Alzheimer's Disease Quotes

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Alzheimer's Disease. Here they are! All 200 of them:

I think it would be interesting if old people got anti-Alzheimer's disease where they slowly began to recover other people's lost memories.
George Carlin
Caregiving often calls us to lean into love we didn't know possible.
Tia Walker (The Inspired Caregiver: Finding Joy While Caring for Those You Love)
In the heart or every caregiver is a knowing that we are all connected. As I do for you, I do for me.
Tia Walker (The Inspired Caregiver: Finding Joy While Caring for Those You Love)
The Statue of Liberty, that frequently malevolent bitch, has an enormous tumor in her gut that has spread to her brain and eyes. With regard to the Native Americans she has Alzheimer's or mad cow disease and can't remember her past, and her blind eyes can't see the terrifying plight of most of the Indian tribes. Meanwhile she blows China and stomps Cuba to death, choosing to forget the Native cultures she has already destroyed.
Jim Harrison (On the Trail to Wounded Knee: The Big Foot Memorial Ride)
She wished she had cancer instead. She'd trade Alzheimer's for cancer in a heartbeat. She felt ashamed for wishing this, and it was certainly a pointless bargaining, but she permitted herself the fantasy anyway. With cancer, she'd have something to fight. There was surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. There was the chance that she could win. Her family and the community at Harvard would rally behind her battle and consider it noble. And even if it defeated her in the end, she'd be able to look them knowingly in the eye and say good-bye before she left.
Lisa Genova (Still Alice)
Dr. Cai Song is an internationally known researcher at the University of British Columbia and co-author of a recent textbook, Fundamentals of Psychoneuroimmunology. “I am convinced that Alzheimer’s is an autoimmune disease,” says Dr. Song. “It is probably triggered by chronic stress acting on an aging immune system.
Gabor Maté (When the Body Says No: Understanding the Stress-Disease Connection)
A nation which fails to adequately remember salient points of its own history, is like a person with Alzheimer's. And that can be a social disease of a most destructive nature.
S.M. Sigerson (The Assassination of Michael Collins: What Happened At Béal na mBláth?)
She almost thought she'd said the words aloud, but she hadn't. They remained trapped in her head, but not because they were barricaded by plaques and tangles. She just couldn't say them aloud
Lisa Genova (Still Alice)
Caffeine dehydrates the brain and body.
Daniel G. Amen (Preventing Alzheimer's: Ways to Help Prevent, Delay, Detect, and Even Halt Alzheimer's Disease and Other Forms of Memory Loss)
It's like you don't get that she's not gone yet, like you think her time left isn't meaningful anymore. You're acting like a selfish child.
Lisa Genova (Still Alice)
Dying from an aggressive fatal brain tumor is like dying from Alzheimer's disease accelerated one hundred times.
Steven Magee
Excess cholesterol in the blood can lead to excess cholesterol in the brain, which may then help trigger the clumping of amyloid seen in Alzheimer’s brains. Under an electron microscope, we can see the clustering of amyloid fibers on and around tiny crystals of cholesterol.
Michael Greger (How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease)
Accepting the fact that she did indeed have Alzheimer's, that she could only bank on two unacceptably effective drugs available to treat it, and that she couldn't trade any of this in for some other, curable disease, what did she want? Assuming the in vitro procedure worked, she wanted to live to hold Anna's baby and know it was her grandchild. She wanted to see Lydia act in something she was proud of. She wanted to see Tom fall in love. She wanted one more sabbatical year with John. She wanted to read every book she could before she could no longer read. She laughed a little, surprised at what she'd just revealed about herself. Nowhere in that list was anything about linguistics, teaching, or Harvard. She ate her last bite of cone. She wanted more sunny, seventy-degree days and ice-cream cones.
Lisa Genova (Still Alice)
I dreamed I saw my maternal grandmother sitting by the bank of a swimming pool, that was also a river. In real life, she had been a victim of Alzheimer’s disease, and had regressed, before her death, to a semi-conscious state. In the dream, as well, she had lost her capacity for self-control. Her genital region was exposed, dimly; it had the appearance of a thick mat of hair. She was stroking herself, absent-mindedly. She walked over to me, with a handful of pubic hair, compacted into something resembling a large artist’s paint-brush. She pushed this at my face. I raised my arm, several times, to deflect her hand; finally, unwilling to hurt her, or interfere with her any farther, I let her have her way. She stroked my face with the brush, gently, and said, like a child, “isn’t it soft?” I looked at her ruined face and said, “yes, Grandma, it’s soft.
Jordan B. Peterson (Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief)
This disease will not be bargained with. I can’t offer it the names of the United States presidents in exchange for the names of my children. I can’t give it the names of the state capitals and keep the memories of my husband.
Lisa Genova (Still Alice)
I am daily learning To be the reluctant guardian of your memories There was light in those eyes; I miss that
Richard L. Ratliff
While the pathology of stroke and Alzheimer’s are different, one key factor unites them: Mounting evidence suggests that a healthy diet may help prevent them both.
Michael Greger (How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease)
They talked about her as if she weren’t sitting in the wing chair, a few feet away. They talked about her, in front of her, as if she were deaf. They talked about her, in front of her, without including her, as if she had Alzheimer’s disease.
Lisa Genova (Still Alice)
Alzheimer's disease occurs in the people over the age of 65 which is 60% of the world’s approximately 24 million dementias patients. There are 2% of people are 65 & 70 year old, also 3% of people are under the age of 75 and 6% among 85 year old people.
Prof. Dr. Robert Hess
From this cascade comes a prediction: getting too little sleep across the adult life span will significantly raise your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Precisely this relationship has now been reported in numerous epidemiological studies, including those individuals suffering from sleep disorders such as insomnia and sleep apnea.VIII Parenthetically, and unscientifically, I have always found it curious that Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan—two heads of state that were very vocal, if not proud, about sleeping only four to five hours a night—both went on to develop the ruthless disease. The current US president, Donald Trump—also a vociferous proclaimer of sleeping just a few hours each night—may want to take note.
Matthew Walker (Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams)
Her ability to use language, that thing that most separates humans from animals, was leaving her, and she was feeling less and less human as it departed. She's said a tearful good-bye to okay some time ago.
Lisa Genova (Still Alice)
But Marisa already knew the answer and it was too late for recrimination. The chance of even a rational discussion of the problem was forever shut out of Mama’s brain. A brutal bastard was steadily sucking the intelligence and the very life from the mother who had once been witty, wise and loving. The scourge had a name Marisa had come to equate with hell: Alzheimer’s Disease.
Anna Jeffrey
The simplest way to look at all these associations, between obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, cancer, and Alzheimer's (not to mention the other the conditions that also associate with obesity and diabetes, such as gout, asthma, and fatty liver disease), is that what makes us fat - the quality and quantity of carbohydrates we consume - also makes us sick.
Gary Taubes (Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It)
SUICIDE IS NOW – in places including the UK and US – a leading cause of death, accounting for over one in a hundred fatalities. According to figures from the World Health Organization, it kills more people than stomach cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, colon cancer, breast cancer, and Alzheimer’s. As people who kill themselves are, more often than not, depressives, depression is one of the deadliest diseases on the planet. It kills more people than most other forms of violence – warfare, terrorism, domestic abuse, assault, gun crime – put together.
Matt Haig (Reasons to Stay Alive)
Alzheimer's... It is a barren disease, as empty and lifeless as a desert. It is a thief of hearts and souls and memories.
Nicholas Sparks (The Notebook (The Notebook, #1))
I miss myself." "I miss you too, Ali, so much." "I never planned to get like this." "I know.
Lisa Genova (Still Alice)
If Alzheimer's disease only destroyed our unhappy memories, would we race for a cure?
Sari Sikstrom (Watermark: The truth beneath the surface)
I think knowledge is a blessing, not a curse. This is especially true in the case of genetic knowledge. To understand the molecular nature of cancer for the first time, to diagnose and prevent Alzheimer’s disease, to discover the secrets of human history, to reconstruct the organisms that populated the pre-Cambrian seas – these seem to me to be immense blessings.
Matt Ridley (Genome: The Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters (P.S.))
Overstimulation of IGF-1-signaling pathways in the brain due to milk consumption could thus accelerate the onset of neurodegenerative disease. IGF-1 passes the blood-brain barrier and reaches the neurons in the brain.
Bodo Melnik
With diets Westernizing globally, Alzheimer’s rates are expected to continue to increase, writes one researcher in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, “unless dietary patterns change to those with less reliance on animal products.…
Michael Greger (How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease)
But you can see it, Harriet, a look in his eyes, an alertness, as if somewhere behind the disease, behind the scar tissue, behind the fog of disassociation, Bernard is all there, he's just lost his ability to communicate. Like somebody turned off his volume. You're certain he can see everything that is transpiring with crystal clarity, and he can't do a goddamn thing about it.
Jonathan Evison (This Is Your Life, Harriet Chance!)
So many modern diseases, including heart disease, depression, cancer, Alzheimer’s, and all the autoimmune diseases (such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus), occur in part because our body’s immune systems produce excess chronic inflammation. In chronic inflammation, the immune system stays on too long and may even begin to attack the body’s own tissues, as though they were outside invaders. The causes of chronic inflammation are many, including diet and, of course, the countless chemical toxins that become embedded in the body. Chronically inflamed bodies produce chemicals, called pro-inflammatory cytokines, which contribute to pain and inflammation.
Norman Doidge (The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity)
An apple a day might have kept the doctor away prior to the industrialization of food growing and preparation. But, according to research compiled by the United States Drug Administration (USDA) today’s apple contains residue of eleven different neurotoxins—azinphos, methyl chloripyrifos, diazinon, dimethoate, ethion, omthoate, parathion, parathion methyl, phosalone, and phosmet — and the USDA was testing for only one category of chemicals known as organophosphate insecticides. That doesn’t sound too appetizing does it? The average apple is sprayed with pesticides seventeen times before it is harvested.
Michelle Schoffro Cook (The Brain Wash: A Powerful, All-Naural Program to Protect Your Brain Against Alzheimer's, Depression, Parkinson's and Other Brain Diseases)
Physical exercise is the fountain of youth; it’s critical to keeping your brain vibrant and young. If you want to attack Alzheimer’s disease, depression, obesity, and aging all at once, move every day. In fact exercise is one of the most powerful antiaging tools, and it directly fights depression, anxiety, heart disease, diabetes and cancer.
Daniel G. Amen (The Brain Warrior's Way: Ignite Your Energy and Focus, Attack Illness and Aging, Transform Pain into Purpose)
The pineal gland is activated by light and controls the body's bio- rhythms in concert with the hypothalamus gland which regulates hunger, thirst, sexual desire and the biological clock that dictates how fast we age. Look at the potential for mass control if you can externally suppress and manipulate the pineal and hypothalamus glands alone. You can make it much harder to perceive beyond the five senses, decide how quickly people age, how much they want sex, when they are hungry and thirsty and for how long. This is the key reason for putting sodium fluoride into water supplies and toothpaste. The pineal gland absorbs more fluoride than any other part of the body and becomes calcified by this highly-damaging toxin. Sodium fluoride is an appalling waste product of the aluminum industry and has been used in rat poison. It causes cancer, genetic damage, Alzheimer's disease, disrupts the endocrine system and dumbs down the brain. It was added to drinking water in the Nazi concentration camps to make the inmates more acquiescent and docile.
David Icke (Human Race Get Off Your Knees: The Lion Sleeps No More)
Irish Alzheimer’s, a disease where everything is forgotten except a grudge.
Kevin Weeks (Brutal)
Being strong alone everyone shall be but being strong in front of the crowd, only a strong heart and strong brain shall be
J. Ruby (The Art of Fixing Alzheimer’s Disease)
One goal of the mindful caregiver is to find ways to not feel ‘dis-eased’ in the caregiving process.
Nancy L. Kriseman (Mindful Caregiver: Finding Easecb: Finding Ease in the Caregiving Journey)
They think I don't know what I'm thinking, but I do.
Ron Mayes (Sherrod's Legacy: Reflections of Sherrod Mayes and His Descendants)
No disease should be allowed to have as its victims both the patient and the caregiver. But that is exactly what is happening every minute of every day. I
Meryl Comer (Slow Dancing with a Stranger: Lost and Found in the Age of Alzheimer's)
Antes de los 30 años, los hombres buscan la enfermedad; después de los 30, la enfermedad busca a los hombres. Proverbio chino
Víctor R. Ramos (La dieta MIND, alimentación que ayuda a prevenir la enfermedad de Alzheimer: Tu cerebro puede estar sufriendo sin que te des cuenta)
God’s grip on us, in the gospel, is much more important than our grasp of the gospel.
Benjamin T. Mast (Second Forgetting: Remembering the Power of the Gospel during Alzheimer's Disease)
You heard that here first: Mercury is 100 percent responsible for Alzheimer’s disease. You will never in your lifetime hear the truth about that anywhere else.
Anthony William (Medical Medium: Secrets Behind Chronic and Mystery Illness and How to Finally Heal)
Elevated blood sugar stirs up inflammation in the bloodstream, as excess sugar can be toxic if it’s not swept up and used by cells. It also triggers a reaction called glycation—the biological process by which sugar binds to proteins and certain fats, resulting in deformed molecules that don’t function well. These sugar proteins are technically called advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The body does not recognize AGEs as normal, so they set off inflammatory reactions. In the brain, sugar molecules and brain proteins combine to produce lethal new structures that contribute to the degeneration of the brain and its functioning. The relationship between poor blood sugar control and Alzheimer’s disease in particular is so strong that researchers are now calling Alzheimer’s disease type-3 diabetes.14
David Perlmutter (Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain for Life)
She could always walk somewhere without him. Of course this somewhere had to be somewhere "safe." She could walk to her office. But she didn't want to go to her office. She felt bored, ignored, and alienated in her office. She felt ridiculous there. She didn't belong there anymore. In all the expansive grandeur that was Harvard, there wasn't room there for a cognitive psychology professor with a broken cognitive psyche.
Lisa Genova (Still Alice)
According to Hugh Fudenberg, MD, the world’s leading immunogeneticist and 13th most quoted biologist of our times (nearly 850 papers in peer review journals), if an individual has had five consecutive flu shots between 1970 and 1980 (the years studied) his/her chances of getting Alzheimer’s Disease is ten times higher than if they had one, two or no shots. I asked Dr. Fudenberg why this was so and he said it was due to the mercury and aluminum that is in every flu shot (and most childhood shots). The gradual mercury and aluminum buildup in the brain causes cognitive dysfunction. Is that why Alzheimer’s is expected to quadruple?219
James Perloff (Truth Is a Lonely Warrior: Unmasking the Forces behind Global Destruction)
Some older or very ill patients may not be suitable candidates for fecal transfer. Colonoscopy is an invasive procedure, especially for those patients who are too ill with other conditions like cancer, heart failure, dialysis, or Alzheimer’s.
J. Thomas LaMont
Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, memory loss, and neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s and ALS can all be prevented by fruit. That’s because not only does fruit prevent these diseases, it prevents oxidation—which is the process that ages us. It
Anthony William (Medical Medium: Secrets Behind Chronic and Mystery Illness and How to Finally Heal)
When a fine old carpet is eaten by mice, the colors and patterns of what's left behind do not change,' wrote my neighbor and friend, the poet Jane Hirschfield, after she visited an old friend suffering from Alzheimer's disease in a nursing home. And so it was with my father. His mind did not melt evenly into undistinguishable lumps, like a dissolving sand castle. It was ravaged selectively, like Tintern Abbey, the Cistercian monastery in northern Wales suppressed in 1531 by King Henry VIII in his split with the Church of Rome. Tintern was turned over to a nobleman, its stained-glass windows smashed, its roof tiles taken up and relaid in village houses. Holy artifacts were sold to passing tourists. Religious statues turned up in nearby gardens. At least one interior wall was dismantled to build a pigsty. I've seen photographs of the remains that inspired Wordsworth: a Gothic skeleton, soaring and roofless, in a green hilly landscape. Grass grows in the transept. The vanished roof lets in light. The delicate stone tracery of its slim, arched quatrefoil windows opens onto green pastures where black-and-white cows graze. Its shape is beautiful, formal, and mysterious. After he developed dementia, my father was no longer useful to anybody. But in the shelter of his broken walls, my mother learned to balance her checkbook, and my heart melted and opened. Never would I wish upon my father the misery of his final years. But he was sacred in his ruin, and I took from it the shards that still sustain me.
Katy Butler (Knocking on Heaven's Door: The Path to a Better Way of Death)
Adams, then in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, could only appear in the premiere program. He died in 1960; Levant in 1972; Golenpaul in 1974; Kieran in 1981. Fadiman became chairman of the Book-of-the-Month Club board of judges and went on with his literary
John Dunning (On the Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio)
He was having one of those lucid moments that make you, as a loved one of an Alzheimer's victim, forget for a minute or two that this is all really happening. You can forget about the disease and its toll and confusion and suddenly engage with the same person with whom you conversed profoundly for so many years, until it all started to go haywire. In that moment I wanted to know what I think so many Alzheimer's caregivers crave to understand: Do you know what has become of you? Can you, so lucid now, see how you act when you are not like you are now? Does it make you sad? Does it make you ashamed? The reprieve right there at the red light was momentary, even illusory. But there for the taking, right in front of me--so obvious that I almost panicked over what to talk about. Do we discuss his beloved baseball? His beloved grandchildren? Me--how I'm doing, how much I miss him? No. As much out of curiosity as concern, I wanted to talk about him. "Dad," I said, "you are losing your mind. You know that. How does that make you feel? How are you doing with that?" "I'm doing the best I can with what God has given me," he said.
Mark Shriver (A Good Man: Rediscovering My Father, Sargent Shriver)
She glanced over her shoulder one more time and saw her mum turn to Brenda. In a very loud whisper, she heard her mum say, ‘She’s pretty. Who is that lady that just left?’ She smiled a sad smile. Alzheimer’s is a cruel disease, but you had to embrace it instead of fighting it to get through.
Kim Nash (Sunshine and Second Chances: A heart-warming, feel-good summer read about friendship, love and second chances.)
Perhaps there is something within the genetic make-up of specific individuals which predisposes them to accumulate and retain aluminium in their brain, as is similarly suggested for individuals with familial Alzheimer’s disease. The new evidence strongly suggests that aluminium is entering the brain in ASD via pro-inflammatory cells which have become loaded up with aluminium in the blood and/or lymph, much as has been demonstrated for monocytes at injection sites for vaccines including aluminium adjuvants. Perhaps we now have the putative link between vaccination and ASD, the link being the inclusion of an aluminium adjuvant in the vaccine.
James Morcan (Vaccine Science Revisited: Are Childhood Immunizations As Safe As Claimed? (The Underground Knowledge Series, #8))
Having greater self-esteem Looking better in jeans or a bathing suit Being able to participate in sports and other activities I used to enjoy Having a better relationship with my spouse Reversing diabetes, heart disease, or other health risks Decreasing my risk for Alzheimer’s disease and other diseases of aging Having the confidence to apply for the job I really want
Daniel G. Amen (Unleash the Power of the Female Brain: Supercharging yours for better health, energy, mood, focus and sex)
People with Parkinson’s are very lucky to have L-dopa. There is no equivalent therapy for other neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, or Lou Gehrig’s disease. Whatever its limitations, L-dopa turned Parkinson’s from a condition in which victims experienced a rapid slide toward immobility and death into a chronic disease with a gradual trajectory of decline. A
Jon Palfreman (Brain Storms: The Race to Unlock the Mysteries of Parkinson's Disease)
By far the most important fat for brain energy utilization is beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-HBA), and we’ll explore this unique fat in more detail in the next chapter. This is why the so-called ketogenic diet has been a treatment for epilepsy since the early 1920s and is now being reevaluated as a very powerful therapeutic option in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease,
David Perlmutter (Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar--Your Brain's Silent Killers)
Every woman I'd ever known had two sets of memories: the one they wanted to remember and the one their heart wouldn't let them forget. The first kind were chosen, mostly positive and personality building, but the second would live on forever, despite age and fatigue and life-stealing diseases like dementia and Alzheimer's. Coded on the heart like a hard drive, the feelings never vanished.
Max Monroe (Banking the Billionaire (Billionaire Bad Boys, #2))
Science is being corrupted by the influence of corporate money. This corruption is leading directly to our poor health, whether it be the epidemic of obesity; neurological diseases like autism, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and multiple sclerosis; the explosion of cancers; or mental problems among the young, including school shooters. There are some who claim this is leading to a culling, if not the mass extinction, of humanity.
Kent Heckenlively (Plague of Corruption: Restoring Faith in the Promise of Science)
I have come to see that the benefits produced by eating a plant-based diet are far more diverse and impressive than any drug or surgery used in medical practice. Heart diseases, cancers, diabetes, stroke and hypertension, arthritis, cataracts, Alzheimer’s disease, impotence and all sorts of other chronic diseases can be largely prevented. These diseases, which generally occur with aging and tissue degeneration, kill the majority of us before our time.
T. Colin Campbell (The China Study: The Most Comprehensive Study of Nutrition Ever Conducted and the Startling Implications for Diet, Weight Loss and Long-Term Health)
Twenty years of medical research has shown that childhood adversity literally gets under our skin, changing people in ways that can endure in their bodies for decades. It can tip a child’s developmental trajectory and affect physiology. It can trigger chronic inflammation and hormonal changes that can last a lifetime. It can alter the way DNA is read and how cells replicate, and it can dramatically increase the risk for heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes—even Alzheimer’s.
Nadine Burke Harris (The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity)
Sturtevant’s rudimentary genetic map would foreshadow the vast and elaborate efforts to map genes along the human genome in the 1990s. By using linkage to establish the relative positions of genes on chromosomes, Sturtevant would also lay the groundwork for the future cloning of genes tied to complex familial diseases, such as breast cancer, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer’s disease. In about twelve hours, in an undergraduate dorm room in New York, he had poured the foundation for the Human Genome Project.
Siddhartha Mukherjee (The Gene: An Intimate History)
Your waist size is such an important predictor of health because the type of fat that is stored around your waistline—called “visceral fat” or “belly fat”—is related to the release of proteins and hormones that cause inflammation, which can in turn damage your arteries and affect how you metabolize sugars and fats. For this reason, visceral fat is strongly linked to type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, Alzheimer’s, and other chronic diseases. Seeing your waist size come down is a great indicator of improving health.
Joseph Mercola (Fat for Fuel: A Revolutionary Diet to Combat Cancer, Boost Brain Power, and Increase Your Energy)
I should also add something about weight here, because we all know that there’s often a relationship between weight and risk for diabetes. If the risk for Alzheimer’s disease goes up with metabolic disorders, then it makes sense that the risk also rises with unhealthy weight gain that has metabolic consequences. The science now speaks to this fact. Carrying extra weight around the abdomen has been shown to be particularly harmful to the brain. One study that garnered lots of media attention looked at over six thousand individuals aged forty to forty-five and measured the size of their bellies between 1964 and 1973.11 A few decades later, they were evaluated to see who had developed dementia and how that related to their waist size at the start of the study. The correlation between risk of dementia and thicker midsections twenty-seven years earlier was remarkable: Those with the highest level of abdominal fat had an increased risk of dementia of almost three-fold in comparison to those with the lowest abdominal weight. There is plenty of evidence that managing your weight now will go a long way toward preventing brain decline later.
Sanjay Gupta (Keep Sharp: Build a Better Brain at Any Age)
ASPARTAME AND MSG: EXCITOTOXINS Aspartame is, in fact, an excitotoxin, one of a group of substances, usually acidic amino acids, that in high amounts react with specialized receptors in the brain, causing destruction of certain types of neurons. A growing number of neurosurgeons and neurologists are convinced that excitotoxins play a critical role in the development of several neurological disorders, including migraines, seizures, learning disorders in children, and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).1 Glutamate and aspartate are two powerful amino acids that act as neurotransmitters in the brain in very small concentrations, but they are also commonly available in food additives. Glutamate is in MSG, a flavor enhancer, and in hydrolyzed vegetable protein, found in hundreds of processed foods. Aspartate is one of three components of aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal), a sugar substitute. In higher concentrations as food additives, these chemicals constantly stimulate brain cells and can cause them to undergo a process of cell death known as excitotoxicity—the cells are excited to death.
Carolyn Dean (The Magnesium Miracle)
When Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act in 1935, old age was defined as sixty-five years, yet estimated life expectancy in the United States at the time was sixty-one years for males and sixty-four years for females.62 A senior citizen today, however, can expect to live eighteen to twenty years longer. The downside is that he or she also should expect to die more slowly. The two most common causes of death in 1935 America were respiratory diseases (pneumonia and influenza) and infectious diarrhea, both of which kill rapidly. In contrast, the two most common causes of death in 2007 America were heart disease and cancer (each accounted for about 25 percent of total deaths). Some heart attack victims die within minutes or hours, but most elderly people with heart disease survive for years while coping with complications such as high blood pressure, congestive heart failure, general weakness, and peripheral vascular disease. Many cancer patients also remain alive for several years following their diagnosis because of chemo-therapy, radiation, surgery, and other treatments. In addition, many of the other leading causes of death today are chronic illnesses such as asthma, Alzheimer’s, type 2 diabetes, and kidney disease, and there has been an upsurge in the occurrence of nonfatal but chronic illnesses such as osteoarthritis, gout, dementia, and hearing loss.63 Altogether, the growing prevalence of chronic illness among middle-aged and elderly individuals is contributing to a health-care crisis because the children born during the post–World War II baby boom are now entering old age, and an unprecedented percentage of them are suffering from lingering, disabling, and costly diseases. The term epidemiologists coined for this phenomenon is the “extension of morbidity.
Daniel E. Lieberman (The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health and Disease)
Nobel laureate Elizabeth Blackburn is more optimistic and says, "Every sign, including genetics, says there's some causality [between telomeres] and the nasty things that happen with aging." She notes that there is a direct link between the shortened telomeres and certain diseases. For example, if you have shortened telomeres- if your telomeres are in the bottom third of the population in terms of length-then your risk of cardiovascular disease is 40 percent greater. "Telomere shortening," she concludes, "seems to underlie the risks for the diseases that kill you...heart disease, diabetes, cancer, even Alzheimer's.
Michio Kaku (The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality and Our Destiny Beyond Earth)
Where do you even start with Cinderella? Let's ignore Cinderella's victim status and total lack of self-determination and head straight for the prince who was, let's face it, a bit of a jerk. Despite being captivated by Cinderella's radiant beauty for half the night, come the cold light of day he has completely forgotten what she looks like and only has her shoe size to go on. Either he was suffering from some sort of early onset Alzheimer's disease or else he was completely off his face during the big ball. the end result is that he goes trawling through the kingdom in some sort of perverted foot-fetish style quest for someone, anyone, who fits the glass slipper. Just how superficial is this guy? What if Cinderella had turned up at the ball looking exactly like she did only with a mole on her face and that had a couple of twelve-centimetre hairs sticking out of it? What if a bearded troll just happened to have the same shoe size as Cinderella? 'Ah, well. Pucker up, bushy cheeks, it's snog time.' And no one ever bothers to question the sheer impracticality of Cinderella's footwear. Glass might be good for many things but it's not exactly malleable in its cooled state. If everyone turned and gaped when Cinderella made her big entrance into the ball, it's only because she'd have come staggering in like a drunken giraffe on rollerblades. Bit of a head turner.
John Larkin (The Shadow Girl)
How often are people told they’ve brought a condition like depression upon themselves? It’s all part of mercury’s blame-the-victim game. Those depressive symptoms are the mercury speaking for the patient without her or his consent. Sometimes mercury moves past the hostage phase and takes someone out, resulting in death by Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, dementia, or stroke. It’s that serious. Mercury has injured or killed well over a billion people. No one likes Alzheimer’s; it’s a frightening, terrible disease. Yet it’s rapidly becoming common—and it’s 100 percent mercury-caused. You heard that here first: Mercury is 100 percent responsible for Alzheimer’s disease. You will never in your lifetime hear the truth about that anywhere else.
Anthony William (Medical Medium: Secrets Behind Chronic and Mystery Illness and How to Finally Heal)
Consider this scenario: A man gets a stomachache after each meal. To “treat” this problem, he takes (either by prescription or by self-medication) some antacid or other nostrum. Then he gets a headache (which may or may not be a side effect of the stomach medication); to “treat” the headache he takes aspirin, which further irritates his stomach. Three years later he develops an ulcer, for which he takes another medication, plus large amounts of milk and cream (although an outmoded treatment, it is still being used today). Meanwhile, he is still taking antacids for his indigestion and eating the same way he always had. Eventually, he has an operation to remove his ulcer. He continues with his high-dairy diet. Soon thereafter he develops arteriosclerosis and high blood pressure and begins to take antihypertensive medication. The side effects of the latter include headaches, dizziness, drowsiness, diarrhea, slow heart rate, mental confusion, hallucinations, weight gain, and impotence. When his wife leaves him for a younger man, he takes antidepressants and sleeping pills. He has a heart attack and undergoes an operation to repair a heart valve. Painkillers keep him going as he slowly recuperates. A year or two later, he finds himself with an irreversible neurological disease such as ALS or Alzheimer’s, and he wonders what could have gone wrong. All that’s left for him to do is wait to die, which he can do in a nursing home, drugged into complaisance and painlessness.
Annemarie Colbin (Food and Healing)
Huperzia serrata   Native to India and Southeast Asia, the Huperzia serrata is also called firmoss. It is used in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine as medicinal plants to treat different types of maladies. In recent studies, researchers have found out that it contains neuro-protective properties.   Benefits   Unlike other medicinal herbs in Asia, Huperzia serrata is not as common in Western folk medicine. This particular herb contains the compound called huperzine A which is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and NMDA receptor antagonist. Below are the benefits of using this medicinal herb.   It is used to improve the brain and cognitive function.   It can also help prevent the occurrence of autoimmune neuromuscular diseases that can lead to muscle weakness and disability.   It has the potential of treating patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.   How to Use   This particular medicinal herb is prepared as tea or infusion. However, there are also dietary supplements available from the market that you can take.
Jeff Robson (Medicinal Herbs: The Ultimate Guide to Medical Herbs that Heal)
— The opening argument was one of Devlin-Brown’s favorite parts of a trial. In a case like this, it was sometimes all that mattered. The U.S. Attorney’s Office had a formula for it, a system that was passed down through generations of prosecutors. It started with what they called “the grab”—a quick, two-minute summary of the case, meant to capture the jury’s attention. The grab could begin in one of two ways. The first was with a big thematic idea, as in, “This is a case about greed.” Devlin-Brown preferred what he called the “It was a dark and stormy night” beginning, which dropped the jurors right into a dramatic scene. Just like in a movie. On this day, his version began with, “It was July of 2008.” He spoke in a gentle, even voice. “Mathew Martoma, the defendant, was one of about a thousand people packed into a crowded Chicago convention hall waiting for an expert on Alzheimer’s disease to take the stage.” Sidney Gilman, he explained, was at an international Alzheimer’s conference to unveil the results of a hotly anticipated drug trial. The results of
Sheelah Kolhatkar (Black Edge: Inside Information, Dirty Money, and the Quest to Bring Down the Most Wanted Man on Wall Street)
Alzheimer’s disease, which is associated with the production and accumulation of amyloid-β in the brain. That means he has serious neural damage all over the brain. While for the past twenty years or so amyloid has been considered the “cause” of Alzheimer’s, there is recent evidence against that hypothesis, and others are being entertained.1 At any rate, the disease results in the slow destruction of the brain, commencing particularly with the loss of neurons in the entorhinal cortex and the hippocampus, resulting in short-term memory loss. The disease can become so debilitating that it can completely reshape Grandpa’s personality, transforming him from a lively and caring person into a listless shell of his former self. Yet, though he may not recognize me, he is still cognizant of social niceties and shakes my hand. He may wander off, but he will still feel fear when confused and lost, and anger when frustrated. His conscious experience of the world is brought to him through whatever operational neural circuitry continues to function, and as he loses function, it becomes more restricted. The contents of that conscious experience most likely are odd, very different from those of the normal brain or his past self. As a result, odd behavior follows.
Michael S. Gazzaniga (The Consciousness Instinct: Unraveling the Mystery of How the Brain Makes the Mind)
We have a crisis in this nation, and it has nothing to do with regulatory reform or marginal tax rates. This book is not going to be about politics. (Sorry to disappoint.) It’s about something deeper and more meaningful. Something a little harder to quantify but a lot more personal. Despite the astonishing medical advances and technological leaps of recent years, average life span is in decline in America for the third year in a row. This is the first time our nation has had even a two-year drop in life expectancy since 1962—when the cause was an influenza epidemic. Normally, declines in life expectancy are due to something big like that—a war, or the return of a dormant disease. But what’s the “big thing” going on in America now? What’s killing all these people? The 2016 data point to three culprits: Alzheimer’s, suicides, and unintentional injuries—a category that includes drug and alcohol–related deaths. Two years ago, 63,632 people died of overdoses. That’s 11,000 more than the previous year, and it’s more than the number of Americans killed during the entire twenty-year Vietnam War. It’s almost twice the number killed in automobile accidents annually, which had been the leading American killer for decades. In 2016, there were 45,000 suicides, a thirty-year high—and the sobering climb shows no signs of abating: the percentage of young people hospitalized for suicidal thoughts and actions has doubled over the past decade.1 We’re killing ourselves, both on purpose and accidentally. These aren’t deaths from famine, or poverty, or war. We’re literally dying of despair.
Ben Sasse (Them: Why We Hate Each Other--and How to Heal)
It may seem paradoxical to claim that stress, a physiological mechanism vital to life, is a cause of illness. To resolve this apparent contradiction, we must differentiate between acute stress and chronic stress. Acute stress is the immediate, short-term body response to threat. Chronic stress is activation of the stress mechanisms over long periods of time when a person is exposed to stressors that cannot be escaped either because she does not recognize them or because she has no control over them. Discharges of nervous system, hormonal output and immune changes constitute the flight-or-fight reactions that help us survive immediate danger. These biological responses are adaptive in the emergencies for which nature designed them. But the same stress responses, triggered chronically and without resolution, produce harm and even permanent damage. Chronically high cortisol levels destroy tissue. Chronically elevated adrenalin levels raise the blood pressure and damage the heart. There is extensive documentation of the inhibiting effect of chronic stress on the immune system. In one study, the activity of immune cells called natural killer (NK) cells were compared in two groups: spousal caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s disease, and age- and health-matched controls. NK cells are front-line troops in the fight against infections and against cancer, having the capacity to attack invading micro-organisms and to destroy cells with malignant mutations. The NK cell functioning of the caregivers was significantly suppressed, even in those whose spouses had died as long as three years previously. The caregivers who reported lower levels of social support also showed the greatest depression in immune activity — just as the loneliest medical students had the most impaired immune systems under the stress of examinations. Another study of caregivers assessed the efficacy of immunization against influenza. In this study 80 per cent among the non-stressed control group developed immunity against the virus, but only 20 per cent of the Alzheimer caregivers were able to do so. The stress of unremitting caregiving inhibited the immune system and left people susceptible to influenza. Research has also shown stress-related delays in tissue repair. The wounds of Alzheimer caregivers took an average of nine days longer to heal than those of controls. Higher levels of stress cause higher cortisol output via the HPA axis, and cortisol inhibits the activity of the inflammatory cells involved in wound healing. Dental students had a wound deliberately inflicted on their hard palates while they were facing immunology exams and again during vacation. In all of them the wound healed more quickly in the summer. Under stress, their white blood cells produced less of a substance essential to healing. The oft-observed relationship between stress, impaired immunity and illness has given rise to the concept of “diseases of adaptation,” a phrase of Hans Selye’s. The flight-or-fight response, it is argued, was indispensable in an era when early human beings had to confront a natural world of predators and other dangers. In civilized society, however, the flight-fight reaction is triggered in situations where it is neither necessary nor helpful, since we no longer face the same mortal threats to existence. The body’s physiological stress mechanisms are often triggered inappropriately, leading to disease. There is another way to look at it. The flight-or-fight alarm reaction exists today for the same purpose evolution originally assigned to it: to enable us to survive. What has happened is that we have lost touch with the gut feelings designed to be our warning system. The body mounts a stress response, but the mind is unaware of the threat. We keep ourselves in physiologically stressful situations, with only a dim awareness of distress or no awareness at all.
Gabor Maté (When the Body Says No: The Cost of Hidden Stress)
Omega-3 is central to cell function and heart health. People who eat a diet rich in omega-3 experience lower rates of heart attack, depression, schizophrenia, ADHD, and Alzheimer's disease. Omega-3 has also been shown to slow the growth of some types of cancer.
Lana Asprey (The Better Baby Book: How to Have a Healthier, Smarter, Happier Baby)
Elite Performance Know your brain. Elite athletes know their bodies and train their bodies; elite mental athletes must know their brains and train their brains. Elite athletes commit serious time to intentional improvement programs, not just haphazard training. They work with a coach, do diagnosis, learn which muscles to work on and how much. Following the suggestions in the book will help you improve your mental fitness. Train your brain. It’s important to train your brain: It will help you personally, not only in your career but also in your later years, by reducing your risk of Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive decline. It will also help your
David Silverstein (Become an Elite Mental Athlete)
in making neurotransmitters, the pathways that neurons travel on. The major breakthrough is the fact that the brain becomes insulin resistant. A substance in coconut oil and palm oil called MCT. When the oil is metabolized, it created ketones which could protect the brain from Alzheimer's, it may reverse the disease. It has been tested as possible treatments for Parkinson's Disease, Huntington's Disease, Multiple Sclerosis and amotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as ALS, or Lou Gherig's disease). There have been some positive results with coconut oil. With further research, there may be a cure for disease that takes so much away from those stricken with the diseases.
Victoria Lane (COCONUT OIL: 101 Miraculous Coconut Oil Benefits, Cures, Uses, and Remedies (Coconut Oil Secrets, Cures, and Recipes for Amazing Health and Vibrant Beauty))
There has been very good news lately that coconut oil can help Alzheimer's patients and patients with Parkinson's Disease, and patients that suffer from dementia. Alzheimer's patients brains cannot metabolize sugar the way it used to. Insulin helps the brain take up sugars from the blood, however insulin isn't very helpful. Generally, brain cells simply starve to death over time. Insulin stimulates brain cells to take sugar and metabolize it for energy. Insulin is also important
Victoria Lane (COCONUT OIL: 101 Miraculous Coconut Oil Benefits, Cures, Uses, and Remedies (Coconut Oil Secrets, Cures, and Recipes for Amazing Health and Vibrant Beauty))
According to a large study from Kaiser Permanente, for every 0.05 increase above 4.72, patients had an additional 6 percent increased risk of developing diabetes in the next ten years (4.82 = 12 percent increased risk, etc.) Above 5 indicates that vascular damage has already occurred and a patient is at risk for having damage to the kidneys and eyes. Why is high fasting blood sugar a problem? High blood sugar causes vascular problems throughout your whole body, including your brain. Over time, it causes blood vessels to become brittle and vulnerable to breakage. It leads not only to diabetes but also to heart disease, strokes, visual impairment, impaired wound healing, wrinkled skin, and cognitive problems. Diabetes doubles the risk for Alzheimer’s disease.
Daniel G. Amen (Unleash the Power of the Female Brain: Supercharging yours for better health, energy, mood, focus and sex)
we have witnessed in the Western world an explosion of other chronic diseases that apparently are affected by the stress response. Heart disease, Alzheimer’s, chronic fatigue, high blood pressure, asthma, immune system diseases, and even cancer are linked to unhealthy levels of stress and the stress hormones.
Henry Emmons (The Chemistry of Calm: A Powerful, Drug-Free Plan to Quiet Your Fears and Overcome Your Anxiety)
Visigoth and Gaul, politics and plague. She fought on, struggling in tandem with antiquated interpretations and outmoded explanations, wondering at the senselessness of something so strong, so powerful, so immovable fading from history, disappearing, once and for all time, into shadow and dust.
Fiddles McMonkeypants
In addition to the conditions it already affects, free radical damage is now being linked to hypertension, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, leukemia, Parkinson’s disease, congestive heart failure, and irritable bowel disease.
Steven Lamm (The Hardness Factor)
Researchers have found that men with lower levels of testosterone are more than four times as likely to suffer from clinical depression, fatal heart attacks, and cancer when compared to other men their age with higher testosterone levels. They are also more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, and have a far greater risk of dying prematurely from any cause (ranging from 88 to 250 percent higher, depending on the study).33
Christopher Ryan (Sex at Dawn: How We Mate, Why We Stray, and What It Means for Modern Relationships)
a man in California who can track whether his father with Alzheimer’s disease, who lives in a nursing home in the United Kingdom, has taken his medication. He can also see how his father sleeps at night.
Bertalan Meskó (The Guide to the Future of Medicine: Technology AND The Human Touch)
Katie informed us that there was a life ever after, a place called Heaven or Eternal Rest where there was no pain or suffering. She forewarned him of his death and his Alzheimer Disease disappeared. He saw a fast rewind replay of his life and he regained his sanity on his deathbed he got an opportunity to say thanks for everything and goodbye to his loved ones. His gift to Emma was a kiss sealing the gift of a ghost whisperer to Emma so he will never abandon her or the kids. They will communicate forever. He will help her through this life and return watching over her and navigate a path for her into the next life, Heaven
Annette J. Dunlea
Loss of Proteostasis: Inside a cell, proteins run the show. They transport materials, send signals, switch processes on and off, and provide structural support. But proteins become less effective over time, so the body recycles them. Unfortunately, as we age, we can lose this ability. The trash collector goes on strike and we suffer a toxic buildup of proteins that can, for example, lead to diseases such as Alzheimer’s.
Peter H. Diamandis (The Future Is Faster Than You Think: How Converging Technologies Are Transforming Business, Industries, and Our Lives (Exponential Technology Series))
Remember that not all people are diagnosed at an early stage. Decision making already may be different when Alzheimer's disease is diagnosed-WHY YOU MUST URGENTLY PREPARE FOR THE FINANCIAL AND LEGAL CONSEQUENCES OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE BARNES ANDNOBLE NOOK BOOK
V.J. Smith (YUM YUM CROCKPOT RECIPES)
Try
Nancy L. Mace (The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for People Who Have Alzheimer Disease, Other Dementias, and Memory Loss (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book))
Alzheimer’s is being called type 3 diabetes, linked to a gluten-rich, wheat-based diet and a stressed-out brain.4 And these are just a few of the diseases that are killing us prematurely and compromising our quality of life.
Alberto Villoldo (One Spirit Medicine: Ancient Ways to Ultimate Wellness)
Even if the body’s inflammatory response is a necessary part of its physiology to heal wounds, fight infection, and rebuild the muscles. However, too much inflammation leads to a number of conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, arthritis, autonomous disorders, cancer, chronic pain, eczema, premature aging, and yeast infection. Sugar is an inflammatory food and having too much sugar in the body exposes it to a continuously inflamed state. Sugar detox helps prevent the foretasted conditions which put sugar addicts at a higher risk of contracting these conditions.
Samantha Michaels (Sugar Detox : Sugar Detox Program To Naturally Cleanse Your Sugar Craving , Lose Weight and Feel Great In Just 15 Days Or Less!)
Nevertheless, the large number of experiences of this type reported by carers suggest that it is an area that deserves far more attention. If it can be shown that patients with significant degradation of their brain tissue (for example, in advanced cases of Alzheimer’s Disease) become lucid, with memories intact, in their final days, what implications does this have for the relationship between mind and brain?
Greg Taylor (Stop Worrying! There Probably is an Afterlife)
If I sequenced my own genome and showed it to a geneticist, she would be able to say approximately where on the planet I or my ancestors came from by matching variants in my genome with the geographic patterns of variants across the globe. She would not, however, be  able to tell whether I was smart or dumb, tall or short, or almost anything else that matters with respect to how I function as a human being. Indeed, despite the fact that most efforts to understand the genome have sprung from efforts to combat disease, for the vast majority of diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, cancer, diabetes, or heart disease, our current understanding allows us only to assign vague probabilities to the likelihood that an individual will develop them.
Svante Pääbo (Neanderthal Man: In Search of Lost Genomes)
Your lifetime risk for general dementia is literally cut in half if you participate in physical activity. Aerobic exercise seems to be the key. With Alzheimer’s, the effect is even greater: Such exercise reduces your odds of getting the disease by more than 60 percent. How much exercise? Once again, a little goes a long way. The researchers showed you have to participate in some form of exercise just twice a week to get the benefit. Bump it up to a 20-minute walk each day, and you can cut your risk of having a stroke—one of the leading causes of mental disability in the elderly—by 57 percent.
John Medina (Brain Rules: 12 Principles for Surviving and Thriving at Work, Home, and School)
It is observed that brains with insulin resistance develop 100% Alzheimer’s disease. This is the reason why Alzheimer’s is also called Type 3 Diabetes.
Srividya Bhaskara (Added Sugars-The Slow Poison)
Ronald Reagan, struck down by Alzheimer's disease, has simply forgotten he was once President of the United States. Is this really so serious? When he was President he had already forgotten he had been an actor. And isn't it more serious to take yourself for the President of the United States when you are, than to forget you have been when you no longer are?
Jean Baudrillard (Cool Memories IV, 1995-2000)
It’s our memories and experiences that make us who we are. Alzheimer’s rips away what defines a person piece by piece. There’s nothing good about the disease. Not one damn thing.” Thayne’s
Robin Perini (Forgotten Secrets (Singing River Legacy, #1))
Alzheimer’s disease is caused by the accumulation in the brain of sticky synapse-destroying plaques made of a piece of a protein called amyloid-beta. Those lab studies indicated that amyloid-beta is formed in the brain by a series of steps, and that either intervening in those steps or destroying amyloid-beta* plaques would be an effective
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
Four things about learning how to care for someone with dementia are important to realize. Firstly, most family carers are unfamiliar with the effects of dementia on people’s abilities, and people with dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease, or another disease, function in ways that most of us have never experienced.  Common sense does not help here. The carers have to learn how to understand new information about memory processes and how to cope with situations that are new to them. Secondly, don’t be too hard on yourself. If you realize you have made a mistake in the way you have been interacting with a person with dementia, learn from it, change what you are doing, but don’t hang onto the guilt. Forgive yourself. Know that every family goes through these painful experiences and feelings of being inadequate. Apologize to the person with dementia and then distract them with something fun. Thirdly, understand that each person with dementia is unique in the way they behave and how they understand what is happening. What has helped one family carer to cope may not help the next. Be patient with yourself and the person with dementia and never stop trying to find ways to help yourselves. Coping often means trying one thing after the other, and then using the approach that works for as long as it continues to work. Fourthly, scolding and arguing will not help them learn because they have lost most of their capacity to learn with their short-term memory. Scolding will, however, establish a procedural memory in their mind that interacting with you is always unpleasant.
Jennifer Ghent-Fuller (Thoughtful Dementia Care: Understanding the Dementia Experience)
Does it surprise you that Alzheimer’s disease is referred to as “type III diabetes” by virtue of their similar pathophysiology? It shouldn’t. Nor should the preventable nature of these diseases. So
Brett Osborn (Get Serious)
when something is ever present, you stop responding to it. This insulin resistance contributes not only to type 2 diabetes, fatty liver, and metabolic syndrome, but also to Alzheimer’s disease.
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
I’ve seen the answer: some of them figure, “If that’s what science is, I might as well make money!” Four years later their brainpower is applied to thinking up algorithms that allow hedge funds to act on financial information a few milliseconds faster rather than to finding new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease or technologies for carbon capture and storage.
Steven Pinker (Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress)
As we become ever more insulin-resistant and glucose-intolerant, as our blood sugar gets higher along with our insulin levels, as our blood pressure elevates and we get ever fatter, we are more likely to be diagnosed as diabetic and manifest the diseases and conditions that associate with diabetes. These include not just heart disease, gout, cancer, Alzheimer’s, and the cluster of Western diseases that Burkitt and Trowell included in their provisional list, but all the conditions typically perceived as complications of diabetes: blood-vessel (vascular) complications that lead to strokes, dementia, and kidney disease; retinopathy (blindness) and cataracts; neuropathies (nerve disorders); plaque deposits in the arteries of the heart (leading to heart attacks) or the legs and feet (leading to amputations); accumulation of advanced glycation end products, AGEs, in the collagen of our skin that can make diabetics look prematurely old, and that in joints, arteries, and the heart and lungs can cause the loss of elasticity as we age. It’s this premature aging of the skin, arteries, and joints that has led some diabetes researchers to think of the disease as a form of accelerated aging. But increasing our risk of contracting all these other chronic conditions means we’re also likely to get these ailments at ever-younger ages and thus, effectively, age faster.
Gary Taubes (The Case Against Sugar)
It must be the nowness of this disease that, in stealing the past and obscuring the future, forces us, the healthy and the ill, to stay in the moment.
Lauren Kessler (Dancing with Rose: Finding Life in the Land of Alzheimer's)
Good News for Coffee Lovers For years many people who love a strong cup of freshly brewed coffee have felt guilty about what coffee might be doing to their health. A growing body of research studies, however, now suggests that drinking up to 3 to 5 cups of coffee a day plays a potential role in preventing a range of disorders, including type 2 diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, and cardiovascular disease.
Deepak Chopra (What Are You Hungry For?: The Chopra Solution to Permanent Weight Loss, Well-Being, and Lightness of Soul)
Other changes that are induced due to intermittent fasting are: Increased Human Growth Hormone(HGH): When you fast, the levels of different growth hormones in your body increase drastically. They have been observed to have increased up to 5 times. This in turn accelerates fat loss and muscle gain. Decreased Levels of Insulin: Through intermittent fasting, the levels of insulin in the body decreases by a lot. On the other hand, this also increases insulin sensitivity in the body. Insulin sensitive means how responsive to insulin your cells are. The decreased levels of insulin make stored body fat more accessible for different biological processes. Better Brain Health:  Another change that occurs when you take part in intermittent fasting is that the brain hormone BDNF increases in amount. It also helps in the growth of new nerve cells. Additionally, this type of fasting can help to protect against Alzheimer’s disease.
Patricia Cook (Autophagy: Learn How To Activate Autophagy Safely Through Intermittent Fasting, Exercise and Diet. A Practical Guide to Detox Your Body and Boost Your Energy)
The risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimers can be significantly decreased through autophagy. Neurodegenerative diseases work on the basis of the accumulation of old and toxic neurons that pile up in particular areas of the brain and spread in surrounding areas. Autophagy replaces useless neuron parts and regenerates new ones, keeping these kinds of diseases in check.
Patricia Cook (Autophagy: Learn How To Activate Autophagy Safely Through Intermittent Fasting, Exercise and Diet. A Practical Guide to Detox Your Body and Boost Your Energy)
The good news, as a senior scientist at the Center for Alzheimer’s Research entitled a review article, is that “Alzheimer’s Disease Is Incurable but Preventable.”61 Diet and lifestyle changes could potentially prevent millions of cases a year.62 How? There is an emerging consensus that “what is good for our hearts is also good for our heads,”63 because clogging of the arteries inside of the brain with atherosclerotic plaque is thought to play a pivotal role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease.64 It is not surprising, then, that the dietary centerpiece of the 2014 “Dietary and Lifestyle Guidelines for the Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease,” published in the journal Neurobiology of Aging, was: “Vegetables, legumes (beans, peas, and lentils), fruits, and whole grains should replace meats and dairy products as primary staples of the diet.
Michael Greger (How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease)
Excess cholesterol in the blood can lead to excess cholesterol in the brain, which may then help trigger the clumping of amyloid seen in Alzheimer’s brains. Under an electron microscope, we can see the clustering of amyloid fibers on and around tiny crystals of cholesterol.85 And indeed, advanced brain imaging techniques, such as PET scans, have shown a direct correlation between the amount of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol in the blood and amyloid buildup in the brain.
Michael Greger (How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease)
It is possible that drinking three or four cups of coffee a day may protect against Alzheimer’s, as it was shown to protect against Parkinson’s.
Valter Longo (The Longevity Diet: Discover the New Science Behind Stem Cell Activation and Regeneration to Slow Aging, Fight Disease, and Optimize Weight)
Feelings of suspicion—sometimes rising to the level of paranoia—can be a symptom of many types of mental illness, including Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s patients may accuse their romantic partners of cheating on them or their caretakers of stealing property or trying to harm or even kill them. While neuroscientists don’t really understand the networks or parts of the brain related to paranoia, in some cases this condition is attributed to temporal lobe damage.
Barbara K. Lipska (The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind: My Tale of Madness and Recovery)
Biomarkers of inflammation, like cytokines and CRP, are increased in many stressful situations, including poverty, debt and social isolation. Carers of patients with Alzheimer’s disease, people with day-to-day responsibility for a spouse or relative with dementia, have increased inflammatory biomarkers.74 So do adults who suffered poverty, neglect or maltreatment as children.
Edward Bullmore (The Inflamed Mind: A radical new approach to depression)
Many degenerative diseases of the brain, especially Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s Disease) have a curious aspect. In all of them, the first thing to go is the sense of smell. Why smell? No one knows. Many reasons for this might exist—the disease somehow attacks the neurons transmitting the sense of smell into the brain. Maybe some primitive evolutionary imprint has left its mark on our nose and it just gives up when the brain begins to degenerate in any area. However, we are taught that in Alzheimer’s, the point of attack is the hippocampus, which is the area responsible for forming new memories—the area cut out of Brenda Milner’s famous patient HM. In Parkinson’s, the debilitated area is the basal ganglia, and particularly the substantia nigra, an area that helps control movement.
Andrew Koob (The Root of Thought: Unlocking Glia- the Brain Cell That Will Help Us Sharpen Our Wits, Heal Injury, and Treat Brain Disease)
Autophagy also plays an important role in the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s is characterized by the abnormal accumulation of amyloid beta (Aß) proteins in the brain, and it’s believed that these accumulations eventually destroy the synaptic connections in the memory and cognition areas. Normally, clumps of Aß protein are removed by autophagy: the brain cell activates the autophagosome, the cell’s internal garbage truck, which engulfs the Aß protein targeted for removal and excretes it, so it can be removed by the blood and recycled into other protein or turned into glucose, depending upon the body’s needs. But in Alzheimer’s disease, autophagy is impaired and the Aß protein remains inside the brain cell, where eventual buildup will result in the clinical syndromes of Alzheimer’s disease. Cancer is yet another disease that may be a result of disordered autophagy. We’re learning that mTOR plays a role in cancer biology, and mTOR inhibitors have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of various cancers. Fasting’s role in inhibiting mTOR, thereby stimulating autophagy, provides an interesting opportunity to prevent cancer’s development.
Jason Fung (The Complete Guide to Fasting: Heal Your Body Through Intermittent, Alternate-Day, and Extended Fasting)
fasting also stimulates growth hormone, which signals the production of some new snazzy cell parts, giving our bodies a complete renovation. Since it triggers both the breakdown of old cellular parts and the creation of new ones, fasting may be considered one of the most potent anti-aging methods in existence. Autophagy also plays an important role in the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s is characterized by the abnormal accumulation of amyloid beta (Aß) proteins in the brain, and it’s believed that these accumulations eventually destroy the synaptic connections in the memory and cognition areas. Normally, clumps of Aß protein are removed by autophagy: the brain cell activates the autophagosome, the cell’s internal garbage truck, which engulfs the Aß protein targeted for removal and excretes it, so it can be removed by the blood and recycled into other protein or turned into glucose, depending upon the body’s needs. But in Alzheimer’s disease, autophagy is impaired and the Aß protein remains inside the brain cell, where eventual buildup will result in the clinical syndromes of Alzheimer’s disease. Cancer is yet another disease that may be a result of disordered autophagy. We’re learning that mTOR plays a role in cancer biology, and mTOR inhibitors have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of various cancers. Fasting’s role in inhibiting mTOR, thereby stimulating autophagy, provides an interesting opportunity to prevent cancer’s development. Indeed, some leading scientists, such as Dr. Thomas Seyfried, a professor of biology at Boston College, have proposed a yearly seven-day water-only fast for this very reason.
Jason Fung (The Complete Guide to Fasting: Heal Your Body Through Intermittent, Alternate-Day, and Extended Fasting)
By 1993 Murdoch was becoming reluctant to engage in public activities and dreaded giving interviews. These late letters increasingly evidence the language difficulties and amnesia that, in retrospect, suggest the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, although the condition remained undiagnosed until 1997.
Iris Murdoch (Living on Paper: Letters from Iris Murdoch 1934-1995)
The breakthrough study was done by Dr. Peter Elwood and a team from the Cochrane Institute of Primary Care and Public Health, Cardiff University, United Kingdom, and released in December 2013. For thirty years, these researchers followed 2,235 men living in Caerphilly, Wales, aged 45 to 59, and observed the impact of five activities on their health and on whether they developed dementia or cognitive decline, heart disease, cancer, or early death. The Cardiff study was meticulous, examining the men at intervals over the thirty years, and if they showed signs of cognitive decline or dementia, they were sent for detailed clinical assessments of high quality. It overcame study design problems from eleven previous studies (discussed in the endnotes). Results showed that if the men did four or five of the following behaviors, their risk for cognitive (mental) decline and dementia (including Alzheimer’s) fell by 60 percent:
Norman Doidge (The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity)
This brings us to the latest area being explored in connection with low-intensity lasers: Alzheimer’s disease, the commonest kind of dementia. The Alzheimer’s brain is also inflamed, and the mitochondria have difficulty functioning and show signs of aging called oxidative stress, which is a kind of “rusting” of the molecules. Lights, which improve general cellular functioning in the brain, can improve all three conditions—inflammation, mitochondrial problems, and oxidative stress.* The hallmark of Alzheimer’s is that the neurons build up excess misshapen proteins, called tau proteins and amyloid proteins, to form plaques that lead to degeneration.
Norman Doidge (The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity)
A team from Sydney, Australia, has lowered levels of these proteins using light. They implanted human genes associated with Alzheimer’s into mouse DNA, so that the animals developed abnormal tau proteins and amyloid plaques. Then they treated them for a month with low-level light therapy, simply by holding the light one to two centimeters above the animals’ heads. Using the same spectrum of near-infrared light that has helped in traumatic brain injury, Parkinson’s disease, and retinal damage, they lowered both the pathological tau proteins and the amyloid plaques by 70 percent in key brain areas that Alzheimer’s affects. Thereafter signs of “rusting” decreased, and the mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cells, improved their function.
Norman Doidge (The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity)
The unfortunate animals raised for food are forced to eat large quantities of fish meal and rendered animal flesh and organs, which is totally unnatural for them, in order to fatten them quickly. Manure is also used to “enrich” their feed, and these additives concentrate toxins to an even higher extent than the plant foods the animals are fed. The toxins in the animal foods we eat include carcinogenic heavy metals, deadly PCBs, chemical residues, antibiotics, and the human-created nightmare we now call the prion. Prions are thought to cause mad cow disease and the other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies that have raged through both human cannibal populations (such as the cannibalistic Fore people of Papua New Guinea where a type of human spongiform encephalopathy, called by them “kuru,” was first documented in the 1950s) and animal cannibal populations (such as the farmed sheep and mink populations that developed scrapie and transmissible mink encephalopathy after being fed rendered animal flesh). Similar diseases such as Creutzfeld-Jacob disease (the human equivalent of mad cow) and, according to some researchers, certain forms of Alzheimer’s disease, now threaten human omnivore populations as well because of perverse industry standards that have dictated feeding cows to other cows, and that still feed pigs to other pigs, chickens to other chickens, and pigs and chickens to cows.30
Will Tuttle (The World Peace Diet)
Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have determined that the brain is directly connected to the immune system by lymphatic vessels we didn’t know existed.25 That we had no idea about these vessels given the fact that the lymphatic system has been so thoroughly studied and charted throughout the body is astonishing on its own. And such a discovery will have significant effects on the study and treatment of neurological diseases, from autism and multiple sclerosis to Alzheimer’s disease and, yes, depression. It’s
Kelly Brogan (A Mind of Your Own: The Truth About Depression and How Women Can Heal Their Bodies to Reclaim Their Lives)
Tears water our eyes. "Remember," mom soothes, "like the beautiful blooms beneath the weeds, Nana is still Nana underneath.
Kathryn Harrison (Weeds in Nana's Garden: A heartfelt story of love that helps explain Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias.)
For David Shenk, the most important of the “windows onto meaning” afforded by Alzheimer’s is its slowing down of death. Shenk likens the disease to a prism that refracts death into a spectrum of its otherwise tightly conjoined parts—death of autonomy, death of memory, death of self-consciousness, death of personality, death of body—and he subscribes to the most common trope of Alzheimer’s: that its particular sadness and horror stem from the sufferer’s loss of his or her “self” long before the body dies.
Jonathan Franzen (How to Be Alone: Essays)
Old Timer's Disease The celebrity with Alzheimer's sued himself for writing his unauthorized autobiography.
Beryl Dov
EFAs are so important to the brain that some medical studies link low EFA levels to diseases such as depression, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s.
Rockridge Press (Nutrition Facts: The Truth About Food)
The population with the highest rate of the “Alzheimer’s gene” has one of the lowest rates of Alzheimer’s disease? This contradiction may be explained by Nigerians’ extremely low blood-cholesterol levels, thanks to a diet low in animal fat104 and consisting mainly of grains and vegetables.105 So, it
Michael Greger (How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease)
butyrate is linked to the prevention of degenerative diseases that affect the nervous system, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. This short chain fatty acid also increases the body’s energy expenditure and reduces inflammation. These characteristics
Greg Cook (Butter Coffee Weight Loss Protocol: Harness The Power of Butter Coffee & MCT Oil for Fat Loss (Paleo Diet, Paleo Recipes, Butter Coffee, Paleo Coffee, MCT Oil, Weight Loss Diet, Butter Coffee Diet))
Inflammation is the body’s natural response to invaders. I already discussed this problem and how “leaky gut” will lead to weight gain. It may be more important to note that “leaky gut” will lead to major health issues because it causes chronic inflammation. Cancer, asthma, headaches, allergies, arthritis, auto-immune disorders, heart disease, diabetes, depression, Alzheimer’s, and osteoporosis are all caused by chronic inflammation.
James Adler (Paleo Lifestyle for Healthy Weight. The Paleo Diet for Weight Loss, Health and Vitality. Transform Yourself With Delicious Paleo Recipes! (Paleo for Weight ... Loss, Paleo Weight Loss, Paleo for Health))
What they found was striking: higher levels of the inactive form of IRS-1 (signifying impaired insulin signaling in the brain) predicted Alzheimer’s disease development in patients with 100 percent accuracy.20 Even more breathtaking, the difference in these blood markers was evident ten years prior to the emergence of symptoms. This suggests that maintaining the brain’s insulin sensitivity throughout life may be a major step toward preventing the disease.
Max Lugavere (Genius Foods: Become Smarter, Happier, and More Productive While Protecting Your Brain for Life)
Biomedicine locates sickness in a specific place in an individual body: a headache, a stomachache a torn knee, lung cancer. Medical anthropologists instead locate sickness and health in three interconnected bodies: the political, the social, and the physical. The prevailing political economy impacts the distribution of sickness and health in a society and the means available to heal those who are sick. For example, poor individuals worldwide are more exposed to toxins that make them sick, while the rich stay healthier. The social body constructs the meanings and experiences surrounding particular physical states. It determines the ideal physical body, legitimizing biomedical practices like plastic surgery to attain it. The social body also determines the boundaries of the physical body. Some cultures locate sickness not in individuals but instead in families or communities. As any caregiver knows, we live the sickness too. And while biomedicine can cure diseases it flounders with permanent hurts, troubles of the mind, states present from birth or that are incurable or progressive. In biomedicine, these states are stigmatized and feared. We medical anthropologists have a term for this: social death.
Dana Walrath (Aliceheimer’s: Alzheimer’s Through the Looking Glass)
David was fifty-nine: well below the age the literature listed as the cutoff point between early-onset Alzheimer’s and the more typical variety. And in early-onset patients, the disease could move quite fast: two or three years until the individual’s comprehension skills were entirely lost, until the individual was no longer verbal. After that, quite rapidly, the function of his muscles and all of his reflexes would shut down completely.
Liz Moore (The Unseen World)
Adult onset diabetes will be reversed and cured. Alzheimer’s will be slowed, and in the early stages even partially reversed. Atherosclerosis will be halted, and slowly reversed. Cancer in principle will be slowed, but if a tumor has resulted, it must be treated. Future cancer risk and risk of recurrence of a treated cancer will both be reduced. Osteoporosis can be stopped and reversed. Loss of stature will, in some cases, reverse also. Osteoarthritis can be reversed in some cases. Aging will noticeably slow.
Mike Nichols (Quantitative Medicine: A Complete Guide to Getting Well, Staying Well, Avoiding Disease, Slowing Aging)
One of the doctors described the disease in a way that helped me. Picture a spiral of memories that begins in the center when you’re a child. A solid line circles outward with each year, laying down memories. Alzheimer’s cuts gaps in the solid line. Some of the newest memories disappear, while some are still there. Then, bit by bit, the disease works itself backward, destroying memories in reverse. Gram will forget us, then the memory of Mom will fade, then Dad. Eventually Pops, and finally her siblings and parents. At the end, her brain will cause her to lose the ability to eat, drink, and swallow.
Robin Perini (Forgotten Secrets (Singing River Legacy, #1))
NAFLD has been associated with cognitive deficits, which increase with the severity of the disease. In mice that are overfed to develop NAFLD, brain changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease begin to emerge, and mice that already had Alzheimer’s-related abnormalities (not a perfect model of human Alzheimer’s, but interesting nonetheless) exhibit exacerbated signs of disease and greater inflammation when fed concentrated fructose.23
Max Lugavere (Genius Foods: Become Smarter, Happier, and More Productive While Protecting Your Brain for Life)
The common cold virus takes hold in your nose and causes a local immune reaction that includes a runny nose and inflammation of the nasal passages. Despite the fact that the virus remains in your nose, your entire body can feel tired, heavy, and lethargic. Those symptoms of overall fatigue are a side effect of the inflammation process; the virus is in your nose, but you feel the effects of inflammation everywhere.
William Joel Meggs (The Inflammation Cure: How to Combat the Hidden Factor Behind Heart Disease, Arthritis, Asthma, Diabetes, Alzheimer's Disease, Osteoporosis and Other Diseases of Aging)
Holding hands, hugging, or just sitting companionably together is an important way to continue to communicate.
Nancy L. Mace (The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for People Who Have Alzheimer Disease, Other Dementias, and Memory Loss (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book))
As the dementia progresses and the person develops trouble with coordination and language, it is easy to forget his need to experience pleasant things and to enjoy himself. Never overlook the importance of hand holding, touching, hugging, and loving.
Nancy L. Mace (The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for People Who Have Alzheimer Disease, Other Dementias, and Memory Loss (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book))
Lp(a). People with high concentrations of Lp(a), an LDL variant, are at increased risk of heart problem and should focus on heart-healthy practices (exercise, low carbs). APO-E4. Apolipoproteins are a family of proteins that coat LDL, HDL, and chylomicron particles in order to make them water soluble. The APO-E4 subtype is a strong risk factor for Alzheimer’s and heart disease. Again, the best way to fight it, indeed, the only way, is through heart-healthy practices. Celiac Disease. This is caused by a reaction to gluten, which is found primarily in wheat. It can be quite serious if undiagnosed. Some cannot digest wheat. The solution is simple, though: no wheat or other glutens. LDL particle size. A predominance of small LDL particles causes heart disease. The size is determined by diet and exercise, but also genetically. Again heart-healthy practices can counteract this. Homeostatic weight. If you are on a low-carb diet and exercise, your body will regulate to the weight that your hypothalamus thinks is your healthiest. Further weight loss is difficult. The specific level is largely genetic. MTHFR. A deficiency of this could result in high homocysteine. Homocysteine is a toxic breakdown product of the essential amino acid methionine. Stress
Mike Nichols (Quantitative Medicine: A Complete Guide to Getting Well, Staying Well, Avoiding Disease, Slowing Aging)
Lp(a). Already mentioned, Lp(a) is a lipoprotein (cholesterol) variant that increases heart risk. About 10% of the population is at risk. See the “Is Your Lp(a) High?” section in chapter 9 for details. APO-E4. Apolipoproteins are a family of proteins that coat LDL, HDL, and chylomicron particles in order to make them water soluble. The APO-E4 subtype is a strong risk factor for Alzheimer’s. See “Do You Have the APO-E4 Variant?” in chapter 9 for details. Again, the best way to fight it, indeed, the only way, is through heart-healthy practices, and knowledge of its presence provides strong motivation. Normally this test is ordered after it is too late. Caught early, the risk can be substantially reduced. TTG and Gliadin Antibodies - Gluten Intolerance. Gluten intolerance is a severe reaction to gluten, found primarily in wheat. In the extreme, it is called celiac disease. Some cannot digest wheat at all. The solution is simple though: cut out wheat and other glutens. See “Are You Gluten Intolerant?” in chapter 9 for details.
Mike Nichols (Quantitative Medicine: A Complete Guide to Getting Well, Staying Well, Avoiding Disease, Slowing Aging)
Herpes simplex encephalitis used to be a prominent cause of such a disabling loss, but Alzheimer’s disease has now become the most frequent culprit. Specific cells within the hippocampal circuitry and its gateway, the entorhinal cortex, are compromised by Alzheimer’s disease. The gradual disruption no longer permits effective learning or recall of integrated events. The result is a progressive loss of spatial and temporal orientation. Unique people, events, and objects can no longer be recalled or recognized. No new ones can be learned. It is now clear that the hippocampus is an important site for neurogenesis, the process of generating new neurons that become incorporated in the local circuitry. New memory formation partly depends on neurogenesis. Interestingly, it is known that stress, which impairs memory, reduces neurogenesis.
António R. Damásio (The Strange Order of Things: Life, Feeling, and the Making of the Cultural Mind)
In Super Genes, Chopra and Tanzi acquaint us with new research that shows that “Some microbiomes may work better at nutrient extraction than others, with obese people extracting too much and skinny people extracting too little.” They also tell us that the microbiome reaches beyond digestion into every part of the body, and “It’s now known that gut bacteria produce neuroactive compounds that interact with brain cells and which can even control the expression of our own genes through epigenetics. When the natural balance of the microbiome becomes disrupted and unbalanced, we call it dysbiosis, yet only now is it being discovered that far from being just a digestive problem, dysbiosis is systemic in the damage it causes. The range of disorders linked to it is growing but is already startling in its numbers: links have been found to asthma, eczema, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis, autism, Alzheimer’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, obesity, cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, cancer, and malnutrition. Avenues for new treatments are leading down the same road—to the microbiome.
Barbara Milhoan (Unconscious Decisions: A Beginner's Guide to Finding the Hidden Beliefs that Control Your Life and Health)
In Alzheimer’s disease the hippocampus is among the areas affected first, that little coil in the central core of the brain that shares a Latin name with sea horses. As the hippocampus erodes, the sufferer loses the ability to form new memories but hangs on to existing ones at first. Then the neocortex, that overmantle of the brain that hosts much of our intellectual functioning, begins to deteriorate. The neocortexes of many animals are comparatively smooth and simple, but the human neocortex is intricately crenelated to create a huge amount of surface area within the confines of the skull. Think of the brain as an intricate landscape of canyons, arroyos, inlets, bays, tunnels, and escarpments surrounding a buried sea horse, with the neurons that relay information scattered all through–scientists call this the ‘neuron forest’.
Rebecca Solnit (The Faraway Nearby)
Even gene variants implicated in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s may have benefits, such as improved cognitive function and better episodic and working memory in young adults.
Jennifer A. Doudna (A Crack in Creation: Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution)
Even gene variants implicated in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s may have benefits: E. S. Lander, “Brave New Genome,” New England Journal of Medicine 373 (2015): 5–8.
Jennifer A. Doudna (A Crack in Creation: Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution)
Dont ever be worried about your life, God is there for you…Find the Stellah Mupanduki Healing books breathed by the Holy Spirit of a Sovereign God and everything will go well with you. There are bookstores all over the world, selling these God-given books for your healing, peace and salvation from terminal, rare and incurable diseases…send the spirit of death and hopelessness away from your life…you conquer when you have the Stellah Mupanduki Holy Spirit breathed books written by the finger of God for your great benefit…Longevity!...For Anointed Readers...For Sacred Healing…Sacred Writing
Stellah Mupanduki (Grandma/Grandpa Be Healed from Alzheimer's Disease: Salvation from Neurological Disseases)
Read this mental healing and strengthening book to your beloved grandpa/grandma and strengthen your family bonding in Christ. Help them to find their way in this life. Help them from being lost in the mind and ways through dementia. If your grandparents can still read, bless them with this salvation from Alzheimers healing book as a gift from you. Tell grandma she is your best friend and anounce to grumpy grandpa that he is your good and inspiring friend whom you love so dearly. This Holy Spirit breathed book allows you to feel strongly that parenting does not stop at all. When you have old grandparents, you are a parent at any age through your love for them.
Stellah Mupanduki (Grandma/Grandpa Be Healed from Alzheimer's Disease: Salvation from Neurological Disseases)
The Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay diet—or MIND diet, for short—was specially designed to improve brain health. Recent well-done studies have found that sticking to the MIND diet helps people avoid mental decline and remain cognitively healthy. One study even showed that people who stuck to the MIND diet cut their risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in half. That’s extraordinary. And since no drug has yet been developed to prevent dementia, it’s your only move.
Rahul Jandial (Neurofitness: The Real Science of Peak Performance from a College Dropout Turned Brain Surgeon)
Cancer is not the only brain disease being targeted for treatment with living cells. Cell therapy also has the potential to replace aging or injured tissue. In this hope for regenerative medicine, modified stem cells are being studied as a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.
Rahul Jandial (Neurofitness: The Real Science of Peak Performance from a College Dropout Turned Brain Surgeon)
of what exactly is good for the heart. Because Alzheimer’s researchers, like diabetologists, assume that Keys’s fat-cholesterol hypothesis is supported by compelling evidence, they will often suggest that cholesterol and saturated fat play a role in Alzheimer’s as well. But if coronary heart disease is mostly a product of the physiological abnormalities of metabolic syndrome, as the evidence suggests, then this implicates insulin, blood sugar, and refined carbohydrates instead, a conclusion supported by several lines of research that began to converge in the last decade.
Gary Taubes (Good Calories, Bad Calories: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Diet, Weight Control, and Disease)
In cases of dementia, however, the determination of the actual cause is likely to be arbitrary. Most of us, if we live long enough, will accumulate both vascular damage and Alzheimer’s plaques and tangles in our brains, even if we don’t manifest any perceptible symptoms of dementia. (Similarly, most of us will have plaques in our arteries even if we don’t manifest clinical signs of heart disease.)
Gary Taubes (Good Calories, Bad Calories: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Diet, Weight Control, and Disease)
The bottom line is pretty irrefutable: What is good for the heart is good for the brain. RUDOLPH TANZI AND ANN PARSON, Decoding Darkness: The Search for the Genetic Causes of Alzheimer’s Disease, 2000
Gary Taubes (Good Calories, Bad Calories: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Diet, Weight Control, and Disease)
One of the key reasons that rates of dementia have fallen sharply since the 1970s is the advent of improved treatments for heart ailments. What’s good for the heart is actually very good for the brain. The steps you take to keep your heart arteries unclogged also keep brain arteries open. Cholesterol-lowering drugs have dramatically reduced coronary artery disease and are effective even in people who live sedentary lifestyles and eat foods that aren’t “heart healthy.” Statins, prescribed to lower cholesterol, have lately been shown to lower the risk of Alzheimer’s disease in most people.
Rahul Jandial (Neurofitness: The Real Science of Peak Performance from a College Dropout Turned Brain Surgeon)
Tentative support has emerged from clinical studies in which middle- and older-age adults have had their sleep disorders successfully treated. As a consequence, their rate of cognitive decline slowed significantly, and further delayed the onset of Alzheimer’s disease by five to ten years.IX My
Matthew Walker (Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams)
different parts of the brain as it thinks. By tracing the path taken by our thoughts, MRI scans have shed new light into the nature of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, schizophrenia, and a host of other mental diseases.
Michio Kaku (The Future of the Mind: The Scientific Quest to Understand, Enhance, and Empower the Mind)
Routinely sleeping less than six or seven hours a night demolishes your immune system, more than doubling your risk of cancer. Insufficient sleep is a key lifestyle factor determining whether or not you will develop Alzheimer’s disease. Inadequate sleep—even moderate reductions for just one week—disrupts blood sugar levels so profoundly that you would be classified as pre-diabetic. Short sleeping increases the likelihood of your coronary arteries becoming blocked and brittle, setting you on a path toward cardiovascular disease, stroke, and congestive heart failure.
Matthew Walker (Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams)
People with damage to their frontal lobe-whether as a result of head trauma... cancer... or a neurodegenerative disease, as with Alzheimer's patients-often undergo significant personality changes. In some cases, these changes are truly bizarre, combining noticeable disinhibition with little appreciation or concern about the consequences of one's actions.
Barbara K. Lipska (The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind: My Tale of Madness and Recovery)
If we want more Junos and Slumdog Millionaires, we need the next Avengers and Transformers. If we want better drugs for cancer and Alzheimer’s, we need the next statin.
Safi Bahcall (Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries)
Alzheimer's is not about the past - the successes, the accolades, the accomplishments. They offer only context and are worthless on places like Pluto. Alzheimer's is about the present and the struggle, the scrappy brawl, the fight to live with a disease. It's being in the present, the relationships, the experiences, which is the core of life, the courage to live in the soul.
Greg O'Brien (On Pluto: Inside the Mind of Alzheimer's)
by constantly bombarding ourselves with things that aren’t food, we’re creating a low level of chronic inflammation throughout our bodies. Inflammation plays a major role in weight gain, and puts us at greater risk for heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and just about every other disease worth freaking out about. Inflammation is the key to everything. Inflammation is your body’s response to foods and additives it deems unhealthy.
Danica Patrick (Pretty Intense: The 90-Day Mind, Body and Food Plan that will absolutely Change Your Life)
It was not until relatively recently, however, that the association between disturbed sleep and Alzheimer’s disease was realized to be more than just an association. While much remains to be understood, we now recognize that sleep disruption and Alzheimer’s disease interact in a self-fulfilling, negative spiral that can initiate and/or accelerate the condition. Alzheimer’s disease is associated with the buildup of a toxic form of protein called beta-amyloid, which aggregates in sticky clumps, or plaques, within the brain. Amyloid plaques are poisonous to neurons, killing the surrounding brain cells. What is strange, however, is that amyloid plaques only affect some parts of the brain and not others, the reasons for which remain unclear. What struck me about this unexplained pattern was the location in the brain where amyloid accumulates early in the course of Alzheimer’s disease, and most severely in the late stages of the condition. That area is the middle part of the frontal lobe—which, as you will remember, is the same brain region essential for the electrical generation of deep NREM sleep in healthy young individuals. At that time, we did not understand if or why Alzheimer’s disease caused sleep disruption, but simply knew that they always co-occurred. I wondered whether the reason patients with Alzheimer’s disease have such impaired deep NREM sleep was, in part, because the disease erodes the very region of the brain that normally generates this key stage of slumber.
Matthew Walker (Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams)
Alzheimer’s,’ Vera clarified. Kim knew enough about the disease to understand why it was called ‘the long goodbye’. The cause was poorly understood, and she had read once that it was something to do with plaques and tangles in the brain. She also knew that there was no treatment to stop or reverse the disease’s progression.
Angela Marsons (Play Dead (DI Kim Stone, #4))
From this cascade comes a prediction: getting too little sleep across the adult life span will significantly raise your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
Matthew Walker (Why We Sleep: The New Science of Sleep and Dreams)
is not only the sinus and nasal microbiome itself that has access to the brain. So do the products the microbes secrete, which can destroy molecules in the brain that support neurons and synapses. Therefore, if your lab results indicate an increase in C4a (this is a component of your immune system that goes up with exposure to biotoxins), if you have symptoms suggestive of type 3 Alzheimer’s disease, or if you have chronic sinus problems, it is important to address the microbiome of your sinuses and nasopharynx.
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
If your fasting insulin is over 4.5 milli-international units per liter, your hemoglobin A1c over 5.5 percent, or your fasting glucose over 93 milligrams per deciliter, you likely have insulin resistance, arguably the single most important metabolic contributor to Alzheimer’s disease development and progression.
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
Consuming fats such as MCT oil (medium-chain triglyceride oil) or unsaturated fats such as olive oil or avocado or nuts also promote mild ketosis. This will switch your metabolism from carbohydrate-burning and insulin resistant, which promotes Alzheimer’s disease, to fat-burning and insulin sensitive, which helps prevent it. Remember: As metabolism goes, so goes cognition.
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
Part of the problem is that the stakes are too high and the bar is too low. With a trillion-dollar global problem—for that’s what Alzheimer’s disease is—the temptation is just too great, and this brings out the liars, the bottom-feeders, the snake-oil salesmen, and the like. For instance, even as experts tell me they don’t believe our published, peer-reviewed results, imitators are starting companies that purport to offer the same protocol, even though they have no expertise in the field and no knowledge of the current protocols
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
The clinical trial system is just not set up to test a comprehensive program like ReCODE. But the bench research had pointed us in the right direction, showing us that a personalized, targeted, precision medicine approach to Alzheimer’s disease makes far more sense than a one-size-fits-all, monotherapy approach.
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
ApoE4 causes a person’s risk of developing the disease to soar.
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
I am weary, Lord . . . bone tired. Weary to the point of tears, and past them. Your Word says you never grow weary; But I know you understand weariness Because once you dragged a heavy cross up a long lonely hill. Many times you had nowhere to lay your head — And people who needed you pressed upon you by day and by night. My reservoir is depleted, almost dry. For longer than I can remember I’ve been dredging from its sludgy underside Giving myself and my loved ones the leftovers of a life occupied with endless tasks. The elastic of my life is so stretched out of shape that it doesn’t snap back anymore. Just once I’d like to say “It is finished,” like you did. But you said it just before you died. I guess my job won’t be over till my life is and that’s okay Lord, if you’ll just give me strength to live it. Deliver me from this limbo of half-life; Not just surviving, but thriving. You who know all, you who know me far better than I know myself — Deposit to my account that as I spend myself there may be always more to draw from. Give me strength To rest without guilt . . . To run without frenzy . . . To soar like an eagle Over the broad breathless canyons of the life you still have for me both here and beyond.
Benjamin T. Mast (Second Forgetting: Remembering the Power of the Gospel during Alzheimer's Disease)
Why more than 99 percent of the pivotal trials of experimental Alzheimer’s drugs have failed. They targeted only one of the thirty-six contributors to the disease.
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
One of the most important contributors to Alzheimer’s disease is inflammation, and one of the most common ways to create systemic inflammation is a leaky gut.
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
Incredibly, given the astounding progress in other areas of medicine over the last twenty years—think cancer or HIV/AIDS or cystic fibrosis or cardiovascular disease—as I write this in 2017 not only is there no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, there is not even anything that reliably prevents or slows Alzheimer’s disease.
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
Alzheimer’s is not a single disease.
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
the people who carry a gene variant (allele) called ApoE4 (ApoE is short for apolipoprotein E; an apolipoprotein is a protein that carries lipids—i.e., fats). ApoE4 is the strongest known genetic risk factor* for Alzheimer’s disease. Carrying one ApoE4 (that is, inherited from one parent) increases your lifetime risk of Alzheimer’s to 30 percent, while carrying two copies (inheriting copies from both parents) increases it to well over 50 percent (from 50 to 90 percent, depending on which study you read). That compares to a risk of only about 9 percent in people who carry zero copies of this allele.
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
Specific herbs support synaptic function. I recommend the following, available as encapsulated extracts or as the herbs themselves, every day unless otherwise indicated: Ashwagandha, 500 mg, twice per day with meals. This helps in the reduction of amyloid, as well as in handling stress. Bacopa monnieri, 250 mg, twice per day with meals, to improve cholinergic function, one of the brain’s key neurotransmitter systems (ashwagandha and bacopa are also available as nasal drops called Nasya Karma; if you prefer this to capsules, take 3 drops per nostril daily). Gotu kola, 500 mg twice per day with meals, to increase focus and alertness. Hericium erinaceus (lion’s mane), 500 mg once or twice a day, to increase nerve growth factor, especially for those with type 2 Alzheimer’s disease. Rhodiola, 200 mg once or twice per day, for those with anxiety and stress. Shankhpushpi (also spelled shankhapushpi and also known as skullcap), taken as 2 or 3 teaspoons or 2 capsules per day, to enhance branching of neurons in the hippocampus. For those with type 3 (toxic) Alzheimer’s disease, MCI, or SCI, tinospora cordifolia (guduchi) is helpful to boost immune support. It is taken at a dosage of 300 mg with meals, 2 or 3 times per day. Along with boosting immune support, those with type 3 may consider guggul, which removes toxins in the gut (somewhat like charcoal). This is typically taken as capsules of guggul extract, 350 or 750 mg per day. For those with type 1 (inflammatory) Alzheimer’s disease, MCI, or SCI, or with bowel symptoms, triphala—a combination of amalaki, haritaki, and bibhitaki—is useful to reduce inflammation. This is best taken on an empty stomach, either as a capsule or by making a tea from the powder.
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
In 2016 Neurotrack released the Imprint Cognitive Assessment Test, a five-minute web-based visual cognitive assessment that, by tracking eye movements, detects which objects and other stimuli people recognize as novel. It thus detects impairment of the hippocampus and nearby structures, identifying people who have dysfunction of this region and may be manifesting the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease. GOAL:
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
had general anesthesia (and how many times). General anesthesia combines some toxicity of the anesthetics with what is often imperfect oxygenation, and this can affect brain function. have dental amalgams. These expose you to inorganic mercury. eat high-mercury fish. This exposes you to organic mercury. take certain medications (especially any with brain effects, such as benzodiazepines like Valium, antidepressants, blood pressure pills, statins, proton pump inhibitors, or antihistamines). used street drugs. drink alcohol (and how much). smoke cigarettes. practice good oral hygiene. Poor oral hygiene can contribute to inflammation. have surgical implants (artificial hips or breast implants, for instance). have liver, kidney, lung, or heart disease. snore.
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
Stress also increases a number of risk factors for cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease, including blood glucose levels, body fat, risk for obesity, carbohydrate craving, leaky gut and the resulting inflammation, permeability of the blood-brain barrier, calcium release and hyperstimulation of neurons, and the risk of cardiovascular disease.
Dale E. Bredesen (The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline)
Soy consumption has been clearly linked to a higher risk of vascular dementia, or Alzheimer’s disease, in men (White et al. 1996). The isoflavones of soy inhibit the enzyme conversion of testosterone to estradiol via the aromatase enzyme, which is necessary for male brain function and maintenance (Irvine et al. 1998).
Nora T. Gedgaudas (Primal Body, Primal Mind: Beyond the Paleo Diet for Total Health and a Longer Life)
power
Peter V. Rabins (The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for People Who Have Alzheimer Disease, Related Dementias, and Memory Loss (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book))
ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE—TYPE 3 DIABETES?
David Perlmutter (Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar--Your Brain's Silent Killers)
Homelessness is not a disease like cancer or Alzheimer's where we don't yet have a cure. We have the cure for homelessness—it's housing. What we lack is political will.
Anonymous
Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). This parasite, which is present in birds and cats, is the reason pregnant women are not supposed to scoop kitty litter. At least 40 percent and as much as 70 percent of humans in Western countries are infected with toxoplasmosis, which is completely asymptomatic unless you are immunocompromised or become infected while pregnant. (There is no risk to the fetus if you are infected with Toxoplasma gondii before becoming pregnant, but getting infected during gestation can cause a variety of serious health problems for the baby.) This parasite, while typically considered completely benign, is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (a suspected autoimmune disease), Parkinson’s disease (a suspected autoimmune disease), Tourette syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic sclerosis, and inflammatory bowel diseases.
Sarah Ballantyne (The Paleo Approach: Reverse Autoimmune Disease, Heal Your Body)
In an article for the New Republic titled The Lethality of Loneliness, Judith Schulevitz writes: Emotional isolation is ranked as high a risk factor for mortality as smoking. A partial list of the physical diseases thought to be caused by or exacerbated by loneliness would include Alzheimer’s, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and even cancer—tumors can metastasize faster in lonely people.
Anonymous
It occurred to me that at one point it was like I had two diseases—one was Alzheimer’s and the other was knowing I had Alzheimer’s.
Anonymous
One recent study performed by the American Medical Association and published in the _Archives of Internal Medicine_ in January 2012 demonstrated an astounding 48 percent increased risk of diabetes among women taking statin medications. This study involved big numbers -- more than one hundred sixty thousand postmenopausal women -- making it hard to ignore its significance and gravity. Recognizing that type 2 diabetes is a powerful risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, a relationship between statin drugs and cognitive decline or cognitive dysfunction is certainly understandable. ~ David Perlmutter, M.D., _Grain Brain_
David Perlmutter
The results of the study revealed that those individuals in the lowest 10 percent of daily physical activity had a 230 percent increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease compared to those in the highest 10 percent of physical activity. When
David Perlmutter (Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar--Your Brain's Silent Killers)
chronically elevated insulin levels and all the fun that brings: Increased rates of cancer, accelerated aging, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, obesity and, ultimately, type 2 diabetes, which is characterized by insulin resistance and chronically elevated blood glucose levels.
Robb Wolf (The Paleo Solution: The Original Human Diet)
We are biological beings, shaped by genetic inheritance and the organization and health of our neurological structures. We have rich inner lives of diverse dispositions, motivations, cognitive abilities and processes, intrapsychic dynamics, and reinforcement histories. We are also social creatures, affected by our social and cultural environments. Together these elements help us understand normal phenomena (like memory construction, neurological function, and social attraction) and abnormal psychological occurrences (such as pseudo-memories, Alzheimer’s disease, and dysfunctional relationships). Unfortunately, much of the work on the
David N. Entwistle (Integrative Approaches to Psychology and Christianity: An Introduction to Worldview Issues, Philosophical Foundations, and Models of Integration)
This is precisely why T2DM, unlike virtually any other disease, affects every single part of the body. Every organ suffers the long-term effects of the excessive sugar load. Your eyes rot – and you go blind. Your kidneys rot – and you need dialysis. You heart rots – and you get heart attacks and heart failure. Your brain rots – and you get Alzheimer’s disease. Your liver rots – and you get fatty liver disease and cirrhosis. Your legs rot – and you get diabetic foot ulcers. Your nerves rot – and you get diabetic neuropathy. No part of your body is spared.
Tim Noakes (Diabetes Unpacked: Just Science and Sense. No Sugar Coating)
Coconut oil, from which we derive MCTs, is a rich source of an important precursor molecule for beta-hydroxybutyrate and is a helpful approach to treating Alzheimer’s disease.24
David Perlmutter (Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar--Your Brain's Silent Killers)
ApoE ε2 is relatively rare, but if you inherit this allele, you’re more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease later in life. ApoE ε3 is the most common allele, but it’s believed to neither increase nor decrease your risk. ApoE ε4, however, is the one typically mentioned in the media and feared the most. In
David Perlmutter (Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar--Your Brain's Silent Killers)
Over the years, I have cared for loved ones with advanced Alzheimer, late stage cardiovascular and renal disease and Stage 4 cancer. But none of those experiences prepared me for being a carer for a Severe or Very Severe ME patient. The breadth, severity and unprediciability of the symptoms and dysfunction from one person ro the next and from one day to the next can be hard to comprehend and mainstream medical education doesn't help.
Mary Dimmock (Severe ME : Notes for Carers)
My Daddy and My Car By Marilyn Akers, Georgia Grits At fifteen, I came home from school one afternoon to find a faded red car with a white hardtop and a damaged front fender parked in the driveway. Since my daddy often worked on cars, both for himself and others, I noticed it only in passing. That is until my daddy explained that it was a 1971 Mercury Comet…and it was mine! Trouble was, it had a blown engine, and it was my job to overhaul it. So after school and on weekends I washed car parts, rode to the junk yard for replacement parts (and foot-long hot dogs from the Dairy Queen), handed my dad all sorts of tools, fixed coffee with cream and sugar, and occasionally got to do a “real” job under the hood. I remember being so excited when he asked me to get on the creeper and roll under the car (the children were never allowed under the car!) to tighten a fender bolt. Another day, I helped him connect the spark-plug wires to the distributor cap. I asked him why this particular job was so important for him to show me. He replied, “So if you’re ever out with a boy and the car breaks down, you’ll know what to look for.” He meant intentional removal of the wires, and it didn’t occur to me until many years later to ask if that advice was from personal experience! When the engine work was done, we took it to Earl Scheib for one of his infamous $99 paint jobs. I was so proud of that car and the work done side by side with my dad. We sold it less than a year later, after I stuck my foot through a rusted hole in the floorboard. I lost my dad in 2001 following a sixteen-year battle with Alzheimer’s Disease. But the bond formed between a teenage daughter and her father, and the lessons I learned from him, will be with me for a lifetime.
Deborah Ford (Grits (Girls Raised in the South) Guide to Life)
For people who never consumed fish, the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease during the four-year follow-up period was increased by 37 percent. In those individuals who consumed fish on a daily basis, risk for these diseases was reduced by 44 percent. Regular
David Perlmutter (Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar--Your Brain's Silent Killers)
Does being “thin” ensure optimal “health”? No. It’s now well accepted that many lean individuals have the condition known as metabolic syndrome, which is a step along the progression from health to heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and possibly Alzheimer’s disease as well. The likely scenario is that these individuals, despite being lean, have what’s called visceral fat—fat around the organs, and particularly the liver—and that this is exacerbating or causing the metabolic syndrome. The argument I’m making is that this visceral fat, too, is caused by the quality and quantity of the carbohydrates in the diet.   8.
Gary Taubes (Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It)
Tariot and Reiman worked so hard designing the study that Tariot began taking off whole days where he didn’t answer the phone or respond to email; he just read, thought, wrote, and talked to the world’s experts. “That alone probably was a critical element for us to make progress,” he said. “Otherwise, you spend your days reacting to the crisis du jour rather than saying, ‘Now, wait a minute: How are we going to do this?’ ” The
Niki Kapsambelis (The Inheritance: A Family on the Front Lines of the Battle Against Alzheimer's Disease)
Coffee drinking is associated with a 10 percent to 15 percent reduction in total mortality.26 Large-scale studies27 found that most major causes of death, including heart disease were reduced. Coffee may guard against the neurologic diseases Alzheimer’s,28, 29 Parkinson’s disease,30, 31 liver cirrhosis32 and liver cancer.
Jason Fung (The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss)
Sugar can contribute to Alzheimer's disease ●
Rebecca Thomas (The White Devil - A 30-Day Sugar Detox Made Simple: Quit Sugar or Quit Life! (Sugar Detox, I Quit Sugar, Added Sugar, Stop Eating Sugar Book 1))
Lowers blood sugar levels Improves insulin sensitivity Increases energy Improves fat-burning Lowers blood cholesterol Prevents Alzheimer’s disease Extends life Reverses aging process Decreases inflammation
Jason Fung (The Complete Guide to Fasting: Heal Your Body Through Intermittent, Alternate-Day, and Extended Fasting)
In all the scientific efforts to find magic pills for fighting off dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, only regular, aerobic exercise and active mental engagement show any measurable results. Rather
Susan Reynolds (Fire Up Your Writing Brain: How to Use Proven Neuroscience to Become a More Creative, Productive, and Successful Writer)