear, hatred, guilt, remorse, those corrupters of the soul that bog us down in mirages of the past or of the future. Only our reconciliation to the present, to the present moment—in Greek, the kairos—can, for Nietzsche, as for Greek culture as a whole, lead to proper serenity, to the “innocence of becoming,” in other words to salvation, understood not in its religious meaning but in the sense of discovering ourselves as saved, finally, from those fears that diminish existence, stunting and shriveling it.
Luc Ferry (The Wisdom of the Myths: How Greek Mythology Can Change Your Life (Learning to Live))
My formula for greatness in a human being,” he wrote, “is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity. Not merely bear what is necessary, still less conceal it—all idealism is mendacity in the face of what is necessary—but love it.
Mark Manson (Everything Is F*cked: A Book About Hope)
Nietzsche instead believed that we must look beyond hope. We must look beyond values. We must evolve into something “beyond good and evil.” For him, this morality of the future had to begin with something he called amor fati, or “love of one’s fate”: “My formula for greatness in a human being,” he wrote, “is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity. Not merely bear what is necessary, still less conceal it—all idealism is mendacity in the face of what is necessary—but love it.”20 Amor fati, for Nietzsche, meant the unconditional acceptance of all life and experience: the highs and the lows, the meaning and the meaninglessness.
Mark Manson (Everything Is F*cked: A Book About Hope)
Amor fati--Nietzsche Accept, appreciate, embrace, carry on. It's simple
H. William Taeusch
Nietzsche instead believed that we must look beyond hope. We must look beyond values. We must evolve into something “beyond good and evil.” For him, this morality of the future had to begin with something he called amor fati, or “love of one’s fate”: “My formula for greatness in a human being,” he wrote, “is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity.
Mark Manson (Everything Is F*cked: A Book About Hope)
Nietzsche instead believed that we must look beyond hope. We must look beyond values. We must evolve into something “beyond good and evil.” For him, this morality of the future had to begin with something he called amor fati, or “love of one’s fate”:
Mark Manson (Everything Is F*cked: A Book About Hope)
Essentially, amor fati is the attitude that regardless of what comes your way, every experience is to be welcomed and accepted, regardless of whether it appears to be positive or negative. When it comes to challenges, amor fati goes beyond simple acceptance. You should love whatever difficulties you face because they are what forge you into a better person. So just like fuel for a fire, those tough times are fuel for your personal growth.
Jason Hemlock (Stoicism: How to Use Stoic Philosophy to Find Inner Peace and Happiness)
My formula for greatness is Amor fati: . . . not only to bear up under every necessity, but to love it.
Will Durant (The Story of Philosophy)
To be a leader is to have a trust in one’s journey. Nietzsche has a Latin term for it: amor fati: the love of fate.
Faisal Hoque (Everything Connects: How to Transform and Lead in the Age of Creativity, Innovation, and Sustainability: How to Transform and Lead in the Age of Creativity, Innovation and Sustainability)
I want to learn more and more to see as beautiful what is necessary in things; then I shall be one of those who makes things beautiful. Amor fati: let that be my love henceforth!
Friedrich Nietzsche
Amor fati. Love your fate. A friend of mine used to say that. The secret of happiness.
Michael Gruber (Valley of Bones (Jimmy Paz, #2))
ஒரு வண்டியின் பின்புறம் ஒரு கயிற்றில் நாயைக் கட்டி இழுத்துச் செல்கிறார்கள். அந்த நாய் எவ்வளவு முயன்றாலும் அந்த வண்டியோடு தான் செல்ல முடியும். இந்த இயல்பைப் புரிந்து கொண்டு, நாய் தானாக அதனோடு நடந்து சென்றால், இலகுவாக நடக்கலாம். இல்லை, நான் வேறு பக்கம் தான் போவேன் என்று அடம் பிடித்தால், தர தரவென்று இழுத்துச் செல்லப்படும். இது தான் விதி. அதாவது இயற்கை விதி. இந்த விதியைப் புரிந்து கொள்ளுங்கள். காதலியுங்கள். Amor Fati! அதாவது Love your fate என்கிறார்கள்.
Ravishankar Ayyakkannu (கடமை கண்ணியம் கட்டுப்பாடு (Tamil Edition))
How did such a brilliant philosophical mind deal with such a failure-ridden dreadful existence? He attempted to philosophize it, to derive wisdom and understanding from it. He conceived and integrated his view of AMOR FATI. When referring to Amor Fati he is arguably talking more generally about the loving of one’s life. The term love is also essential here as a key nuance to his usage it suggests more than a stoic acceptance and rather an almost enthusiastic and total adoration. It is a sentiment or rather a declaration against a tendency to regret, to assume one could have retained more control over the outcomes and conditions of their reality, to have done differently, to have known any better, to have found that an existence void of particular negatives would have ultimately netted more positives and instead to love and embrace all of life exactly how it is with all the good and the bad, the success and the failure, the satisfaction, and the pain.
Robert Pantano
My formula for greatness in a human being is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity. Not merely bear what is necessary, still less conceal it . . . but love it. Friedrich Nietzsche
Matt Haig (The Comfort Book)
L’extinction du désir ou le détachement — amor fati — ou le désir du bien absolu, c’est toujours la même chose : vider le désir, la finalité de tout contenu, désirer à vide, désirer sans souhait. Détacher notre désir de tous les biens et attendre. L’expérience prouve que cette attente est comblée. On touche alors le bien absolu. En tout, par-delà l’objet particulier quel qu’il soit, vouloir à vide, vouloir le vide. Car c’est un vide pour nous que ce bien que nous ne pouvons ni nous représenter ni définir. Mais ce vide est plus plein que tous les pleins. […] La réalité du monde est faite par nous de notre attachement. C’est la réalité du moi transportée par nous dans les choses. Ce n’est nullement la réalité extérieure. Celle-ci n’est perceptible que par le détachement total. Ne restât-il qu’un fil, il y a encore attachement. Le malheur qui contraint à porter l’attachement sur des objets misérables met à nu le caractère misérable de l’attachement. Par là, la nécessité du détachement devient plus claire. […] Toute douleur qui ne détache pas est de la douleur perdue. Rien de plus affreux, froid désert, âme recroquevillée. Ovide. Esclave de Plaute.
Simone Weil
« L’extinction du désir ou le détachement — amor fati — ou le désir du bien absolu, c’est toujours la même chose : vider le désir, la finalité de tout contenu, désirer à vide, désirer sans souhait. Détacher notre désir de tous les biens et attendre. L’expérience prouve que cette attente est comblée. On touche alors le bien absolu. En tout, par-delà l’objet particulier quel qu’il soit, vouloir à vide, vouloir le vide. Car c’est un vide pour nous que ce bien que nous ne pouvons ni nous représenter ni définir. Mais ce vide est plus plein que tous les pleins. […] La réalité du monde est faite par nous de notre attachement. C’est la réalité du moi transportée par nous dans les choses. Ce n’est nullement la réalité extérieure. Celle-ci n’est perceptible que par le détachement total. Ne restât-il qu’un fil, il y a encore attachement. Le malheur qui contraint à porter l’attachement sur des objets misérables met à nu le caractère misérable de l’attachement. Par là, la nécessité du détachement devient plus claire. […] Toute douleur qui ne détache pas est de la douleur perdue. Rien de plus affreux, froid désert, âme recroquevillée. Ovide. Esclave de Plaute. »
Simone Weil
My formula for greatness in a human being is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be other than it is, not in the future, not in the past, not in all eternity. Not merely to endure that which happens of necessity . . . but to love it. — FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE
Robert Greene (The Daily Laws: 366 Meditations)
amor fati or, the love of one’s fate.
Nikki St. Crowe (The Fae Princes (Vicious Lost Boys, #4))
When we embrace whatever happens, what could go wrong? Nothing. And amor fati creates just that. When things can’t go wrong, there’s nothing to worry about. When there’s nothing to worry about, the fear of the future won’t sap our energy and make us feel miserable. By unconditionally embracing our destiny, we have nothing to fear.
Einzelgänger (Stoicism for Inner Peace)
Amor Fati or 'love of absolute Nothingness' is resurrection in death. Not a life after death, as the eschatological myths describe it, but the attaining of life in the freely affirmed permitting of life, is 'the Eschaton'.
Fritz Buri (The Buddha-Christ)
The Benefits of Suffering Not only is sickness an inherent part of life, it is often beneficial one. Nietzsche found that the most brilliant parts of his writings co-occurred with bodily weakness and suffering. He felt that failures, anxieties, deprivations and mistakes, were necessary for him, just as their opposites 'the path of one's own heaven always leads through the voluptuousness of one's own hell'. Those who cannot endure their suffering and try desperately to eliminate it, encourage neglectfulness remissness, and by their efforts rule out happiness 'For happiness and misfortune are brother and sister, we all grow tall together, or, as with you, remain small together'. The two, health and illness, cannot be separated; the ability to tolerate sickness defines health; and illness is a trigger for a new learning 'as important survival supporting signal, and hurt, conditions people to avoid dangers and protect themselves 'some storm is approaching, and we do well to 'catch' as little wind as possible'. Moreover, 'illness may even act as a powerful stimulus to life, to an abundance of life,' exemplified by Nietzsche, who after a prolonged sickness, rediscovered life, enjoyed it even more, and transformed his suffering into his new philosophy. Nietzsche rejected the conception of suffering as an argument against existence, and pointed out that there were ages in which people tolerated suffering 'and saw in it an enchantment of the first order, a genuine seduction to life. Perhaps in those days [. . .] pain did not hurt as much as it does now'. Furthermore, for healthy people, 'being sick can even become an energetic stimulus for life, for living more'. His long period of sickness seemed to him 'as it were, I discovered life anew, including myself; I tasted all good and even little things, as others cannot easily taste them. I turned my will to health, to life, into a philosophy'. Nietzsche felt that he owed his philosophy to Amor Fati, to a higher kind of health, to his prolonged illness 'It is great pain only which is the ultimate emancipator of the spirit'. Pain teaches strong suspicion which enable seeing things from different perspectives, seeming them different from what they seem to be. A great torturing long pain 'compels us, philosophers, to descend into our ultimate depths, and divest ourselves of all trust, all good-nature, veiling, gentleness, and mediocrity'. Having to live with pain and suffering, Nietzsche tried not only to persevere, but to turn it into great suffering, thus turning a constraint into an opportunity, and the list of advantages is telling: 'Prophetic human beings are afflicted with a great deal of suffering [. . .] it is their path that makes them prophets'. Pain and sickness do not necessarily make people any better, but they do make them deeper, and without them the great suspicion which liberates the spirit and a philosophical examination of life will probably be lost 'Only great pain is the ultimate liberator of the spirit'. Persons who experienced severe suffering become ones who know much about a terrifying world, about which others have no clue 'Deep suffering makes noble; it separates'. The ability to discover happiness in the midst of 'weariness, in the old illness, in the convalescent's relapses', is a sign of the free spirit, who can remain grateful, see the bright side of things and furthermore, after periods of sickness get cured of pessimism
Uri Wernik
Look at the herd beneath. One starts to worship when one starts to think that one can't be great and overcoming. When one does not embrace amor fati as the formula for human greatness.
Mecha Constantine
Hope is generally regarded as good. Fear is generally regarded as bad. To a Stoic like Hecato (known as Hecato of Rhodes), they are the same—both are projections into the future about things we do not control. Both are the enemy of this present moment that you are actually in. Both mean you’re living a life in opposition to amor fati.
Ryan Holiday (The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living)
Findest du es nicht schrecklich, dass wir eines Tages sterben werden?" "Nein. Es ist absolut fantastisch! Es öffnet uns die Möglichkeit, das Leben in vollen Zügen zu geniessen. Da jeder Moment unser letzter sein könnte, können wir alles geniessen, was dieses Leben uns bietet.
Ryan Gelpke (Die Howl Gang Legende (German Edition))
Nietzsche said, Amor Fati. Love your fate.
D.F. Bailey (Second Life)
It is certainly true that in his later writings, published and unpublished, Nietzsche speculates on what look like metaphysical or ontological questions. At the risk of some (but not much) oversimplification, we could say that his main thesis with respect to these questions is as follows: Heraclitus was correct and Parmenides incorrect: Being is Becoming, everything is in motion, stability is a ratio of changes, ratios are changing perspectives, changes emerge from chaos and not in accord with a plan or fundamental order. Note what follows from this “ontological” thesis: there is no ego, no subject, and hence no will. The will to power is in fact an infinite regression of points of force. This is what Nietzsche means when he refers to the will as an exoteric concept. No apparent cohesions, or what one might call fields of force, have a unifying identity. Hence personal identity is an illusion. It follows further that there can be no explanation of illusion itself, of why we experience ourselves as finite personalities, why we perceive things or objects, why our experience is organized as if it were a coherent whole. This is what Nietzsche means by his acceptance of Heraclitus’s reference to Zeus as a “playing boy” (pais paizon). The cosmos, or what we take to be order, is just the purposeless play of chaos. Nietzsche’s enthusiastic adoption of Spinoza’s amor fati comes to the same thing. Nietzsche is not a genuine Spinozist except for one point: he denies teleology, or divine purpose.
Stanley Rosen (The Mask of Enlightenment: Nietzsche's Zarathustra (Modern European Philosophy))
I then take the opportunity to ask him about the lemon rule and he laughs, tells me its quite simple: “You know how Nietzsche was all about creating your own morality and use your misfortune to learn from them? You know the tale of being hunted by the sleep paralysis demon and the eternal recurrence? To which he answered: Amor Fati, love your fate no matter what?” I nod. “Well I took the old saying, when life gives you lemons make lemonade and took it as an interpretation of his Amor Fati concept. That’s why we will all have a lemon with us tonight on the pub crawl. And if you lose it, in other words you hate your fate and are a nihilist, you have to drink.
Ryan Gelpke (Nietzsche’s Birthday Party: A Short Story Collection)
Find happiness in Hevel's brevity, Amor Fati's embrace, and God's grace, all of which make life worth living.
Benjamin C. Verar
I am in a mood of fatalistic ‘surrender to God’ — I call it amor fati, so much so, that I would be willing to rush into a lion’s jaws.
Freidrich Nietzsche
Just me, my music, and my books are all I need. They're more loyal to me than anyone or anything else in this world
Gary Tolan aka King Tolan
The Stoics have a term for this: amor fati. Love of fate. “Do not seek for things to happen the way you want them to,” the great Stoic philosopher and former slave Epictetus said. “Rather, wish that what happens happen the way it happens. Then you will be happy.
Arnold Schwarzenegger (Be Useful: Seven Tools for Life)
My formula for greatness in a human being is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity.
Arnold Schwarzenegger (Be Useful: Seven Tools for Life)
Amor Fati, "Love Your Fate," which is in fact your life.
Fredrich Nietzsche
I wasn’t sure if they’d misinterpret my memento mori metaphor: remember that you have to die, but after I said, “Winter is here to say, ‘Have fun,’” Debbie and Maria beautifully bawled like I pierced an arrow of love into their beautiful song. I wrote a poem and left it on the counter: "Life's a treasure in a castle. It isn’t what you see but the people you meet. Amor Fati!" 

Briggs (The Acid Actor: Volume 1)
Idiots are a threat to the life that I taste. I don't need certain ppl around me to fuck up my energy to my pace #1Tolan #TheGreatness
Gary Tolan aka King Tolan
fatum brutum amor fati
Friedrich Nietzsche
Dosrca si to ponovio ćuteći familijarnost, prozelitno prepušteno nestabilnom uvjerenju te shvaćanju da opasno opstoji samo izvan vidokruga, ako i ono je gušeno osjetom neutaženosti, nije dovoljno, strah je nedovoljan, dok se i neosjetno podvaja sadržinom interpretacije, u obrani ludosti, ujedno ludo, ti otkrivaš da ti neprijatelj ne može biti san i takav si otuđen, odavna sebeneznan nestaješ slojevima onoga što ni sam ne vidiš svojom stvarnošću, a opsesija ti je, čuj me, truje te, takav se još stigneš vratiti, vrati se, vrati se, pokušaj se vratiti... sam mogao prepoznati rasuto, prljavo, djetinje neobazrivo razliveno površinom beskonačja, opsjenarski strano je trajalo sve neprestajuće novo, neukrotivo, nasilno novo i tako me otimalo od odluke ishodeći da ludim, sama zbilja iz kaosa izvaja tu avetinjske uzroke osobne udaljenosti, ja kažem, ja poznajem, pogledajmo, umara me navorno prazna zamisao susreta sa smrću svake smislenosti - ali samoća, u mraku, posve bezopasan, beskoristan se istom prisjećajući zadnjih osjeta svoga obješenoga tijela, osim zbunjujućeg ritma nestajućih misli ja zaista nemam čak ni sebe. Sumiram, subalterno, viziju što ne prestaje, sasvim izgubljen, skromno stvaran, samo je pobuna tu, jedna blijedo osjetna potreba što mi oblijeva osobom jedva shvatljivo, to je ono što se zbiva, nešto veće i nemjerljivo, značajno nadmoćno me vuče stvari neizostavno stalnoj, a koju vidim, svjedočim joj svjetlu, zvuku, jasna je, u pjesmi joj beskonačno granajući životi gmižu bazaltom estetski dosljedno, ali okrutno, odsječno neobazrivo spram ičega izvan toga okvrljenoga procesa, prljava borba za postojanjem, a od toga ja odstupam i molim manumisiju odavna već najučtivije dokle slutim, istovremeno, kako sam u mraku možda u potpunosti zapravo nijem.
Ivan Baran (Veliki pad)
By the way, I am possessed of a fatalistic “trust in God” — I call it amor fati — so that I would step into the jaws of a lion.
Friedrich Nietzsche
There are far more important things in life to channel your energy towards. I know me and I know I always have the potential to become a phenomenal person in this life.
Gary Tolan aka King Tolan
A year or two later he would equate all this with amor fati when he finally got around to reading Nietzsche— the idea that you must love whatever comes, joy or sorrow, pain or happiness.
Nick McDonell (Twelve)
LOVE EVERYTHING THAT HAPPENS: AMOR FATI
Ryan Holiday (The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph)
Deus é amor. Procede, mas somente se estamos nos referindo ao deus de Espinosa e ao amor fati de Nietsche.
Cosme Aristides (A Paisagem Limiar ~ Gênese Vampírica: A conspiração sempre foi outra. (Portuguese Edition))