Advocacy Inspirational Quotes

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To say nothing is saying something. You must denounce things you are against or one might believe that you support things you really do not.
Germany Kent
They want us to be afraid. They want us to be afraid of leaving our homes. They want us to barricade our doors and hide our children. Their aim is to make us fear life itself! They want us to hate. They want us to hate 'the other'. They want us to practice aggression and perfect antagonism. Their aim is to divide us all! They want us to be inhuman. They want us to throw out our kindness. They want us to bury our love and burn our hope. Their aim is to take all our light! They think their bricked walls will separate us. They think their damned bombs will defeat us. They are so ignorant they don’t understand that my soul and your soul are old friends. They are so ignorant they don’t understand that when they cut you I bleed. They are so ignorant they don’t understand that we will never be afraid, we will never hate and we will never be silent for life is ours!
Kamand Kojouri
The key is to monetize your appearances so you don’t fall into the trap of having thousands of followers but no revenue. It’s easy to be famous but broke.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
Influencers are seen as thought leaders in their niche. They have privileged access to something everyone else wants: peoples attention.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
Being a rainmaker will have a direct impact on your bottom line and give you a lot more leverage to help the people you care about most.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
Locking in your brand and pairing it with a coherent story is the first step to being a rainmaker.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
When it comes to rain making that all followers are equally valuable. Some people have a lot more influence than others.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
Without a clear recognition of your brand and a focus plan you can miss your mark in the middle of great success.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
The key is to use all the assets you have in establishing your brand: credentials experience and accomplishments.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
When you present your brand consistently people come to know what to expect from you and ultimately look to you for insights and leadership in your niche.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
The More connections you make, the more engagement you elicit, the more value you bring. the more likely it is that your brand will be rewarded.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
Think big. That’s what making rain is all about.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
Choosing a narrow brand message gets you in the door.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
Never before have you had the chance to build a personal brain like you can today.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
Crafting a brain requires reflection strategic thinking and self-awareness.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
I was always taught them when you’re lucky enough to learn something or have some advantage you should share it.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
To save wildlife and wild places the traction has to come not from the regurgitation of bad-news data but from the poets, prophets, preachers, professors, and presidents who have always dared to inspire.
J. Drew Lanham (The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man's Love Affair with Nature)
Everyone from firefighters to sushi chefs who are experts in their fields can enter the mainstream conversation taking place on myriad media channels to voice their opinion’s and talk about their expertise.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
The enormity of problems like hunger and social injustice can certainly motivate us to act. We can be convinced logically of the need for intervention and change. But it is the story of one individual that ultimately makes the difference—by offering living proof.
John Capecci and Timothy Cage
Over the past century, researchers have studied business entrepreneurs extensively.. In contrast, social entrepreneurs have received little attention. Historically, they have been cast as humanitarians or saints, and stories of their work have been passed down more in the form of children's tales than case studies. While the stories may inspire, they fail to make social entrepreneurs' methods comprehensible. One can analyze an entrepreneur, but how does one analyze a saint?
David Bornstein (How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas)
Do all the work you while you still have strength.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind)
As helpers, we often feel the need to see our impact in tangible, measurable ways. We allow negative language into our head about the “broken system;” we look through a lens of “it doesn’t matter, I can’t make a difference”. These ideas are surely contributing to our burnout.
Jenn Bruer (Helping Effortlessly: A Book of Inspiration and Healing)
I do not write every day. I write to the questions and issues before me. I write to deadlines. I write out of my passions. And I write to make peace with my own contradictory nature. For me, writing is a spiritual practice. A small bowl of water sits on my desk, a reminder that even if nothing is happening on the page, something is happening in the room--evaporation. And I always light a candle when I begin to write, a reminder that I have now entered another realm, call it the realm of the Spirit. I am mindful that when one writes, one leaves this world and enters another. My books are collages made from journals, research, and personal experience. I love the images rendered in journal entries, the immediacy that is captured on the page, the handwritten notes. I love the depth of ideas and perspective that research brings to a story, be it biological or anthropological studies or the insights brought to the page by the scholarly work of art historians. When I go into a library, I feel like I am a sleuth looking to solve a mystery. I am completely inspired by the pursuit of knowledge through various references. I read newpapers voraciously. I love what newspapers say about contemporary culture. And then you go back to your own perceptions, your own words, and weigh them against all you have brought together. I am interested in the kaleidoscope of ideas, how you bring many strands of thought into a book and weave them together as one piece of coherent fabric, while at the same time trying to create beautiful language in the service of the story. This is the blood work of the writer. Writing is also about a life engaged. And so, for me, community work, working in the schools or with grassroots conservation organizations is another critical component of my life as a writer. I cannot separate the writing life from a spiritual life, from a life as a teacher or activist or my life intertwined with family and the responsibilities we carry within our own homes. Writing is daring to feel what nurtures and breaks our hearts. Bearing witness is its own form of advocacy. It is a dance with pain and beauty.
Terry Tempest Williams
As you move through this world advocating for what you believe in, do it with love and an open heart, not with anger and a closed heart.
Jenn Bruer (Helping Effortlessly: A Book of Inspiration and Healing)
Never before have you had the chance to build a personal brand like you can today.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
When it comes to rain making, not all followers are equally valuable. Some people have a lot more influence than others.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
The more connections you make, the more engagement you elicit, the more value you bring. The more likely it is that your brand will be rewarded.
Areva Martin (Make It Rain!: How to Use the Media to Revolutionize Your Business & Brand)
It's just as important to be around people that influence stable mental health as it is working towards it.
Kierra C.T. Banks
Genius cannot simply float in the clouds, it must also operate down on earth.
Irène Némirovsky (Suite Française)
I now know that surrendering, allowing, and “BE-ing” is far more productive than grasping for control. I don't know why one child is born with autism and another isn't, or why some children have to fight cancer and some don't. I have lived long enough to know that life is not fair, never will be fair, and we shouldn’t expect it to be.
Jenn Bruer (Helping Effortlessly: A Book of Inspiration and Healing)
What good came of all this exploration? It was a question philosophes found irresistable. Progress was their almost irresistable answer. But Diderot, the secular pontiff of the Enlightenment, the editor of the Encyclopédie, did not agree. In 1773 he wrote a denunciation of explorers as agents of a new kind of barbarism. Base motives drove them: 'tyranny, crime, ambition, misery, curiousity, I know not what restlessness of spirit, the desire to know and the desire to see, boredom, the dislike of familiar pleasures' - all the baggage of the restless temperament. Lust for discovery was a new form of fanaticism on the part of men seeking 'islands to ravage, people to despoil, subjugate and massacre.' The explorers discovered people morally superior to themselves, because more natural or more civilized, while they, on their side, grew in savagery, far from the polite restraints that reined them in at home. 'All the long-range expeditions,' Diderot insisted, 'have reared a new generation of nomadic savages ... men who visit so many countries that they end by belonging to none ... amphibians who live on the surface of the waters,' deracinated, and, in the strictest sense of the word, demoralized. Certainly, the excesses explorers committed - of arrogance, of egotism, of exploitation - showed the folly of supposing that travel necessarily broadens the mind or improves the character. But Diderot exaggerated. Even as he wrote, the cases of disinterested exploration - for scientific or altruistic purposes - were multiplying. If the eighteenth century rediscovered the beauties of nature and the wonders of the picturesque, it was in part because explorers alerted domestic publics to the grandeurs of the world they discovered. If the conservation of species and landscape became, for the first time in Western history, an objective of imperial policy, it was because of what the historian Richard Grove has called 'green imperialism' - the awakened sense of stewardship inspired by the discovery of new Edens in remote oceans. If philosophers enlarged their view of human nature, and grappled earnestly and, on the whole, inclusively with questions about the admissability of formerly excluded humans - blacks, 'Hottentots,' Australian Aboriginals, and all other people estranged by their appearance or culture - to full membership of the moral community, it was because exploration made these brethren increasingly familiar. If critics of Western institutions were fortified in their strictures and encouraged in their advocacy of popular sovreignty, 'enlightened despotism,' 'free thinking,' civil liberties, and human 'rights,' it was, in part, because exploration acquainted them with challenging models from around the world of how society could be organized and life lived.
Felipe Fernández-Armesto (Pathfinders: A Global History of Exploration)
Life's true value and meaning can only be known if we speak for the truth, not for our advocacy, but for the truth itself.
Kasey Collin P. Dumdum
Fiction can sway, suggest, inspire, push back, disgust, magnetise, tempt, or bore. While novels can be a springboard for advocacy and a catalyst for action, they can only indirectly lead to real change. Choosing to take action falls with the reader. Whatever happens after the book is read is out of the writer’s hands.
Antonia Hayes
I was always taught that when you’re lucky enough to learn something or have some advantage you should share it.
Areva Martin
There is an overflowing grace, for every great work.
Lailah Gifty Akita (Think Great: Be Great! (Beautiful Quotes, #1))
Gladstone is remembered for putting the nation’s finances in good order, for establishing the chancellorship of the exchequer as the second post in the government, for his love of liberty and close sympathy for the peoples of subject nations (including the Irish), for his advocacy of international arbitration, and his preference for pursuing a peaceful, non-expansionist foreign policy. He became a hero to many people both inside and outside the Liberal Party, and proved an inspiration to generations of Liberal, and later Labour, politicians. Inevitably, however, with the passage of years his memory has faded, and there are nowadays perhaps only a few veterans of the Liberal Democratic Party who feel any personal affinity with him.
Dick Leonard (The Great Rivalry: Gladstone and Disraeli)
Mara Foundation is the nonprofit side of Mara’s business, a social enterprise focused on emerging entrepreneurs. We have myriad programs designed to address the complete life cycle of an entrepreneur’s business idea, from start-up advice right through to venture capital. My sister Rona, the foundation director, has been a dynamic force in ongoing advocacy for youth and women in business. Always someone with a keen eye for detail, she has secured partnerships for the Foundation with Ernst & Young to nurture and develop small and medium entrepreneurs (SMEs) in Africa and with UN Women, whose UN Women’s Knowledge Gateway for Women’s Economic Empowerment has operations in 80 countries. A spin-off of this is a program called Mara Mentor—tagline: Enable, Empower and Inspire—an online community that connects budding entrepreneurs with experienced and inspiring business leaders around the world.
Ashish J. Thakkar (The Lion Awakes: Adventures in Africa's Economic Miracle)
Political winds change . . .' Signor Stronzo Troia indicated. Those “political winds” stir to feed their financially hungry pockets. Those “political winds” stir toward where they can extract or beg funds, and strongest political backings to serve their political agenda most especially even years before an upcoming election. Would you trust power player dishonest politicians who hide under a halo of magnetising advocacy but at the same time who cover up unscrupulous political movers, black propagandists, Machiavellian manipulators, digital aggressors, political bullies, smear campaigns, and finance smear campaigners through their global strings of unscrupulous, habitually abusive, financial political parasites? Follow their money trail and you will discover their endless dishonesty, and their hidden, darker true characters: unscrupulous, vindictive, destructive, invasive, intrusive, offensive, and habitually abusive, greedy power players, Machiavellian manipulators with impaired conscience. ~ Angelica Hopes, an excerpt from "Sfidatopia" Book 2, Stronzata Trilogy Genre: inspirational, political, literary novel © Ana Angelica Abaya van Doorn
Angelica Hopes
Victim-shaming is not okay. Maybe people should shame those who remain silent when witnessing abuse against others.
Mitta Xinindlu
But Anita Roddick had a different take on that. In 1976, before the words to say it had been found, she set out to create a business that was socially and environmentally regenerative by design. Opening The Body Shop in the British seaside town of Brighton, she sold natural plant-based cosmetics (never tested on animals) in refillable bottles and recycled boxes (why throw away when you can use again?) while paying a fair price to the communities worldwide that supplied cocoa butter, brazil nut oil and dried herbs. As production expanded, the business began to recycle its wastewater for using in its products and was an early investor in wind power. Meanwhile, company profits went to The Body Shop Foundation, which gave them to social and environmental causes. In all, a pretty generous enterprise. Roddick’s motivation? ‘I want to work for a company that contributes to and is part of the community,’ she later explained. ‘If I can’t do something for the public good, what the hell am I doing?’47 Such a values-driven mission is what the analyst Marjorie Kelly calls a company’s ‘living purpose’—turning on its head the neoliberal script that the business of business is simply business. Roddick proved that business can be far more than that, by embedding benevolent values and a regenerative intent at the company’s birth. ‘We dedicated the Articles of Association and Memoranda—which in England is the legal definition of the purpose of your company—to human rights advocacy and social and environmental change,’ she explained in 2005, ‘so everything the company did had that as its canopy.’48 Today’s most innovative enterprises are inspired by the same idea: that the business of business is to contribute to a thriving world. And the growing family of enterprise structures that are intentionally distributive by design—including cooperatives, not-for-profits, community interest companies, and benefit corporations—can be regenerative by design too.49 By explicitly making a regenerative commitment in their corporate by-laws and enshrining it in their governance, they can safeguard a ‘living purpose’ through times of leadership change and protect it from mission creep. Indeed the most profound act of corporate responsibility for any company today is to rewrite its corporate by-laws, or articles of association, in order to redefine itself with a living purpose, rooted in regenerative and distributive design, and then to live and work by it.
Kate Raworth (Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist)